Griswold

Document Sample
Griswold Powered By Docstoc
					Griswold v. Connecticut 
1. The background information: 
Griswold v. Connecticut involved a Connecticut law prohibiting the use of "any drug, medicinal  article or instrument for the purpose of preventing conception." Although the law was passed in  1879, it was rarely enforced. A few attempts had been made to change the law such as Tileston v.  Ullman (1943) Poe v. Ullman (1961). Doctors and patients challenged the statute on the grounds  that a ban on contraception could, in certain situations, threaten the lives and well‐being of  patients. However, the Supreme Court voted to dismiss both appeals.   Shortly after the Poe decision was handed down, Estelle Griswold and Dr. C. Lee Buxton opened a  birth control clinic in New Haven, Connecticut, to test the contraception law once again. Shortly  after the clinic was opened, Griswold and Buxton were arrested, tried, found guilty, and fined $100  each. The conviction was upheld by the Appellate Division of the Circuit Court, and by the  Connecticut Supreme Court of Errors. Griswold then appealed her conviction to the Supreme  Court of the United States. 

2. What the Supreme Court decided: 
Griswold v. Connecticut (1965) was a landmark case in which the Supreme Court of the United  States ruled that the Constitution protected a right to privacy. Although the Bill of Rights does  not explicitly mention "privacy", the argument of the Fourteenth Amendment’s due process  clause and the Ninth Amendment were used to uphold the issue of protecting privacy. 

3. The Implications: 
By a vote of 7‐2, the Supreme Court invalidated the law on the grounds that it violated the "right  to marital privacy". The Supreme Court overturned Griswold's conviction and invalidated the  Connecticut law. 

4. It was important because: 
Since Griswold, the Supreme Court has cited the right to privacy in several rulings protecting  access to sexual healthcare, most notably in Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113 (1973). The Supreme Court  ruled that a woman's choice to have an abortion was protected as a private decision between her  and her doctor. Eisenstadt v. Baird (1972) extended its holding to unmarried couples, whereas the  "right of privacy" in Griswold only applied to marital relationships. For the most part, the Court  has made these later rulings on the basis of Justice Harlan's substantive due process rationale. The  Griswold line of cases remains controversial, and has drawn accusations of "judicial activism".     


				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags: Griswold
Stats:
views:42
posted:5/27/2009
language:English
pages:1
Description: Griswold Ruling