Accounting 305 Federal Taxation 2010 Review Questions by gdj21400

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									DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS
                    Baccalaureate Study in Accounting
                 Baccalaureate Study in Economics (B.A.)
Baccalaureate Study in Economics (B.S./B.A.)Baccalaureate Study in Finance
               Baccalaureate Study in International Business
  Baccalaureate Study in International Economics and Finance (B.S./B.A.)
                   Baccalaureate Study in Management
                     Baccalaureate Study in Marketing
        Baccalaureate Study in Management Information Systems

  Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

                         November 19, 2009
                                       Table of Contents


Accounting……………………………………………………………………………….3

Economics (B.A.)…………………………………………………………………………6

Economics (B.S./B.A.)……………………………………………………………………9
Finance…………………………………………………………………………………..13

International Business………………………………………………………………….16

International Economics and Finance
(B.S./B.A.)………………………………………...……………………………………..19

Management…………………………………………………………………………….23

Marketing……………………………………………………………………………….26

Management Information Systems……………………………………………………32




Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009    2
                  DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS
                                Baccalaureate Study in
                  Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes


             Bachelor of Science in Business Administration in Accounting
                                 Program Description

The core requirements consist of the following courses:

        ACCT 305: Introduction to Financial Accounting
        ACCT: 306 Introduction to Managerial Accounting
        ECON 101: Principles of Macroeconomics
        ECON: 102 Principles of Microeconomics.
        ECON 223: Introduction to Statistics I
        ECON 563: Econometrics
        ECON 543: Applied Macroeconomics
        ECON 546: Managerial Economics
        MGT 218 : Microcomputer Applications in Business
        MGT: 240: Introduction to Management Information Systems
        MGT: 423 Management Theory and Practice
        MGT 426: Principles of Finance
        MGT 501: Ethics in Business and Economics
        MGT 521 or MGT 522: Fundamentals of Business Law
        MGT 545: Principles of Marketing

After completion of the core, students move beyond the fundamentals by taking four (4)
required courses including Intermediate Accounting II (ACCT 410), Intermediate
Accounting II (ACCT 4110), Cost Accounting ( ACCT 509), and Auditing(ACCT 511).
They also take two (2) intradepartmental elective courses such as Federal Taxation I
(ACCT 519) and Federal Taxation II (ACCT 520) to name only two examples. Students
complete their studies by taking a capstone course in management strategy (MGT 575).

Student can complement their course work by taking one or more internship during their
last two years. Only one internship however, can be taken for credit.

                                 Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a B.S.B.A. in Accounting will:

1.      Prepare income statements, cash flow statements, and balance sheets.
2.      Use job-cost systems to determine cost per unit, computing the cost per unit using
        both absorption and variable costing.
3.      Determine whether a piece of capital equipment is subject to an impairment loss.
4.      Calculate the balance of pension benefit obligations.
5.      Prepare schedules of depreciation differences and compute deferred income tax

Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   3
        liability for firms using accelerated cost recovery in preparing their income tax
        returns while employing straight-line depreciation in preparing financial
        statements.

                          Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1.      Seniors enroll in a capstone course in management strategy. The course brings
        together and synthesizes material from accounting, finance, micro and macro
        economics, marketing, operations, information systems, business ethics, and
        international business to assess organizations and develop alternative courses of
        action based on the goals of the organization and fit within larger business
        environment.
            a. The course emphasizes how seniors would communicate within business
                practice through case summary write ups and short presentations
                throughout the semester. In addition, core strategic decision making
                concepts and tools for industry and organizational analysis, formulation of
                strategic plans, and analysis of a strategic plan are introduced and tested in
                an examination consisting of 4-6 short answer questions focused on a
                single business case. These core concepts are taught through both class
                discussions centered on a specific chapter in the text plus an example to
                work through in class and reinforced in the application to a business case
                using case method teaching. The use of case methodology applies directly
                to the goal of teaching concepts of strategy with an eye on practicality in a
                business setting.
            b. The course culminates in the development of a business case on an issue
                of the students’ choice and corresponding analysis which utilizes the
                concepts of the course. The students develop a proposal and outline for
                their project to be critiqued by their peers and the professor. The summary
                case and analysis is presented to the class and developed into a paper. The
                students are graded on their ability to
                      i. State a thesis of their paper which communicates the goal and
                         scope of the paper.
                     ii. Organize the argument of the paper on the thesis, with clarity, and
                         without addition, irrelevant material. .
                    iii. Students are assessed for their insight on the case – to include their
                         ability to synthesize multiple concepts or apply concepts in a novel
                         manner.
                    iv. The paper and presentation must be balanced with a charitable read
                         of opposing arguments and a multi-faceted assessment of the case.
                     v. The paper and presentation must correctly incorporate concepts
                         from the course such as an industry analysis and/or an
                         organizational assessment to develop a realistic course of action
                         for a firm or individual.

2.      During majors’ last year in residence in either the fall or spring semester,[the
        Department administers a “senior assessment,” which consists of a three-hour

Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009    4
        examination that requires them to answer a 5-6 questions that directly test their
        competency in the major. In the case of accounting, students are judged based on
        the level of expertise needed to pass the CPA exam. Only majors who have
        completed all the core and required courses in their major can take this exam. To
        ensure that they have achieved a sufficient level of competency, at least two
        departmental faculty members evaluate the examinations along the following
        criteria
                     i. Student is concise, structured, and clear in answering the question.
                    ii. Student addresses the question using concepts from the major.
                   iii. To pass, student is able to meet requirements i and ii for 5 of 6
                        questions answered.
                   iv. To pass with honors, student is able to meet requirements i and ii
                        for all questions answered plus student adds insight, parallel
                        examples, alternative readings of the questions and answers, or
                        analysis from other classes . Only approximately 2% of the
                        students are able to pass with honors.

        A score of "Pass" or " Pass with Honors" is the requirement for graduation.


                     Use of Results to Improve Student Learning
The department continues to evaluate the structure of the major requirements and the
individual course pedagogy based on developments in the field of accounting, the results
of the senior assessment, student evaluations and feedback from alumni and potential
employers.




Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009    5
                  DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS
                                 Baccalaureate Study
                  Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

                                Bachelor of Arts in Economics
                                    Program Description

The core requirements of this major consist of the following courses:

        ACCT 305: Introduction to Financial Accounting
        ACCT: 306 Introduction to Managerial Accounting
        ECON 101: Principles of Macroeconomics
        ECON: 102 Principles of Microeconomics.
        ECON 223: Introduction to Statistics I
        ECON 563: Econometrics
        ECON 241: Intermediate Macroeconomics
        ECON 242: Intermediate Microeconomics
        MGT: 423 Management Theory and Practice
        MGT 426: Principles of Finance
        MGT 501: Ethics in Business and Economics


After completion of the core, students move beyond the fundamentals by taking four
courses in economics. Examples include Industrial Organization (ECON 548), Antitrust
and Regulation (ECON 549), Public Finance(ECON 559), Econometric Modeling
(ECON 463), Development Economics (ECON 540), International Economics (ECON
580), International Economics (ECON 581), Emerging Financial Markets (ECON 584),
and Family and Economic Growth (ECON 541).. Students complete their studies by
taking a capstone course in policy issue in economics (ECON 493).

Students can complement their course work by taking one or more internships during
their last two years. Only one internship however, can be taken for credit. Some
internships examples include the Council of Economic Advisers and the Federal Reserve
Board, just to name two examples.


                                 Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a B.A. in Economics will:


1.      Understand thoroughly the competitive supply/demand model and use it to
        analyze the impact of government policies (e.g., price controls, excise taxes,
        subsidies) on the welfare of consumers and producers.
2.      Demonstrate an understanding of imperfectly competitive market structures and
        the effects they have on the welfare of consumers and producers.

Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   6
  3.      Demonstrate an understanding of why externalities, such as pollution, can lead to
          market failure and provide a rationale for government involvement.
  4.      Understand thoroughly the open macroeconomy, as represented by the core
          IS/LM, BoP and AD-AS models ( IS denotes Investment-Savings equilibrium;
          LM is an abbreviation for Liquidity Preference (Money demand)-Money Supply
          equilibrium; BoP is Balance of Payments; AD-AS is short for Aggregate
          Demand-Aggregate Supply ) under different assumptions, and analyze the
          impacts of changes in domestic and foreign fiscal and monetary policies on
          domestic and foreign economic variables, such as GDP, interest rates, investment,
          exchange rates, inflation, employment, and net exports.
  5.      Use statistical estimation, hypothesis testing, and basic regression analysis and be
          able to interpret reported regression results.




                            Student Assessment Outcome Measures


1.        Seniors enroll in a capstone course in contemporary policy issues and research in
          economics. Students will write a research paper on an economic public policy
          issue of their interest.
               The students are graded on their ability to
                       v. State a thesis of their paper which communicates the goal and
                           scope of the paper.
                      vi. Organize the argument of the paper on the thesis, with clarity, and
                           without addition, irrelevant material. .
                     vii. Students are assessed for their ability to analyze the policy issue in
                           a manner that is consistent with economic theory.
                    viii. When appropriate, the students are expected to provide an
                           econometric analysis that complements their theoretical analysis.

  3.      During majors’ last year in residence in either the fall or spring semester, the
          Department administers a “senior assessment,” which consists of a three-hour
          examination that requires them to answer a 5-6 questions that directly test their
          competency in the major. Only majors who have completed all the core and
          required courses in their major can take this exam. To ensure that they have
          achieved a sufficient level of competency, at least two departmental faculty
          members evaluate the examinations along the following criteria
                      i. Student is concise, structured, and clear in answering the question.
                     ii. Student addresses the question using concepts from the major. For
                         example, students in economics are expected to be able to
                         demonstrate the impact of a commodity tax using the concepts of
                         consumer and producer surplus.
                    iii. To pass, student is able to meet requirements i and ii for 5 of 6
                         questions answered.

  Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009    7
                    iv. To pass with honors, student is able to meet requirements i and ii
                        for all questions answered plus student adds insight, parallel
                        examples, alternative readings of the questions and answers, or
                        analysis from other classes . Only approximately 2% of the
                        students are able to pass with honors.

        A score of "Pass" or " Pass with Honors" is the requirement for graduation.


                     Use of Results to Improve Student Learning
The department continues to evaluate the structure of the major requirements and the
individual course pedagogy based on assessments from student evaluations, market
demands by talking to prospective students and parents as well as current students, and
outcome results through feedback from alumni and potential employers. For example,
based on feedback from former students, the instructor of the ECON 463 recently
changed the econometric software employed in the course.




Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009    8
                  DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS
                                 Baccalaureate Study
                  Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes



             Bachelor of Science in Business Administration in Economics
                                 Program Description

The core requirements of this major consist of the following courses:

        ACCT 305: Introduction to Financial Accounting
        ACCT: 306 Introduction to Managerial Accounting
        ECON 101: Principles of Macroeconomics
        ECON: 102 Principles of Microeconomics.
        ECON 223: Introduction to Statistics I
        ECON 563: Econometrics
        ECON 241: Intermediate Macroeconomics
        ECON 242: Intermediate Microeconomics
        MGT 218 : Microcomputer Applications in Business
        MGT: 240: Introduction to Management Information Systems
        MGT: 423 Management Theory and Practice
        MGT 426: Principles of Finance
        MGT 501: Ethics in Business and Economics
        MGT 521 or MGT 522: Fundamentals of Business Law
        MGT 545: Principles of Marketing

After completion of the core, students move beyond the fundamentals by choosing
courses in one of two possible concentrations: Microeconomics or Macroeconomics. If
they choose Microeconomics, students take Industrial Organization (ECON 548),
Antitrust and Regulation (ECON 549), and Public Finance(ECON 559). If they
choose macroeconomics, students take International Economics (ECON 580),
International Finance (ECON 581), and Development Economics (ECON 580).
Students also take three intradepartmental electives such as Econometric Modeling
(ECON 463), Emerging Financial Markets (ECON 584), and Family and Economic
Growth (ECON 541). Students complete their studies by taking a capstone course in
management strategy (MGT 575).

Students can complement their course work by taking one or more internships during
their last two years. Only one internship however, can be taken for credit. Some
internships examples include the Council of Economic Advisers and the Federal Reserve
Board, just to name two examples.


                                 Goals for Student Learning



Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   9
Students who graduate with a B.S.B.A. in Economics will:


6.      Understand thoroughly the competitive supply/demand model and use it to
        analyze the impact of government policies (e.g., price controls, excise taxes,
        subsidies) on the welfare of consumers and producers.
7.      Demonstrate an understanding of imperfectly competitive market structures and
        the effects they have on the welfare of consumers and producers.
8.      Demonstrate an understanding of why externalities, such as pollution, can lead to
        market failure and provide a rationale for government involvement.
9.      Understand thoroughly the open macroeconomy, as represented by the core
        IS/LM, BoP and AD-AS models ( IS denotes Investment-Savings equilibrium;
        LM is an abbreviation for Liquidity Preference (Money demand)-Money Supply
        equilibrium; BoP is Balance of Payments; AD-AS is short for Aggregate
        Demand-Aggregate Supply ) under different assumptions, and analyze the
        impacts of changes in domestic and foreign fiscal and monetary policies on
        domestic and foreign economic variables, such as GDP, interest rates, investment,
        exchange rates, inflation, employment, and net exports.
10.     Use statistical estimation, hypothesis testing, and basic regression analysis and be
        able to interpret reported regression results.
11.     Apply game theoretic economic models to business strategy issues.
12.     Understand how economic models can address issues faced by managers.




                          Student Assessment Outcome Measures


4.      Seniors enroll in a capstone course in management strategy. The course brings
        together and synthesizes material from accounting, finance, micro and macro
        economics, marketing, operations, information systems, business ethics, and
        international business to assess organizations and develop alternative courses of
        action based on the goals of the organization and fit within larger business
        environment.
            a. The course emphasizes how seniors would communicate within business
                practice through case summary write ups and short presentations
                throughout the semester. In addition, core strategic decision making
                concepts and tools for industry and organizational analysis, formulation of
                strategic plans, and analysis of a strategic plan are introduced and tested in
                an examination consisting of 4-6 short answer questions focused on a
                single business case. These core concepts are taught through both class
                discussions centered on a specific chapter in the text plus an example to
                work through in class and reinforced in the application to a business case
                using case method teaching. The use of case methodology applies directly
                to the goal of teaching concepts of strategy with an eye on practicality in a

Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   10
               business setting.
            b. The course culminates in the development of a business case on an issue
               of the students’ choice and corresponding analysis which utilizes the
               concepts of the course. The students develop a proposal and outline for
               their project to be critiqued by their peers and the professor. The summary
               case and analysis is presented to the class and developed into a paper. The
               students are graded on their ability to
                     i. State a thesis of their paper which communicates the goal and
                        scope of the paper.
                    ii. Organize the argument of the paper on the thesis, with clarity, and
                        without addition, irrelevant material. .
                  iii. Students are assessed for their insight on the case – to include their
                        ability to synthesize multiple concepts or apply concepts in a novel
                        manner.
                   iv. The paper and presentation must be balanced with a charitable read
                        of opposing arguments and a multi-faceted assessment of the case.
                    v. The paper and presentation must correctly incorporate concepts
                        from the course such as an industry analysis and/or an
                        organizational assessment to develop a realistic course of action
                        for a firm or individual.

5.      During majors’ last year in residence in either the fall or spring semester,[the
        Department administers a “senior assessment,” which consists of a three-hour
        examination that requires them to answer a 5-6 questions that directly test their
        competency in the major. Only majors who have completed all the core and
        required courses in their major can take this exam. To ensure that they have
        achieved a sufficient level of competency, at least two departmental faculty
        members evaluate the examinations along the following criteria
                    i. Student is concise, structured, and clear in answering the question.
                   ii. Student addresses the question using concepts from the major. For
                       example, students in economics are expected to be able to
                       demonstrate the impact of a commodity tax using the concepts of
                       consumer and producer surplus.
                  iii. To pass, student is able to meet requirements i and ii for 5 of 6
                       questions answered.
                  iv. To pass with honors, student is able to meet requirements i and ii
                       for all questions answered plus student adds insight, parallel
                       examples, alternative readings of the questions and answers, or
                       analysis from other classes . Only approximately 2% of the
                       students are able to pass with honors.

        A score of "Pass" or " Pass with Honors" is the requirement for graduation.




Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   11
                     Use of Results to Improve Student Learning
The department continues to evaluate the structure of the major requirements and the
individual course pedagogy based on assessments from student evaluations, market
demands by talking to prospective students and parents as well as current students, and
outcome results through feedback from alumni and potential employers. For example,
based on feedback from former students, the instructor of the ECON 463 recently
changed the econometric software employed in the course.




Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   12
                  DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS
                                 Baccalaureate Study
                  Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes



               Bachelor of Science in Business Administration in Finance
                                 Program Description


The core requirements of this major consist of the following courses:

        ACCT 305: Introduction to Financial Accounting
        ACCT: 306 Introduction to Managerial Accounting
        ECON 101: Principles of Macroeconomics
        ECON: 102 Principles of Microeconomics.
        ECON 223: Introduction to Statistics I
        Now ECON 563: Econometrics
        ECON 241/543: Intermediate Macroeconomics or Applied Macroeconomics
        ECON 242/546: Intermediate Microeconomics or Managerial Economics
        MGT 218 : Microcomputer Applications in Business
        MGT: 240: Introduction to Management Information Systems
        MGT: 423 Management Theory and Practice
        MGT 426: Principles of Finance
        MGT 501: Ethics in Business and Economics
        MGT 521 or MGT 522: Fundamentals of Business Law
        MGT 545: Principles of Marketing

After completion of the core, students move beyond the fundamentals by taking
Investment Analysis (MGT 532), Corporate Finance I (MGT 534), Corporate Finance II
(MGT 536). Students also take three (3) intradepartmental electives. Examples include
Options and Futures (MGT 538), Financial Markets and Institutions, (MGT 542), and
International Corporate Finance (MGT 589), just to name three examples. Students
complete their studies by taking a capstone course in management strategy (MGT 575).

Student can complement their course work by taking one or more internship during their
last two years. Only one internship however, can be taken for credit. The internships
typically follow the interest of the students. For student majoring in Finance, examples
include internships at Merrill Lynch, Wachovia Securities, and Bear Sterns.


                                 Goals for Student Learning


Students who graduate with a B.S.B.A. in Finance will:



Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   13
            1) Demonstrate a professional level of competence in corporate financial
               management, financial markets and institutions, and portfolio
               management. This includes developing an understanding of the basic
               principles, practices and theoretical framework of financial decision-
               making in corporations to optimize shareholders’ value through
               management of corporate assets and liabilities.
            2) Apply fundamental problem solving techniques to practical situations, be
               skilled in analysis of financial securities, and understand the markets in
               which they are traded and the economic and financial factors that affect
               their valuation.
            3) Analyze and interpret financial data for investment decision-making and
               apply different valuation and portfolio selection models.
            4) Understand the principles and theoretical framework of decisions
               concerning financial analysis, planning, risk and return tradeoffs in
               investing and financing, capital budgeting, short-term and long-term
               financing decisions, optimal capital structure, and cost of capital.
            5) Be familiar with options, futures, and other derivative instruments and
               their applications in risk management, investments and portfolio
               management.

                                Student Assessment Outcome Measures

6.      Seniors enroll in a capstone course in management strategy. The course brings
        together and synthesizes material from accounting, finance, micro and macro
        economics, marketing, operations, information systems, business ethics, and
        international business to assess organizations and develop alternative courses of
        action based on the goals of the organization and fit within larger business
        environment.
            a. The course emphasizes how seniors would communicate within business
                practice through case summary write ups and short presentations through
                out the semester. In addition, core strategic decision making concepts and
                tools for industry and organizational analysis, formulation of strategic
                plans, and analysis of a strategic plan are introduced and tested in an
                examination consisting of 4-6 short answer questions focused on a single
                business case. These core concepts are taught through both class
                discussions centered on a specific chapter in the text plus an example to
                work through in class and reinforced in the application to a business case
                using case method teaching. The use of case methodology applies directly
                to the goal of teaching concepts of strategy with an eye on practicality in a
                business setting.
            b. The course culminates in the development of a business case on an issue
                of the students’ choice and corresponding analysis which utilizes the
                concepts of the course. The students develop a proposal and outline for
                their project to be critiqued by their peers and the professor. The summary
                case and analysis is presented to the class and developed into a paper. The
                students are graded on their ability to

Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   14
                     i. State a thesis of their paper which communicates the goal and
                        scope of the paper.
                    ii. Organize the argument of the paper on the thesis, with clarity, and
                        without addition, irrelevant material. .
                   iii. Students are assessed for their insight on the case – to include their
                        ability to synthesize multiple concepts or apply concepts in a novel
                        manner.
                   iv. The paper and presentation must be balanced with a charitable read
                        of opposing arguments and a multi-faceted assessment of the case.
                    v. The paper and presentation must correctly incorporate concepts
                        from the course such as an industry analysis and/or an
                        organizational assessment to develop a realistic course of action
                        for a firm or individual.

7.      During majors’ last year in residence in either the fall or spring semester,[the
        Department administers a “senior assessment,” which consists of a three-hour
        examination that requires them to answer a 5-6 questions that directly test their
        competency in the major. Only majors who have completed all the core and
        required courses in their major can take this exam. To ensure that they have
        achieved a sufficient level of competency, at least two departmental faculty
        members evaluate the examinations along the following criteria. Factors
        considered in the grading of the exams include:
                    i. Has the student been concise, structured, and clear in answering
                       the question.
                   ii. Has the student addressed the question using concepts from the
                       major.
                  iii. To pass, student is able to meet requirements i and ii for 5 of 6
                       questions answered.
                  iv. To pass with honors, student is able to meet requirements i and ii
                       for all questions answered plus student adds insight, parallel
                       examples, alternative readings of the questions and answers, or
                       analysis from other classes . Only approximately 2% of the
                       students are able to pass with honors.

        A score of "Pass" or " Pass with Honors" is the requirement for graduation.




                     Use of Results to Improve Student Learning
The department continues to evaluate the structure of the major requirements and the
individual course pedagogy based on assessments from student evaluations,
developments in financial markets, and survey results from alumni.




Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   15
                  DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS
                                 Baccalaureate Study
                  Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes




      Bachelor of Science in Business Administration in International Business
                               Program Description

The core requirements consist of the following courses:

        ACCT 305: Introduction to Financial Accounting
        ACCT: 306 Introduction to Managerial Accounting
        ECON 101: Principles of Macroeconomics
        ECON: 102 Principles of Microeconomics.
        ECON 223: Introduction to Statistics I
        ECON 563: Econometrics
        ECON 543: Applied Macroeconomics
        ECON 546: Managerial Economics
        MGT 218 : Microcomputer Applications in Business
        MGT: 240: Introduction to Management Information Systems
        MGT: 423 Management Theory and Practice
        MGT 426: Principles of Finance
        MGT 501: Ethics in Business and Economics
        MGT 521 or MGT 522: Fundamentals of Business Law
        MGT 545: Principles of Marketing

After completion of the core, students move beyond the fundamentals by taking
International Marketing (MGT 562), International Corp Finance (MGT 589), and
International Business (MGT 590). They also take three (3) intradepartmental elective
courses such as entrepreneurship (MGT 572), International Management (MGT 591), or
an internship (MGT 500) to name only three examples. Students complete their studies
by taking a capstone course in management strategy (MGT 575).

Students can complement their course work by taking one or more internship during their
last two years. Only one internship however, can be taken for credit. The internships
typically follow the interest of the students.


                                 Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a B.S.B.A. in International Business will:

1.      Demonstrate an understanding of the pros and cons of different alternatives for
        hedging a firm’s foreign exchange exposure.

Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   16
2.      Demonstrate knowledge about forward rate agreements, interest rate futures,
        interest rate swaps, and currency swaps with respect to the management of
        interest rate risks.
3.      Be familiar with the advantages and disadvantages of global branding.
4.      Understand the importance of pressing management issues such as cultural
        diversity, business ethics, and international management.



                          Student Assessment Outcome Measures


8.      Seniors enroll in a capstone course in management strategy. The course brings
        together and synthesizes material from finance, micro and macro economics,
        marketing, operations, information systems, business ethics, and international
        business to assess organizations and develop alternative courses of action based
        on the goals of the organization and fit within larger business environment.
            a. The course emphasizes how seniors would communicate within business
                practice through case summary write ups and short presentations through
                out the semester. In addition, core strategic decision making concepts and
                tools for industry and organizational analysis, formulation of strategic
                plans, and analysis of a strategic plan are introduced and tested in an
                examination consisting of 4-6 short answer questions focused on a single
                business case. These core concepts are taught through both class
                discussions centered on a specific chapter in the text plus an example to
                work through in class and reinforced in the application to a business case
                using case method teaching. The use of case methodology applies directly
                to the goal of teaching concepts of strategy with an eye on practicality in a
                business setting.
            b. The course culminates in the development of a business case on an issue
                of the students’ choice and corresponding analysis which utilizes the
                concepts of the course. The students develop a proposal and outline for
                their project to be critiqued by their peers and the professor. The summary
                case and analysis is presented to the class and developed into a paper. The
                students are graded on their ability to
                      i. State a thesis of their paper which communicates the goal and
                         scope of the paper.
                     ii. Organize the argument of the paper on the thesis, with clarity, and
                         without addition, irrelevant material. .
                    iii. Students are assessed for their insight on the case – to include their
                         ability to synthesize multiple concepts or apply concepts in a novel
                         manner.
                    iv. The paper and presentation must be balanced with a charitable read
                         of opposing arguments and a multi-faceted assessment of the case.
                     v. The paper and presentation must correctly incorporate concepts
                         from the course such as an industry analysis and/or an

Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009    17
                         organizational assessment to develop a realistic course of action
                         for a firm or individual.

9.      During majors’ last year in residence in either the fall or spring semester,[the
        Department administers a “senior assessment,” which consists of a three-hour
        examination that requires them to answer a 5-6 questions that directly test their
        competency in the major. Only majors who have completed all the core and
        required courses in their major can take this exam. To ensure that they have
        achieved a sufficient level of competency, at least two departmental faculty
        members evaluate the examinations along the following criteria
                    i. Student is concise, structured, and clear in answering the question.
                   ii. Student addresses the question using concepts from the major.
                  iii. To pass, student is able to meet requirements i and ii for 5 of 6
                       questions answered.
                  iv. To pass with honors, student is able to meet requirements i and ii
                       for all questions answered plus student adds insight, parallel
                       examples, alternative readings of the questions and answers, or
                       analysis from other classes . Only approximately 2% of the
                       students are able to pass with honors.

        A score of "Pass" or " Pass with Honors" is the requirement for graduation.



                       Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

The department continues to evaluate the structure of the major requirements and the
individual course pedagogy based on real-time assessments from student evaluations,
market demands by talking to prospective students and parents as well as current
students, and outcome results through feedback from alumni and potential employers.
The schedule, syllabus, material, and approach to the management classes is re-assessed
before each semester. Approximately 20% of the course material is refreshed once a year
to try new material and approaches and remain relevant to the current international
business climate.




Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009    18
                  DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS
                                 Baccalaureate Study
                  Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes



                    Bachelor of Science in Business Administration in
                         International Economics and Finance
                                  Program Description

The core requirements of this major consist of the following courses:

        ACCT 305: Introduction to Financial Accounting
        ACCT: 306 Introduction to Managerial Accounting
        ECON 101: Principles of Macroeconomics
        ECON: 102 Principles of Microeconomics.
        ECON 223: Introduction to Statistics I
        ECON 563: Econometrics
        ECON 241: Intermediate Macroeconomics
        ECON 242: Intermediate Microeconomics
        MGT 218: Microcomputer Applications in Business
        MGT: 240: Introduction to Management Information Systems
        MGT: 423 Management Theory and Practice
        MGT 426: Principles of Finance
        MGT 501: Ethics in Business and Economics
        MGT 521 or MGT 522: Fundamentals of Business Law
        MGT 545: Principles of Marketing


After completion of the core, students move beyond the fundamentals by taking
International Economics (ECON 580), International Finance (ECON 581), and
International Corporate Finance (MGT 589). Students complete their studies by taking a
capstone course in Management Strategy (MGT 575). Students are also required to take
Calculus I (MATH 111) and Calculus II (MATH 112). Students can also choose to take
Development Economics (ECON 540), Emerging Financial Markets (ECON 584), and
Family and Economic Growth (ECON 541).

Students can complement their course work by taking one or more internships during
their last two years. Only one internship however, can be taken for credit. Some
internships examples include the Council of Economic Advisers, the Federal Reserve and
Board, and J.P. Morgan.


                                 Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a B.S.B.A. in International Economics and Finance will:

Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   19
13.     Understand thoroughly the competitive supply/demand model and use it to
        analyze the impact of government policies (e.g., price controls, excise taxes,
        subsidies) on the welfare of consumers and producers.
14.     Demonstrate an understanding of imperfectly competitive market structures and
        the effects they have on the welfare of consumers and producers.
15.     Demonstrate an understanding of why externalities, such as pollution, can lead to
        market failure and provide a rationale for government involvement.
16.     Understand thoroughly the open macroeconomy, as represented by the core
        IS/LM, BoP and AD-AS models ( IS denotes Investment-Savings equilibrium;
        LM is an abbreviation for Liquidity Preference (Money demand)-Money Supply
        equilibrium; BoP is Balance of Payments; AD-AS is short for Aggregate
        Demand-Aggregate Supply ) under different assumptions, and analyze the
        impacts of changes in domestic and foreign fiscal and monetary policies on
        domestic and foreign economic variables, such as GDP, interest rates, investment,
        exchange rates, inflation, employment, and net exports.
17.     Demonstrate a professional level of competence in corporate financial
        management, financial markets and institutions, and portfolio management. This
        includes developing an understanding of the basic principles, practices and
        theoretical framework of financial decision-making in corporations to optimize
        shareholders’ value through management of corporate assets and liabilities.
18.     Apply fundamental problem solving techniques to practical situations, be skilled
        in analysis of financial securities, and understand the markets in which they are
        traded and the economic and financial factors that affect their valuation.
19.     Analyze and interpret financial data for investment decision-making and apply
        different valuation and portfolio selection models.
20.     Understand the principles and theoretical framework of decisions concerning
        financial analysis, planning, risk and return tradeoffs in investing and financing,
        capital budgeting, short-term and long-term financing decisions, optimal capital
        structure, and cost of capital.
21.     Be familiar with options, futures, and other derivative instruments and their
        applications in risk management, investments and portfolio management.
22.     Use statistical estimation, hypothesis testing, and basic regression analysis and be
        able to interpret reported regression results.
23.     Apply game theoretic economic models to business strategy issues.
24.     Understand how economic models can address issues faced by managers.




                          Student Assessment Outcome Measures


1.Seniors enroll in a capstone course in management strategy. The course brings together
and synthesizes material from accounting, finance, micro and macro economics,

Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   20
marketing, operations, information systems, business ethics, and international business to
assess organizations and develop alternative courses of action based on the goals of the
organization and fit within larger business environment.
           b. The course emphasizes how seniors would communicate within business
               practice through case summary write ups and short presentations
               throughout the semester. In addition, core strategic decision making
               concepts and tools for industry and organizational analysis, formulation of
               strategic plans, and analysis of a strategic plan are introduced and tested in
               an examination consisting of 4-6 short answer questions focused on a
               single business case. These core concepts are taught through both class
               discussions centered on a specific chapter in the text plus an example to
               work through in class and reinforced in the application to a business case
               using case method teaching. The use of case methodology applies directly
               to the goal of teaching concepts of strategy with an eye on practicality in a
               business setting.
           c. The course culminates in the development of a business case on an issue
               of the students’ choice and corresponding analysis which utilizes the
               concepts of the course. The students develop a proposal and outline for
               their project to be critiqued by their peers and the professor. The summary
               case and analysis is presented to the class and developed into a paper. The
               students are graded on their ability to
                     i. State a thesis of their paper which communicates the goal and
                        scope of the paper.
                    ii. Organize the argument of the paper on the thesis, with clarity, and
                        without addition, irrelevant material. .
                   iii. Students are assessed for their insight on the case – to include their
                        ability to synthesize multiple concepts or apply concepts in a novel
                        manner.
                   iv. The paper and presentation must be balanced with a charitable read
                        of opposing arguments and a multi-faceted assessment of the case.
                    v. The paper and presentation must correctly incorporate concepts
                        from the course such as an industry analysis and/or an
                        organizational assessment to develop a realistic course of action
                        for a firm or individual.

2.      During majors’ last year in residence in either the fall or spring semester,[the
        Department administers a “senior assessment,” which consists of a three-hour
        examination that requires them to answer a 5-6 questions that directly test their
        competency in the major. Only majors who have completed all the core and
        required courses in their major can take this exam. To ensure that they have
        achieved a sufficient level of competency, at least two departmental faculty
        members evaluate the examinations along the following criteria
3.      Student is concise, structured, and clear in answering the question.
4.      Student addresses the question using concepts from the major. For example,
        students in international economics and finance are expected to be able to analyze
        a policy problem by using an IS/LM in an openned economy as well as by using

Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   21
        intertemporal analysis..
5.      To pass, student is able to meet requirements i and ii for 5 of 6 questions
        answered.
6.      To pass with honors, student is able to meet requirements i and ii for all questions
        answered plus student adds insight, parallel examples, alternative readings of the
        questions and answers, or analysis from other classes . Only approximately 2% of
        the students are able to pass with honors.

        A score of "Pass" or " Pass with Honors" is the requirement for graduation.


                     Use of Results to Improve Student Learning
The department continues to evaluate the structure of the major requirements and the
individual course pedagogy based on assessments from student evaluations, market
demands by talking to prospective students and parents as well as current students, and
outcome results through feedback from alumni and potential employers. For example,
based on feedback from former students, the instructor of the ECON 223 recently
changed the econometric software employed in the course.




Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   22
                  DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS
                                 Baccalaureate Study
                  Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes



            Bachelor of Science in Business Administration in Management
                                 Program Description

The core requirements consist of the following courses:

        ACCT 305: Introduction to Financial Accounting
        ACCT: 306 Introduction to Managerial Accounting
        ECON 101: Principles of Macroeconomics
        ECON: 102 Principles of Microeconomics.
        ECON 323: Introduction to Statistics I (Now ECON 223)
        ECON 324: Introduction to Statistics II (Now ECON 563: Econometrics)ECON
        543: Applied Macroeconomics
        ECON 546: Managerial Economics
        MGT 218 : Microcomputer Applications in Business
        MGT: 240: Introduction to Management Information Systems
        MGT: 423 Management Theory and Practice
        MGT 426: Principles of Finance
        MGT 501: Ethics in Business and Economics
        MGT 521 or MGT 522: Fundamentals of Business Law
        MGT 545: Principles of Marketing




After completion of the core, students move beyond the fundamentals by taking three (3)
required courses including leadership (MGT 510), Management of Human Resources (
MGT 530), and Managerial Decision Making ( MGT 565) and three (3)
intradepartmental elective courses such as Entrepreneurship (MGT 572), International
Marketing (MGT 562), or an internship (MGT 500) to name only three examples.
Students complete their studies by taking a capstone course in management strategy
(MGT 575).


                                 Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a B.S.B.A. in Management will:

1.      Explain the differences among the Different leadership approaches, the ethical
        implications of each approach, and how each would work in a business setting
2.      Explain core management concepts such as organizational structure, management

Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   23
        decision making, business ethics, leadership, teamwork, and control systems.
3.      Demonstrate a solid understanding of the fundamentals of strategic management.
4.      Understand the importance of pressing management issues such as cultural
        diversity, business ethics, and international management.

                          Student Assessment Outcome Measures


3.      Seniors enroll in a capstone course in management strategy. The course brings
        together and synthesizes material from finance, micro and macro economics,
        marketing, operations, information systems, business ethics, and international
        business to assess organizations and develop alternative courses of action based
        on the goals of the organization and fit within larger business environment.
            1) The course emphasizes how seniors would communicate within business
                 practice through case summary write ups and short presentations through
                 out the semester. In addition, core strategic decision making concepts and
                 tools for industry and organizational analysis, formulation of strategic
                 plans, and analysis of a strategic plan are introduced and tested in an
                 examination consisting of 4-6 short answer questions focused on a single
                 business case. These core concepts are taught through both class
                 discussions centered on a specific chapter in the text plus an example to
                 work through in class and reinforced in the application to a business case
                 using case method teaching. The use of case methodology applies directly
                 to the goal of teaching concepts of strategy with an eye on practicality in a
                 business setting.
            2) The course culminates in the development of a business case on an issue
                 of the students’ choice and corresponding analysis which utilizes the
                 concepts of the course. The students develop a proposal and outline for
                 their project to be critiqued by their peers and the professor. The summary
                 case and analysis is presented to the class and developed into a paper. The
                 students are graded on their ability to
3.      State a thesis of their paper which communicates the goal and scope of the paper.
4.      Organize the argument of the paper on the thesis, with clarity, and without
        addition, irrelevant material. .
5.      Students are assessed for their insight on the case – to include their ability to
        synthesize multiple concepts or apply concepts in a novel manner.
6.      The paper and presentation must be balanced with a charitable read of opposing
        arguments and a multi-faceted assessment of the case.
7.      The paper and presentation must correctly incorporate concepts from the course
        such as an industry analysis and/or an organizational assessment to develop a
        realistic course of action for a firm or individual.

4.      During majors’ last year in residence in either the fall or spring semester,[the
        Department administers a “senior assessment,” which consists of a three-hour
        examination that requires them to answer a 5-6 questions that directly test their
        competency in the major. Only majors who have completed all the core and

Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   24
        required courses in their major can take this exam. To ensure that they have
        achieved a sufficient level of competency, at least two departmental faculty
        members evaluate the examinations along the following criteria
3.      Student is concise, structured, and clear in answering the question.
4.      Student addresses the question using concepts from the major.
5.      To pass, student is able to meet requirements i and ii for 5 of 6 questions
        answered.
6.      To pass with honors, student is able to meet requirements i and ii for all questions
        answered plus student adds insight, parallel examples, alternative readings of the
        questions and answers, or analysis from other classes . Only approximately 2% of
        the students are able to pass with honors.

        A score of "Pass" or " Pass with Honors" is the requirement for graduation.


                      Use of Results to Improve Student Learning
  The department continues to evaluate the structure of the major requirements and the
  individual course pedagogy based on real-time assessments from student evaluations,
     market demands by talking to prospective students and parents as well as current
  students, and outcome results through feedback from alumni and potential employers.
 The schedule, syllabus, material, and approach to the management classes is re-assessed
before each semester. Approximately 20% of the course material is refreshed once a year
 to try new material and approaches and remain relevant to the current business climate.
Finally, contemporaneous business issues are incorporated in the form of news clippings
 and videos which are researched anew every semester for the core management courses
                               of MGT 423 and MGT 575.




Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   25
                  DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS
                                 Baccalaureate Study
                  Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes



             Bachelor of Science in Business Administration in Marketing
                                 Program Description

The core requirements consist of the following courses:

        ACCT 305: Introduction to Financial Accounting
        ACCT: 306 Introduction to Managerial Accounting
        ECON 101: Principles of Macroeconomics
        ECON: 102 Principles of Microeconomics.
        ECON 323: Introduction to Statistics I (Now ECON 223)
        ECON 324: Introduction to Statistics II (Now ECON 563: Econometrics)ECON
        543: Applied Macroeconomics
        ECON 546: Managerial Economics
        MGT 218 : Microcomputer Applications in Business
        MGT: 240: Introduction to Management Information Systems
        MGT: 423 Management Theory and Practice
        MGT 426: Principles of Finance
        MGT 501: Ethics in Business and Economics
        MGT 521 or MGT 522: Fundamentals of Business Law
        MGT 545: Principles of Marketing




 After completion of the core, students move beyond the fundamentals by taking three
(3) required courses including Market Research( MGT 546), Consumer Behavior (MGT
547), and Marketing Strategy (557). They also take three intradepartmental electives
such as Selling and Sales Management (MGT 548) and International Marketing (MGT
562 ), just to name two examples. Students complete their studies by taking a capstone
course in management strategy (MGT 575).

                                 Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a B.S.B.A. in Marketing will:

1.      Have a firm grasp of the core concepts of marketing. Specifically:
           a. Know the main elements of advertising, be able to estimate the value of a
               brand, and describe the benefits of brands to firms and consumers.
           b. Demonstrate an understanding of the consumer decision-making process,
               know the strategic and moral implications of the difference between

Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   26
               consumer needs and wants, and be aware of the harms of consumerism.
            c. Understand the managerial value of market research, the different types of
               research and when and how to use them, the role of primary and secondary
               data, and the characteristics of useful market information.

2.      Be able to work constructively in a team environment to apply the core concepts
        of marketing in real time and under pressure of deadlines and competitive forces.

3.      Demonstrate proficiency in developing marketing plans for a given new or
        existing product or service. This includes identifying an appropriate segmentation
        approach and target market; articulating clear product, pricing, promotion, and
        place (distribution) strategies; and defining specific goals and measurement
        approaches.

                          Student Assessment Outcome Measures



5.      Seniors enroll in a capstone course in management strategy. The course brings
        together and synthesizes material from accounting, finance, micro and macro
        economics, marketing, operations, information systems, business ethics, and
        international business to assess organizations and develop alternative courses of
        action based on the goals of the organization and fit within larger business
        environment.
            1) The course emphasizes how seniors would communicate within business
                practice through case summary write ups and short presentations through
                out the semester. In addition, core strategic decision making concepts and
                tools for industry and organizational analysis, formulation of strategic
                plans, and analysis of a strategic plan are introduced and tested in an
                examination consisting of 4-6 short answer questions focused on a single
                business case. These core concepts are taught through both class
                discussions centered on a specific chapter in the text plus an example to
                work through in class and reinforced in the application to a business case
                using case method teaching. The use of case methodology applies directly
                to the goal of teaching concepts of strategy with an eye on practicality in a
                business setting.
            2) The course culminates in the development of a business case on an issue
                of the students’ choice and corresponding analysis which utilizes the
                concepts of the course. The students develop a proposal and outline for
                their project to be critiqued by their peers and the professor. The summary
                case and analysis is presented to the class and developed into a paper. The
                students are graded on their ability to
3.      State a thesis of their paper which communicates the goal and scope of the paper.
4.      Organize the argument of the paper on the thesis, with clarity, and without
        addition, irrelevant material. .
5.      Students are assessed for their insight on the case – to include their ability to

Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   27
         synthesize multiple concepts or apply concepts in a novel manner.
6.       The paper and presentation must be balanced with a charitable read of opposing
         arguments and a multi-faceted assessment of the case.
7.       The paper and presentation must correctly incorporate concepts from the course
         such as an industry analysis and/or an organizational assessment to develop a
         realistic course of action for a firm or individual.



6.       It is not enough for students to have absorbed the core concepts of marketing.
         They also need to apply these concepts in a business environment, namely: in a
         group setting with real deadlines and under competitive pressure. This ability is
         assessed in a required marketing course designed explicitly for this purpose
         (MGT 556: Marketing Strategy), normally taken in the Spring semester of the
         students’ senior year. During this course, students work in teams on a
         sophisticated computer-based marketing simulation, where they are responsible
         for making all decisions about market research, product development, product
         launch, pricing, advertising, etc. There are no random factors in the simulation,
         and teams’ results are a direct outcome of the quality of their marketing decision-
         making. Evaluation in this course is a combination of simulation results and
         frequent team and individual meetings with the instructor where self-assessment
         is encouraged and facilitated.

7.       During the Fall or Spring semester of the majors’ senior year, the Department
         administers a “senior assessment,” which consists of a three-hour, two part
         examination. The first part contains twenty questions about concepts relevant to
         marketing planning, and the second requires them to develop a comprehensive
         marketing plan for a given product or service. Only majors who have completed
         all the core and required courses in their major can take this exam. To ensure that
         they understand the concepts and can develop a robust marketing plan, at least
         two departmental faculty members evaluate the examinations. A score of “Pass”
         or “Pass with Honors” is the requirement for graduation. “Pass” is defined as a
         grade of 60% or higher, and “Pass with Honors,” 92%.

                       Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

Each year, marketing faculty review the following inputs to determine what revisions are
required to the structure of the marketing major and its individual courses:

     -   student grades
     -   student course evaluations
     -   informal discussions with students, particularly seniors
     -   feedback from alumni gathered through our career center
     -   externally, significant changes in marketing theory, practice, and business context

As a result, changes to course structure and content are made on a regular basis, and new

Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009    28
courses and changes to the mix of required and elective courses are proposed for approval
to the broader faculty.




Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   29
                  DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS
                                 Baccalaureate Study
                  Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes


                   Bachelor of Science in Business Administration in
                          Management Information Systems
                                 Program Description
             (This program was discontinued in the school year 2009-2010)


The core requirements consist of the following courses:

        ACCT 305: Introduction to Financial Accounting
        ACCT: 306 Introduction to Managerial Accounting
        ECON 101: Principles of Macroeconomics
        ECON: 102 Principles of Microeconomics.
        ECON 323: Introduction to Statistics I (Now ECON 223)
        ECON 324: Introduction to Statistics II (Now ECON 563: Econometrics)ECON
        543: Applied Macroeconomics
        ECON 546: Managerial Economics
        MGT 218: Microcomputer Applications in Business
        MGT: 240: Introduction to Management Information Systems
        MGT: 423 Management Theory and Practice
        MGT 426: Principles of Finance
        MGT 501: Ethics in Business and Economics
        MGT 521 or MGT 522: Fundamentals of Business Law
        MGT 545: Principles of Marketing


After completion of the core, students move beyond the fundamentals by taking Systems
Analysis (MGT 347), Database Management (MGT 431), and Quantitative Methods in
Managerial Decision Making (MGT565). Students are also required to take three courses
in Computer Science. Students complete their studies by taking a capstone course in
management strategy (MGT 575).


                                 Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a B.S.B.A. in Management Information Systems will:

1.      Demonstrate familiarity with the various business models for electronic
        commerce. This includes knowing the difference between data and metadata,
        understanding the importance of supply chain management, knowing the key
        processes associated with data warehousing and demonstrating familiarity with
        Structured Query Language (SQL) statements.

Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   30
2.      Demonstrate an understanding the Systems Development Lifecycle and
        prototyping.
3.      Explain the difference between a decision-support system and a management
        information system.

                          Student Assessment Outcome Measures


8.      Seniors enroll in a capstone course in management strategy. The course brings
        together and synthesizes material from accounting, finance, micro and macro
        economics, marketing, operations, information systems, business ethics, and
        international business to assess organizations and develop alternative courses of
        action based on the goals of the organization and fit within larger business
        environment.
            1) The course emphasizes how seniors would communicate within business
                 practice through case summary write ups and short presentations through
                 out the semester. In addition, core strategic decision making concepts and
                 tools for industry and organizational analysis, formulation of strategic
                 plans, and analysis of a strategic plan are introduced and tested in an
                 examination consisting of 4-6 short answer questions focused on a single
                 business case. These core concepts are taught through both class
                 discussions centered on a specific chapter in the text plus an example to
                 work through in class and reinforced in the application to a business case
                 using case method teaching. The use of case methodology applies directly
                 to the goal of teaching concepts of strategy with an eye on practicality in a
                 business setting.
            2) The course culminates in the development of a business case on an issue
                 of the students’ choice and corresponding analysis which utilizes the
                 concepts of the course. The students develop a proposal and outline for
                 their project to be critiqued by their peers and the professor. The summary
                 case and analysis is presented to the class and developed into a paper. The
                 students are graded on their ability to
3.      State a thesis of their paper which communicates the goal and scope of the paper.
4.      Organize the argument of the paper on the thesis, with clarity, and without
        addition, irrelevant material. .
5.      Students are assessed for their insight on the case – to include their ability to
        synthesize multiple concepts or apply concepts in a novel manner.
6.      The paper and presentation must be balanced with a charitable read of opposing
        arguments and a multi-faceted assessment of the case.
7.      The paper and presentation must correctly incorporate concepts from the course
        such as an industry analysis and/or an organizational assessment to develop a
        realistic course of action for a firm or individual.

9.      During majors’ last year in residence in either the fall or spring semester,[the
        Department administers a “senior assessment,” which consists of a three-hour
        examination that requires them to answer a 5-6 questions that directly test their

Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   31
        competency in the major. Only majors who have completed all the core and
        required courses in their major can take this exam. To ensure that they have
        achieved a sufficient level of competency, at least two departmental faculty
        members evaluate the examinations along the following criteria
3.      Student is concise, structured, and clear in answering the question.
4.      Student addresses the question using concepts from the major.
5.      To pass, student is able to meet requirements i and ii for 5 of 6 questions
        answered.
6.      To pass with honors, student is able to meet requirements i and ii for all questions
        answered plus student adds insight, parallel examples, alternative readings of the
        questions and answers, or analysis from other classes . Only approximately 2% of
        the students are able to pass with honors.

        A score of "Pass" or " Pass with Honors" is the requirement for graduation.


                      Use of Results to Improve Student Learning
The department continues to evaluate the structure of the major requirements and the
individual course pedagogy based on real-time assessments from student evaluations,
market demands by talking to prospective students and parents as well as current
students, and outcome results through feedback from alumni and potential employers.
The schedule, syllabus, material, and approach to the management classes is re-assessed
before each semester. Approximately 20% of the course material is refreshed once a year
to try new material and approaches and remain relevant to the current business climate.




Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   32
ches and remain relevant to the current business climate.




Developed 2007-2008. Last update Fall 2009   32

								
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