Account Opening Letter for an Employee by fdo28738

VIEWS: 628 PAGES: 42

More Info
									     CONTENTS

 1   Opening Letter
 1   Introduction
 2   List of Contacts in the Human Resources Department
 3   Process Checklist
 4   Legislative Issues
 5   Establishing the Hiring Process
 9   Planning the Interview and Selection Process
12   Conducting the Interview
15   Conducting Reference Checks
16   Finalizing the Offer

17 Appendices
Opening Letter

It gives me great pleasure to present a Hiring Guide for Recruiting Research, Grant and
Contract Employees. The aim of this document is to provide those involved in the recruitment of
research, grant and contract employees with information on how to go about the process of
recruiting, selecting and hiring. I encourage all those involved in a recruitment process to
incorporate the procedures in this Guide that are appropriate to their hiring circumstances into
their search and selection protocols.

This Guide contains a wide range of information that will assist both novice and experienced
search participants seeking research, grant and contract employees. Several useful features,
including a process checklist that highlights the key points of the hiring process; a list of contacts
in the Human Resources department; and a listing of disallowed interview questions under the
Ontario Human Rights Code, make this Guide a valuable hiring resource. Its tip-based,
chronological format which simplifies and clarifies the hiring process will be useful to those
hiring for the first time as well as to the more experienced, seasoned recruiter.

In closing, I would like to extend a word of thanks to those who participated in the development
of this document. Your contributions are greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,

Julie Mekarski
Director, Client Services
Human Resources

Introduction

This guide provides information to assist in the process of hiring research, grant and contract
employees and outlines the steps necessary to conduct an effective hiring process including
procedures to encourage equity in the Queen's workforce. Commencing with the initial
employment-planning stage through the final selection and job offer, the guide's user-friendly,
accessible format, presents step-by-step guidelines on how to go about recruiting, interviewing
and selecting potential employees.

Although those who hire research, grant and contract employees are responsible for all hiring
and employment decisions pertaining to the recruitment process, there are a number of valuable
resources available on campus to assist those involved in such processes. For instance, several
people are available in Human Resources to provide advice and clarify the various hiring
procedures. Names of some of those in Human Resources who will be pleased to answer
questions and provide advice about various facets of the hiring process are provided in the next
section: "List of Contacts in the Human Resources Department".




                                                  1
List of Contacts in the Human Resources Department

Compensation Mailbox: hrcomp@queensu.ca


Margaret Goslin (Employment Coordinator)
Email: margaret.goslin@queensu.ca
Tel.: 533-6000 (ext. 74183)

Katie Smith (Employment Coordinator)
Email: katie.smith@queensu.ca
Tel.: 533-6000 (ext. 78601)

Lisa Colby (Compensation Analyst)
Email: lisa.colby@queensu.ca
Tel.: 533-6000 (ext. 78859)

Lori Schnare (Compensation Analyst)
Email: lori.schnare@queensu.ca
Tel.: (613) 533-6000 (ext. 79054)

Diane Pointer (Total Compensation Specialist)
Email: diane.pointer@queensu.ca
Tel.: (613) 533-6000 (ext. 74173)

Shannon Jones (Workplace Advisor, Health & Wellness Programs and Services)
Email: shannon.jones@queensu.ca
Tel.: (613) 533-6000 (ext. 77818)

Lisa Cruise (Payroll and Finance Manager)
Email: lisa.cruise@queensu.ca
Tel.: (613) 533-6000 (ext. 79011)

Laurie Gee (Director, Total Rewards)
Email: laurie.gee@queensu.ca
Tel.: (613) 533-6000 (ext. 74179)

Julie Mekarski (Director, Client Services)
Email: julie.mekarski@queensu.ca
Tel.: 533-6000 (ext. 74803)




                                                2
Process Checklist

This checklist is intended to assist those responsible for hiring research, grant and contract
employees, by providing an easy-reference guide that outlines the major steps involved in this
hiring process. It is important when a project proposal is initially planned, to consider these
employment processes. Hence, this checklist commences with the preliminary phase—the
employment planning stage—and concludes with the contract appointment.

    Budget: when budgeting, determine required staff salaries, employer's benefits
     contribution, payments to central fund and special fund, as well as indirect cost recovery.
    Notification: the recipient of a grant receives notification that funding for a project or
     research has been awarded.
    Documentation and Research Account: Research Services ensures documentation
     completed for all sources of research funds, requests Financial Services to open
     researcher's account.
    Salary and Position Summary: Before beginning a hiring process, contact a member of
     the Compensation Team through the central Compensation mailbox,
     hrcomp@queensu.ca for advice on the Position Summary and appropriate salary grade.
    Advertising: Advertise the position on the Human Resources website. Research, Grant
     and Contract vacancies appear in the ‘Job Opportunities’ section under the heading
     ‘Research and Other Positions’ and are open to internal and external applicants.
    The Interview: Prior to the interviews, develop interview questions based on job-criteria.
     Plan to use these job-related criteria to evaluate candidates when reviewing resumés and
     conducting interviews.
    References: Contact at least two or three references, including current and former
     supervisors, for verification of the candidate's qualifications and their past experience.
    Benefits: When a verbal offer is made, prepare to answer candidate queries. For example,
     reviewing benefits eligibility and benefits premiums will assist with benefits questions.
     Contact the Human Resources Department to discuss what benefits the employee would
     be eligible for based on the terms of their employment.
    Written Offer and Contract: If a verbal offer is accepted, send an Offer of Employment
     letter. This should be written in consultation with an Employment Coordinator. Attach
     the letter (signed by the candidate) to a completed Employment Contract.
    Completing the Employment Contract: Prior to submitting the Employment Contract
     to Human Resources, please ensure that you have included the employee’s current
     mailing address, date of birth, void cheque for banking information, position number and
     a copy of their social insurance card. The contract will need all approval signatures and
     budget information to be processed by the Payroll Unit.
    Notify Other Candidates: Once a position has been accepted by a candidate, notify
     those who were interviewed that another candidate has been offered and accepted the
     position. Be prepared to provide feedback if necessary.
    Maintain Notes: Notes made during the process must be retained for two years to
     support reasons for the selection. This ensures available information should the selection
     be challenged.

                                                3
Legislative Issues

Ontario Human Rights Code and Employment Equity Legislation

Those conducting a recruitment process will need to be aware of various aspects of Human
Rights and Employment Equity legislation. The following outlines the basic principles of the
legislation. Later sections provide the practical steps to ensure appropriate actions that comply
with legislation.

Ontario Human Rights Code

An important function of the Ontario Human Rights Code is to promote equal employment
opportunity regardless of race, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, creed,
sex, sexual orientation, age, record of offences, marital status, family status or handicap.
Although those involved in hiring processes are normally aware of the basic concepts associated
with the need to avoid discriminatory practices during a recruitment process, many are not
familiar with the specific requirements and practical steps to promote a process that not only
complies with legislation but also tends to attract a broad pool of qualified candidates. These and
the various how-to's of putting into practice actions that accord with Human Rights legislation
are detailed in this guide and include ways to avoid the pitfalls of illegal and irrelevant queries.
Examples: using selection criteria that are based on the job-related criteria; becoming familiar
with those interview questions that are prohibited under the Code (see Appendix A).

Other Equity Legislation

The University is committed to the principles of equity and to implementing policies and
practices that encourage the full participation of disadvantaged groups. The University is
regulated by employment equity legislation under the Federal Contractors Program which covers
four groups: women, visible minorities, aboriginal people and persons with disabilities. An
example of a procedure intended to encourage equity in the Queen's workforce is inclusion of the
appropriate University equity statement in all employment advertisements. The University's
goals for achieving employment equity are detailed in Achieving Equity: A Plan for
Employment Equity.




                                                  4
Establishing the Hiring Process

  Hiring Tip
  During the initial stages of the hiring process, review and become knowledgeable about
  effective hiring practices.

Preliminary Phase (Budgeting)

In order to ensure that an adequate level of compensation is available to support the required
salary associated with a hiring, during the planning stage of the project or research proposal, the
budget will need to allow for some specific financial requirements. The Office of Research
Services website provides information for researchers about preparation of the proposal, research
related forms, staff contacts, etc., while the Human Resources department provides information
specific to compensation and employment. The following are some examples of financial
considerations to take into account during the planning phase:

Salary

Determine and budget for the appropriate, required level of compensation for this particular
contract position. Contact a member of the Compensation Team through the central
Compensation Mailbox: hrcomp@queensu.ca or see the List of Contacts in the Human
Resources Department—to be advised of the appropriate salary. Remember to budget for any
applicable July 1 salary increases for research, grant and contract staff.

Employer's Contribution for Benefits

The employer's contribution for benefits mandated by law or elected by the employee, an amount
which may equal up to 30% of the salary paid to the research, grant or contract employee.

Central Fund

Allow for required payments to the central fund. This fund was established to provide for
payments to research, grant and contract employees necessitated by sick leave, maternity,
parental and adoption leaves, severance pay and benefits for long term disability recipients. It
provides internal insurance for those at Queen's who employ research, grant and contract
employees and spreads the cost of unanticipated personnel employment expenses among those
hiring such employees. Contributions to the central fund are required for all at Queen's who
employ research, grant and contract employees and involves payment of an amount equal to
2.5% of all salaries paid to research, grant and contract employees. When the need arises,
reimbursement by the central fund is arranged by contacting Human Resources.

Tuition Support and Childcare Fund

This fund was established in order to fund the child care benefit plan and the tuition support plan
for research, grant and contract employees. Those who employ contract employees contribute an
amount equal to 1% of all salaries paid to contract employees.




                                                 5
Indirect Cost Recovery (Overhead)

The project budget should account for indirect cost recovery. The percent rate at which the
University recovers indirect costs is detailed through Research Services website Policy on the
Administration of Research Funds. The site also provides the following definition: indirect costs
(overheads) are those University expenditures incurred in the conduct of research for which it is
not possible to provide an accurate itemization of the cost of performing a specific research
activity. Indirect costs are real costs to the University, including but not limited to such items as
occupancy cost, building use, central administration, library costs and central computing services
costs.

Once a recipient of a grant receives notification that funding for a project or research has been
awarded and all the documentation has been completed for all sources of research funds,
Research Services requests Financial Services to open a research account for the Researcher.

Position Summary and Compensation Level

  Hiring Tip
  Become familiar with the requirements of the position and review the position summary
  (job overview).

The Position Summary is a vital component in any recruitment process. It is the basis for
determining the appropriate level of compensation for the position, an aid in developing the
employment advertisement and a tool for determining whether candidates are qualified for the
position.

If, at this point in the process, the Researcher or Supervisor has not contacted Human Resources
to determine the appropriate level of compensation and to evaluate the position, or if the
    Queen's University Support Staff Position Summary (job overview) has not yet been
completed (or if the job duties have changed considerably since the Summary was last
completed), the Human Resources Compensation Unit will need to be contacted and the Position
Summary filled out.

The aim is to create a realistic picture of the job, one that reflects the nature and scope of the
position. Use action words that clearly express the nature of the tasks required. A list of such
clarifying action words is included in Appendix B. As a preliminary to completing the position
summary, view the QJE (Queen’s Job Evaluation) Generic Position Overviews to aid in the
development of an accurate Position Summary. Normally, positions for research, grant and
contract employees will fall within the NAS (Natural and Applied Science) family. The salaries
associated with each can be viewed on the web:

      Salary Grid and Salary Range effective July 1, 2009

Once contacted, the Compensation Analyst in Human Resources will be pleased to discuss the
particular hiring situation and answer questions about specific job and compensation
considerations (i.e. part-time vs. full-time, appropriate level of compensation for the particular
position overview, etc.).



                                                  6
Advertisement

  Hiring Tip
  Advertise the position in order to attract a qualified and diverse applicant pool.

It is recommended that all contract positions be advertised on the Human Resources website.
Advertising widely tends to attract a broader pool of qualified, diverse applicants and, as well,
furthers the University goals for achieving employment equity. The content and appearance of
the ad is also important and will have a direct impact on applicant response. As well, the ad
presentation, when published externally, will reflect (either positively or negatively) on the
University.

A job advertisement for a research, grant and contract position will ideally include some specific
criteria (see the following listing). At the same time, the University appreciates the fact that those
who hire contract employees are from a diverse group of units and therefore face differing
circumstances and challenges. While those with more resources at their disposal are in a position
to create and publish a more comprehensive external advertisement, others may be operating on
a limited budget and require a smaller ad, one that recognizes their particular need for cost
containment. The sample employment advertisements provided in Appendix C are designed to
allow for flexibility to meet the diverse requirements of various units and present a range of
formats, designs and sizes.

Regardless of the availability of funding, the Position Summary should be the basis for the
advertisement. As well, an appropriate employment equity statement is required in all Queen's
University employment advertisements when published externally.

The following is a list of basic features to include in the job ad:

      Queen’s logo (when positions are advertised in external publications)
      Title of the position
      Employing department
      Duration of contract
      Principal duties and responsibilities (based on the Position Summary)
      Qualifications
      Salary grade and hiring salary
      Request for letter of application, resume and references
      Name, title and address of the person receiving the applications
      Closing date
      A note indicating that only those chosen for interviews will be contacted
      Employment equity statement:

       “The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen’s is committed
       to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from
       women, visible minorities, aboriginal people, persons with disabilities and persons of any
       sexual orientation or gender identity.”




                                                   7
       In situations where the body of the ad contains 75 words or less, an abbreviated
       employment equity statement may be substituted as follows: “Queen’s University is an
       equal opportunity employer”


If you need assistance with the wording of your ad, please feel free to contact an Employment
Coordinator in the Department of Human Resources (see List of Contacts in the Human
Resources Department).

Hiring units are encouraged to advertise positions on the Human Resources website to ensure
that current Queen's employees are aware of job vacancies. Research, Grant and Contract
vacancies appear under ‘Research and Other Positions’ in the Job Opportunities section of the
Human Resources website and are open to both internal and external applicants.

Some other possible locations for ad placements include:

      specific departments or faculties within the University
      other universities
      newspapers
      professional journals
      centres and journals for racial and cultural issues, special needs, etc. For additional
       locations for ad placements, see the Office of the University Advisor on Equity’s
       Outreach Recruitment website.
      websites specifically set up for job vacancies



Accommodation Requests

Accommodation requests should be directed to Shannon Jones, Workplace Advisor, Health and
Wellness Programs and Services.




                                                 8
Planning the Interview and Selection Process

  Hiring Tip
  Take notes during the interview process.

Participation in the Selection Process

Although ideally at least three people should be involved in selecting a candidate, it is
recognized this is not always feasible in the case of research, grant and contract positions. In fact,
the number of people involved in a process may range from one person (the Researcher) to a
committee of several people. Appropriate people to invite to participate in a selection process
include: colleagues who work on similar projects, other members of the research team; or
individuals who are knowledgeable about the position. When a number of people are involved in
the selection process, it is advisable to include men and women and, when possible, members
from under-represented groups. At the request of the department, an Employment Coordinator
may also sit on the selection team.

Selection Criteria and Process for Evaluating Candidates

  Hiring Tip
  Be clear about the selection criteria (which are outlined in the Position Summary), as they
  will be the basis for recruiting and advertising.

Plan to review resumés and select candidates to be interviewed as soon as possible after the
competition closing date. This will help to ensure that many of the best qualified candidates have
not accepted other positions.

Selection of candidates to be interviewed should be based on a pre-determined list of job-related
selection criteria. The previously prepared Position Summary will list the skills and
qualifications required to do the job. These criteria will also be the foundation for developing
interview questions. Some examples of criteria which may, when appropriate to the position
requirements, be used in the screening and interview process are:

      Education
      Relevant or equivalent work experience
      Knowledge of the job
      Technical skills and abilities
      Financial knowledge and abilities
      Problem-solving abilities
      Communication skills
      Supervision and delegation experience
      Management skills

As well, consideration should be given to arranging for candidate testing, when appropriate.
Clerical positions, in particular, may benefit from computer software testing. For a nominal fee,
Human Resources administers software testing of applicants.




                                                  9
To reiterate, plan to use criteria that are based on the requirements of the job as outlined in the
Position Summary. These pre-determined criteria will facilitate the process of assessing and
selecting candidates to be interviewed.

Determining Interview Location and Amenities

  Hiring Tip
  Select an interview location that is accessible to everyone including people with disabilities.

When planning the interview location and amenities, there are a number of important
considerations. For instance, plan to conduct the interview in a private location. Eliminate all
distractions, such as ringing phones and loose papers. When a number of candidates remain to be
seen, try to take a ten-minute break between interviews. In addition, try not to conduct more than
four or five interviews over the course of one working day.

When contacting individuals for interviews, it is important to advise the candidate if they require
accommodation for the interview to contact Shannon Jones, Workplace Advisor, Health and
Wellness Programs in Human Resources.

The seating arrangements should be comfortable and amenities convenient. For example, make
sure that there is a place for the candidate to hang a coat. Supplying the candidate with a glass of
water is also conducive to a positive interview climate. In addition, ensure that the location is
accessible to people with disabilities in order to be prepared should a situation arise where a
candidate requires this accommodation. Other unanticipated accommodation arrangements may
also arise. In this event, Employment Coordinators in Human Resources (see List of Contacts in
the Human Resources Department) are available to provide advice regarding accommodation
issues and Human Rights requirements. Interview questions prohibited under the Ontario Human
Rights guidelines are listed in Appendix A.

Developing Interview Content and Questions

  Hiring Tip
  Ensure that interview questions relate to the position criteria (as described in the job
  overview). Prior to interviewing, examine questions disallowed by legislation.

Interview formats may range from a highly structured model to a more flexible arrangement.
Typically, interviews for positions graded 1-9 are based on a semi-structured model. That is, they
involve development of a list of questions (based on the position criteria) to be asked of each of
the candidates and interspersed by probing questions to clarify and explore responses more
deeply. Examples of some typical interview questions associated with specific selection criteria
are provided in Appendix D.

When developing the list of interview questions, ensure that each of the job criteria is addressed
so that the information necessary to determine qualifications for each of the job requirements is
produced. As well, plan to ask candidates to elaborate on areas of their resumés and cover letters
such as time gaps between jobs, overlaps, frequency of job changes, etc. When developing
interview questions, plan to use open-ended questions. This will encourage communication and
provide the applicant with the opportunity to present more information.


                                                 10
Once questions have been developed for each of the position criteria, it is a good idea to envision
possible answers. If a committee has been struck, discuss the possible answers with the other
members. Make a note of various appropriate responses and use these as an aid to evaluate
candidate responses to the interview question. A sample Candidate Assessment Form is provided
in Appendix E.




                                                11
Conducting the Interview

Before the Interview

  Hiring Tip
  As a representative of the University, strive to provide all candidates with a favourable
  impression.

Once the applications have been reviewed and evaluated using the previously established list of
job-related selection criteria, the selected candidates should be contacted and invited to an
interview and, if appropriate, for practical testing. In addition to providing the location of the
interview and the date and time, candidates should be advised of the name of the interviewer(s)
and any information or material they will be required to bring to the interview. During this phase
as well as the later interviewing phase of the process, it is important, as a representative of the
University, to strive to create a favourable impression.

  Hiring Tip
  Prior to interviewing, review applications, resumés and other related material, noting areas
  requiring clarification.

Once interviews have been arranged with the selected candidates, review the job advertisement,
the Position Summary and interviewees’ resumés. (Make note of any areas of concern in the
resumés.) A review of the information in this Guide is also recommended.

Before commencing the interview, review the following questions:

      Am I thoroughly familiar with the criteria being sought in the applicant?
      Are these criteria both job-related and realistic?
      Can I clearly communicate the duties and responsibilities of this position to applicants?
      Am I prepared to provide additional relevant information about the job and the University
       to applicants?

The interview is normally comprised of three main parts: the opening or rapport-building phase;
the body of the interview and exchange-of-information phase; and the closure of the interview.

Opening the Interview

  Hiring Tip
  Take time at the opening of the interview to ensure that the candidate is comfortable.

If there is more than one interviewer, the chair of the selection committee should open the
interview, introduce all members, and explain each member’s role. During the opening of the
interview, take time to ensure that the candidate is made to feel at ease. Comfortable seating
arrangements and amenities such as providing a glass of water will encourage the applicant's
ease and promote an environment conducive to a fluent exchange of information. Good eye
contact and offering verbal reinforcement when appropriate will also help establish a good
rapport with the candidate.



                                                12
Next, go over the interview format with the candidate. This way, the candidate will know what to
expect.

      Mention topics that will be covered and the approximate duration of the interview.
      Explain that the candidate will have the opportunity to ask questions at the end of the
       interview.
      Advise the candidate that some notes will be taken during the interview in order to ensure
       an effective evaluation. (These notes are particularly important when many candidates are
       being interviewed and when final hiring decisions are challenged.)

Exchanging Information

  Hiring Tip
  Ask open-ended questions that will encourage candidate communication.

The information exchange stage constitutes the bulk of the interview. During this time, the
interviewer(s) will have the opportunity to ask the list of pre-determined questions to assess
whether the candidate’s qualifications match the job requirements. One suggested format for
listing the interview questions is included in Appendix E.

Remember to ask the same pre-determined questions of all candidates. This will encourage an
equal opportunity for each of the candidates.

After all questions have been presented and answered, provide the candidate with information
not covered during the question period (work environment, overtime or travel required, normal
working hours, etc.).

Candidates should then have the opportunity to ask questions. Keep in mind that a candidate’s
questions may reflect their level of interest in the position. However, there may be other reasons
for the candidate's lack of questions. For instance, it may be that the interviewee is nervous, or
that their questions may have already been addressed.

Closing the Interview

Thank the candidate for attending. State approximately when the decision will be made, and
stress to the candidate that he or she will be advised of the decision as soon as possible. If
arrangements were previously made to administer practical testing, the applicant may have been
scheduled to complete the test at this point in the process, if not earlier in the competition.

Evaluating the Candidates

  Hiring Tip
  Use the pre-determined selection criteria to assess and determine the short list of candidates.
  Assess each candidate immediately after each interview.

Assess the candidates immediately after the interviews. This is particularly important when there
have been a number of interviews. The previously established selection criteria should be the
basis for assessing the candidate’s suitability for the position. Many interviewers prefer a format
similar to that illustrated in Appendix E. In this format, the interview questions, based on each of

                                                13
the job criteria, are included as part of the Candidate Assessment Form which provides a section
for written comments, judgments and assessments.

  Hiring Tip
  Avoid making hasty judgments and jumping to conclusions.

Second interviews may be required for selected candidates in order to clarify some of the
candidates' qualifications.




                                               14
Conducting Reference Checks

  Hiring Tip
  Base reference-checking questions on the job-related criteria.

Information received through contacting the candidate's referees regarding past work-related
experiences and qualifications, in combination with the information gathered during the
interview, will be invaluable in making a good hiring decision. Appropriate references are
normally work-related and include, but may not be limited to, current and/or previous
supervisors.

The purpose of the reference-check is to verify the candidate's qualifications as they relate to the
requirements of the vacant position. The reference-check interview resembles the employment
interview in that the questions asked are based on pre-determined selection criteria taken from
the Position Summary. Following a specific format and asking previously determined interview
questions will help to ensure that the reference check covers all the important areas. Appendix F
provides an example of a suggested format and questions.

Reference Checking Tips

      Always obtain permission from applicants to contact employers for references.
      Reference checks should be conducted by someone who was present at the interview (i.e.,
       the position supervisor).
      References should be checked after completion of the interview process; they should
       address job-related requirements; any information that is not job-related should be
       disregarded.
      Conduct all reference checks in a uniform and consistent manner.
      Check with a minimum of two previous employers/supervisors. Contacting more than
       one referee will help to eliminate the possibility of either positive or negative bias. It will
       tend to provide a better balanced picture of the candidate’s work patterns and habits.
      If an applicant is ultimately rejected because of an unfavourable reference, prepare
       documentation to support the job-related reason.
      If information resulting from a reference check contradicts impressions or information
       obtained during the interview, give the individual an opportunity to refute or explain any
       information resulting from the reference check, particularly if the candidate has made it
       to the final stage of the competition.
      If a candidate asks that the current employer not be contacted for references, advise that
       any job offer will be contingent upon a completion of a reference check with the current
       employer.




                                                 15
Finalizing the Offer

The final phase of the recruitment involves the verbal offer of employment, preparation of the
Offer of Employment letter, completion of the Authorization to Pay a Monthly Salary From
Grant and Contract Funds form, finalization of the written rationale for the selection, and
notification to other interviewed candidates that another candidate has been offered and accepted
the position.

Offer of Employment and Providing Information Regarding Benefits

When a suitable candidate for the position has been selected, a verbal offer of employment is
made. At this point the candidate may wish to discuss details of the appointment that were not
addressed earlier in the process. For example, if access to benefits was not discussed earlier,
when the verbal offer is made the candidate may have questions about benefits availability.
Appendix I provides information that will be useful should the prospective employee have
questions about access to payroll benefits. As well, cost-sharing of premiums is detailed on the
Human Resources benefits website. Detailed information is available to the employee by
contacting the Compensation Unit in Human Resources.

Offer of Employment Letter

If the verbal offer is acceptable to the candidate, a written offer of employment is prepared. The
offer of employment letter, which is prepared and signed by the Researcher or Supervisor, is
presented to the successful candidate for signature. The signed offer indicates acceptance of the
terms of employment. (Appendix H) provides a sample offer of employment letter). Once signed,
the letter of offer should be attached to the employment contract, Authorization to Pay a Monthly
Salary From Grant and Contract Funds. For information about the authorization form (which is
available in Human Resources), see the section immediately following this offer of employment
section.

The offer of employment letter details the following information:

      Nature and duties of the position, including any special conditions
      Names of supervisors and those from whom direction may be given
      Start date and duration of the contract
      Full-time or part-time (with hours per week defined)
      Probationary period (if the employee is new to the University) and the associated
       conditions
      Level of position and starting salary
      Information regarding enrolment in benefits
      Required notice of end of employment




                                                16
Employment Contract (Authorization to Pay a Monthly Salary From Grant and
Contract Funds)

While the offer of employment represents an intent to enter into an employment contract, the
employment contract or Authorization to Pay a Monthly Salary from Grant and Contract Funds
form (available in Human Resources), represents an agreement by the University and the
employee. If the appropriate salary has not yet been confirmed with Human Resources, this will
need to be done before completion of the authorization form (see List of Contacts in the Human
Resources Department). The Principal Investigator (or the supervisor) and the employee
complete appropriate sections of the form and provide signatures where indicated.

The offer of employment (signed by both the Principal Investigator and the employee) is then
attached to the employment contract and submitted for approval to the person to whom the
Principal Investigator reports (e.g. department head). The letter and contract are then forwarded
to the Department of Human Resources for review before being forwarded to Financial Services
where the funds to be paid for salary over the period of the contract are "committed" from the
appropriate account (i.e., Financial Services monitors to ensure that the appropriate amount
remains available to be used only for the contract salary). Principal Investigators should be aware
that payments for benefits (including contributions to the central fund) are not "committed" and
should therefore plan to ensure that the appropriate amount remains available. Copies of the fully
signed contract are then distributed to the appropriate parties including the department, the
Principal Investigator and the employee, indicating University approval of the contract.

If as the document is circulated to the various departments there are questions or concerns about
any of the information in the contract, it may be returned without an authorizing signature to the
Principal Investigator for amendments or resolutions.

Documentation of the Selection Process

  Hiring Tip
  Maintain notes about the process and the reasons for the final selection.

During each phase of the hiring and selection process, ensure a written record is maintained
including a brief summary outlining the reasons for selecting the successful candidate and the
reasons why others were disqualified. This will ensure that the necessary information is available
to provide a rationale should the selection be challenged.

Notifying Other Interviewed Candidates

Once the position has been offered to and accepted by a candidate, others who were interviewed
should be notified that another has been offered and accepted the position. Candidates are
normally advised by telephone of the decision.




                                                17
Appendices

19   Appendix A: Prohibited Interview Questions
23   Appendix B: Action Words
24   Appendix C: Sample Advertisement
27   Appendix D: Sample Interview Questions
29   Appendix E: Candidate Assessment Form
30   Appendix F: Telephone Reference Form
34   Appendix G: Tuition Support and Childcare Fund
36   Appendix H: Sample Offer of Employment
38   Appendix I: Benefits Eligibility
40   Appendix J: Hiring Tips
41   Appendix K: Other Web-based Resources




                                         18
Appendix A: Prohibited Interview Questions

The following listing of questions that are permissible and those that are prohibited during the
employment interview is from the Ontario Human Rights Commission publication, Hiring? A
Human Rights Guide.

race/colour/ancestry/place Permissible Questions
of origin/ethnic origin
                               Questions about or relating to a service organization
                                 working with a particular community as to membership in
                                 the group served, if such membership can be justified as
                                 required to do the particular job.


                              Prohibited Questions

                                     Questions about or relating to physical characteristics such
                                      as colour of eyes, hair, skin, height, weight.
                                     Questions about mother tongue, where language skills were
                                      obtained and whether one speaks English or French
                                      fluently, unless fluency in English or French is a reasonable
                                      and genuine requirement for the position.
                                     Questions about or relating to birth-place, nationality of
                                      ancestors, spouse and other relatives, Canadian citizenship,
                                      landed immigrant status, permanent residency,
                                      naturalization, requests for proof of Canadian citizenship or
                                      Social Insurance Number (A S.I.N. may contain
                                      information about an applicant's place of origin or
                                      citizenship status. A S.I.N. may be requested following a
                                      conditional offer of employment).
                                     Questions about or relating to "Canadian" experience for a
                                      particular job.
                                     Questions about or relating to membership in organizations
                                      which are identified by a prohibited ground of
                                      discrimination, such as an Anglo-Canadian organization.
                                     Questions about the name and location of schools attended.
                                     Questions which do not fall into the "Special Interest
                                      Organizations" exemptions set out below.

creed                         Permissible Questions

                                     Questions by a denominational school as to religious
                                      membership, if the job involves communicating religious
                                      values to students.


                              Prohibited Questions


                                                19
                           All questions which do not fall into the "Special Interest
                            Organizations" exceptions set out below.

citizenship          Permissible Questions

                           Questions about or relating to citizenship, if required by
                            law for a particular job.
                           Questions about or relating to citizenship or permanent
                            resident status, where cultural, educational, trade union or
                            athletic activities can be restricted to Canadian citizens and
                            permanent residents.
                           Questions about or relating to citizenship or place of
                            residence with intention to obtain citizenship, when an
                            organization requires that a senior executive position be
                            held by a Canadian citizen or a person living in Canada
                            with the intention to obtain citizenship.

                     Prohibited Questions

                           Questions about or relating to the applicant's citizenship
                            that do not fall within the exceptions outlined in the Code.

sex                  Permissible Questions

                           Questions about or relating to gender, if it is a reasonable
                            and genuine requirement for a particular job, such as
                            employment in a shelter for battered women.

                     Prohibited Questions

                           All other questions concerning the applicant's sex,
                            including questions regarding pregnancy or child-bearing
                            plans.

sexual orientation   Permissible Questions

                           None.

                     Prohibited Questions

                           All questions about or relating to sexual orientation.

record of offences   Permissible Questions

                           Questions to determine whether the applicant has been
                            convicted of a criminal offence for which a pardon has not

                                      20
                             been granted. Questions to determine if an applicant is
                             bondable, if being bondable is a reasonable and genuine
                             qualification of the job. Questions to determine if an
                             applicant has a record of convictions under the Highway
                             Traffic Act, if driving is an essential job duty (e.g. bus
                             driver).

                      Prohibited Questions

                            All other questions except those with respect to unpardoned
                             Criminal Code convictions

handicap/disability       Employers are obligated to offer candidates with disabilities an
                      accommodation of their needs if required for any part of the
                      interview or test screening process.
                          If the applicant's disability becomes an issue at the interview,
                      e.g. where the applicant chooses to talk about his/her disability, an
                      employer may make inquiries about the applicant's accommodation
                      needs. Inquiries should be limited to the applicant's ability to
                      perform the essential duties of the job. Questions should not be
                      unnecessary, such as "How did you end up in a wheelchair?" or
                      "Have you been blind all your life". They should be asked with the
                      aim of ascertaining the applicant's ability to perform essential
                      duties.
                          Any questions beyond this scope should be made with great
                      caution and care as it may lead to a complaint on the ground of
                      disability should the applicant not be successful. Additionally, if an
                      employer fails to canvass possible accommodation measures where
                      disability has become an issue at an interview, this also could
                      potentially lead to a complaint on the ground of disability should
                      the applicant not be successful.
                          Any other disability issues should not be raised until a
                      conditional offer of employment is made.
                          These protections also apply to other accommodation needs
                      covered by the Code, such as pregnancy and religious needs,
                      although the requirement to accommodate a disability is based on
                      the needs of the individual, whereas other grounds are protected on
                      the basis of needs of the group.

                      Permissible Questions

                            Questions directly related to the applicant's ability to
                             perform the essential duties of the job.

                      Prohibited Questions

                            All other questions concerning the applicant's disability.


                                        21
age                           Permissible Questions

                                     Questions about or relating to age if the employer serves a
                                      particular age group and/or if age requirements are
                                      reasonable and genuine to qualify for employment.

                              Prohibited Questions

                                     All other questions about age.

marital status                Permissible Questions

                                     Questions about or relating to marital status if the employer
                                      serves a particular group identified by marital status (e.g.
                                      single woman) and/or if marital status is a reasonable and
                                      genuine requirement for employment.

                              Prohibited Questions

                                     All other questions as to marital status

family status                 Permissible Questions

                                     Questions about or relating to family status if family status
                                      is a reasonable and genuine requirement for employment.
                                      Please see further Nepotism or Anti-Nepotism Policies in
                                      "Section 7: Exceptions".

                              Prohibited Questions

                                     All other questions as to family status.


Appendix B: Action Words

The Position Summary is an important part of any hiring process. It is the basis for determining
the level of compensation for the position, developing the employment advertisement, and
determining whether candidates are qualified for the position. As such, it is crucial that the
Position Summary create a realistic picture of the job, one that reflects the nature and scope of
the job. When preparing this job summary, use of the following action words, as appropriate,
will assist the Researcher or Supervisor in clarifying the tasks involved and in defining the nature
of the job responsibilities.

Accepts       Batches       Creates        Facilitates   Inspects       Observes    Reports
Acts          Calculates    Delegates      Figures       Instructs      Obtains     Represents
Administers   Circulates    Designs        Files         Interprets     Operates    Requests
Advises       Classifies    Determines     Fills in      Investigates   Organizes   Researches
                                                22
Allocates     Codes          Develops       Fines        Issues       Outlines       Reviews
Analyzes      Collects       Devises        Follows up   Itemizes     Oversees       Revises
Anticipates   Compiles       Directs        Formulates   Lists        Participates   Schedules
Approves      Conducts       Disseminates   Furnishes    Locates      Performs       Screens
Arranges      Consolidates   Documents      Generates    Maintains    Plans          Selects
Ascertains    Constructs     Drafts         Guides       Manages      Prepares       Specifies
Assigns       Consults       Edits          Identifies   Measures     Processes      Studies
Assists       Coordinates    Ensures        Implements   Modifies     Proposes       Troubleshoots
Audits        Corrects       Establishes    Informs      Monitors     Rates          Utilizes
Authorizes    Correlates     Evaluates      Initiates    Negotiates   Records        Verifies
Balances      Counsels       Examines       Inputs       Notifies     Refers         Writes




                                               23
Appendix C: Sample Advertisements

                       Study Coordinator - Department of
                       (Name)



            The (name of unit) is seeking a Study Coordinator for a full-
            time contract position. Responsibilities include protocol and
            forms development, trials administration, data review,
            quality control, as well as interaction with clinical
            investigators and pharmaceutical firms. Candidates require a
            Master's Degree in health sciences or equivalent
            combination of education and experience in a medical,
            research or pharmaceutical setting. Other requirements
            include strong computer skills, including MS-Office, basic
            statistics, and data evaluation skills. Previous experience
            working within Good Clinical Practice guidelines, with the
            clinical trials process or regulatory activities, data validation
            experience, or clinical research training would be considered
            assets. Minimum hiring salary: $43,968. This is a one-year
            contract with a possibility of renewal.
            Please submit resume and cover letter by (closing date) to:
            (recipient's name or job title)
            (name of unit)
            (unit address)
            (e-mail, fax number)

            The University invites applications from all qualified
            individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and
            diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from
            women, visible minorities, aboriginal people, persons with
            disabilities and persons of any sexual orientation or gender
            identity.

            Only applicants selected for interviews will be contacted.


                       Research Technician



            A full-time one-year contract position supported by a (name
            of project grant, research, etc.) is available in (name of unit).
            The successful candidate will be responsible for
            establishment and maintenance of tissue culture stocks for
            several laboratories. Additional duties will include large
            scale preparation of sterile media, serum testing,
            mycoplasma testing and ordering of supplies and reagents.
                                           24
Expert knowledge and demonstrated skill in sterile tissue
culture techniques are essential and excellent organization
and interpersonal skills are required. Previous experience in
a cellular biology laboratory is a major asset, although some
training opportunities exist. A B.Sc or equivalent in a life
science is preferred. Salary will be commensurate with
experience.
Send resume and names of 3 references by (closing date) to:
(recipient's name or title)
(name of unit)
(unit address)
(e-mail, fax number).

The University invites applications from all qualified
individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and
diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from
women, visible minorities, aboriginal people, persons with
disabilities and persons of any sexual orientation or gender
identity.

Only applicants selected for interviews will be contacted.


           Research Assistant



The (name of unit) is accepting applications for a full-time
research assistant in molecular virology for a one-year
contract appointment with the possibility of renewal. The
research project focuses on studying the mechanisms of
DNA replication, gene regulation and host range
determination of baculovirus.
Major responsibilities include maintenance of cell cultures
and media, purchasing of materials and supplies, and
performing experiments in molecular virology under the
direction of the Principal Investigator. Other duties include
tasks such as maintenance of inventory records,
maintenance of equipment, and ensuring proper adherence
to laboratory safety regulations by all lab personnel.
Requirements include experience in working with
baculovirus and recombinant DNA including cloning, gene
expression and protein purification would be a definite asset.
An ability to perform multiple tasks at the same time, to
keep accurate records of experimental procedures, and a
willingness to assist undergraduate and graduate students in
their research progrsm would also be beneficial. Salary will
be commensurate with experience.
Send resume and names of 3 references by (closing date) to:
                             25
(recipient's name or title)
(name of unit)
(unit address)
(e-mail, fax number)

The University invites applications from all qualified
individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and
diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from
women, visible minorities, aboriginal people, persons with
disabilities and persons of any sexual orientation or gender
identity.

Only applicants selected for interviews will be contacted.


            Research Technician



(Name of Department) at Queen's University has vacancies
for several research technicians. The positions require a
university science or engineering degree. The posts are
initially for three to four months but could become full time
contract positions.

Apply in writing to:
(recipient's name or job title), (name of unit), Queen's
University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 or email (email
address).
Queen's University is an equal opportunity employer.




                              26
Appendix D: Sample Interview Questions

Skilful interviewing requires solid preparation and a systematic approach. This involves
development, prior to the interview, of a set of well-planned, job-related questions. The
following interview questions are intended as sample questions to assist hiring units in the
development of their own specific questions for their particular employment interview. When
incorporating these and other interview questions into a selection process, plan to use questions
that are based on job-related criteria and are founded on the skills and qualifications described in
the specific Position Summary. Note that not all of the listed questions are relevant to every job
nor is the list exhaustive. For advice on the process or on development of additional interview
questions, contact an Employment Coordinator in Human Resources.

Many interviewers use the behavioural interview for hiring. This type of interview is based on
the premise that the best way to predict a candidate's future performance is to examine his or her
past and present performance. Here are some examples of questions designed to help the
interviewer learn more about the interviewee and how they perform:

      To find out if the candidate is an analytical/systematic thinker:

       "Tell me about a time when you had to analyze information and make a recommendation.
       What was your reasoning? What kind of thought process did you go through?

      To find out if the candidate takes initiative:

       "Describe a situation in which you recognized a potential problem as an opportunity.
       What did you do?"

      To find out if the candidate is results-oriented:

       "Describe one of the most challenging assignments you have had. How did you handle it?
       What problems did you encounter and how did you overcome them?"

      To find out if the candidate has research/technical skills:

       "Tell me about a research project you completed in the past. Give me examples of how
       you would apply the skills used in that project to the requirements of this position?"

      To find out if the candidate has coordinating abilities:

       "Describe your experience in coordinating the efforts of different organizational units or
       people. What sorts of problems did you encounter? How did you deal with them?"

      To find out if the candidate is service-oriented:

       "Describe a time when you had to deal with an especially difficult customer situation.
       What did you do? How did you feel?"

      To find out if the candidate has planning abilities:


                                                 27
    "Have you ever had to plan, implement and evaluate a project from start to finish? Could
    you describe it and your role? Would you do anything differently the next time?"

   To find out if the candidate is a problem-solver:

    "Describe a situation in which you took immediate action when faced with an unforeseen
    emergency."

   To find out if the candidate is a relationship-builder:

    "What, in your opinion, are the key ingredients in building and maintaining successful
    business relationships? Give me examples of how you have made these work for you."

   To find out if the candidate has computing abilities:

    "What software packages do you use and how often do you use them? Describe your
    level of expertise with each of the packages and the tasks you complete with each."

   To find out if the candidate has communication abilities:

    "Would you say that you are most effective in communicating face-to-face, by telephone,
    or in written form? Tell me about why you consider yourself to be most effective in this
    area and describe a situation that illustrates this."




                                              28
Appendix E: Sample Candidate Assessment Form

Position Title and Department:
Candidate:
Date:
                                      List of Those Points
Interview Questions (Based on
                                 Interviewer is Looking for in   Interviewer's Comments/Rating
   Each of the Job Criteria)
                                     Candidate's Response




                                              29
Appendix F: Telephone Reference Form

General Notes and Guidelines

      Plan your call ahead of time. The sequence may not develop exactly as planned; be
       flexible.
      Ask open-ended questions where responses require explanation rather than yes or no
       answers.
      Let the referee talk freely.
      Take notes. Probe where more information would be useful.
      Assure referee that your conversation is strictly confidential. If you sense hesitation,
       emphasize that you would really appreciate his/her comments

The following pages contain a suggested script for phone interviews.




                                                30
Reference:                                    Phone:
Title/Organization:
Relationship to Candidate:
Candidate Name:
Date of Reference:

Suggested Script

1.   Hello, this is ______________ speaking. I’m with the Department of
     ______________ at Queen’s University in Kingston. Your name has been given to
     me by ______________ who is one of several individuals being considered for a
     position at the University. Do you have a few moments to speak with me about
     his/her employment/involvement with your company? (If no, arrange for a follow-
     up at a later time.)
2.   The position for which we are considering ______________ involves




3.   Would you mind confirming her/his dates of employment with your company?
     Start ______________ Finish ______________
4.   Would you please describe the type of work he/she did while working for you?




5.   An important aspect about this position is
     How well do you think ______________ would fulfill this responsibility?




6.   Another important aspect is




7.   I'd be interested in learning about the type of employee ______________
     is/was. Can you comment on (choose from the following as examples):
          attendance

                                           31
           punctuality
           ability to get along with others
           dependability/reliability
           ability to learn
           time management
           ability to meet deadlines
           organizational skills
           honesty
           writing ability
           communication skills
           initiative
           judgment
           ability to supervise
           management style
8.   You mentioned earlier that
     Could you please explain more about that comment?




9.   Could you describe the types of situations which the candidate would find stressful?



10. Could you identify areas for improvement?



11. Given the job I've described, what would pose the biggest challenge for
     ______________?



12. What was his/her reason for leaving?


     Given the opportunity, would you rehire her/him?




                                               32
13. Is there anything else you would like to comment on?




     Thank you very much for your time.




                                          33
Appendix G: Central Fund and Tuition Support and Childcare Fund

Those who employ research, grant and contract employees contribute to both the Central Fund
and to the Special Fund in order to provide for various employee related benefits and obligations.
The required contributions and the specific benefits are as follows:

Central Fund

The central fund, established to provide for payments to research, grant and contract employees
necessitated by sick leave, maternity, parental and adoption leaves, severance pay and benefits
for long term disability recipients, provides internal insurance for those who employ research,
grant and contract employees. Contributions to the central fund are required for all at Queen's
who employ research, grant and contract employees and involve payment of an amount equal to
2.5% of all salaries paid to research, grant and contract employees. Application of the fund is as
follows:

Sick Leave

Those at Queen's who employ research, grant and contract workers are responsible for paying the
first month's salary of an employee on sick leave. The next few months of sick leave (up to five
months) will be paid from the central fund, upon presentation of a statement from the employee's
doctor. Absences beyond this six-month continuous period can be insured (at the employee's
expense and if the employee chooses this benefit) and covered by the Long Term Disability Plan.
The Sick Leave plan is administered in accordance with the policy as outlined in the Staff Policy
Manual.

Maternity, Parental and Adoption Leave

The central fund pays the University's contribution to the salary and benefits during maternity
and parental leave, in accordance with the policy as outlined in the Staff Policy Manual.
However, those at Queen's who employ research, grant and contract employees are responsible
for any accrued vacation entitlement while the employee is on maternity or parental leave.

Benefits Associated With LTD

The central fund pays employer benefit costs associated with long term disability.

Severance Pay

As well, those at Queen's who employ research, grant and contract employees are responsible for
paying the first increment of severance pay equivalent to two weeks' salary of a non-renewed or
terminated contract employee. The central fund will then pay any additional severance pay
required under the Employment Standards Act for research, grant and contract employees. The
Severance Pay policy is administered in accordance with the policy as outlined in the Staff Policy
Manual.



                                                34
Contributions to the central fund for research, grant and contract employees, currently specified
as 2.5% of salary, will be adjusted annually when appropriate to ensure that no substantial deficit
accumulates.

Tuition Support and Childcare Fund

This fund was established in order to fund the child care benefit plan and the tuition support plan
for research, grant and contract employees. Those who employ contract employees contribute an
amount equal to 1% of all salaries paid to contract employees. Details of the Child Care Benefit
Plan and the Tuition Support Plan are provided in the     Compensation section of the Human
Resources web site.




                                                35
Appendix H: Sample Offer of Employment

Dear Mr./Ms ________

I am pleased to offer you employment as a Research Technician at Classification ________ in
my laboratory in the Department of ________ at Queen's University, subject to the completion of
an employment contract.

In this position, you will be expected to work as a member of a team to support on-going
research in the area of ________. Your duties will be to analyze samples of ________ by
techniques which will include use of ________. Test information and data will be catalogued
________. Data will be analyzed by ________ and presented ________. You will also be
expected to assist and participate in the research activities of the laboratory in other ways when
requested.

Your work will be generally supervised by the undersigned, and you may also expect to receive
direction from ________.

This position is available from ________, 2001 until ________, 2001 and is on a full-time basis
(i.e., 35 hours per week). Your annual salary will be $________, which is consistent with
compensation policies as outlined in the current Queen's Staff Policy Manual.

And (for employees who are new to Queen's):

In accordance with University policy, you will be working under a probationary period until
________ (usually three months in length) during which time your supervisor will be assessing
your performance and suitability to the job. This will also give you some time to adjust to this
new position. In the event that the terms and conditions of this appointment are not met, your
employment with the University may be terminated on or before the last day of the probationary
period.

Then:

The terms and conditions of your employment at Queen's University are outlined in this letter,
and a contract form which must be signed by you prior to commencing work. Please refer to the
Queen's University Staff Policy Manual for policies relative to your employment. You may have
access to some optional benefits. Please contact the Human Resources Department as soon as
possible to enrol for those benefits for which you are eligible (533-2070). If you do not enrol
within 31 days of your starting date of employment you will be required to make a late
application and you may have to provide medical evidence of good health at your own expense.
For determination of your entitlement to vacation, it is recognized that at the conclusion of this
contract you will have an equivalent of ________ years of continuous service at Queen's
University.




                                                36
I will be pleased to provide any further information about this position. If you have any
questions about personnel policies at Queen's University, please contact the Department of
Human Resources.
If you wish to accept this offer of employment, please sign and date a copy of this letter and
return it to the undersigned. I look forward to welcoming you to the ________ laboratory in
________ Hall.


Yours sincerely,




I accept this offer of employment with effect from ________.



Signed                                        Date




                                                37
Appendix I: Benefits Eligibility

Eligibility for payroll-related benefits for those on research, grant or contract appointments is
dependent on the type of appointment. The following chart describes various types of contract
appointments and provides the information necessary to determine the eligibility status of
contract employees for payroll benefits. Information on eligibility for other benefits (i.e., tuition
assistance program) is provided in the Queen's Support Staff Manual. Human Resources will be
pleased to assist with questions regarding employee eligibility for Queen's benefits.

 Research,
 Grant and        Queen's        Semi-      Supplementary    Life
                                                                                LTD          Dental
  Contract        Pension        private       Medical    Insurance
Appointments
Full-time
contract
appointments   Yes,
                                  Yes             Yes             Yes           Yes           Yes
extending    mandatory1
beyond 12
months
Part-time
                                                                              Yes, one
contract            Yes,
                                                                             year after
appointments      optional
                                  Yes             Yes             Yes          date of        Yes
extending          after 2
                                                                              original
beyond 12          years2
                                                                            appointment
months
Part-time
contract
appointments         No           Yes             Yes             Yes            No            No
of less than
12 months
Full-time
contract 12-
                    No3           Yes             Yes             Yes           Yes           Yes
month
appointment
Full-time
contract
appointment         No3           Yes             Yes             Yes           No4           No4
of less than
12 months




                                                  38
1
  All staff appointed to a full-time contract position on or after January 1, 1995, will be required
to join the pension plan as soon as the appointment extends beyond one year.
2
  Part-time contract employees are eligible to join the pension plan upon completion of 24
months of continuous service if 35% of YMPE earned, or worked at least 700 hours in each of
the 2 immediately preceding consecutive calendar years.
3
  However, should an employee receive a further appointment which will extend beyond one
year from the original appointment date, they will be required to join the pension plan. Full-time
term appointments shall have the option to join the plan from the original date of hire.
4
  Should an employee receive a further appointment which will extend beyond one year from the
original appointment date, they will be eligible to join the LTD and dental plans effective on the
renewal date.




                                                 39
Appendix J: Hiring Tips

This checklist is a quick reference to several important hiring tips. These processes are described
in more detail in the various sections of the Guide.

    Review and become knowledgeable about effective hiring practices.
    Become familiar with the requirements of the position and review the Position Summary
     (job overview).
    Advertise the position to attract a qualified and diverse applicant pool.
    Take notes during the interview process.
    Be clear about the selection criteria (which are outlined in the Position Summary), as they
     will be the basis for recruiting and advertising.
    Select an interview location that is accessible to everyone including people with
     disabilities.
    Ensure that interview questions relate to the position (as described in the job overview).
     Prior to interviewing, examine questions disallowed by legislation.
    As a representative of the University, strive to provide all candidates with a favourable
     impression.
    Prior to interviewing, review applications, resumes and other related material, noting
     areas requiring clarification.
    Take time at the opening of the interview to ensure that the candidate is comfortable.
    Ask open-ended questions that will encourage candidate communication.
    Use your pre-determined selection criteria to assess and determine the short list of
     candidates. Assess each candidate immediately after each interview.
    Avoid making hasty judgments and jumping to conclusions.
    Base reference-checking questions on the job-related criteria.
    Maintain notes about the process and the reasons for the final selection.




                                                40
Appendix K: Other Web-based Resources

There are a number of web-based resources in addition to those cited earlier in this guide that
will be useful to those seeking employment related information. These include websites that
provide information on various areas of government legislation such as employment standards,
human rights and health and safety. These Provincial Government websites can be accessed by
clicking on the following:

      Employment Standards
      Occupational Health and Safety
      Ontario Human Rights Commission




                                               41

								
To top