California Residentia Rental Agreement by tij15535

VIEWS: 15 PAGES: 212

California Residentia Rental Agreement document sample

More Info
									       SNOHOMISH COUNTY

 HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
     2005-2009 CONSOLIDATED PLAN
                  AND
   PROGRAM YEAR 2005 ACTION PLAN

                   Issued
                 May 11, 2005




       Snohomish County Department of
      Planning and Development Services
Office Of Housing And Community Development
          2731 Wetmore Ave., Suite 402
               Everett, WA 98201


            Phone (425) 388-3605
             Fax (425) 388-3504
                 TDD (425) 388-3700
                                       TABLE OF CONTENTS
Program Background and Structure
Introduction ........................................................................................................................... 1
Purpose................................................................................................................................. 2
Lead Agency ......................................................................................................................... 3
Institutional Structure ............................................................................................................ 3
Citizen Participation .............................................................................................................. 5
Interagency Consultations................................................................................................... 12
Program Funds ................................................................................................................... 14
Monitoring ........................................................................................................................... 20
Amendments ....................................................................................................................... 20

Strategic Plan
Time Period......................................................................................................................... 21
Priority Needs ..................................................................................................................... 21
County Population and Housing Profile .............................................................................. 23
Homeless Needs................................................................................................................. 43
Priority Homeless Needs .................................................................................................... 53
Homeless Strategy .............................................................................................................. 56
Needs of Special Populations ............................................................................................. 61
Veterans.............................................................................................................................. 71
Priority Needs of Special Populations ................................................................................. 72
Housing Needs ................................................................................................................... 73
Priority Housing Needs ....................................................................................................... 73
Market Analysis ................................................................................................................... 73
Housing Strategies and Objectives ..................................................................................... 99
Needs of Public Housing ................................................................................................... 106
Public Housing Strategy .................................................................................................... 106
Lead-Based Paint Needs .................................................................................................. 109
Barriers to Affordable Housing .......................................................................................... 111
Fair Housing...................................................................................................................... 119
Anti-Poverty Strategy ........................................................................................................ 119
Priority Non-Housing Community Development Needs .................................................... 120
Community Development Strategies and Objectives ........................................................ 122
Outcomes.......................................................................................................................... 131
Float Loans ....................................................................................................................... 133

Program Year 2005 Action Plan
Sources of Funds .............................................................................................................. 139
Description of Projects ...................................................................................................... 139
Geographic Distribution of Projects ................................................................................... 139
Homeless and Other Special Needs Populations ............................................................. 140
Public Housing .................................................................................................................. 140
Anti-Poverty Strategy ........................................................................................................ 140
W/MBE Policy ................................................................................................................... 141
Lead-Based Paint Hazards ............................................................................................... 142
Other Actions .................................................................................................................... 142
Monitoring ......................................................................................................................... 144
Development of Program Outcomes Measures ................................................................ 144
Begin HUD Table 3 Project Summaries ............................................................................ 146
                              CHARTS AND FIGURES
Table 1: 2004 Adjusted Family Income Limits...................................................................... 4
Table 2: Population Growth In Snohomish County, 200-2004 ........................................... 22
Figure 1: Growth Rate of Cities, 2000-2004 ....................................................................... 24
Table 3: County Household Median Income Characteristics By CT ................................... 25
Figure 2: Map of Low- and Moderate Income Block Groups .............................................. 32
Table 3: State Living Wage Level & 2004 HUD Income Guidelines ................................... 33
Figure 3: Real Wages vs. Living Wages ............................................................................ 34
Figure 4: Distribution of Family and Non-Family Households ............................................ 35
Figure 5: Renters and Owners ............................................................................................ 36
Figure 6: Owners and Renters by Jurisdiction .................................................................... 37
Table 5: Households in the Lowest Income Quartile .......................................................... 38
Table 6: Growth in Number of Housing Units, 2000-2004 .................................................. 38
Figure 7: New Units 2000-2004 by Type of Structure ......................................................... 39
Figure 9: 2000 Distribution of Housing Types .................................................................... 40
Figure 10: 2004 Distribution of Housing Types ................................................................... 41
Figure 11: Age of Housing ................................................................................................. 42
Figure 12: Condition of Residential Structures ................................................................... 43
Figure 13: 2005 Point In Time Count (PIT): Disability Distribution ..................................... 45
Figure 14: 2005 PIT: Individual vs. Family Homelessness ................................................ 49
Table 7: 2005 PIT: Duration of Homelessness .................................................................. 50
Table 8: 2005 PIT: Frequency of Homelessness .............................................................. 50
Table 9: 2005 PIT: Current Living Situation ...................................................................... 51
Table 10: 2005 PIT: Situations Causing Homelessness ................................................... 51
Table 11A-F: Continuum of Care Gaps Analysis Charts ............................................... 53-55
Table 12: 2005 PIT: Household Needs ............................................................................. 55
Table 13: Special Needs of the Non-Homeless ................................................................. 72
Table 14: Priority Needs Summary Table .......................................................................... 73
Table 15: History of Average Rents By Area, 2000-2004 .................................................. 74
Figure 15: Rate of Average Changes of Rent by Area, 2000-2004 ..................................... 75
Table 16: Variation in Rents Due to Unit Type, Countywide .............................................. 75
Table 17: Rents in Buildings of 20+ Units by Market Area ................................................. 76
Table 18: Most/Least Affordable Rental Markets ............................................................... 76
Table 19: History of Vacancy Rates by Area, 2000-2004 .................................................. 77
Figure 16: History of Snohomish County Vacancy Rates, 2000-2004 ................................ 77
Table 20: When Full Time Work Can’t Pay the Rent .......................................................... 78
Table 21: What a Family of Three Earning $21,050 Can Afford for Rent ........................... 79
Figure 17: What Rents Can 30% of Median Income Afford? .............................................. 80
Figure 18: What Rent Can 50% of Median Afford? ............................................................ 80
Table 22: 2004 BAH Compared With Average Rents in Snohomish County ..................... 81
Table 23: Military Housing in Snohomish County ............................................................... 81
Table 24: Average Price Per Unit....................................................................................... 82
Table 25: New Apartment Units Constructed 1999-April, 2004 .......................................... 82
Figure 19: 23004 Sales Price Comparison by Market ........................................................ 83
Table 26: 2004 Sales Price in Snohomish County Markets ............................................... 84
Figure 20: Average Snohomish County Home Sales Prices by Housing Type ................... 85
Table 27: Affordable Purchase Price by Income Group ..................................................... 85
Figure 22: For-Sale Housing Affordability to 80% of Median.............................................. 86
Table 28: Affordability of Snohomish County Single-Family Housing ................................ 87
Figure 23: HASCO-Owned Housing by Funding Source ................................................... 88
Table 29: HASCO Tenant-Based Rental Assistance Programs ......................................... 89
Figure 24: HASCO Units by Household Type .................................................................... 90
Figure 25: HASCO-Owned Housing by Bedroom Size ...................................................... 90
Figure 26: Income Profile of Public Housing Residents and Sec. 8 Tenants ..................... 91
Table 30: Race of Households HASCO Waiting Lists ........................................................ 92
Figure 27: Supply/Demand for Public Housing by Household Type .................................... 92
Figure 28: Sec. 8 Waiting List by Household Type ............................................................ 93
Figure 29: Average Wait Times for Public Housing by Area and Unit Size ........................ 94
Figure 30: Average Wait for Sec. 8 Assistance by Unit Size .............................................. 94
Figure 31: Composition of Snohomish County’s Assisted Housing .................................... 96
Figure 32: Affordability of Assisted Housing Units ............................................................. 96
Figure 33: Risk Assessment of Project-Based Section 8 Units .......................................... 98
Figure 34: Units With Expiring Sec. 8 Contracts by Expiration Date .................................. 99
I. CONSOLIDATED PLAN: Program Background and Structure
1. Introduction. Snohomish County, in consortium with 18 cities and towns, receives
funds from the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) on an
entitlement basis. (Because these funds are allocated by HUD based on a formula,
they are sometimes referred to as ―formula funds‖ and are so designated at several
points in this Consolidated Plan). The funds are for the purposes of assisting with
emergency shelter; transitional and permanent housing; public services for the elderly,
the handicapped, and other special needs populations; capital investment in
infrastructure; and economic development. Federal regulations require that persons of
low- and moderate-income, the elderly or persons with special needs comprise the
majority of all persons receiving benefit from expenditure of these funds.

The three sources of the County’s HUD funds are the Community Development Block
Grant program (CDBG), the HOME Investment Partnership program (HOME), the
Emergency Shelter Grant program (ESG), Housing Opportunities for Persons With
AIDS (HOPWA). A full explanation of each of these programs will be found below in
Section 7, Program Funds.

Jurisdictions that receive HUD funds are required to prepare a Consolidated Housing
and Community Development Plan. Using a five-year horizon, the plan describes the
community's housing, public service and community development needs and
demonstrates how anticipated funding from HUD will be used to address those needs.
In addition, the plan must include the recipient's spending plan for the next program
year and establish that the allocations are responsive to the strategies and objectives
cited in the five-year plan. This document has been prepared to meet those
requirements and will be in effect from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2010 (Snohomish
County operates its federal entitlement grant programs on a July 1- June 30 fiscal year).
The year 2005 Action Plan included with this Consolidated Plan covers the program
year commencing July 1, 2005 and ending on June 30, 2006. Annual Action plans for
the years 2006-07, 2007-08, 2008-09 and 20009-10 will be produced in accord with the
County’s public participation plan and enacted as annual amendments to this
Consolidated Plan.

This plan is subdivided into three units. This, the first, lays out the purposes of the plan,
and discusses the process employed in producing the Consolidated Plan and annual
Action Plan. The second, the 2005-2009 Strategic Plan, presents data on and analysis
of the County’s public service and housing and non-housing community development
needs and strategies for addressing identified community needs. The third, the year
2005 Annual Action plan, lists the projects proposed for funding with federal funds
during program year 2005 and which address issues identified in the Strategic Plan.

Because all aspects of the 2005-2009 Consolidated Plan as well as the program year
2005 Action Plan were developed together, the processes and procedures recounted in
this section (e.g., public participation, interagency consultation, technical assistance)


                                             1
apply in common to both elements of the document. Where necessary, initiatives that
apply to specific aspects of the process are clearly identified.


2. Purpose. The Consolidated Plan is a statement of principles and actions which will
guide the County and the other members of the Snohomish County Housing and
Community Development Urban County Consortium (the consortium) in addressing
priority housing, public service and community development needs by providing decent
housing and a suitable living environment for, and to expand economic opportunities
available to, persons of low- and moderate-income.

"Providing decent housing" includes:
 Assisting homeless persons to obtain affordable housing;
 Retaining affordable housing stock;
 Increasing the availability of permanent housing that is affordable and available
   without discrimination; and
 Increasing supportive housing that includes structural features and services to
   enable persons with special needs to live in dignity.

"Providing a suitable living environment" includes:
 Improving the safety and livability of neighborhoods;
 Increasing access to quality facilities and services;
 Reducing the isolation of income groups within areas by deconcentrating housing
   opportunities and revitalizing deteriorating neighborhoods;
 Restoring and preserving natural and physical features of special value for historic,
   architectural, or aesthetic reasons; and
 Conserving energy resources.

"Expand economic opportunities" includes:
  Creating jobs for low income persons;
  Providing access to credit for community development that promotes long-term
   economic and social viability; and
  Assisting residents of federally assisted and public housing achieve self-sufficiency.

HUD requires that the benefits of programs supported with formula funds principally
accrue to persons of low and moderate-income and/or defined special needs
populations and/or the elderly and/or the homeless. This means that a minimum of
51% or more of those assisted by such programs must fall into one or more of these
classes.

 Using the most recent compilation available at the time this plan was drafted (January,
2005), Table 1 shows the income eligibility levels for families in Snohomish County.
Families at or below the income levels listed in the table meet the income eligibility test
for assistance from the federal programs administered by Snohomish County and
subject to this Consolidated Plan.

                                            2
                                        Table 1
                     2004 Adjusted Family Income Limits
                          1 person                 $40,600 or less
                          2 person                 $46,400 or less
                          3 person                 $52,200 or less
                          4 person                 $58,000 or less
                          5 person                 $62,650 or less
                          6 person                 $67,300 or less
                          7 person                 $71,900 or less
                          8 person                 $76,550 or less



Elderly beneficiaries are defined as those 62 years of age or older; examples of special
needs beneficiaries are developmentally delayed and handicapped persons, and
persons suffering from HIV/AIDS and their families.

In addressing the service and infrastructure needs of targeted populations, the
Consolidated Plan and the annual Action Plan guide the investment of substantial sums
of public funds. Public participation is fundamental to the process that the County
employs in developing the objectives and priorities that guide those investments.
Driven by a written public participation plan, the process relies on multi-faceted
community consultations that solicit input from the general public, local jurisdictions,
non-profit agencies and populations targeted by HUD funds.


3. Lead Agency. Acting in consortium with 19 cities and towns, Snohomish County
has been designated an entitlement jurisdiction by HUD, qualifying it to receive HUD
funds on a formula basis. Snohomish County is the legal entity (lead agency) which
contracts with HUD on behalf of the other members of the consortium and administers
the program. The County acts through a five member elected County Council to
establish policies governing use of HUD funds and to contract with subgrantees.
Subgrantees comprise non-profit agencies and units of local government.


4. Institutional Structure. The consortium’s nine member Policy Advisory Board
(PAB) assists the County Council in its responsibilities. The PAB's makeup and
representation are as follows: the Snohomish County Executive (or his designee); three
members of the Snohomish County Council; one representative selected by all
participating units of local government whose population base, independently, is 10,000
or greater; one representative selected by participating units of local government whose
population base, independently, is between 3,000 and 10,000; one representative
selected by all participating units of local government whose population base,
independently, is less than 3,000; one representative selected at large by all
participating units of local government; and another representative selected at-large by
                                           3
the eight members of the PAB. Each member of board has one unweighted vote; the
member selected by the PAB serves as the chair of the board, voting only in cases of
ties. ―Participating unit of local government‖ means a signatory to the ―Snohomish
County Housing and Community Development Block Grant Interlocal Cooperation
Agreement.‖ The agreement sets forth the membership of the consortium and governs
the actions of the PAB. It is renewed every three years.

Consistent with the interlocal agreement and its own bylaws, the PAB holds public
hearings, coordinates public information and review processes and makes
recommendations to the County Council on matters relating to HUD entitlement funds.

The interlocal agreement also establishes a Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to
assist the PAB with project review. The TAC reviews project proposals on such issues
as technical merit, financial feasibility and extent of benefit, and makes
recommendations on project selection to the PAB. The TAC consists of one
representative from each unit of local government in the consortium, one representative
of the Housing Authority of Snohomish County; and citizens selected by the PAB
through an application process representing the following HUD-defined benefited
categories: two disabled persons; two low income persons, at least one of whom is
homeless, formerly homeless or represents such groups; two senior citizens; and two
minority persons. Each TAC member has one unweighted vote.

The Office of Housing and Community Development of the Snohomish County
Department of Planning and Development Services staffs the PAB and TAC and
manages the competitive application processes for the County's HUD funds. It is also
responsible for contracting, monitoring and compliance procedures.


5. Citizen Participation. Snohomish County has adopted and is in compliance
with a Citizen Participation Plan (CPP) developed under the terms of Section 91.105 of
the Consolidated Plan regulations. The full text of the County’s CPP follows.

    INTRODUCTION. Snohomish County, in consortium with 19 cities and towns,
    receives funds from the federal Department of Housing and Urban
    Development (HUD) on an entitlement basis. The funds are for the purposes of
    assisting with emergency shelter; transitional and permanent housing; social
    services for the elderly, the handicapped, and other special needs populations;
    capital investment in infrastructure; and economic development. Federal
    regulations require that persons of low- and moderate-income, the elderly or
    persons with special needs comprise the majority of all persons who benefit
    from expenditure of these funds.

    Snohomish County is the legal entity responsible to HUD for allocation of the
    County’s entitlement HUD funds. The County acts through a five member
    elected County Council to establish policies governing use of HUD funds and to
    contract with subgrantees comprising non-profit agencies and units of local
    government. A nine member Policy Advisory Board (PAB) representing the
                                           4
County and units of local government participating in the consortium assists the
Council in its responsibilities. The PAB provides a public forum for developing,
evaluating and recommending policy issues for Council action. The PAB
receives advice on program technical issues from its subordinate Technical
Advisory Committee (TAC). The Grants Administration section of the County’s
Department of Planning and Development Services staffs the PAB and
manages the competitive application processes for the County’s HUD funds. It
is also responsible for contracting, monitoring and compliance procedures.

Jurisdictions that receive HUD funds are required to prepare a Consolidated
Housing and Community Development Plan. Using a five-year horizon, the
plan sets forth the community’s housing, social service and community
development needs and demonstrate how anticipated funding from HUD will be
used to address those needs. In addition, a supporting action plan must be
developed annually to establish that each year’s allocations of HUD funds are
responsive to the goals and objectives cited in the five year plan (for the
purposes of this citizen participation plan the term ―Consolidated Plan‖ will refer
to both the five year strategic plan and the annual plans).

Snohomish County believes that the participation of the general public in the
development of the Consolidated Plan, substantial amendments to it, and the
plan’s evaluation, is an essential aspect of the program. Only through input
from the public, especially those populations that the Consolidated Plan is
designed to principally benefit, can the County ensure that the allocation of
scarce federal community assistance funds will be governed by prevailing
community priorities. This citizen participation plan (CPP) is designed to
encourage the maximum degree of meaningful public partnership in Snohomish
County’s administration of the programs subject to the Consolidated Plan.

For additional information on the CPP, or any aspect of Snohomish County’s
HUD Housing and Community Development programs, please contact the
Snohomish County Department of Planning and Development Services, 3000
Rockefeller MS#604, Everett, WA 98201. Telephone numbers are: (206) 388-
3311 (voice), (206) 388-3700 (TDD) and 388-3670 (fax).

PURPOSE. The purpose of this Citizen Participation Plan is to provide for and
encourage citizens to participate in the development of the Consolidated Plan,
any substantial amendments to the Consolidated Plan, and the performance
report. The CPP is designed especially to encourage participation by low- and
moderate-income persons, particularly those living in slum and blighted areas
and in areas where Community Development Block Grant funds are proposed
to be used, and by residents of predominantly low- and moderate-income
neighborhoods, as defined by Snohomish County. The CPP encourages the
participation of all of the County’s citizens, including minorities and non-English
speaking persons, as well as persons with disabilities.


                                        5
The CPP seeks, in conjunction with consultation with public housing authorities,
the participation of residents of public and assisted housing developments, in
the process of developing and implementing the Consolidated Plan, along with
other low-income residents of targeted revitalization areas in which the
developments are located. The County will provide information to the housing
agencies about Consolidated Plan activities related to their developments and
surrounding communities so that the housing agencies can make this
information available at an annual public hearing.

The CPP provides citizens with a reasonable opportunity to comment on the
citizen participation plan and on substantial amendments to it. The CPP will be
made generally available to the public and will be made available in a format
accessible to persons with disabilities, upon request.

ELEMENTS.          Citizen comment on the citizen participation plan and
amendments. Proposed amendments to the CPP will be subject to a public
comment period prior to being acted upon by the Policy Advisory Board.
Proposed amendments will be advertised in a newspaper of general circulation
within Snohomish County for a period of thirty days. Copies of the proposed
amendments, together with a copy of the full text of the existing CPP, will be
available to the public on request (the material will be made available in a
format accessible to persons with disabilities, upon request). Staff will evaluate
commentary received and a written record maintained regarding disposition of
written commentary and testimony. The Policy Advisory Board will act upon the
amendments. Such action may be adoption, rejection, or a remanding to staff
for additional work. If remanded for additional work, the revised amendments
will be subject to the public comment process outlined above.

DEVELOPMENT OF THE CONSOLIDATED PLAN.                        Snohomish County
wishes to ensure the participation of all interested and affected parties in
development of both the five-year Consolidated Plan and the annual action
plans which implement it. Before Snohomish County adopts a consolidated or
annual plan, the County will make available to citizens, public agencies, units of
local government and other interested parties information that includes the
amount of assistance the County expects to receive (including grant funds and
program income) and the range of activities that may be undertaken, including
the estimated amount that will benefit persons of low- and moderate-income.
This will be accomplished by advertising the information in one or more
newspapers of general circulation, by maintaining the information for public
inspection at the department of Planning and Development Services, and by
mailing the information to agencies and individuals upon request. The
information will be made available in a format accessible to persons with
disabilities, upon request.

Some programs governed by the Consolidated Plan have the potential to
displace residents of Snohomish County. The County maintains a policy to
minimize the displacement of persons and to assist any persons displaced.
                                        6
The policy specifies the types and levels of assistance the County will make
available (or require others to make available) to persons displaced. It is part of
the County’s public participation process to make copies that policy available
upon request. The policy is also available for public inspection at the offices of
the department of Planning and Development Services. The displacement
policy will be made available in a format accessible to persons with disabilities,
upon request.

PUBLICATION OF THE PROPOSED CONSOLIDATED PLAN. Snohomish
County will publish the proposed Consolidated Plan in a manner that affords
citizens, public agencies, and other interested parties a reasonable opportunity
to examine its contents and to submit comments. This will be accomplished by
publishing a summary of the proposed Consolidated Plan in one or more
newspapers of general circulation, and by making copies of the proposed
Consolidated Plan available at libraries, government offices, public places, and
on the County’s Internet web site. The summary will describe the contents and
purpose of the Consolidated Plan, and will include a list of the locations where
copies of the entire proposed Consolidated Plan may be examined. In addition,
the County will provide a reasonable number of free copies of the plan to
citizens and groups that request it. The plan will be made available in a format
accessible to persons with disabilities, upon request.

PUBLIC COMMENT ON THE PROPOSED CONSOLIDATED PLAN.
Snohomish County will accept comments from citizens on the proposed
Consolidated Plan for a period of not less than 30 days beginning with the date
of official publication of the plan summary. The County will consider any
comments or views of citizens received in writing, or orally at the public
hearings, in preparing the final Consolidated Plan. A summary of these
comments or views, and a summary of any comments or views not accepted
and the reasons therefore, will be attached to the final Consolidated Plan.

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSOLIDATED PLAN. From time to time it is
necessary to amend the Consolidated Plan. Amendments are characterized as
either substantial or non-substantial and the County’s policies for public
participation differ for the two amendment categories.

  Substantial amendments are defined as follows:

         A substantial amendment to a Consolidated Plan is a change
         involving any of the following actions:

         (1) Allocation of funds, from any one or combination of the
             Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME
             Investment Partnership (HOME), Emergency Shelter Grant
             (ESG) and Supportive Housing Program (SHP) programs, in
             the amount of $25,000 or more to a new activity (that is, an


                                        7
              activity not previously allocated any funds under any of these
              grant programs).

          (2) Allocation of additional funds to a previously funded activity,
              from any one or combination of CDBG, HOME, ESG and SHP,
              of more than $75,000 or an amount which raises the total
              commitment of all such funds to the activity by more than 50
              percent of the originally planned total County contribution,
              whichever is greater; whether or not accompanied by a
              substantial change in other characteristics identified in (3)
              below.

          (3) A substantial change, whether or not accompanied by a change
              in funding allocation, in the purpose, location, scope, scale, or
              the number or identity of intended beneficiaries of a previously
              funded activity.

          (4) Cancellation of a previously funded activity, including any
              remaining part of a partially completed activity whereby the
              original characteristics of the activity [those listed in (3) above]
              are substantially changed as a result of the cancellation.

          (5) A substantial change in program objectives, funding priorities,
              methods of choosing activities for funding, or methods for
              obtaining public consultation and comment.

It is not practical to uniformly define, for all potential cases, the term ―substantial
change‖ as used in (2), through (5) above. The Policy Advisory Board, in its
judgment, will interpret the term on a case-by-case basis. However, any action
that changes the number or identity of the probable beneficiaries of an activity
by more than 25 percent of their originally represented number will usually be
considered a substantial change.

Within the dollar limits set in (2) above, and unless accompanied by a
―substantial change‖ in other characteristics, ―cost overruns‖ encountered in
completing funded activities and approved by the Policy Advisory Board will
normally not be deemed ―substantial amendments.‖

Changes in the County’s budgeted costs of program planning and
administration, which are limited by Federal statute and regulation to certain
defined percentages of the HUD grants, are not treated as substantial
amendments.

Snohomish County will provide citizens with reasonable notice of and an
opportunity to comment on substantial amendments. Notice of intent to enact
a substantial amendment to the Consolidated Plan will be published in
summary form in one or more newspapers of general circulation, and by making
                                          8
copies of the proposed amendment available at libraries, government offices,
and public places. The notice will describe the contents and purpose of the
amendment. The notice will be made available in a format accessible to
persons with disabilities, upon request.

The County will receive comments on the substantial amendment for at least 30
days, commencing with official publication of the notice of intent, before the
amendment is implemented. The County will consider any comments or views
of citizens received in writing, or orally at public hearings, if any, in preparing
the substantial amendment of the Consolidated Plan. A summary of these
comments or views, and a summary of any comments or views not accepted
and the reasons therefore, will be attached to the substantial amendment of the
Consolidated Plan.

Non-substantial amendments are considered by their nature to be routine
programmatic actions and do not require public notice. They will become part
of the administrative record and will be available for public inspection on
request at the department of Planning and Development Services.

PERFORMANCE REPORTS. Snohomish County is required to prepare an
annual performance report for HUD and encourages citizens to review and
comment on the report before it is transmitted to HUD. Annually the County will
publish a notice of intent to submit its performance report in one or more
newspapers of general circulation, and by making copies of the report available
at libraries, government offices, and public places. The County will receive
comments on the performance report for a period of not less than 15 days prior
the date the performance report is submitted to HUD. The County will consider
any comments or views of citizens received in writing, or orally at public
hearings in preparing the performance report. A summary of these comments
or views shall be attached to the performance report.

PUBLIC HEARINGS. The County will provide for at least two public hearings
per year to obtain citizens' views and to respond to proposals and questions, to
be conducted at a minimum of two different stages of the program year.
Together, the hearings will address housing and community development
needs, development of proposed activities, and review of program performance.
To obtain the views of citizens on housing and community development needs,
including priority non-housing community development needs, at least one of
these hearings will be held before the proposed consolidated plan is published
for comment.

Public notice of intent to hold the hearings will be accomplished by publishing a
notice in one or more newspapers of general circulation a minimum of two
weeks prior to the hearings, and by mailing notices to agencies and individuals
who request being placed on a notification list. The notice will contain sufficient
information about the subject of the hearing to permit informed comment.
Normally, the hearings will be held in the Snohomish County Administration
                                        9
Building located at 3000 Rockefeller, Everett, Washington. The Administration
building is handicapped accessible, located adjacent to public transportation,
has adequate parking and is central to a substantial proportion of the County’s
HUD-eligible population. When appropriate, meetings may be held in other
locations to ensure access by potential and actual beneficiaries. In addition, by
advanced request to its ADA compliance program, the County is prepared to
offer assistance to physically-, visually- and hearing-impaired citizens to ensure
that the hearings are accessible to all. This includes providing translators for
hearings where a substantial number of non-English speaking residents can be
reasonably expected to participate.

MEETINGS. It is the County’s policy to provide citizens with reasonable and
timely access to local meetings.

AVAILABILITY TO THE PUBLIC.           The Consolidated Plan as adopted,
substantial amendments, the performance report, and all associated policy
documents will be available to the public, including in a form accessible to
persons with disabilities, upon request by writing the Snohomish County
Department of Planning and Development Services, 3000 Rockefeller MS#604,
Everett, WA 98201 or contacting the department at (206) 388-3311 (voice),
(206) 388-3700 (TDD) or 388-3670 (fax).

ACCESS TO RECORDS. The County will provide citizens, public agencies,
and other interested parties with reasonable and timely access to information
and records relating to the Consolidated Plan and the County’s use of
assistance under the programs covered by the Consolidated Plan during the
preceding five years.

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE. The County will provide technical assistance to
groups representative of persons of low- and moderate-income that request
such assistance in developing proposals for funding assistance under any of
the programs covered by the Consolidated Plan. The assistance to be provided
will be commensurate with the resources available to the County for provision of
such assistance.

COMPLAINTS. Within 15 working days, where practicable, the County will
provide a timely, substantive written response to every written citizen complaint
generated by the Consolidated Plan or any of the programs it governs.

USE OF CITIZEN PARTICIPATION PLAN. Snohomish County commits itself
to follow this citizen participation plan.

JURISDICTION RESPONSIBILITY. The requirements for citizen participation
do not restrict the responsibility or authority of Snohomish County for the
development and execution of its Consolidated Plan.



                                       10
This Consolidated Plan and accompanying program year 2005 annual Action Plan were
developed in compliance with that process. The County held four public hearings in
various parts of the County on housing and non-housing community development needs
(access to all hearings was in compliance with the Americans With Disabilities Act); the
County consulted widely with agencies, groups and individuals impacted by HUD-
supported programs in the County; and the plan was advertised and circulated for 30
days of public comment. The milestones in that process are recited below.

September 29, 2004: NOFA for program year 2005 released
November 1, 2004: Public hearing on public service, housing and non-housing
community development needs
November 4, 2004: Public hearing on public service, housing and non-housing
community development needs
November 8, 2004: Public hearing on public service, housing and non-housing
community development needs
November 9, 2004: Public hearing on public service, housing and non-housing
community development needs
October 6-7, 2004: Technical assistance for applicants
October 29, 2004: Applications due
November 2, 2004 – January 1, 2005: Technical review of applications
January 5, 32005: Supplemental application period opened
January 19, 2005: Supplemental application period closed
February 8, 2005: Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) meetings
February 28, 2005: Policy Advisory Board acts on TAC recommendations
March 2, 2005: Present Consolidated Plan as part of Housing Authority of Snohomish
County’s public hearing on authority’s Agency Plan
March 20, 2005: Publish Consolidated Plan and program year 2005 Action Plan
March 20-April 19 2005: 30-day public comment period
May 11 2005: Council approves Consolidated Plan and program year 2005 Action Plan
May 13, 2005: Consolidated Plan and program year 2005 Action Plan sent to HUD
May 13-June 30, 2005: HUD reviews Consolidated Plan and program year 2005 Action
Plan
July 1, 2005: Program year 2005 begins

In the schedule above, the items referring to a ―supplementary application period‖ reflect
the fact that the consortium did not receive applications for facilities and housing
projects adequate in the aggregate to commit all of the anticipated funding for program
year 2005. Consequently, the consortium sponsored a supplemental application period,


                                           11
notification of which to eligible applicants was made via a newspaper ad and direct
mailings to the agencies.

Recognizing the value of coordinating the Consolidated Plans of Snohomish County
and the City of Everett and the Agency Plans of the Housing Authority of Snohomish
County and the Everett Housing Authority, all four agencies cosponsored the four initial
public hearings in November of 2004. Staff from all four agencies attended the
meetings and participated in discussions with the public.

The program year 2005 Action Plan was considered and adopted by the Policy Advisory
Board at a public meeting on February 28, 2005 and was advertised for public comment
for 30 days subsequent to the meeting.

The Consolidated Plan, along with the program year 2005 Action Plan, was circulated
for 30 days’ public comment between March 20 and April 19, 2005 and a final public
hearing on the plan was held in April 2005. The County Council adopted the plan by
motion at a public meeting on May 4, 2005.

Snohomish County’s citizen participation plan also provides for a public program
evaluation process. Within 90 days of the conclusion of each program year, the County
prepares a report on the program year’s issues and accomplishments. This report is
made available to the public and is advertised publicly in the County’s newspaper of
record for comment. In addition, a public hearing is held at which the report is
presented and public comment invited.


6. Interagency Consultations. In developing the Consolidated Plan and program
year 2005 Action Plan, Snohomish County staff consulted consortium member
jurisdictions and with a variety of public and private agencies which provide assisted
housing, health services and social services (including those focusing on services to
children, elderly persons, persons with disabilities, persons with HIV/AIDS and their
families, and homeless persons).      Strategies for consultation included face-to-face
meetings, telephone conversations and written communications. In addition, agencies
were invited to attend three public hearings at which comments on development of the
Consolidated Plan and the program year 2005 Action Plan were sought.

In addition to the required public hearings, Snohomish County has considered the
results of several public processes portions of which relate to housing, social service or
community development issues. Principal among these has been the public input
generated by the County’s 10-year update to its General Policy Plan as mandated the
State Growth Management Act (GMA). The product of that process, the General Policy
Plan (GPP), addresses and proposes polices for such issues as the distribution of
population growth, housing, transportation, capital facilities, and economic
development. While these issues were not addressed by the County's growth
management planners within the limited context of HUD formula funds eligibility criteria,
the public comments elicited by the process and the policies proposed in the GPP have
direct bearing on the County's HUD-eligible populations.
                                           12
The extensive public participation process pursued during update of the GPP included a
variety of procedures. The public participation in the plan's development included broad
dissemination of all plan proposals and alternatives, opportunity for written comments,
stakeholder interviews, provision for open discussion at public workshops, meetings and
hearings after effective notice, communication programs, information services, and
consideration of and response to public comments.

Because the comprehensive planning process is a continuing one under GMA, this
source of public participation continues to benefit the Consolidated Plan.

Substantial public participation indirectly impacted the Consolidated Plan via the
County's Human Services Department, which is active in many areas which touch on
housing and non-housing public service delivery. The department describes its purview
as including "programs which assist those with economic disadvantages, those with
functional disabilities such as the frail elderly, and physically disabled, those with
developmental disabilities, those with acute or chronic mental illness, and those at risk
or suffering from substance abuse." In serving these clients, a large proportion of whom
are HUD-eligible, the department relies on professional staff organized into issue-
focused divisions (e.g. aging, mental health, drug abuse, and developmental
disabilities). Departmental policy development benefits from formal and informal public
comment relayed through the staffs of the various divisions. In addition, the department
notes that it "benefits directly from the advice and support of the numerous boards, task
forces, committees and groups that lend their experience, expertise and judgment to the
programs which they serve." Because of interdepartmental consultations between
Human Services Department staff and Planning and Development Services staff during
preparation of the Consolidated Plan, the plan benefited from the results of the Human
Services public participation initiatives.

Indirect public participation also comes to the County through resident councils
operated by the Housing Authority of Snohomish County and the Everett Housing
Authority. The councils are actively involved with management and policy issues
affecting the authorities' multi-family and scattered-site properties and so exert influence
on the authorities' overall policies and priorities in this area. This influence is reflected
in programs for which the authorities seek HUD-funded assistance from the County.

Snohomish County’s continuum of care planning process for the homeless makes its
own contribution to the interagency consultation and public participation aspects of
developing the Consolidated Plan and each year’s Action Plan. The Snohomish County
Homeless Policy Task Force, a group of 60 representatives from City and County
government, non-profit agencies, advocacy groups, Indian tribes, service providers,
(homeless, mental health, HIV/AIDS, and other disabled populations), housing
authorities and developers, and philanthropic organizations, manages Continuum of
Care planning. Working together and meeting monthly, the partners have been able to
improve coordination of advocacy, housing and services, as well as reduce duplication
of effort. The task force is the designated entity for developing and coordinating the
County’s continuum of care plan and, as part of that process, oversees the development
                                             13
of each year’s application for McKinney homeless funds. The task force has been
directly involved in development of the 2005-2009 Housing and Community
Development Consolidated Plan and the program year 2005 Action Plan. Additionally,
the work of the task force feeds directly into the consolidated planning process because
Snohomish County’s departments of Human Services and Planning and Development
Services, who are also responsible for preparing the plans, share staffing of the task
force.

Another critical partner in the consolidated planning process has been the Housing
Consortium of Everett and Snohomish County (the Consortium), an outgrowth of a
Healthy Communities initiative sponsored by Snohomish County Tomorrow (SCT) in the
1990s. SCT is a committee comprising representatives of City, County and private
sector interests that serves in an advisory capacity to Snohomish County government
on issues surrounding implementation of the State’s Growth Management Act.
Membership of the Consortium includes representatives of City and County
government, the lending industry, affordable housing providers, and social service
providers. The committee, meeting monthly, focuses on issues of particular interest to
affordable housing providers including funding, leveraging of local resources, and
evaluation of affordable housing needs countywide. Several members of the County’s
Office of Housing and Community Development sit on the Consortium, providing a
direct conduit into the consolidated planning process.

The Community Housing Resource Board (CHRB) of Everett and Snohomish County
was also consulted during the consolidated planning process. Members of the CHRB
include the Association of Realtors, the Rental Housing Mediation Service, the City of
Everett, Snohomish County, the Everett Housing Authority, Snohomish County Housing
Authority, the Homeless Policy Task Force, the Navy Housing Office, HUD, and several
local banks. The CHRB meets every other month and focuses on disseminating
information on Fair Housing Laws and Landlord/Tenant laws. It accomplishes this
primarily through distributing printed materials in a variety of languages and conducting
an average of six seminars per year for education of landlords about fair housing
issues.

A full list of all agencies that provided both direct and indirect input into the consolidated
Planning process is available upon request.


7. Program Funds. The Community Development Block Grant, HOME Investment
Partnership (including American Dream Downpayment Initiative funds) and Emergency
Shelter Grant funds to be allocated to the County by HUD become available July 1 of
each fiscal year. The application process begins about September of the fiscal year
preceding the July 1 commencement date with an omnibus Notice of Funding
Availability (NOFA), with an exception for Emergency Shelter Grant as noted below.
Between October and January, applications are reviewed and evaluated by staff and
eligible ones are presented to the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) for
consideration, normally in January or February. The TAC ranks the projects based on
specific criteria such as how well the proposed projects address one or more strategies
                                           14
in the County’s Consolidated Plan, its Continuum of Care plan, readiness to proceed, its
viability, and its integration with other related activities. The TAC makes funding
recommendations that are then forwarded to the Housing and Community Development
Policy Advisory Board (PAB) for final consideration, usually in early March. (Refer to
section I. 4, ―Institutional Structure‖, for a fuller discussion of the roles and constitutions
of the TAC and PAB.) After a thirty-day public comment period on the PAB’s actions,
the Snohomish County Council acts on the funding recommendations. Council action
normally occurs early in May and the package of proposed allocations is presented to
HUD by mid-May. HUD has 45 days to approve or request modifications of the
package and the program year commences July 1.

Community Development Block Grant. CDBG funds may be expended in three areas:
public services, administration and planning, and capital projects. Public services
(primarily supportive services for low income persons or persons with families and
special needs groups including but not limited to the disabled, frail elderly, victims of
domestic abuse, abused children and the homeless) may account for no more than 15%
of the consortium's allocation; planning (related to housing and community development
needs of low income neighborhoods and populations) and CDBG program
administrative costs are similarly capped at 20%. The bulk (at least 65%) of the CDBG
allocation is available for investments such as street improvements, building acquisition,
site improvements, capital housing rehabilitation, and facility rental and lease payments.
Snohomish County allocates the federally mandated minimum 65% to these categories.
Of that amount representing 65% of the total CDBG allocation, it is current County
practice that 55% will be dedicated to non-housing capital projects and 45% will be
dedicated to housing capital projects.

Emergency Shelter Grant. The purpose of the ESG program is to aid homeless
persons by providing emergency shelter and related support services. In addition to
emergency housing, examples of activities eligible for ESG assistance include
childcare, housing referral, rental and utility assistance, employment training and health
care. These services are offered to shelter residents to help them regain their
independence. Normally, ESG funding commitments are made for a period of two years
so are a part of the NOFA in alternate years. However, second-year funding
recommendations are reviewed and evaluated by the TAC, PAB and Council the
second year of each two-year cycle.

HOME Investment Partnership. Activities eligible for HOME assistance are focused on
four principal program areas: (1) home ownership; (2) home owner property
rehabilitation; (3) rental housing development; and (4) tenant-based rental assistance.
These program areas share equal priority in Snohomish County’s Housing and
Community Development Consolidated Plan. HOME-assisted new construction and
rehabilitation projects must meet local building codes and federal ―section 8" housing
quality standards as set forth in federal regulations cited in 24 CFR 982.401. HOME
income targeting regulations require that 90% of tenant-based rental assistance and
rental units be dedicated to families at or below 60% of the median income with the
remainder going to families at or below 80% of median income. Also, 100% of home
ownership funds must benefit families at or below 80% of the median income.
                                              15
HOME program regulations permit the County and the City of Everett to pool their
populations and other formula factors for maximum benefit under the terms of the
federal allocation formula. The County and the City are signatories to a two-party
interlocal agreement that reserves to the City a portion of HOME funds proportionate to
the increase in funds beyond what the County would receive without Everett’s
participation. Consistent with that agreement, the County passes 21% of its annual
HOME allocation on to the City.

With respect to the allocation of HOME funds by Snohomish County, the following
stipulations comprise a portion of the applicable policies.

    Resale/Recapture Provisions. Resale and recapture provisions apply to the use
    of HOME funds for homebuyer assistance programs. Snohomish County will
    allow for the use of either resale or recapture provisions, as appropriate.
    Resale or recapture provisions are triggered when, during the period of
    affordability, the housing ceases to be the principal residence of the buyer who
    was assisted with HOME funds. Applicants for HOME funding will need to
    propose resale or recapture provisions at the time of application for funding,
    and demonstrate how the provisions are consistent with the resale or recapture
    guidelines.

    Resale Guidelines. Resale provisions must be used in situations where HOME
    funding will be provided as development subsidies (as opposed to direct
    assistance to the low-income buyer) and where assistance is provided to
    homebuyers in the form of grants. Resale provisions may be used in other
    instances as well. When resale provisions are proposed, they must ensure
    that:

         the property will be sold to a low-income buyer who will use the
          property as a principal residence;
         the price at resale will provide the original HOME-assisted buyer with a
          fair return on their original and any subsequent investments in the
          property; and
         the housing will continue to be affordable throughout the period of
          affordability to a range of low-income buyers.

    Recapture Guidelines. Recapture provisions are intended to ensure that all, or
    a portion, of the HOME funds provided to the homebuyer, are returned to
    Snohomish County when the home is no longer the buyer’s principal residence.
    The following options for recapture of funds are acceptable:

         recapture of the entire amount;
         reduction in the amount recaptured based on the amount of time
          during the period of affordability in which the buyer has occupied the
          home;

                                           16
     share of net proceeds (sales price minus loan repayments, other than
      the HOME loan, and closing costs);
     return of the owner’s investment first and then repayment of all or a
      portion of the HOME assistance.

The special provisions of the HOME program related to single-family properties
with more than one unit (i.e. duplex, triplex, four-plex) [24 CFR Part
92.254(a)(5)(ii)(6)]    and     lease-purchase      programs [24 CFR     Part
92.254(a)(5)(ii)(7)] will also apply, as appropriate.

HOME Tenant-Based Rental Assistance (TBRA). Snohomish County is not
presently funding any TBRA programs with HOME funds.

Other Forms of Investment. Snohomish County intends no forms of investment
other than those described in 24 CFR 92.205 (b).

Affirmative Marketing. Snohomish County requires that applicants for HOME
funding submit an affirmative marketing plan for proposed projects; evaluation
of those plans comprises one of the scoring criteria by which proposals are
ranked. Contracts governing approved projects all contain clauses requiring
affirmative marketing and County staff test for compliance during on-site
monitoring visits.

Minority/Women’s Business Outreach. Language is included in every bid
specification for construction of grant projects to ensure Minority and Women
Business Enterprise participation.

On any construction project of $50,000 or more, the bidding contractor must
submit documentation to demonstrate a good faith effort to meet the 7.7% MBE
goal in enlisting minority subcontractors or suppliers. Failure to do so results in
the bid being rejected as non-responsive.

Snohomish County provides a list of businesses that have been identified as
minority and women businesses.       This list is maintained and updated
constantly.

In addition, Snohomish County is a sponsoring member of the National
Association of Women in Construction, an international association that
promotes and supports the advancement and employment of women in the
construction field.

Finally, all agencies receiving grant funds are held to the following contract
provisions:

―No person shall on the grounds of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex,
be excluded from participation in or denied the benefits of, or be otherwise
subjected to discrimination under any program or activity funded in whole or in
                                        17
    part under this Agreement. Any prohibition against discrimination on the basis
    of age under the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 or with respect to an otherwise
    qualified handicapped individual as provided in Section 504 of the Rehabilitation
    Act of 1973 shall also apply to any such program or activity.

    ―The Agency shall take affirmative action to overcome the effects of any prior
    discriminatory practice which tends on the grounds of race, color, national
    origin, or sex to exclude individuals from participating in, to deny them the
    benefits of, or to subject them to discrimination under the project

    ―The Agency shall take affirmative action to overcome the effects of conditions
    that would otherwise result in limiting participation by persons of a particular
    race, color, national origin or sex.‖

    Refinancing. Snohomish County is not presently using HOME funds to
    refinance existing debt secured by multifamily housing rehabilitated with HOME
    funds. Should the County do so, it will first promulgate financing guidelines as
    required under 24 CFR 92.206(b).

Within the HOME program, HUD has created a specific allocation of funds to assist low-
and moderate-income persons achieve homeownership. Referred to as the American
Dream Downpayment Initiative (ADDI), HUD intends that the funds be used to increase
the rates of homeownership among low- and moderate-income persons. To accomplish
this goal, Snohomish County works with the private non-profit organization HomeSight.
The anticipated accomplishments for HomeSight are set forth in HUD’s Table 3 format
at the end of the Action Plan incorporated in Section 3 of this document.

HUD requires that the County develop ―a plan for targeted outreach to residents and
tenants of public and manufactured housing and to other families assisted by public
housing agencies for the purposes of ensuring that ADDI funds are used to provide
Downpayment assistance for such residents, tenants, and families.‖ To that end,
HomeSight works with the Everett Housing Authority and the Housing Authority of
Snohomish County (HASCO) to provide home ownership opportunities to residents of
publicly owned housing and of Section 8 housing. HomeSight has been working with
both Housing Authorities on the Section 8 to Homeownership program since 2001.
Since the inception of the program 17 recipients of Section 8 assistance have closed on
homes and 117 have received home ownership counseling and education.

HomeSight is presently working with the Everett Housing Authority (EHA) on the
Parkridge condominium conversion project. EHA purchased Parkridge in February of
this year and is reaching out to the present low-income tenants to inform them of the
home ownership assistance opportunities available in Snohomish County through
HomeSight. HomeSight has presented one outreach meeting to tenants to date, which
six households attended, and has scheduled further outreach meetings. Parkridge has
60 units.


                                           18
Because of the strong partnership between HomeSight and the two Public Housing
Authorities located in Snohomish County, public housing tenants have access to
information about home ownership counseling and education and purchase assistance
that HomeSight offers.

In late 2004 HomeSight launched its minority outreach marketing strategy. HomeSight
began advertising on Snohomish County buses in Russian, Spanish, Vietnamese, and
Mandarin Chinese. HomeSight staff members speak all of those languages except
Russian, and HomeSight has access to translation services for clients who need them.

HUD ADDI regulations also require that the County provide in this Plan a description of
the actions to be taken to ensure the suitability of families receiving ADDI funds to
undertake and maintain homeownership. In compliance, Snohomish County will route
its ADDI funds through its existing homeownership assistance program administered by
HomeSight. HomeSight provides one-on-one financial counseling and homebuyer
education to first-time homebuyers. Recipients of Snohomish County’s first-time
homebuyer assistance must graduate from HomeSight’s education and counseling
program and must be approved by HomeSight’s underwriters.                  HomeSight’s
underwriting guidelines are thoroughly professional, and its two underwriters each have
more than 25 years of banking experience.

As part of its overall commitment to developing program evaluation tools, the County
will also assess the efficacy of its allocation of ADDI funds to HomeSight based on
performance measures including the following.
     HomeSight historically has provided at least 12 outreach meetings in Snohomish
        County every year to educate prospective first-time homebuyers about available
        education, counseling, and purchase assistance programs.
     HomeSight has also historically provided six in-depth first-time homebuyer
        courses that are six-and-a-half hours long in Snohomish County every year. This
        daylong course covers topics vital to successful home ownership: avoiding
        predatory lending, home maintenance, and other topics.
     HomeSight since 1998 has provided one-on-one financial counseling to
        prospective first-time homebuyers who seek it in Snohomish County. HomeSight
        historically has tracked and will continue to track the number of loans and the
        dollar amounts that go to first-time homebuyers.

Housing Opportunities for Persons With Aids. HOPWA funds may be used to provide
emergency, transitional and permanent housing as well as support services for low-
income persons with AIDS and their families. HUD allocates these funds on a formula
basis to jurisdictions with a population of 500,000 or more and more than 1,500
cumulative cases of AIDS. The City of Seattle administers the HOPWA program for the
Seattle Eligible Metropolitan Area (EMA), which includes all of King, Snohomish and
Island counties. An AIDS Housing Committee representing jurisdictions and providers
from throughout the EMA sets policies for allocation of HOPWA funds.



                                          19
8. Monitoring Plan. Monitoring of all activities assisted in whole or in part with HUD
funds administered by Snohomish County and the City of Everett pursuant to this Plan
will be carried out by staff on the County Department of Planning and Development
Services and the City of Everett Department of Community Development, respectively,
in accord with the specific compliance monitoring requirements prescribed by regulation
for each of the HUD programs. All program compliance requirements and reports
required of subrecipients and project sponsors will be specified in the County's and City
of Everett's funding award contracts. Monitoring procedures and practices will assure
that reports are submitted, reviewed and assessed, and that any noncompliance
reflected in reports is investigated and resolved. County and City staff will also conduct
a risk assessment of all agencies being funded to assist in determining which projects
must be monitored at more frequent intervals. On-site monitoring will be done to
examine subrecipients' and project sponsors' operations and records, as required by
HUD regulations, to validate reports and verify compliance. These monitoring
operations will be conducted in accord with written operating procedures and schedules.
The substantive results of funded activities will be monitored in relation to the
Consolidated Plan objectives.

Activities incorporated in the Strategic Plan which are assisted with funds administered
by another County or City department, by one of the housing authorities, or by another
independent public agency, will be monitored for regulatory compliance in accordance
with their funding source regulatory terms by the administering department or agency.
County and City planning and community development staff will obtain annual reports of
the substantive results of these activities from the administering agencies to monitor for
progress against the Plan objectives. It is the County’s goal to monitor projects every 2
years after completion, or more often if required by regulation.


9.    Amendments. As needed, this Consolidated Plan will be amended in
compliance with Snohomish County’s citizen participation plan and HUD program
regulations.




                                           20
II. CONSOLIDATED PLAN: Strategic Plan
1. Time Period. This Consolidated Plan covers the period from July 1, 2005
through June 30, 2010.


2. Priority Needs. The priority needs of each major sub-category addressed by
formula funds will be found in the section of the Strategic Plan dealing with that
particular sub-category. Snohomish County’s approach to calibrating need to available
resources has been, through assessment of available data and consultation with
provider agencies and representatives of assisted client groups, to establish goals and
objectives with projected quantified results. Homeless strategies and objectives will be
found in section 4, housing strategies and objectives will be found in section 13, and
community development strategies will be found in section 21. Because need
substantially outstrips available resources, the practice in the past has been to
subdivide the federal formula funds along lines of federal eligibility and then evaluate
annual project applications competitively against five-year goals and objectives as set
forth in the Consolidated Plan. While this method has not provided an absolute rank
ordering of goal priorities, it has allowed the County’s consortium to respond to the
changing face of need as it evolves over time. However, in response to local initiative
and CPD Notice 03-09, the consortium members are actively working toward ranked
priorities, goals and outcomes as discussed in section 22. To the extent that the results
of those efforts require, the 2005-2009 Consolidated Plan will be amended to reflect the
results of that work.

Discussions of obstacles to meeting identified needs are to be found in the section
addressing each priority need.


3. County Population and Housing Profile. The profile of population, housing,
and households is based on information from the 2000 Census, updated where possible
with data from the Washington State Office of Financial Management, the Snohomish
County Assessor’s Office, and the Snohomish County Department of Planning and
Development Services.

Population Change. Snohomish County is the third largest county in the State, with a
population of 644,800. Slightly less than half of the population lives in the
unincorporated area of the county, and the balance resides in the 19 incorporated cities.
This is a reversal of the 20-year pattern of more people living in the unincorporated
area.

The rate of growth has moderated in recent years. Between 1970 and 2000 the
County’s population grew from 265,236 and 606,024, a rate of 128%; since 2000, the
county population has increased by only 6%. Nonetheless, the County ranks third in the
state in total population and sixth based on its rate of growth between 2000 and 2004.


                                           21
Fifty-four percent (54%) of the growth is the result of net migration and the balance is
from natural increase (births over deaths).

The most growth occurred in the cities, though at a rate only one percentage point in
excess of that posted by the unincorporated areas.


                                                Table 2
          Population Growth in Snohomish County, 2000 - 2004
                                               2000          2004     % Change
       Snohomish County (all)                 606,024       644,800      6%
       Unincorporated                         291,142       309,418      6%
       Incorporated                           314,882       335,882      7%
      Source: State of Washington, 2004 Population Trends



Cities with the highest growth rates include Arlington, Darrington, Granite Falls and
Sultan, all with growth in excess of 20%. These rates are substantially below the
county’s growth rates for the 1990-2000 decade. For that period the growth of the
entire county, the unincorporated county and the incorporated county were 25%, 12%
and 42% respectively. For that same period Mill Creek, Gold Bar, Stanwood, Lake
Stevens, Arlington, and Granite Falls all grew by more than 50%, while three cities,
Marysville, Mukilteo, and Monroe each grew by more than 25%.




                                                   22
                                               Figure 1

                          Growth Rates of Cities, 2000-2004

     Arlington
          Brier
    Darrington
     Edmonds
       Everett
     Gold Bar
      Gr. Falls
         Index
   Lk Stevens
    Lynnwood
    Maryvsille
    Mill Creek
       Monroe
     Mtlk Terr.
      Mukilteo
   Snohomish
    Stanwood
        Sultan
    Woodway

                  0%           5%            10%          15%   20%   25%       30%

Source: State of Washington, 2004 Population Trends



Population Characteristics. Between 1970 and 2000, the white population in
Snohomish County has decreased from 98.3% to 85.6%. Of the 14.4% of the county’s
population represented by minorities, the portion comprising Black/African American
increased tenfold between 1970 and 2000, from 1,012 to 10,113. The most rapidly
increasing minority racial group is the Asian, which posted a 646% rate of growth from
1980 to 2000, growing from 4,921 to 36,735. According to census 2000 data, minority
populations equal or exceed the county’s rate in Everett (19.2%), Mill Creek (17.2%),
Brier (14.4%), Lynnwood (25.6%), Mountlake Terrace (22.5%), and Mukilteo (19.4%).

The age profile of the population in the unincorporated county is somewhat younger
than that of the population living in cities. In the unincorporated area 28.8% of the
population is less than 18 years old and 7.2% is over 65. In the cities 25.9% of the
population is less than 18 and 10.9% is over 65. In several cities, the elderly are a
                                           23
significantly higher proportion of the population than in the County as a whole (9.1%). In
Everett, Darrington, Edmonds, Lynnwood, Marysville, Mill Creek, Snohomish, Stanwood
and Woodway, people over the age of 65 make up 10% or more of the population.

From December 2000 to December 2004, non-agricultural jobs in Snohomish County
grew from 216,900 to 223,500, an increase of 6600 jobs or 3.1% (State of Washington
Employment Security Department). During this period, jobs in services (trade,
information, finance, professional, business, health, leisure, and hospitality) grew
12.5%, and government jobs grew 13.8%. Jobs in manufacturing declined 20.6%, and
jobs in construction declined 4.6%.

Income Data. Because the benefits of the federal funds covered by the Consolidated
Plan are targeted to low- and moderate-income persons, it is useful to illustrate the
relative levels of income in Snohomish County. The following table provides basic
income data for each of the County’s census tracts and block groups using Census
2000 data. Reviewing it with reference to the federal income eligibility guidelines cited
elsewhere will give an understanding of the distribution of income levels in the County.




                                           24
                                                                   Table 3

         Snohomish County Household Median Income Characteristics By Census Tract
                                         Source: U.S. Census Bureau; all values in 1999 dollars
                                                                              Households
                                                 Households                      with a
                                  Households        with a                    householder
                                     with a      householder                     who is                                          Households
                                  householder       who is                       Native      Households Households Households       with a
                    Households       who is        American     Households     Hawaiian         with a      with a      with a   householder
                       with a       Black or      Indian and       with a      and Other     householder householder householder    who is
                    householder     African         Alaska      householder      Pacific        who is    who is Two   who is    White alone
Census     All        who is       American         Native         who is       Islander     Some other    or more   Hispanic or not Hispanic
 Tract Households   White alone      alone          alone       Asian alone       alone       race alone    races       Latino    or Latino
   401     53,063        53,063        80,488          55,556        71,250         26,250        73,438      42,750      75,668      52,844
   402     19,918        20,000        22,917          26,125        13,750         37,875        25,972      20,417      42,292      19,316
   403     41,906        41,655        51,250          13,542        14,167              0        52,031      47,292      52,083      41,351
   404     32,800        34,250        25,104          17,308   2,500-                   0        48,482      31,250      49,732      33,683
   405     39,049        38,638        66,250          26,250        40,625         46,250        40,750      41,250      41,094      38,638
   406     36,172        35,078       127,308          52,917             0              0        90,957      30,250      22,955      36,875
   407     22,092        23,056        10,682          26,875        23,958         28,750        22,875      15,192      24,125      22,824
   408     31,514        32,292        13,333          30,417        30,625              0        19,167      33,750      18,403      33,438
   409     62,411        63,000        23,750          75,102        63,929              0              0     11,250      12,222      62,470
   410     39,200        40,104          8,750         15,417        36,429         27,125       100,928      36,071      45,125      40,330
   411     47,383        46,918        61,964          59,167        50,000              0        14,750      39,531      23,571      46,810
412.01     55,927        56,918        35,694               0        91,657              0        26,625      48,021      27,125      57,263
412.02     40,272        39,849        17,292          31,500        41,923              0        46,875      24,766      55,341      39,332
413.01     63,548        63,831       102,264          90,957        59,750              0        61,094      45,500      83,352      63,226
413.02     70,360        70,890        85,000          44,853        65,250              0        63,750      63,750      70,893      71,081
   414     43,194        43,333        53,750          88,154        49,444              0        37,188      38,043      36,591      44,306
   415     50,461        48,571              0         57,188       100,542              0        36,429      33,750      37,143      49,286
416.01     63,521        62,701        90,957          52,500        70,313              0        82,630      34,250      76,959      62,355
416.05     67,500        68,447       101,254          45,000        49,625              0        41,250     103,756      58,281      68,295
416.06     53,500        53,667        11,250               0        41,827              0        66,250      75,081      52,188      54,917
416.07     81,798        81,864       177,361               0        75,250              0              0     85,489           0      81,864
416.08     76,116        77,222              0              0        61,528              0              0     94,288      85,489      76,926
417.01     40,186        40,693        30,536               0        24,875         26,250        59,861      33,929      58,056      40,676
417.02     60,371        60,000        11,842          47,188        70,125              0        28,750      82,310      31,319      60,108

                                                                     25
         Snohomish County Household Median Income Characteristics By Census Tract
                                         Source: U.S. Census Bureau; all values in 1999 dollars
                                                                          Households
                                                 Households                  with a
                                  Households        with a                householder
                                     with a      householder                 who is                                         Households
                                  householder       who is                   Native    Households Households Households        with a
                    Households       who is        American Households Hawaiian          with a      with a      with a     householder
                       with a       Black or      Indian and     with a    and Other householder householder householder       who is
                    householder     African         Alaska    householder    Pacific     who is    who is Two   who is      White alone
Census     All        who is       American         Native      who is      Islander   Some other   or more   Hispanic or   not Hispanic
 Tract Households   White alone      alone          alone     Asian alone     alone    race alone    races      Latino       or Latino
418.04     39,167        39,432        43,068           9,792      47,614       36,250     41,010      32,386      40,938        39,273
418.05     40,810        41,014        27,386        125,000       43,088       30,469     19,432      28,889      22,000        41,915
418.06     40,739        40,460        31,932           6,528      65,357       53,750     41,016      17,206      34,191        40,578
418.07     37,878        37,477        34,167          71,250      47,847       77,437     27,563      46,250      35,395        37,313
418.08     40,884        40,029        41,250          62,813      43,266       18,750     51,625      45,156      46,875        40,320
419.01     45,282        44,563        54,375          33,929      28,304      102,264     56,500      62,250      55,250        44,188
419.03     34,457        35,150        28,462          53,929      23,650            0     24,408      50,764      25,924        35,580
419.04     33,358        34,573        41,736          24,427      33,824            0     29,474      21,944      31,875        34,390
419.05     41,107        42,000        35,179          24,766      54,519            0     19,861      35,313      26,250        43,265
420.01     80,419        79,208       116,728               0     110,100            0     58,750      44,750      85,839        77,838
420.03     78,776        79,688       101,254          47,083      73,036            0     67,656      93,763      69,531        79,431
420.04     59,719        59,598        52,500          66,250      59,167            0     83,934      83,934      80,249        59,330
420.05     87,934        88,320       102,264          90,957      85,304       53,750           0     36,250      37,125        88,616
420.06     45,635        48,068        45,677               0      28,750            0     30,139      65,500      68,036        47,727
501.01     72,125        72,208       139,585               0      65,469            0           0     68,750      81,186        71,375
501.02     53,267        53,951        66,058               0      21,071       66,250     50,972      46,750      50,417        54,129
   502     75,565        75,503          7,250              0      88,457            0           0    175,323   200,000+         75,206
   503     72,452        71,058        90,957          90,957      85,433      102,264     56,250      81,134      29,886        71,587
504.01     50,603        51,956        40,114        102,264       38,500       58,750     36,250      50,417      37,813        51,809
504.02     48,438        50,899        41,528          21,250      33,523       66,250     41,389      23,409      28,558        51,280
   505     50,000        50,808        46,250          31,806      26,528       58,750     31,250      71,250      52,750        50,654
   506    102,187       101,344              0       152,338      187,500            0     57,083      80,488      57,083       101,344
   507     54,293        55,584        52,981        153,780       19,886       90,957     36,563      53,229      37,596        56,201
   508     53,774        54,760        46,250          34,886      40,938            0     43,958      55,694      42,917        55,000
   509     42,143        41,750        56,429          37,344      50,446      125,381     37,708      43,917      30,536        42,167
   510     46,875        46,920        80,242          54,583      46,094            0     45,179      45,417      35,192        47,292

                                                                  26
         Snohomish County Household Median Income Characteristics By Census Tract
                                         Source: U.S. Census Bureau; all values in 1999 dollars
                                                                          Households
                                                 Households                  with a
                                  Households        with a                householder
                                     with a      householder                 who is                                          Households
                                  householder       who is                   Native     Households Households Households        with a
                    Households       who is        American Households Hawaiian           with a      with a      with a     householder
                       with a       Black or      Indian and     with a    and Other householder householder householder        who is
                    householder     African         Alaska    householder    Pacific      who is    who is Two   who is      White alone
Census     All        who is       American         Native      who is      Islander    Some other   or more   Hispanic or   not Hispanic
 Tract Households   White alone      alone          alone     Asian alone     alone     race alone    races      Latino       or Latino
   511     46,408        46,453        47,083          32,500      28,750             0     71,250     126,135      41,875        46,701
   512     48,862        48,426        37,500          29,750      50,179             0     50,469      57,250      56,354        48,125
   513     47,425        48,277        30,104        105,361       40,341       90,957      43,750      42,250      68,214        48,221
   514     35,986        35,713        50,227          27,969      36,563       39,821      26,875      29,676      37,917        35,406
   515     38,750        41,844        34,474          26,458      33,365             0     53,676      30,398      53,676        41,938
516.01     53,373        52,434        65,104          17,143      60,536             0    102,264      62,788      39,318        52,594
516.02     55,292        54,129        80,168          68,750      57,604             0     62,083      91,277      61,111        53,826
517.01     34,830        35,354        19,438          51,250      37,500       23,750            0     47,500      27,396        36,333
517.02     54,048        51,136        64,196          44,821      80,924       90,957      47,411      26,111      47,411        51,136
518.01     40,024        41,019        32,212          73,750      36,500             0     35,000      36,563      34,236        40,957
518.02     51,713        50,865        52,679               0      59,514             0           0     55,714      45,714        51,026
519.05     52,057        52,222        33,750          82,500      46,875             0     49,688      59,688      60,179        51,855
519.09     56,327        56,083        53,750          35,556      55,952             0     66,000      70,938      67,083        55,813
519.11     71,296        71,159        21,250          23,750      75,910             0     51,250      88,416      25,714        71,524
519.12     78,802        79,394              0              0      71,667        2,500-           0          0      76,765        80,000
519.13     81,219        81,347       100,653               0      54,432       63,750            0    125,519      68,750        81,347
519.14     67,018        66,548              0              0      66,429             0           0     83,911     100,216        65,913
519.15     68,175        67,477        85,489          84,468      75,067             0     81,250      77,744      61,103        67,679
519.16     72,077        71,028              0       101,351       82,515             0           0    152,338     102,264        71,028
519.17     54,430        56,026        51,250               0      52,045             0     53,750      40,139      51,307        56,026
519.18     64,219        63,646              0         19,712      67,381             0     31,250           0      32,250        63,958
519.19     59,536        58,314        58,750          31,250      70,402             0     36,932      71,146      56,375        58,140
519.20     60,747        60,104        82,619          80,488      71,875             0     35,729      55,441      57,841        60,260
520.03     64,737        64,441              0              0      75,487             0           0          0           0        64,441
520.04     65,726        63,792        66,250          73,000      76,214             0     32,692      81,091      33,654        63,792
520.05     66,014        68,241        45,313          90,957      60,568       41,250      19,750      80,560      26,979        69,167

                                                                  27
         Snohomish County Household Median Income Characteristics By Census Tract
                                         Source: U.S. Census Bureau; all values in 1999 dollars
                                                                           Households
                                                 Households                   with a
                                  Households        with a                 householder
                                     with a      householder                  who is                                          Households
                                  householder       who is                    Native    Households Households Households         with a
                    Households       who is        American Households Hawaiian           with a      with a      with a      householder
                       with a       Black or      Indian and     with a     and Other householder householder householder        who is
                    householder     African         Alaska    householder     Pacific     who is    who is Two   who is       White alone
Census     All        who is       American         Native      who is       Islander   Some other   or more   Hispanic or    not Hispanic
 Tract Households   White alone      alone          alone     Asian alone      alone    race alone    races      Latino        or Latino
520.06     78,257        78,191              0       134,651       61,818             0    102,264    200,000+      63,625         78,825
520.07     71,857        71,893        26,250               0      80,155             0     28,750           0      82,038         70,821
521.04     47,400        47,250       102,264               0       2,500-            0     43,750      51,250      51,250         47,250
521.05     61,667        62,083              0              0      46,250             0           0     62,813      15,000         65,536
521.07     68,750        69,808              0         21,250      66,250             0           0     90,000     177,361         68,365
521.08     79,719        79,846              0              0            0            0           0     52,019     120,679         78,962
521.10     75,103        75,526        60,938          56,250      76,153       127,308     79,200      60,893      81,890         75,118
521.11     77,843        79,797        75,487               0      61,136             0    100,992      56,563      78,750         79,595
521.12     68,828        67,734        54,063               0     107,167             0           0     92,022      38,750         67,656
521.13     80,628        80,241              0              0            0            0    101,153      86,806     101,153         80,241
522.03     66,042        66,563              0              0      36,250             0     61,250      73,173      86,049         65,781
522.04     62,169        62,823        71,250          53,750     102,608             0     33,571      14,926      33,929         62,782
522.05     41,076        41,054        49,712          31,250      46,932             0     32,143      65,139      37,500         41,349
522.06     65,106        66,090              0         60,536      48,750             0      2,500-     60,156       2,500-        66,090
522.07     66,497        65,941              0       102,264       53,750             0           0    100,821      46,645         66,435
523.01     63,777        62,952              0              0            0            0     51,250      95,394   200,000+          62,766
523.02     62,566        62,366        43,750          81,537      80,488             0     90,957      46,250      36,964         62,433
524.01     60,038        57,177              0         87,853      94,322             0           0     61,875      67,857         57,016
524.02     39,038        39,407          6,964         36,250            0            0     31,477      19,375      27,045         39,936
525.02     66,488        66,953              0         2,500-      55,000             0     56,458      87,267      64,688         67,188
525.03     59,904        58,301        90,537               0      62,083             0     70,833      51,333      71,042         58,013
525.04     61,918        61,968        61,250               0            0            0           0          0            0        61,968
526.03     49,896        49,766              0         80,488            0            0           0     72,708      63,750         49,609
526.04     49,125        49,625        48,750          31,250      46,250             0     43,750      16,705      23,942         49,821
526.05     64,167        63,773        71,250          29,474            0            0    102,264      65,735      63,750         64,144
526.06     67,262        66,667       127,308          75,487      80,488             0     80,488      67,500      80,081         66,726

                                                                   28
         Snohomish County Household Median Income Characteristics By Census Tract
                                         Source: U.S. Census Bureau; all values in 1999 dollars
                                                                           Households
                                                 Households                   with a
                                  Households        with a                 householder
                                     with a      householder                  who is                                          Households
                                  householder       who is                    Native    Households Households Households         with a
                    Households       who is        American Households Hawaiian           with a      with a       with a     householder
                       with a       Black or      Indian and     with a     and Other householder householder householder        who is
                    householder     African         Alaska    householder     Pacific     who is    who is Two    who is      White alone
Census     All        who is       American         Native      who is       Islander   Some other   or more    Hispanic or   not Hispanic
 Tract Households   White alone      alone          alone     Asian alone      alone    race alone    races       Latino       or Latino
526.07     69,211        71,174        61,250               0      62,708             0     24,833      37,292       40,500        71,402
527.01     57,800        58,250              0         48,750            0            0     24,583      66,250       45,625        58,050
527.03     59,594        60,044        51,250          48,750      55,625             0     56,250      85,102       62,000        60,015
527.04     69,152        67,634        80,488               0      74,583        53,750     56,250      76,155       56,250        67,634
527.05     67,188        69,219              0         54,063      72,955             0           0     40,417       71,250        67,083
528.03     51,472        51,489        24,886          80,488      57,500             0     44,205      39,868       54,271        51,383
528.04     60,254        60,337        90,957          72,000      42,778             0     26,591      33,438       60,708        60,041
528.05     48,099        47,682              0         77,500      70,781        85,489     11,719      37,386       48,333        47,390
528.06     56,390        56,071        41,635               0      73,967             0     58,500      31,979       52,417        56,097
529.01     40,417        40,507        51,818          24,500      19,219             0     43,417      25,750       34,405        40,822
529.03     37,827        37,768              0         28,125      27,292        46,250     61,250      43,424       44,674        37,533
529.04     51,030        50,794        27,396          90,957      46,563             0     39,896      68,906       73,295        50,541
530.01     42,500        46,466        11,875          30,909      50,833        28,750     40,625      42,083       42,000        46,161
530.02     51,514        53,886        39,028          32,614      38,750        46,250     58,125      37,083       59,063        53,913
531.01     61,702        62,021              0              0            0       47,188     53,750            0      53,750        62,021
531.02     58,253        58,347              0         51,250            0            0      2,500-    101,085       80,938        58,333
532.01     49,280        49,356              0         36,250            0            0           0     75,487            0        49,356
532.02     62,134        61,951        85,489               0            0            0           0     33,750            0        61,951
533.01     46,332        44,464        70,417          56,875        8,750            0     57,375      51,875       55,625        44,719
533.02     59,018        60,433              0         24,609      16,250             0           0           0           0        60,433
   534     59,375        59,931        56,250          41,042     102,264        38,750     36,250      42,292            0        59,931
535.03     55,365        54,777        66,250          31,875      71,250       102,264     16,250      86,479       72,667        54,271
535.04     37,595        37,840              0              0      34,821             0     50,875      26,000       52,250        37,527
535.05     58,432        58,665        85,489          11,786      38,750             0     63,542        8,750      63,333        58,654
535.06     56,000        56,206              0         46,250            0            0     85,489      23,750       72,031        55,971
536.01     52,184        53,889        51,250          19,063      41,250        11,250     37,778      68,393       68,571        53,150

                                                                   29
           Snohomish County Household Median Income Characteristics By Census Tract
                                         Source: U.S. Census Bureau; all values in 1999 dollars
                                                                           Households
                                               Households                     with a
                                  Households      with a                  householder
                                     with a    householder                    who is                                          Households
                                 householder      who is                      Native    Households Households Households         with a
                     Households      who is      American Households Hawaiian             with a       with a        with a   householder
                       with a       Black or    Indian and     with a       and Other householder householder householder        who is
                    householder     African       Alaska    householder       Pacific     who is    who is Two      who is    White alone
Census     All         who is      American       Native      who is         Islander   Some other    or more     Hispanic or not Hispanic
 Tract Households White alone        alone        alone     Asian alone        alone    race alone     races        Latino     or Latino
536.02     57,246        57,607              0       32,500             0             0     80,488       29,808       102,297      57,337
   537     35,052        36,927              0       16,731             0             0     18,750       22,917        26,250      37,188
538.01     53,619        54,086              0       12,083   200,000+                0           0      12,500        88,699      53,769
538.02     48,899        48,988              0       66,250       90,531         61,250           0      34,000        36,250      49,137
538.03     44,167        44,627              0       25,000     100,744          66,250     50,833       22,292        46,250      44,539
   NOTE: The left-aligned "2,500-" and "200,000+" values found in the table above are unexplained anomalies in the Census Bureau data.




                                                                  30
Another way to represent the geographic distribution of income throughout the County is
to map those census tracts that qualify for ―area wide benefit‖ under CDBG regulations.
HUD assumes that a project which provides general benefit (for example, a fire station)
throughout a service area, rather than specific benefit to a limited clientele (for example,
residents of a homeless shelter) will benefit all households in that area including those
with incomes too high to qualify for CDBG assistance. In order to qualify for CDBG
assistance, the area must demonstrate that 51% or more of the households to be
benefited meet the income test for eligibility. If a defined area meets this test, it is said
to qualify for ―area wide benefit.‖ An important technical footnote to this concept is that
Snohomish County is a member of a special class of jurisdictions that are allowed to
qualify area wide benefit at a rate lower than 51%. For the County, the figure is actually
46.6%, which means that if a proposed project benefits an area in which 46.6% or more
of the households are eligible for HUD benefit, the area can qualify for area wide
benefit. Essentially, the reason for the exception is that in some jurisdictions with a
wide variation in income levels, the values for the more prosperous areas can skew the
economic indicators to the detriment of the less prosperous areas. In Snohomish
County such indicators as median household income, incidence of homeownership,
prevailing wages, etc. in the southwest portion of the county are far more robust than in
other portions of the County. By reducing the 51% benefit test to 46.6%, HUD enables
access to its programs by areas of need in the county that would otherwise be excluded
because of the southwest county’s prosperity. The following map illustrates the
principle by calling out the census tracts that qualify for area wide benefit at the 46.6%
rate.




                                             31
                      Figure 2




Figure 2


           Figure 2




                        32
Washington Citizen Action (WCA) recently issued a report entitled Searching for Work
that Pays: 2004 Northwest Job Gap Study. The report describes the economic
challenge of many working families. It defines the ―living wage level‖ as the amount a
person must earn to ―meet all of a family’s basic needs, deal with emergencies, and
plan ahead without resorting to public assistance.‖ The following table compares the
State’s living wage level with 30%, 50%, and 80% of the County area median income,
as defined by HUD.


                                                 Table 4
        State Living Wage Level & 2004 HUD Income Guidelines
           HH            HUD 30%              HUD 50%              HUD 80%           State Living
           Size           Median               Median               Median           Wage Level
            1             $16,350              $27,250              $40,250            $20,942
            2             $18,700              $31,150              $46,000            $32,550
            3             $21,050              $35,050              $51,750            $43,608
            4             $23,350              $38,950              $57,500           $41,023*
      *4-person household is 2 adults (only one working) with a toddler & a school-aged child
      Source: Department of Housing and Urban Development and Washington Citizen Action



The State living wage level is most comparable to 50% of the HUD median income.

The following table lists the top ten occupations, based on the number of people
employed, in the Seattle-Bellevue-Everett area and associated annual wages.
Generally, the highest growth rates are in job categories with the lowest wages. Of the
10 most common occupations, only three exceed the $32,550 annual income the WCA
report indicates is the minimum for a two-person household and only two exceed the
WCA’s $41,023 minimum annual income for a four-person household. In point of fact,
the data in the chart probably overstate the availability of living-wage jobs in Snohomish
County. Since the job and wage data are aggregations of Seattle, Bellevue, Everett and
Island County rather than specific to Snohomish County alone, and because King
County is the acknowledged leading provider of well-paying jobs, and given that Census
2000 data indicate that 34.5% of the county workforce commutes to King County for
their employment, the situation for those Snohomish County residents unable to
commute and searching for livable-wage jobs is likely a good deal more dire than the
data would indicate.




                                                      33
                                                      Figure 3

                                     Real Wages vs Living Wage Level



  Combined food prep/serve
         workers


               Wait persons                                                                    Living Wage
                                                                                               4 People

                   Cashiers

                                                                                                 Living
 Laborers and freight, stock,                                                                    Wage
     materials movers                                                                          2 Persons


                 Retail sales
                                                                                                Living
                                                                                                Wage 1
                                                                                                Person
       Office clerks, general



          Registered nurses


           Customer service
            representatives


                 Sales Reps



   Business operations spc.


                                0    10,000       20,000        30,000   40,000   50,000   60,000     70,000
Note: Secretary does not include legal or medical secretaries
Source: Washington Department of Employment Security



Household Characteristics. The average household size in the County is 2.65 persons.
Average household size is larger in the unincorporated area (2.81 persons) and smaller
in the cities (2.52 persons).

Family households are the majority of households (70.2%) in the County. A
proportionally larger number of families live in the unincorporated county than in the
cities.




                                                         34
                                        Figure 4

              Distribution of Family and Nonfamily Households


                   80%


                   60%


                   40%


                   20%


                      0%
                              Cities            Balance of County
           Families            66%                    76%
           Nonfamilies         34%                    24%

    Source: 2000 Census



Single person households make up more than one quarter (27%) of the households in
the cities, while they are less than one fifth (17%) of households in the unincorporated
county. In most cities, single person households account for at least one fifth to one
third of all households. The exceptions are Brier (12%), Woodway (14%), Lake Stevens
(16%), Gold Bar (18%), Mukilteo (19%).

Most cities have high proportions of family households (more than 80%). In Everett 79%
of households are families and in Index, 72% of households are families. Just 11% of
all households in the County have 5 or more people.

Twenty-three percent (23%) of families in the County are headed by single parents. The
proportion of single parent families is higher in the cities (27%) than in the
unincorporated area (20%). Cities with the highest proportions of single parent families
are Index (50%), Everett (35%), Snohomish (32%), Stanwood (32%), Sultan (31%) and
Gold Bar (30%).

Ninety-two per cent (92%) of all people residing in group quarters (group homes,
nursing homes, shelters, dormitories, institutions) live in the incorporated area, and 46%
of those live in Everett. Of the statewide group quarter population, 1,996 or twenty-two
percent (22%) live in Monroe, reflecting the presence of the state correctional facility.




                                           35
Household Tenure. The balance between renter and owner households differs between
the incorporated and unincorporated areas.


                                            Figure 5

                                  Renters and Owners


     Incorporated Jurisdictions                    Unincorporated Snohomish County



                                                                         Renters
                                  Renters                                 23%
                                   41%

   Owners
    59%
                                                       Owners
                                                        77%



Source: 2000 Census



The total incorporated area has more owner than renter households The City of Everett
has 54% renter households, Lynnwood has 47%, Snohomish has 45%, Stanwood has
42% and Mountlake Terrace has 41% renter households. On the other hand, Brier and
Woodway have only 9% and 4% renter households, respectively. The following figure
illustrates the relationship of renters to owners for each city.




                                              36
                                       Figure 6

                      Owners and Renters by Jurisdiction




        Everett

          Index

     Lynnwood

    Snohomish

     Stanwood

      Mtlk Terr.

        Monroe

      Arlington

     Maryvsille

       Gr. Falls

     Mill Creek

     Darrington                                                              Owners
      Edmonds                                                                Renters
       Mukilteo

         Sultan

    Lk Stevens

 Unincorporated

      Gold Bar

           Brier

     Woodway


               0%     20%        40%          60%       80%         100%



Source: 2000 Census



Income Characteristics of Households. In 2000, nearly 50,000 households in the
County were in the lowest income quartile, with annual incomes of less than $19,052
                                         37
(roughly 50% of median income for a 4-person household). That number is projected to
increase to over 60,000 households by 2010.


                                  Table 5
                                         2000   2010   2020   2020
Households in the Lowest Income Quartile 49,480 62,714 75,179 86,877
% Increase                                  n/a   26%    20%    16%
Source: Puget Sound Regional Council, Small Area Forecasts, January 2000



In 2000, the median household income for Snohomish County was $53,060. Snohomish
County cities with household incomes below the median were Darrington, Everett,
Lynnwood, Index, Stanwood, Gold Bar, Arlington, Snohomish, Sultan, Marysville,
Mountlake Terrace, Granite Falls, and Monroe. Cities with household incomes above
the median were Edmonds, the portion of Bothell lying in Snohomish County, Lake
Stevens, Mukilteo, Mill Creek, Brier and Woodway.

According to the 2000 census, people living below the poverty line are 8% of the
population of cities compared with 6% of the population in the unincorporated area.
Cities with the highest poverty rates are Everett (13%), Stanwood (12%), and Index
(17%).

Households receiving public assistance are 3% of the households in cities and 2% of
households in unincorporated Snohomish County.

Housing Units. Since 2000, the number of housing units in the County has increased
from 236,205 to 256,938 (9%). Forty-eight per cent (48%) of new units built are located
in cities.

                                                  Table 6
                 Growth in Number of Housing Units, 2000 -2004
                                    2000               2004        Actual   % Change
Snohomish County                   236,025            256,698      Change
                                                                   20,673          9%
(all)
Unincorporated Area               108,986             119,675      10,689         10%
Cities                            127,219             137,023       9,804          8%
Source: State of Washington, 2004 Population Trends

The greatest increase was in the number of single-family units.




                                                       38
                                                        Figure 7

                     New Units 2000 - 2004 by Type of Structure


    Mobile Homes



        Multifamily



     Single Family


                             0         2,000    4,000      6,000         8,000 10,000 12,000 14,000 16,000


Source: State of Washington, 2004 Population Trends

                                                          Figure 8
                                                    Increase in Housing Units
                                                           2000-2004




      Everett
   Marysville
    Arlington
     Mukilteo
   Mill Creek
   Lynnwood
      Bothell
      Monroe
       Sultan
     Gr. Falls
  Lk Stevens
   Stanwood
    Edmonds
  Snohomish
   Darrington
    Mtlk Terr.
   Woodway
         Brier
    Gold Bar
        Index
                 0

                       250

                                 500

                                          750

                                                1,000

                                                        1,250

                                                                 1,500

                                                                          1,750

                                                                                  2,000

                                                                                          2,250

                                                                                                  2,500

                                                                                                          2,750

                                                                                                                  3,000

                                                                                                                          3,250




Source: State of Washington, 2004 Population Trends

                                                                39
From 2000 to 2004, Snohomish County’s total housing unit count increased from
236,205 to 256,698. The increases were from 155,178 to 168,783 for single-family
units, from 62,662 to 68,477 for multi-family units, and for mobile homes the increase
was from 18,365 to 19,438.

In each of the cities but Everett, there are more single family than multifamily units. In
the majority of communities single-family units make up more than 60% of the housing
stock, while in Everett they are 48% of all units. The majority of communities
experienced higher increases in single-family homes. However, in Bothell, Edmonds,
Everett, Lynnwood, and Stanwood the increase in multi-family units was greater.

The following two charts illustrate the relative distributions throughout the county of
single-family, multi-family and mobile housing (the MH/TH/Spec category).

                                                  Figure 9

                                          2000 Distribution of Housing Types

  120%
                                                                                                         Snohomish County
                                                                                                         Unincorporated county
                                                                                                         Incorporated county
  100%                                                                                                   Arlington
                                                                                                         Bothell part
                                                                                                         Brier
                                                                                                         Darrington
  80%                                                                                                    Edmonds
                                                                                                         Everett
                                                                                                         Gold Bar
                                                                                                         Granite Falls
  60%                                                                                                    Index
                                                                                                         Lake Stevens
                                                                                                         Lynnwood
                                                                                                         Marysville
  40%                                                                                                    Mill Creek
                                                                                                         Monroe
                                                                                                         MountlakeTerrace
                                                                                                         Mukilteo
  20%
                                                                                                         Snohomish
                                                                                                         Stanwood
                                                                                                         Sultan
                                                                                                         Woodway
   0%
           2000 Single Unit as % of All     2000 Two or More as % of All   2000 MH/TR/Spec as % of All




                                                       40
                                                 Figure 10

                                      2004 Distributon of Housing Types

120%

                                                                                                     Snohomish County
                                                                                                     Unincorporated county
                                                                                                     Incorporated county
100%                                                                                                 Arlington
                                                                                                     Bothell part
                                                                                                     Brier
                                                                                                     Darrington
80%                                                                                                  Edmonds
                                                                                                     Everett
                                                                                                     Gold Bar
                                                                                                     Granite Falls
60%                                                                                                  Index
                                                                                                     Lake Stevens
                                                                                                     Lynnwood
                                                                                                     Marysville
40%                                                                                                  Mill Creek
                                                                                                     Monroe
                                                                                                     MountlakeTerrace
                                                                                                     Mukilteo
20%                                                                                                  Snohomish
                                                                                                     Stanwood
                                                                                                     Sultan
                                                                                                     Woodway

 0%
       2004 Single Unit as % of All     2004 Two or More as % of All   2004 MH/TR/Spec as % of All




                                                       41
As Figure 11 illustrates, the housing stock is older in the cities than in the
unincorporated area.

                                                 Figure 11

                                          Age of Housing


        50%

        45%

        40%

        35%

        30%
                                                                                   10 -30 Years
        25%                                                                        31 - 60 Years
                                                                                   60 +Years
        20%

        15%

        10%

          5%

          0%
                            Cites                   Unicorporated

      Source: 2000 Census



Communities in which older housing (60+ years) comprises fifteen percent or more of
the total housing stock are Granite Falls (15.3%), Stanwood (15.4%), Everett (18.6%),
Snohomish (22%), Darrington (22.4%) and Index (62.9%).

In the cities, housing units tend to be smaller than in the unincorporated area. Sixty-five
percent (65%) of all studio and one-bedroom units are located in cities and 55% of all

                                            42
units with four or more bedrooms are located in the unincorporated County. As was the
case in 1990, census 2000 data confirm that in the majority of cities, more than two-
thirds of the units have two or three bedrooms.

Housing Condition. The majority of the housing stock in the County is in good, very
good, or excellent condition, as classified by the Snohomish County Assessor’s Office.
However, units in 40% of residential structure are in need of some repair. Units in
average condition are those needing minor repairs and correction of deferred
maintenance. Units in fair condition need major repairs, and those in poor condition
require replacement of most systems.


                                              Figure 12
                             Condition of Residential Structures


                                           Poor
                                       Fair 1%              Excellent
                                       6%                     9%

                                                                          Very Good
                   Average                                                   5%
                    33%




                                                                Good
                                                                46%




       Source: Snohomish County Assessor’s Office


4. Homeless Needs. There are 12 emergency shelters in Snohomish County that
participate in data collection. In 2004, these shelters provided emergency housing for
3,256 men, women and children. The majority of the data collected is from shelters that
only serve families – only ONE shelter serves individuals. The following are
characteristics of the sheltered homeless population as reported by the 12 emergency
shelter programs unless otherwise noted:

   Racial/Ethnic Minorities: A trend exists in the continued growth of minority
    populations in shelters, which increased from 31.4% in 2000 to 34.9% in 2004. The
    proportion of homeless minorities, relative to that of the whole population of the
    County, is significant. African-Americans make up the largest part of this group,
    followed by Native Americans and Hispanics.

   Veterans: Both the number and percentage of veterans sheltered have increased
    from 2000 to 2004. In 2000, the 192 veterans in shelters constituted 5.2% of all
    persons sheltered in the 12 reporting shelters; in 2004, the 341 veterans in shelters
    were 10.5% of all persons sheltered.
                                                    43
    The County’s Veterans Assistance Office tracks the number of homeless veterans it
    assists. During calendar year 2004, the Office provided $50,909 in vouchers for
    shelter, transportation, food, medical and other emergency assistance to 184 homeless
    veterans. The January 2005 Point In Time Count identified 121 homeless veterans
    either living on the street, in emergency shelters or living with friends or relatives.

    The WorkSource Veterans Assistance Program reports the enrollment of 170
    homeless vets and the placement of 103 veterans in housing, of whom 82 are in
    transitional housing. The program met their 2003 goals and has been re-funded for
    2004 and 2005.

 Incarcerated Homeless: The Snohomish County Jail implemented a data collection
    system in late 2004, which tracks information on homeless and veteran status for
    incarcerated adults. In the first two months, the County Jail reported booking 2,829
    persons; of those, 541 were confirmed homeless men and women. The majority of
    those persons (374) were staying with family or friends temporarily and not by choice.
    Sixty men and women reported living on the street, and 41 were living in emergency
    shelters or transitional housing programs.           The remaining 66 persons were
    precariously housed: most were at imminent risk of eviction or had no housing
    identified upon release from jail, some were living week-to-week in motels, and 15 (6
    men and 9 women) were victims of domestic violence. These numbers may represent
    a duplicated count, and not every person booked into jail can be interviewed to assess
    housing status (many are able to post bond and obtain release prior to such an
    interview). Nevertheless, it is a clear indication that homelessness is either a reality or
    a very imminent possibility for a significant number of persons booked into the Jail.

   Age: In 2004, 971 of all persons sheltered (or 29.8%) were age 17 and younger; 2,180
    (67%) were between the ages of 18 to 54, and 105 (3.2%) were age 55 or older.

   Sources of Household Income: At the time they enter shelter, most households
    have no income. Most of those who have no income are reported by the Everett
    Gospel Mission, by the Cocoon House shelter for teens, and by the Snohomish
    County Center for Battered Women. When people do have income at the time they
    enter shelter, it is most likely to be Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF)
    or other public assistance. Both the number and percent of people employed at the
    time they enter shelter have dropped, from 344 persons (15.2%) in 2000 to 192
    persons (8.32%) in 2004.

   Primary Reason Household Became Homeless: Lack of affordable housing is the
    most commonly cited reason for households becoming homeless and it has increased
    from 387 households (17.1% of those sheltered) in 2000 to 668 households (28.9% of
    those sheltered) in 2004. Eviction or displacement is the next most common reason
    for homelessness (22.0% of those sheltered), followed by lack of income (17% of those
    sheltered). It is worth noting that these three factors, which account for 67.9% of all
    persons in shelters, are all economic in nature.


                                              44
    In 2004, at least 31.6% of all households composed of single women or women with
    children who were in emergency shelters were there as a direct result of domestic
    violence. The actual percentage is almost certainly higher, but cannot be determined
    from the existing report form. It is important to note that even when domestic violence
    is not reported as the primary reason for that specific incident of homelessness, it is a
    contributing factor for many homeless women.

   Disabilities: There is a close relationship between disability and homelessness. In
    2004, of the total 3,256 persons served, shelters reported 415 (12.8%) persons with
    mental health issues or chronic mental illness, 588 (18.1%) with substance abuse
    problems, and 147 (4.5%) persons with other types of disabilities. There is duplication
    among those characteristics (i.e., a person may be reported as both mentally ill and
    having substance abuse problems). Conversely, intake statistics may underreport
    disabilities because some are not readily apparent at the time a person enters the
    shelter. A 1999 study by the California State Independent Living Council found that
    50% of the homeless persons included in the study had significant disabilities, with the
    majority having disabling mental illness. This compares with about 10% of adults in the
    general population having disabilities.

    Applying the national rates of disability to U.S. Census statistics, the Snohomish
    County Division of Long Term Care and Aging estimates there were 102,814 people
    with moderate and severe disabilities in the county in 1998. With a 78%
    unemployment rate, most of these people are living on SSI or SSDI. For these people,
    any loss of housing is likely to result in homelessness, given the one- to four-year
    waiting list for subsidized housing.

    The January 2005 Point In Time Homeless Count surveyed 1406 homeless persons,
    of which 988 self-reported disability.

                                          Figure 13
                        2005 Point In Time Count: Disability Distribution
                         594




                                                                         419
                                                245

                                                286
                                               240
                                                55




                                                54




                                                                26
                                                40




                                             117
                                          S




                                                                     e
                                           l
                     ua HIV l
                                          l




                                        al




                                        er
                                         e
                                       ed




                                          l

                                       ta
                                       ta
                                       ta




                                       ta
                                      ID




                                                                 on
                                     us
                                     su




                                     th
                                    en
                                    en

                                    en




                                   en
                                    os
                                   /A




                                                                N
                                  Ab




                                   O
                                  Vi




                                  M
                                  m
                                l/M




                                 gn




                                  D
                              op




                                e
                              ia
                  ca




                             nc
                            el




                            D
                si




                          ta
                        ev




                        lly
                y




                       bs
             Ph

                       D




                    Su
                    D




   Mental Health: Compass Health, the county’s largest mental health provider, gathers
    data on homeless people to whom it provides services, whether they are sheltered or
    not. In 2004, the Compass Health homeless project outreached to almost 600

                                             45
    unduplicated homeless persons; of that number, Compass Health provided mental
    health and housing support to 150 through the homeless project. It is standard
    policy that every Compass Health clinician serves other clients who become
    homeless, and assist with housing support. Compass Health also operates a Drop
    In Center that is open from 8:00 am to 1:00 pm daily and offers breakfast and
    lunch two days per week. The Drop In Center was implemented to assist Compass
    Health to identify mental health needs and to have the opportunity to forge
    relationships with those homeless who would not necessarily seek assistance.
    Presently, the Compass Health Drop In Center is at risk, and has only secured 14
    months of funding. This outreach style Drop In Center is crucial to addressing the
    chronic homeless, mentally ill needs and the program plays a vital role in outreach.

   Domestic Violence: In 2003, the Center for Battered Women housed 392 victims of
    domestic violence in their 15 bed confidential shelter. However, more that four times
    as many people (1,621) were turned away from the shelter due to lack of space. Of
    those fortunate enough to be sheltered, 30 percent were from Everett, 30 percent were
    from other areas in Snohomish County, 24 percent were from King County, and 18
    percent were from other areas in Washington State or other states.

    Increasingly, more single women are seeking shelter form domestic violence. In 2003,
    single women made up 57% of the Center for Battered Women’s shelter clients.
    Virtually all potentially available transitional housing is for women with children. This
    means that single women stay in shelter for longer periods and have no place to
    transition to. Therefore, there is a growing need for domestic violence housing,
    emergency, transitional and permanent for single women victims without children.

   Chemical Dependency: Affordable housing is one of the most critical needs for people
    with chemical dependency. Housing people who are chemically dependent - even
    those who are in recovery - is difficult. There is often strong neighborhood opposition
    to such housing due to perceived safety concerns. In addition, most subsidized
    housing programs will evict residents if they are abusing drugs or alcohol. Often times,
    treatment options are not made available to those being evicted.

   HIV/AIDS: The dedicated permanent AIDS housing in Snohomish County for people
    with HIV/AIDS is provided through two units of Section 8 assistance and 5 permanent-
    based rental assistance (PBRA) units. HUD has also eliminated the HIV/AIDS housing
    vouchers set-aside in the Shelter Plus Care program, of which Snohomish County had
    15 slots. Two years ago, Snohomish County lost 2 of its 17 Housing Opportunities for
    Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) tenant based rental assistance (TBRA) slots. If the
    proposed Section 8 budget cuts are made permanent, there will be significantly fewer
    affordable hosing options for this population. Already, homelessness is a frequently
    recurring issue in the lives of many people living with HIV/AIDS. According to Catholic
    Community Services, administrators of the federal HOPWA program, there is an unmet
    need for 4 to 5 housing slots a year.

   Household Status: Shelters report that the majority of those who use emergency
    shelters are women with children. It is to be noted that the majority of reporting
                                         46
    shelters only serve families. An unfortunate trend is the rise in the number of teenage
    parents seeking shelter. In 2000, 35 teens and children were reported turned away by
    emergency shelter providers; in 2004, 174 teen parents and children were reported
    turned away. The extent of duplication in requests for shelter by teen parents is
    unknown.

   Unsheltered Homeless:       The number of people reported turned away from
    emergency shelters has increased in the past four years. In 2000, a total of 10,571
    persons were reported turned away; by 2004, that number had climbed to 20,597. If
    people do not seek emergency shelter, they are not included in any of the statistics
    currently collected by emergency shelter providers. In 2004, approximately 82.5% of
    all persons reported turned away were members of families with children. In
    January 2005, a 24-hour Point In Time Count identified 2,500 homeless, of which
    35.78% (503) reported that they were living on the street, camping, or living in a
    vehicle and 452 were living in a shelter or in a transitional housing project. One
    hundred and fourteen people (114) reported that it was ―unknown‖ where they would
    be sleeping.

    Prevention services report turnaway counts increased from 6,149 persons in 2000 to
    27,091 in 2004 an increase of 340.6%. This is a duplicated count, and at present there
    are no plans to attempt to "unduplicate" these numbers. (However, the steering
    committee of the Homeless Policy Task Force recognizes the need for an unduplicated
    count and will continue to plan for and support efforts to gather more accurate needs
    data.) Some of the increased demand may be due to the new Community Assistance
    Program operated by The Interfaith Association of Snohomish County, which includes
    requests for assistance not previously reported as part of this system. Since 1998,
    assistance to prevent eviction increased by almost 20 percent and now totals 75
    percent of all prevention assistance provided. At the same time, an increasing number
    of people have been denied prevention services due to lack of funding. More funding
    for prevention services is needed to keep people from becoming homeless.

    Furthermore, increases may reflect the slow return to economic recovery and several
    households have lost employment, exhausted unemployment, liquidated assets, and
    are becoming increasingly at risk of homelessness. The Snohomish County Economic
    Development Council’s website notes that, ―The County continues to see a
    pronounced shift in its major industry sectors. Between the years 1970 and 2000, the
    Services Industry was the fastest growing sector in Snohomish County, increasing by
    484% and the Manufacturing Industry was the slowest growing sector, increasing only
    80%‖. This shift has had a detrimental effect on unskilled and semi-skilled workers,
    who in the past might have found relatively high paying jobs in the manufacturing
    sector, but now are more likely employed in low-wage service sector jobs.

    Shelter turnaway counts are duplicated, as people are counted by each shelter to
    which they apply and are turned away, as well as by the shelter that accepts them. At
    the present time, combined emergency shelter and turnaway statistics are not
    collected in such a way as to eliminate duplication; however, surveys are conducted
    periodically to gather information about the extent of duplication.
                                            47
   The most common reason people are turned away from shelters is a lack of shelter
   space; however, people are turned away for other reasons as well. Some shelters
   serve specialized populations, such as youth or families. Most shelters are unable to
   serve people with felony histories, untreated mental illness or substance abuse
   problems that may present a disruption or danger to others in the shelter facility.
   Additional barriers exist; for example, shelters are generally unable to serve people
   with pets, and have up front fees or rules that do not allow for late entry to assist those
   with late evening employment.

 Homeless Youth: Previously, homeless teens with children found little or no shelter. The
  County is responding to the need by opening an additional 32 transitional housing
  units to meet this population’s specific needs. Youth housing needs have
  continued to rise and at this time there is only one licensed youth emergency shelter in
 the county. Other shelters do not accept unaccompanied youth under the age of 18
 years. As a result, a new 8-bed youth shelter will open in North County in 2005 and an
 additional 8-bed youth shelter is planned to open in South County in 2006, increasing the
 present 8-bed youth capacity to a total of 24-beds.

 Single Females: The Snohomish County Homeless Policy Task Force has
  identified a need for housing for the single adult female population and has
  responded by developing a 12-unit permanent housing project for chronically
  homeless women which will open in 2005. The Homeless Policy Task Force has
  also developed a 14-unit chronically homeless permanent housing project for both
  males and females expected to open in late 2005 or early 2006, adding 26 new
  units specifically for homeless individuals.       Additionally, a Mission-style
  emergency shelter is being planned to open in South County, making
  approximately 32 more beds available for single adult females.

 Point in Time Count: The Homeless Policy Task Force conducted a 24-hour Point in
  Time Count on January 18, 2005 and the data results are unduplicated. The Homeless
  Policy Task Force collected data in emergency shelters, transitional housing projects
  and through a street count. The Point In Time Count included the use of both a tick
  sheet and a survey. The survey contained demographic information, a ―reasons for
  being homeless‖ section and a need survey.         Some of the respondents did not
  complete the survey but were recorded on a ―tick sheet‖ matrix.
  The Point In Time Count identified 2497 unduplicated homeless households of the 2500
  household counted. The unduplicated Point In Time Count results are as follows:




                                      Figure 14
                               2005 Point In Time Count:
                                             48
                             Individual vs. Family Homelessness
          2037

                                       2037 Individuals and 460 Families were counted.
                                       Three duplicate records were disregarded.
                       460
                                       The results identified 588 Youth as being
                                        homeless.
        IND      FAMILIES




The tallies for individuals and families from the Point In Time count were:

  Homeless Individuals:
    514 Adult Females
    863 Adult Males
    147 Youth Females
    111 Youth Males

  Homeless Families:
    245 Female Head of Household
    137 Male Head of Household
    78 Genders Unspecified
    330 Youth Genders Unspecified
    72 Adult Genders Unspecified.

SURVEY RESPONDENTS: Of the 2500 household counted, 1406 completed a survey
and 1094 declined to complete the survey. Of those counted who completed a survey,
the following results were recorded.

  Of the 1094 households that completed a survey:
    989 Homeless Individuals Completed a Survey (70.34%)
    414 Homeless Families Completed a Survey (29.45%)
Of those who completed a survey, 57.18% (804) were males and 35.28% (251) were
females. Of those homeless surveyed 42.46% (597) are between 26 and 44 years of age,
have a self-reported disability (70.2%), have an average of 1.7 members in the household
and reported that 121 are veterans. The survey requested information about length of
time in homelessness and results show that the majority of who completed surveys has
been homeless for one year or longer (35.42% or 498 respondents). The following chart
shows the responses and family/individual breakdowns.




                                              49
                                        Table 7
                 2005 Point In Time Count: Duration of Homelessness
                                 Individuals       Families            All
                                                                  Respondents
N/A (Not Homeless)                  1 0.10%          1 0.24%          2 0.14%
Less than 2 Weeks                   8     0.81       5     1.21      13     0.92
2-3 Weeks                           6     0.61       1     0.24       7     0.50
1-2 Months                         81     8.19      43    10.39     124     8.82
3-5 Months                         97     9.81      53    12.80     150    10.67
6-8 Months                         89     9.00      43    10.39     132     9.39
9-11 Months                        31     3.13      26     6.28      58     4.13
1 Year or Longer                  346    34.98     152    36.71     498    35.42
No Response                       330    33.37      90    21.74     422    30.01
Individual Respondents 989, Families 414, Total 1406 records



The survey requested information about how often they experience homelessness and
results show that the majority of who completed surveys have been homeless one time,
(36.70% or 516 respondents). The data also reports that 208 households have been
homeless more than 4 times in the last year. The following chart shows the responses
and family/individual breakdowns.

                                       Table 8
               2005 Point In Time Count: Frequency of Homelessness
                                Individuals      Families           All
                                                               Respondents
N/A                                2 0.20%         1 0.24%         3 0.21%
Once                             295    29.83   221     53.38    516    36.70
Two or Three Times               105    10.62     57    13.77    163    11.59
Four Times                        22     2.22      4     0.97     26     1.85
More Than Four Times             180    18.20     27     6.52    208    14.79
No Response                      385    38.93   104     25.12    490    34.85
Individual Respondents 989, Families 414, Total 1406




Of those who completed a Point In Time Count Survey, individuals where predominately
identified as being ―on the street‖ homeless and more families were served in shelters
and in transitional housing. The results are as follows:




                                                               50
                                          Table 9
                                2005 Point In Time Count:
            Current Living Situation (More Than One Response Possible)
                                   Individuals       Families          All
                                                                  Respondents
Stable                               13 1.31%        14 3.38%        28 1.99%
Homeless (Street, camping,          420    42.47     82     19.81   503    35.78
vehicle, etc.)
Homeless (Shelter,                  252    25.48    200     48.31   452    32.15
Transitional Housing)
Homeless – Before                    45     4.55     12      2.90    57     4.05
Incarceration
Homeless – Leaving                   68     6.88     24      5.80    93     6.61
Incarceration
Living with Friends                 172    17.39     33      7.97   206    14.65
Living with Relatives               143    14.46     53     12.80   196    13.94
Eviction Notice                      14     1.42     16      3.86    30     2.13
Individual Respondents 989, Families 414, Total 1406


The Point In Time Survey also included a ―Situations Causing Homelessness‖, loss of job
being reported as the number one cause (459 or 32.65%) by all survey respondents. The
results of the ―Situations Causing Homelessness‖ are predominately economic. The
National Low-Income Housing Coalition looks at the relationship between wages and
housing costs and calculates a ―housing wage‖, or the hourly wage rate required to afford
units of various sizes and still meet other basic needs without resorting to public
assistance. The National Low-Income Housing Coalition estimated Snohomish County
housing wage as $18.43 per hour. As the January 2000 Washington citizen Action
Northwest Federation of Community Organizations reports, eight of the top ten jobs do
not pay enough (a ―living wage‖) to support even one person, much less a family, at a level
that covers basic needs (i.e. food, housing, child care, health care, transportation, etc.).
The results from the Point In Time Survey support the conclusion that economic reasons
are contributing to homelessness. The survey results are as follows:

                                       Table 10
                              2005 Point In Time Count:
        Situations Causing Homelessness (More Than One Response Possible)
                                Individuals        Families         All
                                                                Respondents
Not Specified                    322    32.56      54     13.04  376    26.74
                                            %                %             %
Domestic Violence                 88     8.90     127     30.68  215    15.29
Family Break-up                  145    14.66     118     28.50  264    18.78
Job Loss / Unemployed            296    29.93     161     38.89  459    32.65
Poor Credit Rating                93     9.40      86     20.77  179    12.73
Medical Costs                     45     4.55      24      5.80   69     4.91
Mental Illness                   104    10.52      45     10.87  150    10.67
Medical Problems / Illness        91     9.20      47     11.35  139     9.89
                                          51
Drug / Alcohol Use                               202   20.42    79   19.08   281   19.99
Unable to Pay Rent                               212   21.44   167   40.34   381   27.10
Evicted (Non-Payment of                           27    2.73    15    3.62    42    2.99
Utilities)
Evicted (Other Reason)                            72    7.28    66   15.94   138    9.82
Lack of Child Care                                10    1.01    21    5.07    31    2.20
Convicted of Felony                               92    9.30    35    8.45   128    9.10
Convicted of Misdemeanor                          59    5.97    31    7.49    90    6.40
Prison / Jail                                    137   13.85    57   13.77   195   13.87
Parole / Probation                                47    4.75    26    6.28    73    5.19
TANF Sanction                                      3    0.30    18    4.35    21    1.49
TANF Termination                                   2    0.20     9    2.17    11    0.78
Exhausted Unemployment                            52    5.26    29    7.00    82    5.83
Benefits.
Reduced Work Hours                                21    2.12    19    4.59    41    2.92
Need Add’l Job Skills                             47    4.75    55   13.29   102    7.25
Other                                             42    4.25    24    5.80    66    4.69
Individual Respondents 989, Families 414, Total 1406


 Homelessness Prevention Services: Homelessness prevention services may include
  short-term rental subsidies; landlord-tenant mediation; foreclosure or eviction prevention;
  assistance with paying utility deposits, security deposits and first/last months' rental
  deposits; major and minor home repair services (including wheelchair accommodations),
  and weatherization services. A variety of agencies currently provide those services
  throughout the County. As part of the 10 Year Plan To End Homelessness, the
  Homeless Policy Task Force Steering Committee is developing strategies to maximize
  current funding and to gain additional funding sources to actively focus on prevention and
  diversion.

 General: Homeless people live temporarily in inexpensive motels, stay for periods of
  time with friends or relatives, live in abandoned or unoccupied buildings, sleep in their
  vehicles, create makeshift shelters in wooded areas (both urban and rural), stay
  temporarily in area campgrounds, and sleep under freeway overpass structures. People
  living in substandard housing often have no alternative but to remain there, despite
  health and safety hazards, because they are unable to obtain any affordable housing.
  Undocumented aliens may continue to live in substandard and even dangerous housing,
  because they fear that any complaint to the landlord will result in their being reported to
  the Immigration and Naturalization Service.

 Nearly all of the existing emergency shelters are within the City of Everett. Although
  there are no residency requirements, getting to a shelter in Everett can be difficult or
  impossible for homeless people in rural areas such as Index, Darrington, or Sultan if they
  do not have a vehicle. Additionally, people are reluctant to leave communities where
  they have been living for some time and have friends, and where their children are
  attending school.


                                                        52
 All available data suggest that the homeless population is growing. For all populations
  of homeless, there is a tremendous lack of capacity to meet the current need. Presently,
  Snohomish County has a well-developed homeless system which manages the needs of
  family homelessness and the majority of housing and service opportunities are available
  for families; Snohomish County providers are just beginning to build housing and
  placement opportunities for homeless individuals and specifically, developing plans to
  house the chronic homelessness.          Chronic Homelessness is defined as an
  unaccompanied homeless individual with a disabling condition who has either been
  continuously homeless for a year or more OR has had at least four episodes of
  homelessness in the past three years. The disabling condition definition is defined as
  a person with a diagnosable substance use disorder, serious mental illness,
  developmental disabilities, or chronic physical illness or disability, including the co-
  occurrence of two or more of these conditions. The Department of Housing and
  Urban Development (HUD) is charging communities across the United States to
  eliminate chronic homelessness and it is estimated that Snohomish County has
  approximately 600 homeless persons that can be categorized as chronically
  homeless.


5. Priority Homeless Needs: The following table ―Gaps Analysis Chart‖ presents
data on housing needs of homeless based on the homeless housing inventory in the
following ―Table 1A‖ format as prescribed by HUD. The 2004 data were developed as part
of Snohomish County’s Continuum of Care planning process and in preparation for the
writing of the local 10-Yer Plan to End Homelessness. The community processes are
collegial, undertaken in consultation with non-profit housing developers, financial
institutions, government representatives, funders, homeless shelters, transitional housing
providers, homeless people and social service agencies regarding the needs of homeless
families with children and individuals, persons with disabilities and other categories of
homeless persons, and is consistent with the County’s citizen participation process. The
2004 GAPS Analysis reports the number of persons living in all of the circumstances cited
above was estimated through the 2004 GAPS Analysis as nightly need includes: 1,965
homeless individuals, 2,206 families, of which 1,153 are chronically homeless persons
unsheltered nightly in Snohomish County.

                                       Table 11A
                                    (HUD Table 1A)
                    2004 Continuum of Care Housing Gaps Analysis Chart
                             Current Inventory in  Under Development in   Unmet Need/Gap
                                    2004                   2005
INDIVIDUALS
 Beds   Emergency Shelter         150                      10                  1157
        Transitional Housing      189                       8                   150
       Permanent Supportive      1471                      50                   319
              Housing
                Total           1,810                      68                  1,626
PERSONS IN FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN
 Beds   Emergency Shelter         189                       0                   319
        Transitional Housing      658                      132                  113

                                           53
           Permanent Supportive                326                               0                       927
                Housing
                 Total                         1173                           132                       1,359


                                            Table 11 B
                            Sheltered and Unsheltered Homeless Persons
             Homeless Population                      Sheltered                             Unsheltered          Total
                                                      Emergency       Transitional
   1.Homeless Individuals                                      150                 189               1,626        1,965
   2.Homeless Families with Children                           189                 658               1,359        2,206
   2a.Persons in Homeless Families with                        397               1,382               2,854        4,633
   Children(2.1 average)
   Total (lines 1 + 2a)                                        547               1,571               4,480        6,598
           Homeless Subpopulations                             Sheltered                    Unsheltered          TOTAL
   1. Chronically Homeless                                                           257               896        1,153
   2. Seriously Mentally ill                                                         237
   3. Chronic Substance Abuse                                                         78
   4. Veterans                                                                       116
   5. Persons with HIV/AIDS                                                           42
   6. Victims of Domestic Violence                                                   276
   7. Youth                                                                           39

    The Homeless Policy Task Force, Continuum of Care, cites the following as 2004
    homeless inventory housing availability. This information was gathered to calculate the
    gap in housing or ―or un-met housing need’ as shown in the GAPS table above.

                                           Table 11 C
                                  Emergency Shelter: Current Inventory
                                   2004 YEAR ROUND UNITS / BEDS                                    2004 ALL BEDS
                              FAMILY UNITS       FAMILY BEDS         INDIVIDUAL          YEAR         SEASONAL    OVERFLOW/
                                                                       BEDS            ROUND BED                  VOUCHERS
                                                                                         COUNT

                SUBTOTAL             32                162              114                276           0               63
                                  Emergency Under Development
                SUBTOTAL                                                10
TOTAL                              32                 162              124                 276           0               63


                                             Table 11 D
                                  Transitional Housing: Current Inventory
                                     2004 YEAR ROUND UNITS / BEDS                                  2004 ALL BEDS
                                  FAMILY UNITS FAMILY BEDS   INDIVIDUAL                     YEAR      SEASONAL    OVERFLOW/
                                                               BEDS                        ROUND                  VOUCHERS
                  SUBTOTAL            204          658          185                         842          0            0
                                  Transitional Under Development
                  SUBTOTAL                39             132                 8              140          0               0
TOTAL                                 243               790              193               982           0               0


                                                       54
                                         Table 11F
                       Permanent Supportive Housing: Current Inventory
                                      2004 YEAR ROUND UNITS / BEDS                   2004 ALL BEDS
                               FAMILY UNITS    FAMILY BEDS      INDIVIDUAL   YEAR      SEASONAL OVERFLOW/
                                                                   BEDS      ROUND                 VOUCHERS
                 SUBTOTAL          314             326             1471       1797         0          0
                             PERMANENT SUPPORTIVE UNDER DEVELOPMENT
                 SUBTOTAL           0                0              45        45          0          0
TOTAL                             314              326            1516       1942         0          0


    The Point In Time Count, Survey has critical self-report information of which 1,406
    respondents completed the ―Needs Survey‖ section and recorded ―affordable housing‖,
    ―food‖, ―a safe place to stay‖, ―job search assistance‖, ―dental assistance‖, and ―medical
    assistance‖ respectively as the top six needs. The responses are categorized in
    Individuals responded, Families responded and All Respondents.

    The full Point In Time Count Needs Survey results are as follows:

                                           Table 12
                                  2005 Point In Time Count
                  Household Needs Cited: (More Than One Response Possible)
                                    Individuals        Families          All
                                                                    Respondents
    Safe place to stay               363    36.70     119     28.74  483     34.35
                                                %                %              %
    Eviction prevention               77     7.79      41      9.90  118      8.39
    Affordable housing               435    43.98     237     57.25  674     47.94
    Case management                  106    10.72     111     26.81  218     15.50
    Foster care assistance            19     1.92      11      2.66   30      2.13
    Food                             356    36.00     152     36.71  509     36.20
    Help getting food stamps         175    17.69      70     16.91  246     17.50
    Utility assistance               137    13.85     100     24.15  237     16.86
    Clothing                         265    26.79     112     27.05  378     26.88
    Medical assistance               272    27.50     111     26.81  383     27.24
    Medication                       169    17.09      61     14.73  230     16.36
    Mental health assistance         159    16.08      67     16.18  227     16.15
    Dental assistance                289    29.22     113     27.29  404     28.73
    Personal / family counseling     134    13.55     105     25.36  240     17.07
    Personal storage                 118    11.93      34      8.21  152     10.81
    Bus ticket                       260    26.29      74     17.87  334     23.76
    Reliable transportation          244    24.67     109     26.33  354     25.18
    Child care                        19     1.92      62     14.98   81      5.76
    Budget assistance                 93     9.40      99     23.91  192     13.66
    Credit counseling                 93     9.40      85     20.53  179     12.73
    Educational information          103    10.41      85     20.53  188     13.37
    Job search assistance            256    25.88     131     31.64  387     27.52
                                                  55
Resume assistance                                116       11.73   77   18.60   193   13.73
Alcohol / drug treatment                         178       18.00   57   13.77   235   16.71
Program information                               88        8.90   37    8.94   125    8.89
Laundromat                                       184       18.60   60   14.49   245   17.43
Place to clean up / shower                       210       21.23   49   11.84   260   18.49
Pet placement for housing                         41        4.15   19    4.59    60    4.27
Legal assistance                                 119       12.03   75   18.12   195   13.87
Help, don’t know where to                        140       14.16   54   13.04   195   13.87
start
Other                                                  7    0.71   14    3.38    21    1.49
Individual Respondents 989, Families 414, Total 1406




6. Homeless Strategy: Throughout 2004, the Homeless Policy Task Force, and
specifically its steering committee, has reviewed current delivery processes and
systems, resulting in plans to streamline homeless delivery system entrance, plan for
prevention, gain accurate data, measure performance (systems and project), organize
advocacy opportunities and become more cost effective. The Homeless Policy Task
Force is moving toward ending rather than managing homelessness though several
strategies. All of the information collected, gaps in delivery identified, barriers
acknowledged and planning will be put forth in one document, the 10 - Year Plan to End
Homelessness. The Snohomish County 10 Year Plan To End Homelessness has been
titled: Everyone@Home.NOW.

In 2003 the Homeless Policy Task Force recognized the need for ―ending‖ rather than
―managing‖ homelessness and ratified the ―Housing First‖ strategy. The components of
―Housing First― include rapid re-housing; needs identification and provision of and/or
referral to crisis intervention; short-term housing/shelter; and short-term management.
One or more of these tools is applied to each case and quickly produces a plan for
gaining permanent housing. The Homeless Policy Task Force also recognized the need
for data and that successes could be reported through data. As a result, the Homeless
Policy Task Force ratified the use of an outcome-measured rating and ranking tool to
score Supportive Housing Program applications. Applicants are asked about their
participation in data gathering and are awarded bonus points for their participation.

The Homeless Policy Task Force also recognized a need for performance-driven results
and ratified the use of performance measures for rating and ranking applications.
Performance measures include: client stabilization through housing placement (how
quickly do clients gain housing placement); housing longevity (how long clients stay
housed); and income increase. Transitional programs are measured on the number of
graduating clients that gain permanent housing placement immediately after graduating
from transitional housing. In the 2005 Supportive Housing Program funding round similar
outcome-based measures will be used, including a ―logic model‖ that will ask applicants to
write program goals to be submitted with their applications.

The Snohomish County Homeless Policy Task Force (HPTF) has led the planning and
development of Snohomish County’s Continuum of Care System (CoC) for the
                                     56
homeless for 15 years. The HPTF is a countywide, community-based planning group
encompassing nonprofit organizations (including those representing people with
disabilities), government agencies (including Snohomish County Human Services,
Snohomish County Office of Housing and Community Development, Washington State
Department of Corrections, and Washington State Department of Social and Health
Services), public housing authorities (including Housing Authority of Snohomish County,
Everett Housing Authority, and Tulalip Housing Authority), faith-based and other
community-based organizations, homeless providers, housing developers, veterans
representatives, homeless representatives and advocates, and mainstream resource
providers (including Compass Health, the Community Health Center, and Snohomish
Health District).

An effective CoC System must address housing and service needs along the entire
continuum in addition to the specific needs of each homeless subpopulation.

Snohomish County’s CoC includes homeless prevention services, emergency shelter,
transitional housing, permanent supportive housing, and permanent affordable housing.
The Homeless Policy Task Force writes an annual Action Plan as part of the County’s
funding application for HUD McKinney funds. The Action Plan includes goals and
activities to improve services and increase housing; addressing the gaps between the
unserved homeless population and their needs and the service/housing capacity.

The Homeless Policy Task Force adopted a Housing First philosophy as an integral
component of its 2002-2003 Action Plan and continues to support a Housing First
approach to addressing homelessness.

A Housing First philosophy rests on two central premises: 1) re-housing should be the
central goal, and 2) providing housing assistance and follow-up case management
services after a family or individual is housed, significantly reduces the time people
spend experiencing homelessness.

A Housing First approach consists of three components:

   Crisis intervention, emergency services (including shelter), screening and needs
    assessment;

   Permanent housing services to help people access and sustain housing. Services to
    help people find affordable units, access housing subsidies, and negotiate leases
    are vital. People may also need assistance to overcome barriers such as bad credit,
    poor tenant history, and discrimination. Services should be tailored to the specific
    population; and

   Case Management Services to help people secure and/or increase income, identify
    service needs, provide supports and resources, and move people towards self-
    sufficiency.


                                           57
Many individuals and families have the capacity to exit homelessness rapidly and return
to permanent, independent housing without on-going assistance. Others will require
longer stays in transitional housing to overcome issues such as domestic violence or
substance abuse, and some families and individuals will need permanent supportive
housing in order to remain housed.

The report ―Housing First, Ending Family Homelessness‖ published by Beyond Shelter
states:

       ―While acknowledging and addressing the personal factors that contribute
      to family homelessness, the housing first methodology was designed to
      more effectively address the economic root causes of the problem:
      poverty and the lack of affordable housing. The program provides a critical
      link between the emergency/transitional housing system and the
      community-based social service, educational and health care
      organizations that bring about neighborhood integration and family self-
      sufficiency.
      ―The approach deals with the interrelated problems those homeless
      families face: poverty, economic development, social infrastructure and
      housing. Services are provided in an integrated, holistic manner to place
      families not only back into housing, but into communities. It involves them
      in economic and social services after they are stabilized in permanent
      housing and are no longer traumatized by the crisis of homelessness.
      ―Central to the effectiveness of housing first is the concept that
      empowerment helps clients identify their own needs, recognize the
      choices they have, create options for themselves and plan strategies for
      permanent change in their lives.
      ―Evolving in an era of shrinking resources, the housing first approach
      places great emphasis on reducing duplication of effort and maximizing
      the effectiveness of community resources. By situating homeless
      individuals within the larger community, the program fosters human
      connection. The methodology is a cost-effective model that coordinates
      many existing systems and services, rather than creating new ones.‖

HUD is requiring all recipients of McKinney funds to develop a plan to end chronic
homelessness. Plans must include strategies to effect a 50% measurable reduction in
chronic homelessness by 2008.

Currently, the Homeless Policy Task Force’s steering committee of the HPTF is
developing a set of strategies focused on ending homelessness by the year 2012. In
order for these strategies to have significant impact on homelessness, government
programs, elected officials, homeless providers, and funders must make funding and
implementation commitments to supporting and adhering to a Housing First approach
and these related strategies.
                                          58
We should encourage projects that serve people with the most barriers to permanent
housing and who are most likely to be homeless the longest. While holding providers
accountable for quickly housing people and keeping people housed long-term is
important, funders should consider the population served and the extent and severity of
their needs and barriers when evaluating program effectiveness.

Therefore, the HPTF makes the following recommendations regarding the prioritization
and effective use of federal funds in order to achieve the goals of our County Ten Year
Plan to End Homelessness and satisfy HUD requirements:

    1. Maintain existing housing stock and services and expand affordable
       housing options and appropriate services where need is most prevalent.

         The shelter, transitional, and permanent housing system in our community
         should be organized to reduce or minimize the length of time people remain
         homeless, and the number of times they become homeless. All housing
         providers should demonstrate through strategic outcome measures that people
         obtain housing quickly and stay housed

         Transitional housing programs that seek to convert to a permanent supportive
         housing status to provide longer-term support to keep the homeless housed and
         help them become more self-sufficient, as appropriate to the specific population,
         should be supported

    2. Expand homeless prevention services to include rapid re-entry programs.
       Once someone is homeless the cost of re-housing is 4 times the cost of
       keeping and retaining that person’s housing.

         Our community must continue to develop skilled housing search and housing
         placement services. Continued and expanded funding of rent/mortgage
         assistance, damage deposit loans/assistance, utilities assistance, and subsidized
         rent must be a priority.

         The largest number of turn-away calls received at the Community Information
         Line and at many provider agencies is for homeless prevention services.
         Increasing resources for prevention will keep families and individuals housed,
         conserving and saving limited community resources.1

         Priorities for determining the effectiveness of a particular project shall include
         homeless prevention strategies and/or other prevention activities that reduce risk
         factors and build developmental assets towards self-sufficiency.
1
 The number of calls received for rent and mortgage assistance has increased from 5% of total calls in 1994 to 20% of calls in
2003, the steepest increase from 2001 to 2003. Source: Community Information Line Statistics.
Homeless prevention turn away incidents reported by Snohomish County providers increased from 14,669 individuals in 2003 to
25,235 individuals in 2004 (through November a 72% increase without December stats), the majority of whom are children. Source:
Snohomish County ESAP/EHAP data.


                                                             59
    3. Develop a Community Case Management System (CCMS) with the goal of
       minimizing the duration and impact of homelessness and maximizing the
       effectiveness of resource allocation. The CCMS is a web-based centralized
       intake system for families and individuals in a housing crisis, coupled with
       Housing Advocates geographically dispersed throughout the County. Each
       Housing Advocate would provide emergency services, screening and
       assessment, homeless prevention services and case management until a viable
       housing alternative is identified.

         The CCMS should be a priority for new dollars coming into the homeless service
         delivery system. Federal funds should be used to develop the system only if
         current capacity to house and serve homeless populations is not jeopardized by
         funding the new system.

    4. Develop services and affordable housing; expanding the Continuum to
       include safe havens and more permanent supportive housing options.

         Snohomish County needs more affordable permanent housing. While the
         housing developers and homeless service providers have taken advantage of
         funding opportunities (Sound Families in particular) to develop housing stock and
         best practices in Transitional Housing for Families with Children, other
         populations are currently underserved.

         Permanent Supportive Housing and other innovative models that combine
         housing with the services necessary to keep people housed need to be
         developed to address gaps in the CoC, particularly for ex-offenders, veterans,
         people with mental illness or addictions, chronically ill, medically fragile, and
         people with developmental disabilities.2

    5. Develop new housing stock and services based upon accurate need and
       capacity data. Provide continued funding to programs that demonstrate
       measurable outcomes and overall progress towards ending homelessness.

         The County is currently implementing a Homeless Management Information
         System (HMIS). Snohomish County data on homelessness needs to be improved
         so that we can obtain more accurate counts of persons who are served and
         those who are turned away, and better measure outcome attainment. The
         system should receive the support necessary to ensure that all homeless service
         providers can access the system in 2006. Service providers should be required
         to participate in HMIS if they receive federal, state, or county funds to serve
         homeless people.



2
  The 2004 Continuum of Care Housing Gaps Analysis Chart documents that 4,480 individuals were unsheltered (homeless) at the
time the count was taken. 1,626 were individuals and 2,854 were persons in homeless families with children. Of those individuals
896 were chronically homeless. Source: 2004 Continuum of Care Housing Gaps Analysis Chart, 2004 HUD McKinney Application.
                                                               60
       The most statistically reliable countywide data sources should be used to
       determine gaps in services. Funding of new programs should be based upon
       documented need from a reliable source. Areas of greatest need should receive
       new funding first.

The above recommendations are the strategies and activities prescribed in the
HPTF CoC 2004-2005 Action Plan adopted by the task force in July 16, 2004. Prior
to writing the plan, the Housing Policy Task Force and the Housing Consortium of
Everett and Snohomish County (HCESC) held the ―Really Big Important Meeting‖
(RBIM) in late June to gather community input. Goals of the RBIM meeting were to
better understand the needs of the homeless population and the funding and resources
available to serve them and then reach consensus on the key strategies that will bring
an end to homelessness in our county.

The RBIM identified three similar essential strategies:

     A Community Case Management System is a vital component to the CoC and
      should be a priority for development and funding.

     Homelessness Prevention Services are key and more resources are needed.

     Snohomish County needs more affordable permanent housing, particularly for
      very low-income families and chronically homeless individuals.

These strategies became the basis for the mutual recommendations on the use of
Housing Trust Funds (2060) submitted to the Policy Advisory Board by both the HPTF
and the HCESC on September 4, 2004.

The steering committee of the Housing Policy Task Force is drafting Snohomish
County’s Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness over the next few months. These
recommendations and essential strategies are the foundation of the plan. This
recommendation was approved by vote of the Homeless Policy Task Force on
December 2, 2004 to be put forth recommendation towards the use of the Affordable
Housing Trust Fund, to the Snohomish County Consolidated Plan, the Everett
Consolidated Plan, the Housing Authority of Snohomish County’s Consolidated Plan
and the Everett Consolidated Plan to ensure the prioritization of homelessness.


7. Needs of Special Populations. (Persons with special needs who are not
currently or imminently homeless.)

Elderly/Frail Elderly: The following data were taken from Snohomish County Area Plan
on Aging and a State of Washington long-term care report. The statistics present a
summary profile of the County’s elderly and frail elderly population.

   In 2000, 12.3% (74,550) of the total population in Snohomish County comprised
    persons age 60 and older; 4.4% (26,654) was persons age 75 and older.
                                         61
   Between 1990 and 2000, the total population grew by 30.1%, the 60 and older age
    group grew by 25.0% and the 75 and older group grew by 52.0%.

   In 2000, 68,787 (92.2%) persons age 60 and older were white, non-Hispanic, 447
    (0.6%) were African-American, 546 (0.7%) were Native American, 2,977 (4.0%)
    were Asian, 77 (0.1%) were Native Hawaiian, 270 (0.4%) were other and 866 (1.2%)
    were two or more races. There were 905 persons of Hispanic origin (any race),
    1.2% of the older population.

   Between 1990 and 2000 the non-white older population grew by 224.7% and
    Hispanic origin (all races) older population grew by 79.9%, while the older white
    population grew by only 18.8%.

   Of the 4,728 persons age 65 and over who reported in the 2000 Census that they
    spoke a language other than English at home, 3,165 (66.9%) reported they spoke
    English well or very well and 1,563 (33.1%) reported that they spoke English not well
    or at all. The number of persons age 65 and over reporting that they spoke English
    not well or not at all increased from 664 in the 1990 census to 1,563 in the 2000
    Census, an increase of 135.4%. According to calculations by the State of
    Washington’s Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), Aging and
    Disability Administration (ADSA), the number of people age 60 and over who speak
    English ―less than very well‖ is 3,223.

   Of the 55,248 persons age 65 and over living in Snohomish County in 2000, 15,028
    (27.2%) lived alone. Women comprised 77.3% of those living alone.

   Of 54,405 persons age 65 and older 4,220 (7.8%) were below poverty level. Of the
    3,111 minority persons age 65 and older, 439 (14.1%) were below poverty level. Of
    the 483 Hispanic or Latino persons 65 and older, 72 (14.9%) were below poverty
    level. According to ADSA calculations, there were 5,783 persons 60 and older with
    incomes below the poverty level.

   In 2000, there were 23,280 persons 65 years of age or older in Snohomish County
    with a disability; that represented 42.8% of the older population. Of the 23,280
    persons 65 years of age or older with a disability, 13,800 (59.3%) were women. The
    poverty rates for men and women age 65 and older with a disability were 656 (6.9%)
    and 2,057 (14.9%), respectively.

   Of renter households headed by persons age 65 and older in the county (8,373),
    45.5% paid 35% or more of their income for rent. For householders headed by
    persons 75 and older (4,703), 52.2% exceeded that level.

   Of homeowner households headed by persons age 65 or older in the county
    (18,621), 16.8% paid 35% or more of their income for selected monthly owner costs.


                                           62
    For households headed by persons 75 and older (8,094), 16.3% exceeded that
    level.

   Of the 54,405 persons age 65 and over living in Snohomish County in 2000, 7,628
    (14.0%) live in the rural parts of the county. (In Washington State, the Aging and
    Disability Services Administration defines rural areas as any area that is not defined
    urban. Urban areas comprise (1) urbanized areas (a central place and its adjacent
    densely settled territories with a combined minimum population of 5,000) and (2) an
    incorporated place or a census designated place with 20,000 or more inhabitants.)

While the elderly comprise a substantial portion of the total need for low-income rental
assistance, issues confronting the frail elderly bear particular scrutiny. This category
comprises elderly persons who have physical and/or progressive mental limitations due
to aging that limit their mobility and self-care capability, and ultimately erode their
capacity for independent living. (For example they may have difficulty with one or more
"activities of daily living" [ADLs] such as dressing, preparing food and eating, bathing,
and moving around in their homes; and may be unable to go outside home for
shopping, medical care, etc. without assistance.)

The 2000 Census identified 23,280 persons over age 65 reporting one or more such
limitations, 60% of them women. For this population, housing and supportive services
needs depend upon each individual's independent living capability as it changes over
time. Options range from various levels of in-home assistance in support of
independent living, to one or more types of semi-independent congregate housing and
group home living, to full long term custodial quarters and care.          Access to
correspondingly appropriate housing and supportive services is complicated by low-
income. Though there is no tabulation of these 23,280 frail elderly by income in the
census data, among all elderly households 43.1% of renters are below 50% of median
income. If the same proportions are applied to the 23,280, then approximately 10,034
frail elderly persons in Snohomish County were very low-income in 2000. Middle-
income elderly ultimately share many of the same financial issues due to the costs of
progressively higher levels of supportive housing and services.

The housing and living conditions of the frail elderly depend upon availability of these
necessary personal services and appropriate affordable housing. The primary needs of
those capable of living independently with supportive services are affordable rent, or
financial assistance with homeowner costs, and affordable supportive services. For
those requiring some form of congregate or group housing and attendant personal
services, the supply and cost of those is the issue. It is difficult to assess whether the
range of required services and types of housing facilities is sufficient in terms of supply
and cost. Several generalizations can be made, however. They apply principally to the
needs of lower income elderly and, most acutely, to the very low-income.

   Supportive services for low-income households require public (or private charitable)
    funding and the funding available from both public and private sources to provide
    them is limited. Public reimbursement rates, supplemental funds sources and
    private donations, are barely sufficient to employ and retain adequate service
                                            63
    personnel, to connect persons in need with the services, and to supply the services
    in the quantity or intensity needed.
   A large number of elderly are cared for inadequately in family households for whom
    the care burden is not physically or financially feasible. The demand for all forms of
    congregate and group housing with allied services is substantially in excess of the
    supply. To make it available and affordable to lower income persons requires both
    capital and operating subsidies. Both private non-profit and for-profit sponsors along
    with public housing agencies would readily provide these facilities and services, if
    sufficient funding were available.
   A major initiative funded by DSHS provides for a more consistent licensing and
    regulatory process for assisted group living with respect to standards for care or
    qualifications and skills of personnel.      This is particularly important in the
    independent for-profit adult family home and boarding home classes. This initiative
    has greatly diminished the incidence of seriously deficient personal care and medical
    assessment in many of these settings. This assessment is buttressed by the
    admissions to these homes, persons who would otherwise be placed in skilled
    nursing facilities. There are 308 Adult Family Homes representing an aggregate of
    approximately 1,702 beds and 42 boarding homes (aggregate bed count
    unavailable), in Snohomish County. As a result of regular and consistent licensing
    and inspection processes quality of care is improved in these homes. Because the
    high aggregate cost of Medicaid, the federal and state governments can be
    expected to increasingly attempt to divert persons from nursing homes into less
    expensive group home facilities, placing greater demands on this much improved
    licensing and quality assurance process.
   For those who require it, the supply of nursing homes (skilled nursing facilities) is
    currently reasonably sufficient. According to data provided by the Sate of
    Washington’s Department of Social and Health Services, as of December 31, 2004
    there were 1,758 beds in 19 facilities in Snohomish County. Nursing home care is
    cost-prohibitive for the majority of households and access is thus completely
    dependent upon continued availability of Medicaid as presently provided for long
    term care (and Medicare for elderly requiring limited term convalescence after
    hospitalization). Nursing homes are highly regulated, with extremely extensive and
    detailed care standards and regular State inspection and enforcement. Contrary to
    some opinion, (and with the inevitable occasional exception) the principal factor
    governing quality of care in nursing homes is funding, rather than lack
    owner/operator incentive or sufficiently punitive enforcement. Because the large
    majority of nursing home residents are Medicaid-supported, most of these facilities
    are heavily dependent upon Medicaid reimbursement rates for staffing and operating
    budgets. These tight State-dependent facility budgets permit staffing levels which
    are marginally sufficient but continuously stressed at best, and frequently insufficient
    to maintain standard care in the face of changing patient loads, level-of-care needs,
    and increasing regulatory requirements. (Medicare reimbursement rates are
    substantially higher, but are available only for a limited convalescent period, so that
    the elderly who require continuing nursing home care end up on Medicaid.)


                                            64
Under rapidly spreading managed care cost-cutting standards, recovering hospital
patients, both private insurance and Medicare, are being discharged from shorter
hospital stays while still requiring 24-hour skilled nursing care. With both private
insurance and Medicare paying higher rates for this subacute care, than for long-term
Medicaid patients, many nursing home operators are restructuring to accommodate
more of these short-term patients as a means of increasing revenue. Nationally, it
appears the cost-cutting imperative will continue to expand the demand for these
subacute nursing home beds. Whether this will lead to a shortage of beds available to
Medicaid dependent patients is not yet possible to judge. The total number of nursing
home beds in an area is regulated by the State through the issuance of operating
licenses. As the State attempts to limit the total cost of Medicaid by diverting more
Medicaid dependent long term care cases into less expensive group home settings, it
conceivably might reduce the total number of nursing home beds as a part of that
strategy. If the licenses are available, however, it appears likely that the industry will
supply the facilities for both subacute and Medicaid beds. But it is also likely that
Medicaid reimbursement rates will have to increase commensurate with required care
standards.

In attempting to enumerate the special needs classes comprising the physically
disabled, developmentally disabled, and mentally ill, reasonably accurate counts of
persons in need are possible only for those persons known to the service provider
network as a result of current or past contact or enrollment. There is no reliable way to
ascertain the number of persons with significant disabilities who may have housing and
related needs but who are not known to the system. The 2000 Census included
questions intended to identify persons with "limitations on mobility or self-care
capability", but they were not sufficient to be of value in assessing specific disability
populations. However, both the 2000 Census data and a variety of sample surveys do
indicate that some sizeable proportion of these populations is not receiving assistance
from established programs, and that these persons consequently are not included in
program participant counts. Estimates of the percentage of the total population with
some type of significant disability range from five to ten percent, with some higher. The
census information tends to corroborate the five to ten percent range, with the actual
rate dependent upon how disabilities are defined. What proportions of those with
various disabilities have housing related needs is equally problematic. In general,
however, it can be assumed that persons with disabilities have a greater incidence of
housing needs than the general population, and even than the non-disabled low-income
population, because of additional limitations on their potential incomes and the higher
costs of housing meeting their needs.
Physically Disabled. This is the population most difficult to accurately estimate. One
indicator of the incidence among low-income households is the number and proportion
of applicants on housing authority waiting lists identified as handicapped. Of the 3,783
total households on the HASCO waiting list, (February, 2005) 1,208 (32%) reported a
handicapped household member; equivalent figures for EHA were 2,248 total
households with 510 (22.6%) reporting a handicapped household member. Among the
housing authorities' in-residence tenant populations, the following numbers of
households are identified as "head of household handicapped or disabled": HASCO - 82
of 252 (32.5%) total public housing units and 1,410 of 3,110 (45.3%) total Section 8
                                           65
certificates and vouchers. EHA – 408 of 788 (51.7%) total public housing units; and
892 of 2,252 total Section 8 certificates and vouchers (39.7%). (Many of the
households reporting a handicapped head do not require fully accessible dwelling units,
however; and at present in both housing authorities' cases, all handicapped households
are occupying units commensurate with their needs.)
In addition to special housing needs, substantially handicapped persons also need
various supportive services, particularly handicapped-accessible transportation, and in-
home assistance. Wheelchair-accessible public bus service is available on some
routes, but bus service is sparsely distributed. Some on-demand dial-a-ride service is
available for the elderly and disabled.
Mobility remains a major problem and need. In-home services of most kinds are
generally available, but those provided free or at reduced cost as public services are
often in short supply, and private pay services are generally cost prohibitive for the
majority of disabled persons.
The supportive housing needs of persons with physical disabilities due to congenital
conditions, accidents, or illnesses common to the early and middle years of life, are not
expected to increase in the foreseeable future for reasons other than population growth.
However the supportive housing and services needs of persons with physical disabilities
common to the elderly will increase significantly over the next 20 years as the baby
boom bulge ages.
Mentally ill. Decent, safe, affordable housing is a basic need for anyone to live with
stability in our communities. With the continuing movement towards treating individuals
with serious and persistent mental illnesses in the community and less in institutions,
housing is an essential element in being able to serve these adults, children, and
families. Yet several factors are combining to make it more difficult to meet the housing
needs of the County’s citizens with serious mental illness.

The housing needs and problems of persons with mental illness are influenced by the
availability of inpatient beds and are characterized by:
   1. low incomes derived from public assistance, requiring deeply subsidized rent;
   2. psychiatric conditions dictating varying necessary levels of supervision and
       support in their housing setting; and
   3. the stigma associated with mental illness results in the frequent reluctance of
       property owners to rent to people with mental illness and difficulty of siting group
       living facilities due to neighborhood resistance.

Estimates of the prevalence of mental illness in the population at large are influenced by
several factors (survey methodology, clinical criteria, etc.) The number of people
served through the public mental health system is far lower due to limited availability of
services and the need to meet eligibility criteria. The Prevalence Study of Serious
Mental Illness in Washington State update that was released in December 2003
estimated 295,884 residents of all ages statewide meet the criteria for serious mental
illness (SMI). 148,732 are in households with incomes at or below 200% of Federal
Poverty Level (FPL), or 250% FPL for identified children, and are likely to be dependent
on publicly supported mental health services. When these figures are adjusted for
                                            66
Snohomish County’s population, an estimated 29,458 residents meet SMI criteria,
14,148 of who are at or below the identified FPL criteria, which is far higher than the
average income of most public mental health system clients.

The public mental health system served 8,510 people in ongoing services within
Snohomish County in the year ending July 2004. In general, clients served by the
public mental health system must be Medicaid recipients, have incomes below the FPL,
and meet clinical criteria.

The housing crisis for people with chronic mental illness is rapidly becoming more
severe. Inpatient and residential resources for the mentally ill have been declining
sharply in Snohomish County. Over the past two years the number of state hospital
beds has decreased from 981 to 834, with the closure of additional wards planned.
Community inpatient capacity has not kept pace with these closures and is threatened
by low reimbursement rates. Statewide, inpatient capacity at community hospitals has
been declining. Although no community hospital inpatient beds have been lost in
Snohomish County, this statewide trend has had a local impact as residents from other
counties utilize our limited community hospital resources.

Housing is not affordable to most consumers involved in the public mental health
system. In 2002 the basic income for a single adult with a chronic mental illness on SSI
was $560 per month and $440 for a parent on TANF with one child ($546 for two
children). Fair market rent in Snohomish County was $582 for a one bedroom
apartment and $736 for a two-bedroom apartment.

Services in the public mental health system in Washington are provided on a regional
basis. State data is reported by region. Snohomish County is one of five counties
served by the North Sound Mental Health Administration (NSMHA), but has 63% of the
region’s population.

An analysis of the residential needs for clients served by the provider network in the
region was updated in 2001. It estimated a 40% increase in housing units was required
to meet the unmet need. Since then housing options for mental health clients have
declined.

A study was commissioned by the State Mental Health Division and published in
October 2004 to analyze the capacity and demand for inpatient and community
residential beds. It found Washington State to be far below its peer states in state
investment for comparable services. The study identified the gap in spending to be a
minimum of $20 million to meet the spending level of peer states for residential services
only. The North Sound Region was found to have a much lower rate of residential beds
per 100,000 population that the rest of the state (14.5 beds as compared to the state
average of 35.4), hence a far greater unmet need. The study estimated that this region
needed to add 158 residential beds and 5 crisis beds to its capacity to bring it to par
with peer states. This study utilized data reported as of June 30, 2004.


                                           67
A significant number of residential units have been lost since that time as a result of
reinterpretation of federal rules for Medicaid reimbursement for services in residential
settings. This newly reinterpreted rule limits the size of such facilities to a maximum of
16 beds. As a result, the closure of 65 beds in staffed mental health facilities in
Snohomish County has occurred since October 2004. Two residential facilities
decreased from 20 to 16 beds to meet Medicaid requirements. One agency closed its
facility-based services for a loss of 48 beds and is serving clients in independent living
in the community.

Additionally the County’s crisis bed facility closed 9 beds to bring it to the 16-bed limit
for Medicaid reimbursement. Crisis beds have been used to provide emergency
housing for those who cannot be served by shelters, as well as to prevent the need for
hospitalization.

The October 2004 study also identified the need for specialized community based
housing options for specialty patient populations currently served by the state hospitals.
Such services include psychiatric nursing care/adult family homes, specialty residences
for persons with developmental disabilities, medical facilities for persons with traumatic
brain injury, and residential programs for populations with other rehabilitative needs.

The result of this shortage of inpatient and residential beds is vicious cycle of existing
hospital beds being full as discharge options are curtailed. New patients in need of
inpatient services cannot be admitted because beds are full. The cycle of destabilization
continues and the need for stable housing in the community becomes more critical.

Washington State estimates that 40% of the homeless population has serious mental
illness. Discharges from inpatient and correctional settings combined with a lack of
residential resources in the community are contributing factors. Many individuals are in
need of specialized emergency housing as their acute mental illness renders their
behavior too difficult to house in standard shelters.

A regional study on homelessness that is based on the state’s ongoing prevalence data
was conducted in 2002. It estimated that on any given night there are 560 individuals
with serious mental illness who are homeless within the region. In March 2001 the
region reported 252 current consumers being served by community mental health
providers who were identified as homeless. The residential status was unknown for an
additional 1,115 consumers, so it is certain that there are even more homeless people
served by the public mental health system.

Developmentally disabled. As of 3-10-2005, the Washington State Department of
Social and Health Services Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) has a total
caseload of 2,909 persons with developmental disabilities in Snohomish County; and
about 2,051of these people are receiving supportive services of some type. As is the
case for other disabilities, the developmentally disabled population beyond those
currently receiving services is very difficult to estimate. There are a number of different
types of disability that might make a person eligible to receive services from DDD
including mental retardation, autism, cerebral palsy, epilepsy and other neurological
                                            68
conditions. Some people have more than one disability. The only data available
breaking down the severity of the disabling condition is for mental retardation with 549
reported as mild, 486 as moderate, 150 as severe and 64 as having profound mental
retardation. No degree of mental retardation is reported for 88 clients. The total for all
levels of mental retardation is 1,437. Dual diagnoses of mental retardation and mental
illness together are present in 52 clients. It is now estimated that the total
developmentally disabled population is increasing by about 75 per year in Snohomish
County.

Currently 574 clients live in their own homes – rented or owned by them, with or without
roommates to share costs. Of that total, 299 receive residential support services from
state contracted agencies. The other 275 may or may not have additional support
services. 190 clients live in some type of congregate facilities with most of those being
Adult Family Homes. The balance reside with their parents or other relatives, nursing
homes or other setting. Many of these would prefer supported community housing if it
were available and included personal care and assistance with routine tasks as
individually needed.

As with other disabled groups, developmentally disabled housing needs are defined by
low income dependent on public assistance, need for sustained supportive services,
and resistance to their presence from rental property owners and neighbors. Their
supported housing also particularly needs to be located close to public transportation
and retail shopping, and in comparatively safe areas on account of their vulnerability to
predation.

Alcohol and Other Drugs. According to Washington State’s TARGET Management
Information Services (a reporting system capable of generating a variety of information
specific to alcohol and drugs) more than one out of every ten adult residents is in need
of chemical dependency treatment. In Snohomish County 13.2% of adults earning less
than 200% the federal poverty are in need of treatment. However, demand for
treatment far exceeds current funding levels. During this past year, January through
December 2004, Washington State has experienced a 79.2% treatment gap. What this
gap means is that for those who qualify for and are in need of chemical dependency
treatment 79.2% did not receive it. In Snohomish County the treatment gap is 78.3%
that equates to almost 8,000 individuals who, because of lack of funding, are not able to
access publicly funded treatment. Waiting lists for indigent populations seeking alcohol
and/or drug treatment have quadrupled since 1991.

Individuals receiving public funded treatment in Snohomish County have significant
factors such as income, employment and homelessness impacting unmet needs. In
Snohomish County 62% of those admitted into treatment during the past year report a
monthly income of $0 to $500.00 per month; 16% report incomes between $501.00 and
$1,000. From January 01, 2004 to December 20, 2004 individuals accessing publicly
funded treatment reported the following information regarding their primary residence:
101 individuals report living in a controlled environment (jail/work release etc), 63
individuals live in drug-free shared housing, 21 youth were living in foster or group
homes, 64 report living in homeless shelters, 16 report living on the streets and 86
                                          69
individuals reported no stable living arrangements. 14% of low-income adults receiving
publicly funded chemical dependency treatment in Washington State are homeless.
From January 01, 2004 to December 20, 2004 individuals accessing County funded
treatment reported the following employment information: 15% were employed full time,
7% worked part time, 10% were disabled, 7% were underage and not in the work force
and 30% were unemployed and seeking work.

Snohomish County Human Service’s Alcohol and Other Drugs unit facilitates and
coordinates local planning and service delivery for state and federally funded prevention
and outpatient treatment services. The Department contracts with seven private non-
profit agencies to provide outpatient treatment for substance abusing and/or chemically
dependent youth and adults at 14 separate sites throughout the county. When inpatient
services are needed, these outpatient providers work in collaboration with inpatient
agencies to arrange for inpatient services. When individuals are discharged from
inpatient services the outpatient agencies assist them with access to needed services
upon their return to the community; in many cases these services include finding clean
and sober housing, food, medical services and chemical dependency aftercare on an
outpatient basis. Housing needs are encountered when alcohol or other drugs of abuse
directly or indirectly causes eviction from or loss of existing housing, or when a patient
leaves inpatient treatment and either needs supported housing in order to continue
recovery or has no housing to return to and no resources to secure housing.
Approximately $1.5 million a year is spent on adult outpatient treatment in our county.
$300,000 a year for youth outpatient treatment however, the wait to get into treatment is
weeks, sometimes months.

There are several different sub-populations by age and circumstances with serious
alcohol or drug abuse conditions whose housing situations have not yet deteriorated to
the brink of homelessness. Drug and alcohol prevention programs currently serve
some and others may be involved in at risk intervention programs for homeless
prevention. Undoubtedly large numbers of others are not yet identified as needing
intervention to prevent possible housing or other serious problems.

There are significant unmet needs for chemical dependency treatment and other
ancillary services in Snohomish County. Of those admitted into treatment in 2004, 351
individuals lacked stable housing, 1,170 were unemployed or under-employed and just
over 71% had incomes of less than $1,000 a month. In Snohomish County alone
almost 8,000 individuals were not able to access treatment. Research shows that
treatment works and significantly improves employment, income and other ancillary
needs such as housing. Research shows every dollar spent on treatment results in
$3.71 saved in Medicaid cost, criminal justice and public assistance. When people
have access to treatment there are significant savings to the community. Snohomish
County Human Service’s Alcohol and Other Drugs unit works in close collaboration with
others in our community to maximize available treatment dollars and serve as many
residents of our community as possible.

Persons with HIV/AIDS. Currently all assisted housing for persons with HIV or AIDS is
provided in the form of rental assistance. There are no dedicated capital AIDS housing
                                           70
facilities. Snohomish County participates with King County and the City of Seattle in a
consortium, managed by the City of Seattle, to receive housing assistance funds under
the HUD Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA) program directed to
the Seattle Eligible Metropolitan Area (SEMA). The consortium undertakes planning for
AIDS-related housing needs throughout the three jurisdictions. The County is
represented in the planning process by Catholic Community Services of Western
Washington—Northwest (current recipient of HOWA contract in Snohomish County) and
staff from the County’s Department of Planning and Development Services.

Besides units funded under HOPWA, additional units of rental assistance are dedicated
to HIV/AIDS use from the County’s HUD Shelter Plus Care allocation and set-asides of
Section 8 vouchers by both the Housing Authority of Snohomish County and the Everett
Housing Authority. A total of approximately 54 HIV/AIDS-dedicated subsidized units
was available in 2004 in the following proportions:
        14 Section 8 units that include 2 project based Section 8 units;
        20 HOPWA units;
        20 units form Shelter Plus Care from 2004

With few exception, persons diagnosed with HIV/AIDS eventually experience reductions
in or loss of their previous independent incomes, exhaust their resources, and depend
on public assistance income that is not sufficient to pay market rate rents. In 2004
approximately 125 persons with HIV/AIDS depended on some form of services
designed to maintain individuals in housing or additional financial assistance with
housing, ranging form a one week motel voucher or additional financial assistance, to
one of the rental units listed above. In addition in 2004 Emergency Shelter and
Homeless Prevention funds provided 346 bed nights for the HIV/AIDS homeless
population; and Snohomish Health District provided Ryan White funds for rental
assistance for 10 individuals diagnosed with HIV/AIDS.

Due to the change in medication therapies, persons with HIV/AIDS are living longer and
the case loads are increasing. This means a larger HIV/AIDS population living with
chronic disabling disease and requiring subsidized housing units. In 2004-2005 wait lists
are occurring for subsidized housing. If current housing stocks remain stable, a
conservative estimate would anticipate the need for an increase of 10 % to 20% per
year in the subsidized rental units reserved for persons with HIV/AIDS.


8. Veterans. There are 66,000 military veterans residing in Snohomish County.
Veterans comprise 11% of the County’s general population and 15% of the population
18 years of age or older, a greater number than the US average of 13%.

While the World War II veteran population in Snohomish County ages and continues to
diminish due to death, the Vietnam Era veterans are also diminishing in number. Of the
total population of veterans residing in the County, the greatest number (36%) are
Vietnam Era veterans. Studies indicate that this population is aging faster and dying
earlier than average for people of like age resulting in higher use of medical and other
services at a younger age.
                                           71
In addition, the demand for emergency vouchers from the Snohomish County Veterans’
Assistance Fund has increased nearly three-fold in the last 4 years, from an average of
43 veterans requesting assistance a month in 2001 to an average of 17 a month in
2004.

This increase can be related to two things:
   (1) the economic downturn during this period in Snohomish County; and
   (2) an amendment to RCW 41.04 passed by the legislature in 2002 that broadened
       the definition of veteran to include veterans who did not serve during wartime as
       well as members of reserve units and National Guard who served at least 90
       days of active duty.

The County’s Veterans Assistance Program staff also respond to requests for
information about services available in the community, assess veteran’s needs and
refer them to resources that will help them meet those needs, help veterans apply for
and access benefits to which they are entitled, and provide case management for
veterans who are incarcerated and need to enter VA treatment programs.

A demonstration project administered by Everett WorkSource Center and funded by the
US Department of Labor continues to assist homeless veterans in finding and retaining
employment. Partnering with WorkSource on this Project, the Veterans Assistance
Program assists many of these veterans with basic needs and work clothing/tools in
order for them to go to work.

The growing population of the county and increased demand for veteran services has
led to greater coordination of services and programs relating to homeless and
incarcerated veterans between the County’s Human Services and Corrections
Departments. Increased participation in the Homeless Policy Task Force also increases
service options for homeless veterans. These cooperative efforts will continue to gain
momentum as the veteran population in Snohomish County continues to grow.


9. Priority Needs of Special Populations. Following is a presentation of
priority needs of special populations based on the foregoing data. They are rendered in
a modified format of optional HUD Table 1B.


                                         Table 13
                    Special Needs of the Non-Homeless
                       Sub-Populations                   Priority Need
         Elderly                                             High
         Frail Elderly                                       High
         Severe Mental Illness                               High
         Developmentally Disabled                            High
         Physically Disabled                                 High

                                           72
          Persons with Alcohol/Other Drug Addiction              High
          Persons w/HIV/AIDS                                     High


10. Housing Needs. Snohomish County’s housing needs are described in section
II. 2, ―County Profile‖, and section II. 10, ―Market Analysis‖ of this document.


11. Priority Housing Needs.          Snohomish County’s priority housing needs are
presented below in HUD ―Table 2A‖ format.

                                         Table 14
                           Priority Needs Summary Table
          Priority Housing Needs           Priority Need      Estimated      Estimated
                (households)                   Level            Units        Dollars to
                                           High, Medium,                      Address
                                                Low                         (in millions)
                                             0-30%       H     3,020           $241.6
                         Small Related      31-50%       H     2,968           $237.5
                                            51-80%       M     2,823           $225.9
                                             0-30%       H       441               $35.3
                         Large Related      31-50%       H       781               $62.5
          Renter                            51-80%       M       462               $37.0
                                             0-30%       H     1,824           $146.0
                            Elderly         31-50%       H     1,262           $100.9
                                            51-80%       M       627               $50.2
                                             0-30%       H     1,930           $154.4
                           All Other        31-50%       H     2,245           $179.6
                                            51-80%       M     1,973           $157.8
                                             0-30%       H     4,251               $65.4
          Owner                             31-50%       H     3,825               $58.9
                                            51-80%       M     7,073           $108.9




12. Market Analysis. This section analyzes information concerning rental housing
costs, vacancy rates, market trends, and affordability, as well as for-sale housing prices,
volumes, trends, and affordability.

The data utilized were derived from several sources. Dupre+Scott Apartment Advisors,
Inc. furnishes a series of studies, some to subscribers and others commissioned by the
County.
     Their Apartment Vacancy Report and The 1 to 19 Unit Apartment Report surveys
        over 31,000 rental units in 787 buildings across the county. They provide data on

                                             73
       vacancy rates and average rents by unit type (number of bedrooms) and
       submarket.
      The Rent Reasonableness Survey based on the same dataset, provides the
       average rent and the percentage of units, by building type (number of units) and
       unit type, by submarket. The submarket areas are somewhat different than those
       used in the reports mentioned above.
      The Rental Housing Study gives the percentage of units affordable to certain
       income sectors by building type, jurisdiction and census tract, as well as the
       percentage of units by rent range, average rent, and vacancy rate, by jurisdiction
       or census tract.
      The Apartment Investment Report and The Apartment Advisor deliver information
       on various conditions of the apartment property market, including construction
       and sales trends.

Other data in this section come from the housing office of Everett Naval Station
(NAVATA Everett Family Housing) and the Central Puget Sound Real Estate Research
Committee, an industry group that publishes a semi-annual report on single-family and
condominium sales.

Rental Costs & Comparison of Market Areas: The average Snohomish County rent at
large (20+ units) properties in 2004 was $746, up 2% from 2000 but down 4% from
March 2003. Rents at the large properties have changed between –6% to +9% over five
years, depending upon area of the county. The data illustrated in Table 9 and Figure 10
show the differences in market areas, as well as trends.

                                                     Table 15
                               History of Average Rents by Area, 2000-2004
                                  20+-Unit Properties in Snohomish County
                                                                                              %
    Area                          2000             2001            2002       2003    2004   Chg
    Lynnwood                  $    710         $    782        $    800   $    783   $ 771    9%
    Edmonds                   $    687         $    710        $    734   $    728   $ 691    1%
    Mountlake Terrace         $    769         $    785        $    820   $    780   $ 725   -6%
    Mill Creek                $    826         $    929        $    915   $    899   $ 872    6%
    Central Everett           $    596         $    603        $    616   $    611   $ 615    3%
    Thrashers Corner          $    790         $    798        $    790   $    880   $ 839    6%
    Snohomish County          $    732         $    782        $    793   $    774   $ 746    2%
    Paine Field               $    703         $    729        $    729   $    732   $ 694   -1%
    Marysville/Monroe         $    641         $    677        $    694   $    664   $ 664    4%
    Silver Lake               $    739         $    766        $    798   $    751   $ 723   -2%
  Source: Dupre+Scott, Apartment Vacancy Report, Spring 2004




                                                          74
                                                                 Figure 15
                                      Rate of Average Changes of Rent by Area, 2000-2004


                                  10%

                                      8%

                                      6%

                                      4%

                                      2%

                                      0%

                                  -2%

                                  -4%

                                  -6%
                                                                  % Chg
                    Lynnwood                                       9%
                    Thrashers Corner                               6%
                    Mill Creek                                     6%
                    Marysville/Monroe                              4%
                    Central Everett                                3%
                    Snohomish County                               2%
                    Edmonds                                        1%
                    Paine Field                                    -1%
                    Silver Lake                                    -2%
                    Mountlake Terrace                              -6%




    The type of building makes a substantial difference in the rent. Single-family rents
    average $1,158 per month. Single-family housing rents for a premium of $350 or more,
    depending on unit type. By comparison, 5-19 unit apartments average $658, and 2-4
    unit apartments average $771.

    Likewise, unit type has a significant impact on rents. At larger properties, the first two
    bedrooms add $70 to $80, while the third add $155 (on average). An additional
    bathroom adds an average of $125 to rent. At smaller properties, extra bedrooms add
    anywhere from $150 to $400 a month, depending on unit size.

                                                                 Table 16
                                           Variation in Rents Due to Unit Type, Countywide
                                                            April-May, 2004
                                                                          2 Bed/1 2 Bed/2
Building Type         All                  Studio     1 Bed     2 Bed      Bath     Bath   3 Bed            4 Bed     5 Bed
Large (20+ units)   $ 746                  $ 556      $ 626               $ 705    $ 830   $ 985           N/A       N/A
Small (1-19
units)              $ 810                  $ 434     $ 566         $ 718        N/A        N/A   $ 1,103   $ 1,444   $ 1,530



    Rents also vary considerably depending upon area of the County. As Table 10
    illustrates, rents for a two-bedroom apartment ranged from a low of $670 in Central
    Everett to a high of $859 in Thrashers Corner, a difference of $189.



                                                                         75
                                                 Table 17
                           Rents in Buildings of 20+ Units by Market Area
                                         0 BR      1 BR      2 BR      3 BR
                    Area                 Rent      Rent      Rent      Rent
                    Snohomish Co.        $ 528      $ 628     $ 772     $ 997
                    Silver Lake          $ 509      $ 610     $ 730     $ 903
                    Marysville/Monroe       N/A     $ 597     $ 725     $ 919
                    Thrashers Corner     $ 619      $ 740     $ 895     $ 1,165
                    Edmonds              $ 525      $ 616     $ 773     $ 951
                    Central Everett      $ 509      $ 560     $ 670     $ 730
                    Lynnwood             $ 481      $ 629     $ 798     $ 1,007
                    Paine Field          $ 541      $ 595     $ 734     $ 998
                    Mountlake
                    Terrace                 N/A     $ 622     $ 765     $ 990
                    Mill Creek              N/A     $ 682     $ 859     $ 1,074
                  Source: Dupre+Scott, Apartment Vacancy Report 22(2), October 2004




The most affordable and least affordable areas of the County are shown in Tables 11
and 12 below. (A certain type of building or unit may be more affordable or less
affordable in any of these markets.) Utilities are added to average rents to illustrate all
housing costs in an area.

                                                 Table 18
                             Most/Least Affordable Rental Markets
                                            Average Rent + Utilities, 2 BR
                     Area          Single
                                               2-3 Units   4-19 Units                 20+ Units
                                   Family
             Arlington          $       869 $        872 $          763               $      783
             E. Sno. Co.        $       997 $        979 $          678               $      798
             Edmonds            $     1,133 $        927 $          817               $      851
             Everett            $       967 $        841 $          742               $      815
             Goldbar, Sultan    $     1,198 $      1,095        N/A                       N/A
             Lake Stevens       $       959 $        805 $          781               $      885
             Lynnwood           $       947 $        798 $          818               $      897
             Mill Creek         $     1,183 $      1,090 $        1,479               $      926
             Mountlake Terrace  $       883      N/A       $        770               $      862
             Mukilteo               N/A           N/A           N/A                   $      916
             Other Sno. Co.     $       978 $        985 $          833               $      765
             Sno. Co. Total     $       996 $        872 $          774               $      859
           Source: Dupre+Scott, Apartment Vacancy Report


Vacancy Rates: The vacancy rate at large properties, which indicates a market that is
slightly overbuilt, is 8.5% (April 2004), down from 9.0% in 2003 but up from 3.8% in
2001. The county has an average 6.8% vacancy rate over five years. (See Table 13 and
Figure 11.)



                                                     76
Dupre+Scott reports that the vacancy rate in 1-19 unit properties in Snohomish County
were rather high, 9.2% in 2004. Vacancies were highest in three-bedroom rentals at
10.6%; rates were 7.0% in one-bedrooms.

Vacancy rates vary by community as well as by type of housing. Over five years,
Marysville/Monroe has had the lowest vacancy rate (5.4%) and the Paine Field area the
highest (8.4%).

                                                      Table 19
                            History of Vacancy Rates by Area, 2000-2004
                        Area          2000 2001     2002     2003     2004               5-Yr Avg
            Edmonds                   3.5% 3.2%     8.3%     8.6%     8.3%                 5.9%
            Mountlake Terrace         5.5% 4.4%     9.4%     8.6%     9.7%                 6.9%
            Marysville/Monroe         2.4% 4.9%     6.2%     7.9%     5.2%                 5.4%
            Lynnwood                  4.5% 3.4%     8.2%     8.7%     8.2%                 6.2%
            Thrashers Corner          6.4% 5.3%     5.1%     6.9%     7.9%                 6.1%
            Central Everett           5.4% 3.4%     6.0%    11.5%     9.3%                 6.6%
            Mill Creek                4.5% 4.2%     7.8%     6.2%     7.0%                 5.6%
            Silver Lake               5.5% 4.1%     8.9%     9.5%     8.1%                 7.4%
            Paine Field               6.5% 3.5% 10.4% 11.6% 10.0%                          8.4%
            Snohomish County          5.1% 3.8%     8.6%     9.0%     8.5%                 6.8%
           Source: Dupre+Scott, Apartment Vacancy Report




                                                     Figure 16
                                  History of Snohomish County Vacancy Rates, 2000-2004

   0.1


  0.09


  0.08


  0.07


  0.06


                                                                                                Snohomish County
  0.05
                                                                                                Five-Year Average

  0.04


  0.03


  0.02


  0.01


    0
    2000                   2001                    2002                 2003             2004




                                                           77
Rental Housing Affordability: Housing is said to be affordable by the Department of
Housing and Urban Development (HUD) if a household pays no more than thirty
percent (30%) of its income for rent and utilities. Housing affordability varies by income
level, by area of the county, and by type of unit rented.

Affordability by Income: Many jobs available to low-income households pay minimum
wage. One way to analyze affordability is to determine how many hours a family of three
with one dependent would have to work at minimum wage in order to afford the average
2-bedroom apartment and pay 30% of their income for rent.

Table 14 shows that in all markets both adults would have to work more than full-time at
minimum wage to afford the average apartment. The table also shows that different
markets are more expensive and that the two-person family with one dependent would
have to earn nearly three times the minimum wage to afford a two-bedroom apartment.

                                         Table 20
                             When Full Time Work Can't Pay the Rent
                                                           2 BR
                                                   Hourly                Hours/Week
                                                   Wage                     at Min
                    Area            Avg. Rent
                                                 Needed to     Minimum      Wage
                                     & Utilities
                                                 Afford Apt     Wage      Needed to
                                        Apt
                                                   at 30%                Afford 2 BR
                                                  Income                     Apt
         Arlington                  $ 783        $ 15.07      $ 7.01              86
         E. Sno. Co.                $ 798        $ 15.35      $ 7.01              88
         Edmonds                    $ 851        $ 16.37      $ 7.01              93
         Everett                    $ 815        $ 15.67      $ 7.01              89
         Goldbar, Sultan            $ 1,095      $ 21.06      $ 7.01             120
         Lake Stevens               $ 885        $ 17.03      $ 7.01              97
         Lynnwood                   $ 897        $ 17.25      $ 7.01              98
         Mill Creek                 $ 926        $ 17.80      $ 7.01             102
         Mountlake Terrace          $ 862        $ 16.57      $ 7.01              95
         Mukilteo                   $ 916        $ 17.61      $ 7.01             100
         Other Sno. Co.             $ 765        $ 14.71      $ 7.01              84
                Sno. Co. Total      $ 859        $ 16.52      $ 7.01              94



Another way affordability is analyzed is to compare percent of median income a family
earns with rents (HUD annually defines family income by household size and percent of
median income). Most government housing programs assist households that earn less
than 80% of median income or less, because these households cannot afford average-
priced market rate housing.

In Snohomish County:
     Households that earn less than 30% of median ($16,350 to $30,850 depending
      on family size) cannot afford housing in any size, type, or market.
                                             78
      Households that earn less than 50% ($27,250 to $51,400 depending on family
       size) can only afford studio apartments, but cannot afford one-bedroom units and
       up.
      Households that earn 80% of median ($40,250 to $75,900, depending on family
       size) can afford most averaged priced rental housing of all types and in all
       Snohomish County markets.

Several examples illustrate how affordability changes for a family of three depending
upon its income and rental market area.

                                           Table 21
                         What a Family of Three Earning $21,050 a
                             Year Can Afford to Pay for Rent
                                                        2 BR
                              Area
                                              Current      Affordable
                       Arlington                $ 783          $ 526
                       E. Sno. Co.              $ 798          $ 526
                       Edmonds                  $ 851          $ 526
                       Everett                  $ 815          $ 526
                       Goldbar, Sultan         $1,095          $ 526
                       Lake Stevens             $ 885          $ 526
                       Lynnwood                 $897           $ 526
                       Mill Creek               $ 926          $ 526
                       Mountlake Terrace        $ 862          $ 526
                       Mukilteo                 $ 916          $ 526
                       Other Sno. Co.           $ 765          $ 526
                       Sno. Co. Total           $ 859          $ 526




                                             79
                                                            Figure 17
                                           What Rents Can 30% of Median Income Afford?
      1200




      1000




        800




        600




        400




        200




            0
                            E. Sno.                        Goldbar,    Lake                           Mountlake               Other     Sno. Co.
                Arlington             Edmonds   Everett                         Lynnwood Mill Creek               Mukilteo
                              Co.                           Sultan    Stevens                          Terrace               Sno. Co.    Total
  Current       783.46341    798      851.1962 814.59894    1095       885.4    896.96163 925.6046 861.68254 915.67208         765      859.07737
  Affordable     526.25     526.25     526.25   526.25     526.25     526.25        526.25   526.25    526.25     526.25     526.25      526.25




Figures 17 and 18 show that households with 50% of median income can more easily
afford averaged priced rental housing than lower-income families.

                                                             Figure 18
                                                What Rent Can 50% of Median Afford?
      1200




      1000




        800




        600




        400




        200




            0
                            E. Sno.                        Goldbar,    Lake                           Mountlake               Other     Sno. Co.
                Arlington             Edmonds   Everett                         Lynnwood Mill Creek               Mukilteo
                              Co.                           Sultan    Stevens                          Terrace               Sno. Co.    Total
  Current       783.46341    798      851.1962 814.59894    1095       885.4    896.96163 925.6046 861.68254 915.67208         765      859.07737
  Affordable     876.25     876.25     876.25   876.25     876.25     876.25        876.25   876.25    876.25     876.25     876.25      876.25




                                                                               80
Can the Military Afford Rental Housing in Snohomish County? Sailors stationed at the
Everett Home Port rent housing in Snohomish County communities. There is a small
amount of military owned or joint venture housing where sailors and officers may live.
The Navy works with the private rental market to make housing available and
affordable. The Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) is designed to compensate sailors
for 100% of the average local rent.

                                       Table 22
     2004 Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) Compared with Average Rents in
                               Snohomish County
                          2 BR Average                               1 BR Average
                                                  BAH
       BAH with     Market                        without      Market
Rank   Dependents   Rent/Utilities   Difference   Dependents   Rent/Utilities   Difference
E-1    $    931     $       861      $      70    $ 793        $ 697            $      96
E-2    $    931     $       861      $      70    $ 793        $ 697            $      96
E-3    $    931     $       861      $      70    $ 793        $ 697            $      96
E-4    $    931     $       861      $      70    $ 793        $ 697            $      96
E-5    $ 1,003      $       861      $     142    $ 834        $ 697            $ 137
E-6    $ 1,238      $       861      $     377    $ 881        $ 697            $ 184
E-7    $ 1,257      $       861      $     396    $ 936        $ 697            $ 239
E-8    $ 1,313      $       861      $     452    $ 1,049      $ 697            $ 352
E-9    $ 1,418      $       861      $     557    $ 1,122      $ 697            $ 425
W-1    $ 1,239      $       861      $     378    $ 904        $ 697            $ 207
W-2    $ 1,266      $       861      $     405    $ 1,048      $ 697            $ 351
W-3    $ 1,379      $       861      $     518    $ 1,129      $ 697            $ 432
W-4    $ 1,432      $       861      $     571    $ 1,243      $ 697            $ 546
O1E    $ 1,261      $       861      $     400    $ 1,003      $ 697            $ 306
O2E    $ 1,360      $       861      $     499    $ 1,106      $ 697            $ 409
O3E    $ 1,442      $       861      $     581    $ 1,238      $ 697            $ 541
O-1    $ 1,029      $       861      $     168    $ 877        $ 697            $ 180
O-2    $ 1,233      $       861      $     372    $ 978        $ 697            $ 281
O-3    $ 1,374      $       861      $     513    $ 1,154      $ 697            $ 457
O-4    $ 1,520      $       861      $     659    $ 1,259      $ 697            $ 562
O-5    $ 1,619      $       861      $     758    $ 1,281      $ 697            $ 584
O-6    $ 1,632      $       861      $     771    $ 1,379      $ 697            $ 682
O-7    $ 1,651      $       861      $     790    $ 1,407      $ 697            $ 710



The military maintains its own stock of rental housing for enlisted military personnel and
officers, shown in Table 18.

                                             Table 23
                           Military Housing in Snohomish County
                                             Number of Units by Bedrooms
                Housing Complex
                                       2 BR       3 BR        4 BR       Total
             Brier                           0         12           0         12
             Country Manor Condo            42       125           18       185
                                                  81
                               Military Housing in Snohomish County
               Carroll's Creek Landing          85       175        28              288
                         Total                 127       312        46              485



Rental Housing Trends: According to The Apartment Investment Report published by
Dupre+Scott, the average price in Snohomish County to acquire a rental unit was
$68,410 (April 2004), an increase from $64,942 in 2003. However, the price to acquire a
rental property has only rebounded to the price of 2001, when it was $68,820 per unit.

                                                   Table 24
                                          Average Price per Unit
       Snohomish          1999          2000       2001        2002        2003        2004
        County          $ 54,196      $ 61,762   $ 68,820    $ 63,507    $ 64,942    $ 68,410
     Source: Dupre+Scott Apartment Investment Report


In spite of higher expenses, the Panel of Management Experts for The Apartment
Advisor expects rents to begin rising again by spring 2005, forecasting a 3% increase
by year-end 2005. Vacancy rates have started to decline and this trend will continue in
2005.
According to The Apartment Advisor, Snohomish County has added about 1,012 units a
year since 1998, but the number of new units has declined considerably in those six
years:

                                                   Table 25
                                    New Apartment Units Constructed
                                            1999-April 2004
                            1999                                        2364
                            2000                                        1746
                            2001                                         934
                            2002                                         764
                            2003                                         168
                            2004, as of April                             98



Analysis of For-Sale Housing in Snohomish County: Housing products available to
purchase in Snohomish County fall into four categories: single-family housing (which
includes previously owned and new); new single-family housing; condominium housing
(which includes previously owned and new); and new condominium housing.

The data is available from the Central Puget Sound Real Estate Research Committee,
which reports closed sales by quarter by zip code. These have been consolidated into
submarkets and identified below by the cities they contain. This analysis details sales
volume, comparison of market areas, change in sales price, and affordability to
households earning 80% and 100% of median family income.

Sales Volume:

                                                       82
      Between April 2003 and March 2004, 14,853 housing units had been sold in
       Snohomish County. Of these, 3,363were new houses and 865 were new
       condominiums.

Sales Prices & Comparison of Market Areas:
    Edmonds/Woodway has the highest average sales price for all detached single-
      family homes sold in the county and Bothell/Mill Creek has the highest
      condominium sales price.
    Southeast Snohomish County has the lowest single-family sales prices in 2004,
      and Stanwood and Southeast have the lowest condominium sales prices.


                                         Figure 19

                           2004 Sales Price Comparison by Market

                              400000

                              350000

                              300000

                              250000

                              200000

                              150000

                              100000

                               50000

                                    0
                                                  All Single-Family
               Snohomish Co Total                   277748.423
               Edmonds/Woodway                     382659.9239
               Snohomish                           336350.9692
               Bothell/Mill Creek                  331402.0418
               Mukilteo/Lynnwood/Brier             330124.3627
               Stanwood                            260485.1932
               Monroe                              255560.5382
               Lake Stevens                        252595.6936
               Everett                             238073.4777
               Mountlake Terrace                    234320.328




Figure 19 and Table 21 compare single-family and condominium prices for each market
area.




                                             83
                                                 Table 26
                         2004 Sales Prices in Snohomish County Markets
                                                   New
                                  All Single-
                Area                             Single-        All         New
                                      Family
                                                  Family   Condominium   Condominium
      Snohomish Co Total         $ 277,748      $ 310,796  $ 205,772     $ 224,935
      Arlington                  $ 226,417      $ 22,872   $ 162,739     $ 161,310
      Bothell/Mill Creek         $ 331,402      $ 367,881  $ 253,907     $ 300,013
      Darrington                 $ 128,464      $ 126,367  $       -     $     -
      Edmonds/Woodway            $ 382,660      $ 582,065  $ 237,208     $ 259,322
      Everett                    $ 38,073       $ 63,267   $ 249,850     $ 182,741
      Granite Falls              $ 98,402       $ 236,987  $ 181,762     $     -
      Lake Stevens               $ 52,596       $ 278,636  $ 189,293     $ 221,500
      Marysville/Tulalip         $ 218,385      $ 28,234   $ 206,618     $ 186,876
      Monroe                     $ 55,561       $ 271,895  $ 184,138     $ 131,324
      Mountlake Terrace          $ 34,320       $ 350,390  $ 182,128     $ 209,111
      Mukilteo/Lynnwood/Brier $ 330,124         $ 437,567  $ 199,644     $ 219,158
      Snohomish                  $ 36,351       $ 364,820  $ 199,393     $ 185,188
      Southeast                  $ 198,442      $ 207,307  $ 169,993     $ 153,950
      Stanwood                   $ 260,485      $ 302,199  $ 169,836     $   -
    Source: Central Puget Sound Real Estate Research Reports




   The average sales price in Snohomish County varies by age and type of
    structure as illustrated by Figure 20.
   Existing condominiums are the most affordable sales housing available in the
    County.




                                                      84
                                                            Figure 20
                              Average Snohomish County Home Sales Prices by Housing Type

 350000




 300000




 250000




 200000

                                                                                                         Snohomish Co Total

 150000




 100000




  50000




     0
          All Single-Family          New Single-Family      All Condominium       New Condominium




Price Trends over Time:
     Average home sales prices have increased 34% for the county since 1999, and
       condominium prices have increased 45% for the same period. This is an average
       increase of 6.8% per year for single-family homes and 9% per year for
       condominiums.
     Some areas of the county have experienced greater change in the 1990 to 1999
       time period, up to 49% increase in single-family homes in Southeast Snohomish
       County and 81% in condominium prices.

Home Purchase Affordability: The sales price a three-person household can afford is
calculated in Table 21 at two levels of income: 80% and 100% of median income.

                                                            Table 27
                                  Affordable Purchase Price by Income Group
                                          Three-Person Households
                                                                                                                     Qty of
                                                 Cash at     Monthly                                Affordable       These,
  2004 Family Income Level                       Closing     Payment              Loan                 Price          2000
120% of Median
100% of Median $ 71,900                      $     63,188    $    1,678       $   214,441       $     268,052
80% of Median     $ 51,750                   $     15,297    $    1,208       $   154,344       $     162,467
50% of Median     $ 35,050                   $     10,683    $      818       $   104,536       $     110,038


                                                                 85
                                      Affordable Purchase Price by Income Group
                                              Three-Person Households
 Loan Term                  $           30 years
 Interest Rate                        6.9% APR            Fixed
 Down Payment                           5% if income is <=80% of median family income
                                       20% if income is >80% of median family income
Source: HUD (family income levels)




        In Snohomish County, three-person families that earn less than 80% of median
         cannot afford to purchase any type of housing. The average house price exceeds
         their affordable purchase price by $115,281.
        The most nearly affordable type of housing for this family is a condominium. With
         a subsidy or increase of income of $43,305, this family could afford an average-
         priced condominium home. This number increased more than ten times the
         $3,904 gap of 1999. Figure 16 illustrates the gap between average prices for
         different types of housing and what a family earning 80% of median can afford.

                                                                    Figure 22
                                                    For-Sale Housing Affordability to 80% Median



                350000



                300000



                250000



                200000



                150000



                100000



                 50000



                        0
                                All Single-Family           New Single-Family      All Condominium   New Condominium
        Average Price             277748.423                  310795.9331             205772.26        224934.8092
        Affordable Price            162467                       162467                162467            162467




        A family earning 100% of median income can easily afford the average
         condominium, but cannot afford to buy the average-priced house. A small
         increase in income or down payment could make the average house affordable
         to these families as Table 22 illustrates.

                                                                            86
                                                          Table 28
                            Affordability of Snohomish County Single-Family Housing
                              For Family of 3, by Pct of Median Family Income, 2004
                                                               At Income = 80%            At Income = 100%
                                                              Less/Over                           Less/Over
 Housing Type           Average Price     Affordable Price     Average       Affordable Price      Average
 All Single-
 Family                 $ 277,748            $ 162,467               $ (115,281)   $ 268,052   $ (9,696)
 New Single-
 Family                 $ 310,796            $ 162,467               $ (148,329)   $ 268,052   $ (42,744)
 All
 Condominium            $ 205,772            $ 162,467               $ (43,305)    $ 268,052   $ 62,280
 New
 Condominium            $ 224,935            $ 162,467               $ (62,468)    $ 268,052   $ 43,117
Source: Central Puget Sound Real Estate Research Committee and HUD


      Assisted Rental Housing: The subjects of this analysis are the characteristics of:
          1) the assisted housing stock in Snohomish County;
          2) the households currently living in assisted housing; and
          3) the households on waiting lists for assistance.
     It is based primarily on information from the Housing Authority of Snohomish County
     (HASCO). Information developed by the Washington Low-Income Housing Network on
     the privately owned, federally subsidized housing stock, and on project-based Section
     8-assisted housing at risk of loss, was also used as a resource.

     The Housing Authority of Snohomish County: The Housing Authority of Snohomish
     County (HASCO) owns 1,697 housing units that were developed and/or are assisted
     through a variety of housing capital and operating assistance programs. These units are
     located in the unincorporated area of the County, and in the cities of Arlington,
     Edmonds, Lake Stevens, Lynnwood, Marysville, Monroe, Mountlake Terrace,
     Snohomish and Stanwood.




                                                              87
                                          Figure 23
                          HASCO-Owned Housing by Funding
                                    Source


                                    Referendum 37
                                          1%                               Rural
                                                      Public Housing
                                                           15%         Development
                   Tax Exempt                                          Project-based
                     Bonds                                                Rental
                      40%                                               Assistance
                                                                            16%




                                                    LIHTC
                                                     28%

                Source: HASCO, Inventory of Housing Programs


In addition, HASCO administers tenant-based rental assistance programs serving 3,355
households.




                                               88
                             Table 29
              HASCO Tenant-Based Rental Assistance Programs
  Program and Fund     Households     Characteristics of Households
  Source                 Served
  Section 8 Certs/Vouchers              2,986         < 50% median income; some units
                                                      set aside for family self-sufficiency,
                                                      mentally ill, developmentally disabled,
                                                      terminally ill, homeless, frail elderly,
                                                      victims of domestic violence, Sound
                                                      Families
  Shelter + Care                         353          < 50% median income; homeless and
  (McKinney Homeless                                  disabled by mental illness, chemical
  Program)                                            dependency, HIV/AIDS, or
                                                      developmental disability. The
                                                      program is administered for HASCO
                                                      by Pathways for Women YWCA.

  Housing Opportunities for              16           < 50% median income; disabled by
  Persons with AIDS (HUD                              HIV/AIDS. The Snohomish Health
  HOPWA Program)                                      District and Catholic Community
                                                      Services administer the program for
                                                      HASCO.

              Total                     3,355

  Source: HASCO, Inventory of Housing Programs



The bulk of housing units owned by HASCO provides housing for families. Eighty two
percent (82%) of the family housing was acquired or developed through the Low-
Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program or through the sale of tax-exempt bonds.




                                                 89
                                               Figure 24
                           HASCO Units by Household Type




   Elderly/Disabled
          302




   Family
        1395



                       0        200       400       600     800   1000   1200   1400



Source: HASCO, Inventory of Housing Programs



The HASCO-owned housing stock consists primarily of two-bedroom and larger units.

                                                Figure 25




             Source: HASCO, Inventory of Housing Programs

Through the federal project-based assistance programs (Low Rent Public Housing and
the USDA Rural Development) and the Section 8 certificate/voucher program, HASCO
assists 3,902 households. The vast majority of these households are extremely low-
income, with annual incomes of less than 30% of the area median income.

                                                   90
                                       Figure 26

            Income Profile of Public Housing Residents and
                           Section 8 Tenants



    100%
     90%
     80%
     70%
     60%
     50%
     40%
     30%
     20%
     10%
      0%

                <30% Median   30%-50% Median    50%-80% Median   >80% Median
Source: HASCO



While minority households make up about 14% of the County’s population, they account
for 17% of public housing residents and Section 8 tenants, and those waiting for public
housing and Section 8 rental assistance. African Americans, in particular, are
represented among households on the waiting lists in a much higher proportion (8%)
than their share of the countywide population (2%).




                                           91
                                    Table 30
                     Race of Households HASCO Waiting Lists
                                               % Total
                                         #        HH         % Total
                     Race
                                    Households (waiting    (Population)
                                                 lists)
         White                             3,337       83.3%        85.6%
         African American                    320       8.0%           1.7%
         Native American/Alaska              102       2.5%           1.4%
         Native
         Asian/Pacific Islander               242      6.0%           6.0%
                     Total                 4,001        100%        100%
         Hispanic                            196        4.9%          4.7%
         Non-Hispanic                      3,805       95.1%        95.3%
                     Total                 4,001        100%          100%


There are currently 4,001 households on the waiting lists for public housing and the
Section 8 program. That means that for every public housing unit or Section 8
certificate/voucher available, there are almost 1.5 eligible low-income households
waiting for assistance. This does not include households who have not applied or those
discouraged by the length of the wait.

The majority of households on the waiting list are families. The family demand for public
housing units is extremely high compared with the supply of units. There is nearly 5
times the number of families seeking public housing than can be served with the current
supply. For elderly and disabled families, the ratio is even worse, with 20 households
waiting for each unit.

                                  Figure 27
                Supply and Demand for Public Housing by
                            Household Type


                     1,200

                     1,000

                        800

                        600

                        400

                        200

                         0
                               Elderly/Disabled            Family
    Public Housing Units             30                      223
    Public Housing Waiting           601                    1,050
    List

Source: HASCO


                                           92
Nearly family households use 57% of Section 8 certificates and vouchers. Family
households also make up almost two thirds of the Section 8 waiting list.

                                        Figure 28

                     Section 8 Waiting List by Household Type



                     1,400
                     1,200
                     1,000
                       800
                       600
                       400
                       200
                         0
                                Elderly/Disabled              Family
     Section 8 Waiting List          1,045                     1,305

     Source: HASCO

The average waiting time for all households is long. The wait for Section 8 units is
generally longer than for Public Housing assistance.

The time a household may expect to wait for a public housing unit varies by the size of
unit needed and where in the County the housing is located. HASCO maintains the
waiting list information for four areas in the County:
1)   North County;
2)   South County;
3)   South Everett (the unincorporated area just beyond Everett’s southern city limit); and
4)   East County.
The largest numbers of applicants are for housing units in the South County and south
Everett areas.

Typically, the average wait for all households is one to two years. The wait for units in
South County is the longest. South County contains the only one-bedroom Public
Housing apartments for seniors and disabled, with a wait of approximately 20 months.



                                             93
                                                Figure 29
                 Average Wait Times for Public Housing by Area and Unit
                                     Size (Months)




       20

       18

       16

       14

       12

       10

        8

        6

        4

        2

        0
                 No. County        So. County           So. Everett        E. County




  Source: HASCO Note: There are no 1-bedroom apartments operated by HASCO in No. County, So. Everett or
  E. County

Most households will wait for between two and three years for Section 8 assistance.
Large families (needing a 4-bedroom, or larger, unit) will wait a slightly longer period of
time.

                                                Figure 30
            Average Wait for Section 8 Assistance by Unit Size
                                (Months)




  4+ BR



   3 BR



   2 BR



   1 BR


            26                28            30                 32              34               36

Source: HASCO




                                                   94
Other Housing Authorities: There are two other housing authorities in Snohomish
County. They are the Everett Housing Authority and the Tulalip Tribal Housing
Authority.

The Everett Housing Authority (EHA) owns 998 units and administers 2,335 Section 8
vouchers. Where HASCO serves predominately families in its programs, the Everett
Housing Authority serves more senior and disabled households. Sixty-two percent
(62%) of public housing residents and 50% of Section 8 tenants are elderly or disabled.

In Snohomish County’s 2000-2004 Consolidated Plan, the Tulalip Tribes, Inc. were
reported to own 136 units of low-rent public housing for tribal members. All units were
located on the Tulalip reservation and the bulk of the units were two-, three-, four-, and
five-bedroom units for families. The Tribes were also reported to manage 133 units of
Mutual Housing. Through this federal program the rent paid by families went to the
purchase of the home over a 25-year period. Recently, the Tribe’s housing authority
was abolished and it was not possible to update the data in this section. Once the
Tribes complete the restructuring of their housing programs, they will be approached for
more current data. At that time, this section will be updated accordingly.

Inventory of Assisted Rental Housing Project: In 1995, Snohomish County’s Department
of Planning and Development Services compiled a complete inventory of emergency,
transitional and permanent assisted rental housing projects in the County. Both
HASCO and the County have periodically updated the inventory, most recently in
December of 2004. The inventory includes:
    1) units owned by all three housing authorities;
    2) units which received public capital and/or operating assistance and are owned by
        private nonprofit organization;
    3) privately-owned, federally subsidized units; and
    4) units produced through the LIHTC and/or tax-exempt bond programs.

It does not include Section 8 certificates/vouchers. Because some units are flexible and
can serve more than one category of need, the inventory does include some degree of
over-reporting. Methodologies to neutralize this will be incorporated into future updates
of the inventory. However, the limited degree of over-reporting does not unduly
influence the validity of the following conclusions drawn form the inventory.

The total of transitional and permanent units as reported by the inventory is 7,514. This
represented about 3% of the County’s total housing stock in 2004.

About 60% of the housing in the inventory is family housing. The balance is for seniors,
disabled, and special needs populations. About three-quarters of the housing is
affordable for households earning 50% or less of the median income.




                                           95
                                               Figure 31

               Composition of Snohomish County's Assisted
                                Housing




  Elderly/Disabled




           Family




                     0    500     1000      1500        2000   2500       3000    3500       4000



Source: HASCO and Snohomish County Planning and Development Services



                                             Figure 32
                         Affordability of Assisted Housing Units



                                                                             Affordability
                             61%-80%                                          at <30%
                               15%
                                                                             37% of units




      Affordability
      at 50%-80%

      25% of units


                                                                             Affordability
                                                                             at 30%-50%

                                                                             38% of units




 Source: HASCO and Snohomish County Planning and Development Services s



                                                   96
Assessment of Potential Loss of Project-Based Section 8 Units: The consensus of
discussions with staff from the Everett Housing Authority and the Housing Authority of
Snohomish County is that the turmoil facing project-based Section 8 units has abated
substantially from 2000, when the last Consolidated Plan was issued. This is primarily
because the majority of projects at risk in 2000 have either already opted out or have
been recommitted to the program.

In October of 2002, the Washington Low Income Housing Network (WLIHN) issued a
statewide risk assessment of potential loss of project based Section 8 units (from which
much of the data in this section are taken). It summarized the situation as follows.

       ―In 1974, the Section 8 program replaced mortgage subsidy programs as
       the primary means of creating federally-assisted, affordable rental housing
       in the United States. Tenants’ rents are limited to 30% of gross income. A
       Section 8, or Housing Assistance Program (HAP), contract, between the
       building owner and HUD, sets the ―contract rent‖ for each unit. The
       subsidy is tied to the unit; tenants cannot move to another location and
       continue to receive the rental assistance.

As Section 8 subsidy contracts expire, building owners have several options, which
include:
   Renew the HAP for one to five years at a time with the understanding that renewals
    exceeding one year’s duration are subject to future Congressional appropriations.
    The WLIHN study notes that under certain conditions, 20-year renewals may be
    made.
   Adjust rents so they are comparable to the surrounding market under one of the two
    following scenarios:
   If the rents are above market rate for comparable units, the owner may adjust rents
    so they are comparable to the surrounding market with or without restructuring the
    underlying mortgage. In those cases in which a mortgage is fully restructured, the
    owner must execute a 30-year use agreement with HUD to renew the HAP.
   If the rents are below market rate for comparable units the owner may adjust rents
    up to the market rate, subject to certain conditions relating to the owner’s financial
    circumstances and the condition of the building. Owners who choose this option
    must renew their contracts annually for five years, again subject to Congressional
    appropriations.
   ―Opt out‖ of any relationship with HUD and rent the units at market rate, or seek
    other subsidies
   Sell the property to another owner who may, or may not continue the subsidy
    contract
The WLIHN has developed a methodology to assess the risk of these properties being
lost as affordable housing due to the expiration of the Section 8 contract. It considers:
   The property owner and physical condition of the property
                                           97
   Whether or not the property also has a HUD-subsidized mortgage
   The level of subsidy compared with market rents
   Demand for housing in the local market
   Whether the property is eligible for HUD’s mortgage restructuring programs
In its report, the WLIHN identified nine projects in Snohomish County on representing a
total of 1,529 units apportioned among 33 contracts. Of those units, 832 were at high
risk of loss, 77 at moderate risk and 90 at low risk.

Based on its methodology, WLIHN has concluded that the bulk of these units in
Snohomish County are at high risk of loss, based primarily on the assumption that
owners could receive more income from the units at market rent than they do from the
rent subsidies.

                                                Figure 33

                   Risk Assessment of Project-Based Section 8 Units



          900
          800
          700
          600
          500
          400
          300
          200
          100
             0
                       High Risk           Intermediate Risk             Low Risk
         Units            832                      77                       90
    Source: Washington Low Income Housing Network, Washington State Project-Based Section 8
    Housing: A Risk Assessment

However, many of the issues pending when the report was issued in 2002 have
resolved themselves with projects either recommitting to the program or opting out
altogether. Looking prospectively, the report listed a total of only 273 in nine projects
due to expire between 2005 and 2012.



                                                    98
                                                 Figure 34

                        Units with Expiring Section 8 Contracts
                                   by Expiration Date

  140

  120

  100

   80
                                                                                                          Units
   60

   40

   20

     0
               2005-06                 2007-08                2009-10                 2011-12
Source: Washington Low Income Housing Network, Washington State Project-Based Section 8 Housing: A Risk
Assessment



13. Housing Strategies and Objectives.                In 1995, community leaders in
Snohomish County joined together to identify and support those critical areas that make
a community healthy. This group of committed citizens is known as Healthy
Communities. The founders of Healthy Communities polled Snohomish County
residents, who established six priorities for a healthy Snohomish County. Affordable
housing was one of those priorities.

Committees were formed to address each of the priorities. Affordable housing has been
addressed through the work of two committees: the Affordable Housing Stakeholders
Committee; and the Homeownership Committee. The legacy today is the non-profit
Housing Consortium of Everett and Snohomish County.

The strategies presented here reflect the inherited work of these committees and the
input of the Consortium as well as the analysis of the housing market and housing
needs required for the Consolidated Plan.

The overriding conclusion of all of this work is that no area of need, from homelessness
to homeownership, should or could be the single priority. Housing needs must be
addressed across a continuum. The overall priority, therefore, has to be the
maintenance and enhancement of a housing continuum. For a community attempting to
meet the affordable housing needs of its residents, establishment and maintenance of a
housing continuum is critical. Also, housing priorities, goals and outcomes are an
essential component of the work being done by the County to comply with CPD Circular
03-09, which seeks to establish an outcomes-based tool for evaluating proposed

                                                    99
projects and their results. As this work yields results applicable to housing, the 2005-
2009 Consolidated Plan will be amended to reflect those advances.

The following strategies were developed with the overall goal of maintaining and
enhancing the housing continuum for homeless people, people with special housing
needs, low-income renters, and low- and moderate-income homeowners and
homebuyers in the County.

Priority: Housing
Strategy H-1: Sustain, and increase to the extent possible with available funds, the
number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households with incomes of up to
80% of area median income, with emphasis on those at or below 50% of area median
income, through:
   1)   new construction;
   2)   acquisition and/or rehabilitation of existing units;
   3)   provision of rent subsidies; and
   4)   preservation and transition of for-profit housing units to non-profit ownership of
        HUD Section 8, or similarly subsidized housing, where there is the risk of
        converting to market-rate rents not affordable to low-income households.

                               Objectives for 2005 – 2009
Objective HO-1:      Assist with the construction, acquisition, rehabilitation and/or
preservation of to 1,200 multi-family housing units for low-income renters. The County
anticipates that approximately 75% of the units will be affordable to households with
less than 50% of the median income, and the balance largely affordable to households
with incomes between 50% and 80% of the median.
Objective HO-2: Use current Section 8 rent subsidies to assist about 3,000 very low-
income households each year. Administer the program as effectively as possible given
reduced federal housing resources.
Objective HO-3: Support the provision of programs related to fair housing for low-
income renters.

                             Activities to Achieve Objectives
Activity 1: County resources to achieve this objective will be provided through the CDBG
and HOME consortia, and by the Housing Authority of Snohomish County (HASCO).
Funding for development of additional units, or the preservation of existing affordable
units, will derive from CDBG, HOME, and County Affordable Housing Trust Fund
resources. The County currently runs an annual funding process, but will be considering
other possible approaches. Housing providers have asked for more flexible timing of
funding commitments in a housing market where development opportunities must be
acted upon quickly. The County will also provide credit enhancements to HASCO for
acquisition activities and HASCO will continue to provide tax-exempt bond funding for
other nonprofit developers. HASCO will administer rental assistance for very low- and
low-income households through the Section 8 Housing Assistance Payments program.

                                           100
HASCO currently provides rental assistance for just under 3,000 households. HASCO
will seek additional vouchers annually, if provided by HUD.
Activity 2: The County will continue to support rental housing mediation services and fair
housing counseling for landlords and tenants


Strategy H-2: Provide support for operations of existing homeless shelters and
construction of needed shelters in under-served areas and for under-served
populations. Increase the inventory of transitional housing for households needing
assistance to move from homelessness into self-sufficiency. Continue to work in
partnership with the Gates Foundation’s ―Sound Families‖ program to expand the
inventory of transitional housing in Snohomish County.

                               Objectives for 2005 – 2009
Objective HO-4: Maintain the existing shelter and transitional housing system in order to
serve about 3,000 homeless people each year.
Objective HO-5: Develop new shelter beds, transitional housing units, rent subsidies,
and permanent housing for homeless people. Groups currently underserved are
homeless families with children and homeless youth. Increase the supply of beds/units
or rent subsidies so that by 2010 an additional 300 individuals can be assisted annually.
Objective HO-6: Continue to support the operation of facilities and programs providing
shelter and services to homeless families and individuals, particularly the chronically
homeless and those at risk for chronic homelessness.

                             Activities to Achieve Objectives
Activity 1: The needs of homeless people exist across the continuum of housing and
support services. Recognizing that shelter, transitional housing, and affordable rental
housing are all needed, the County will continue to support the development and
operation of such projects. The County will emphasize development of transitional and
permanent housing projects, particularly for families with children and youth.
Activity 2: The County will implement this priority using federal, state and local
resources targeted for the homeless, including the Emergency Shelter Grant Program,
the Supportive Housing Program, the Shelter Plus Care Program and the County’s
Affordable Housing Trust Fund. The County will also continue to work through the
Snohomish County Homeless Policy Task Force and the Continuum of Care Plan to be
responsive to the current and emerging needs of homeless people.
Activity 3: The County will continue to support homeless facilities and services through
the allocation of CDBG funds to public service projects such as those operated by the
Everett Gospel Mission, Community Health Center, Volunteers of America, YWCA, and
Salvation Army.
Activity 4: In partnership with the Snohomish County Homeless Policy Task Force, the
County will aggressively implement, and continuously refine, its ten-year plan to end
homelessness.

                                           101
Strategy H-3: Provide support for the operations and development of transitional and
permanent housing, and service programs for people with special needs, including: the
elderly and frail elderly; chronically mentally ill; developmentally disabled; people with
physical disabilities; people in recovery from substance abuse; people with HIV/AIDS;
and victims of domestic violence.

                               Objectives for 2005 – 2009
Objective HO-7: Increase the supply of transitional and permanent units for special
needs population by 500 over the next five years. These units are included in the 1,200
units to be added for very low-income households under Strategy H-1.
Objective HO-8: Maintain and increase rent subsidies, if provided by HUD, through the
Section 8 and Shelter Plus Care programs, and continue to set aside Section 8
vouchers for people with special needs. If enough vouchers are available, assist about
3000 households over the next five years. Use of Section 8 program resources is
conditioned, of course on whether the program is continued and, if so, at what level.

Objective HO-9: Provide support to service programs necessary for people living with
special needs to live independently.

                             Activities to Achieve Objectives
Activity 1: The County will continue to use HOME and Affordable Housing Trust Fund
resources to create permanent and transitional housing in apartment units and group
homes for people with special needs.
Activity 2: Assuming the continued availability of Section 8 resources, HASCO will
continue to provide rent subsidy programs for people with special needs. HASCO sets
aside Section 8 vouchers for those moving toward self-sufficiency, the mentally ill,
developmentally disabled, physically disabled, terminally ill, homeless, and frail elderly.
HASCO is the grantee for the subsidies provided through the Shelter Plus Care and
HOPWA programs in addition to these set asides.
Activity 3: The County, through the CDBG program, will continue to provide Public
Service funds to a variety of agencies serving special needs groups. These might
include Snohomish County Center for Battered Women, Senior Services of Snohomish
County, the Snohomish County Health District, Housing Hope, Compass Health,
YWCA, and Catholic Community Services.


Strategy H-4: Help low-income people to stay in their homes, and maintain the current
housing stock, through home repair, rehabilitation, and weatherization services.

                               Objectives for 2005 – 2009
Objective HO-10: Provide housing rehabilitation loans to 200 low- and moderate-income
homeowners at the rate of 40 per year.



                                           102
Objective HO-11: Provide grants to 375 homeowners, at a rate of 75 households per
year, to make pre- and post-weatherization repairs to guarantee the efficacy of the
weatherization measures and to address health and safety issues.
Objective HO-12: Provide repairs or replacement of dangerous, failed or failing heating
systems to 200 single-family, owner-occupied homes, at a rate of 40 homes per year,
for households with incomes at or below 50% of the area median income.
Objective HO-13:      Provide minor home repairs for 200 elderly and disabled
homeowners at a rate of 40 homes per year by providing health and safety related
repairs for households with incomes below 50% of the area median income.



                            Activities to Achieve Objectives
Activity 1: HASCO operates the Housing Rehabilitation Program that provides
rehabilitation loans up to a maximum of $40,000. The program is available to income-
eligible homeowners living in the County outside of Everett. (The City of Everett’s
Community Housing Improvement Program serves Everett homeowners.) Low interest
loans, deferred payment loans, and grants are available for critical health and safety
repairs. The loans average per $26,500. HASCO receives about $1 million in
CDBG/HOME funds each year from Snohomish County for this program.
Activity 2: The Snohomish County Human Services Department operates a countywide
weatherization program for very low-income homeowners. The funds to pay for
weatherization measures are provided by federal and state weatherization programs
and by local utilities. Funds provided by the County are used to make minor repairs that
will allow the weatherization measures to be accomplished, or will protect them once
they are complete.
Activity 3: Senior Services of Snohomish County operates a countywide Minor Home
Repair Program that provides health- and safety-related repairs for persons age 62 and
over and for persons with disabilities who are age 18 and older and who have incomes
at or below 50% of the area median income. The program limits repairs to $1,500.
Homeowners with incomes at or below 30% of the area median income receive grants
and those with incomes between 31% and 50% of the area median income are asked to
contribute the cost of the materials for the repairs.


Strategy H-5: Increase the incidence of homeownership using self-help construction,
manufactured housing, homebuyer education, and mortgage assistance programs.

                              Objectives for 2005 – 2009
Objective HO-14: Provide 50 units for purchase by low- and moderate-income first-time
homebuyers over five years.
Objective HO-15: Provide financing assistance for 70 first-time buyers.
Objective HO-16: Conduct homebuyer education classes for 5,000 potential buyers.

                                          103
                            Activities to Achieve Objectives
Activity 1: There are three agencies located in county that develop new units, or sell
existing units, to low- and moderate-income first-time homebuyers. They are Housing
Hope, HomeSight, and Habitat for Humanity. Developers from outside of the county
occasionally augment their work.
Housing Hope uses funding from the USDA’s Self-Help Program, in conjunction with
state and county funds, to assist buyers to build new units, HomeSight uses public and
private funds to rehabilitate housing units and to construct new ones. Habitat for
Humanity uses public funds for land acquisition, and then uses donated materials and
volunteer and buyer labor to develop units. These agencies will continue to play active
roles in developing and/or selling units over the next five years using a combination of
resources, including County funds as they are available.
Activity 2: HomeSight, a Seattle-based nonprofit organization, provides homebuyer
education classes and a Combo Loan program (comprising a first mortgage through a
private lender, a second mortgage from the private sector and a third mortgage with
HOMEW and ADDI funds) to low-income, first-time homebuyers.
Activity 4: HASCO will continue the homeownership option under the Section 8 program
during the next five years.


Strategy H-6: Improve the processes for utilizing the grant funds allocated to the
County.
                           Objectives for 2005 – 2009
Objective HO-17: Enhance the financial and administrative rigor of the project review
process with additional, outside financial analysis.
Objective HO-18: In conjunction with appropriate partners, seek to streamline the
method to secure financing for low-income housing projects by coordinating all funding
sources (federal, state, county) possible in a single application process.
Objective HO-19: Increase the predictability of housing production by providing stability
and continuity in project funding.


                            Activities to Achieve Objectives
Activity 1: The County, working with affordable housing providers and the Housing
Consortium of Everett and Snohomish County , will explore ways to revise the funding
process to create more certainty of funding for providers and more timely funding
commitments.


Strategy H-7: Enhance the resources that can be used for housing production.

                                 Objectives 2005-2009


                                          104
Objective HO-20: Maintain the County’s CDBG float loan program to take prompt
advantage of emergent opportunities to purchase sites for low-income housing in an
environment that is highly competitive for all types of housing development.
Objective HO-21: Maintain the County’s Affordable Housing Trust Fund and the State
Housing Trust Fund.
Objective HO-22: Maintain equitable use of the state tax credit allocation by county
housing providers.
                           Activities to Achieve Objectives
Activity 1: The County will continue to operate its CDBG float loan program and its
Affordable Housing Trust Fund as additional local tools to facilitate acquisition and
development of affordable housing.


Strategy H-8: Utilize the expertise of housing providers who will create a stable and
well-maintained low-income housing stock to expand the subsidized housing inventory
in the community.
                                Objectives 2005-2009
Objective HO-23: Use available HOME funds to support the operations of Community
Housing Development Organizations (CHDOs). The County will assist four CHDOs
each year for the next five years.
Objective HO-24: Review the financial strength housing providers for long-term
organizational viability so that local dollars fund long-term community assets.
Objective HO-25: Strengthen community partnerships by rewarding links between
housing providers and service agencies.
Objective HO-26: Build and maintain local capacity to efficiently produce and maintain
housing.
Objective HO-27: Ensure a commitment by housing providers to maintaining low-
income housing once it is constructed.

                           Activities to Achieve Objectives
Activity 1: The County, in addition to continuing use of HOME funds for CHDO operating
grants, is working cooperatively with the Housing Consortium of Everett and Snohomish
County to define the specific activities that will be undertaken to address these
objectives.

Activity 2:     The Public Funders Consortium will continue to coordinate asset
management and assure projects are monitored for physical condition and participant
qualifications.

Activity 3: The County will conduct periodic financial review of program activities to
provide feedback and assistance for long-term stability of publicly funded projects.


                                         105
14. Needs of Public Housing. The needs of public housing have been addressed
above in section III. 10, ―Market Analysis.‖ In addition, the following table provides
further data on housing need in the County.


                                     Table 30
                    Housing Needs of Families in the Jurisdiction
                                 by Family Type
 Family Type                  Overall      Afford-     Supply   Quality   Access     Sizes *   Loca-
                                           ability                **      -ibility             tion
 Income <= 30%                7078            5          5        4          5         4         4
 of AMI
 Income >30%                  7154            5          5        3          5         4         4
 but <=50% of
 AMI
 Income >50%                  6190            3          3        2          4         3         3
 but <80% of AMI
 Elderly                      3577            5          4        4          3         3         3
 Families with                6760            5          5        4          5         5         5
 Disabilities
 African                         352          5          5        4          5         4         4
 American
 Hispanic                        530          5          5        5          5         4         4
 * Size mismatch most acute among immigrant families
 ** Most severe problems in rural areas


15. Public Housing Strategy. Public housing agencies are required to prepare a
5-year agency plan that identifies the needs of public housing and sets forth a strategy
for addressing those needs. The following, taken from HASCO’s Public Housing
Agency Plan for fiscal years 2005-2009, summarizes the agency’s public housing
strategy and is consistent with the Snohomish County 2005-2009 Housing and
Community Development Consolidated Plan.

        ―The need for additional Section 8, Public Housing and other forms of
        assisted housing is evidenced by the numbers of families needing
        assistance in Snohomish County as well as those currently on the waiting
        list. At least 18,200 households with incomes below 80% of the median
        need some sort of help with housing. Over 4,000 households are waiting
        for Section 8 or Public Housing; most of those are families with children,
        under 30% of the median income, and needing 2 or 3 bedroom units.
        HASCO established aggressive goals of 100 additional Section 8
        vouchers per year for the initial Public Housing Agency Plan and 100
        additional affordable housing units annually to help meet the need.


                                                       106
―The picture for the foreseeable future makes these goals for the coming
five years impractical. Congress has mandated HUD to reduce the costs
of the Section 8 program. HASCO’s goal will be to effectively as possible
manage the program during a period of diminishing federal resources and
continue to serve the 2986 vouchers each year without reduction in
program size. The goal for additional affordable housing is reduced to 100
units over the next five years as the sales price of apartments and the
costs of new construction soar above HASCO’s ability to provide
affordable housing for low-income families. These goals are coordinated
with the Everett and Snohomish County Housing Consortium, a coalition
of non-profit and public housing providers in the county. The Snohomish
County Consolidate Plan is also coordinated through this planning
consortium.

―HASCO will continue to carefully screen Public Housing applicants to
assure that our residential communities remain a good and safe place to
live. Although deconcentration and income mixing is not currently a
problem, preference will be given when necessary to higher income
families to assure a presence of working households in all family
developments. Work is encouraged through the setting of flat rents as an
incentive to retain working families. HASCO is exempt from HUD’s rule on
deconcentration because all of our Public Housing developments are
under 100 units.

―HASCO will rely on the Section 8 program to house the bulk of
households with incomes below 30% of median income and shall attempt
to exceed the federal mandate of 75% of households below that threshold.
The wait list will continue to be first come first served. If the supply of
vouchers permits, a series of set-aside vouchers that assists those with a
disadvantage in accessing housing, such as the disabled, or programs
aimed at upward mobility, such as Project Self-Sufficiency and the Sound
Families Initiative, will continue. HASCO also plans to provide additional
project based housing vouchers in support of the Sound families program,
especially in mixed income developments where services are provided to
residents. This program provides housing and support services to
homeless parent(s) and their children. HASCO hopes to increase the
number of Sound Families projects by at least 1 new or expanded project
per year over the next 5 years.

―Assistance to the homeless is also provided through other HASCO
programs. Vouchers from the Section 8 program also assist this
population. HASCO is the grantee for the Shelter Plus Care program
administered by the YWCA. Over 300 families receive help for their
disability/homeless situation through the consortium of agencies
participating in this program. If HUD funding is available, a goal is set to
expand the program by a project per year (of up to 20 units) for a total of
100 additional units over the 5-year period. HASCO will continue to
                                    107
participate in the Snohomish County Homeless Policy Task Force that
coordinates homelessness planning issues including the 10-year plan to
end homelessness.

―The physical needs assessment of 210 Public Housing units has been
performed, including scattered sites. This provides HASCO with an
accurate projection of the overall needs of these properties. Public
Housing improvements are programmed through a 1 and 5-year action
plan. During the 5-year plan, $388,041 has been requested from HUD
each year to include HASCO-wide cost and property improvements.
Emphasis in 2005 through 2009 will be interior upgrades including
replacement of carpet and vinyl, appliances, sinks and faucets, hot water
tanks, heating systems and light fixtures.

―HASCO has reviewed all 12 Public Housing developments for the
potential of vouchering them out and renting the units to low-income
households. The initial assessment reveals that all developments could
be vouchered out and rented to families with incomes below 50% of the
median and in most cases below 30% of the median income. HASCO’s
public housing stock is relatively new and in excellent condition, and will
compete well with other rental properties in the community. A formal
demonstration project proposal has been submitted to HUD in January
2004 requesting that the Public Housing stock be allowed to voucher out.
A combination of vouchers and private market rents will provide adequate
income for effective maintenance and operation. No response from HUD
has been provided to date. However, HASCO has set a goal to voucher
out all Public Housing family units during the next 5 years.

―HASCO has implemented the homeownership option available under the
Housing Choice Voucher program, and welcomed the first homeowner in
―2002. Up to 20 participants will be enrolled in the homeownership
process per year, with a goal of at least 1 voucher supported household
successfully purchasing a home annually and 5 Section 8 households
purchasing without additional assistance. At least 25 other lower income
households in the community will be helped annually to become first time
homebuyers through HomeSight’s SnoHome loan program. HASCO will
complete a successful transfer of the program to HomeSight during the
five year period.

―The required number of Family Self- Sufficiency participants continues to
decline, currently at 53 households. While HASCO has found this program
to be very beneficial for residents, HUD financial constraints make
expansion of the program infeasible. HASCO will continue to serve the
required number of families until all of them have finished the program. As
an alternative, HASCO is participating in the Snohomish County Individual
Development Account (IDA) collaborative. Currently 9 residents are
enrolled in this program with HASCO providing case management. IDA
                                   108
       account holders are matched $3 for every $1 saved. Successful
       participants can use the proceeds of the IDA account to start a business,
       pursue a college education or purchase a home.

       ―HASCO also promotes homeownership through the single-family
       rehabilitation loan program to help families upgrade their homes. These
       low-income homeowners could in many instances lose their homes due to
       poor condition and inability to finance improvements. This program has
       helped almost 500 families with $9 million in loans since 1980. A goal has
       been established to assist 40 homeowners to rehabilitate their homes per
       year over the next five-year period.

        ―The Public Housing Drug Elimination program, while defunded by HUD,
       remains a part of the HASCO work program. The strategy remains
       focused on prevention. Key elements include youth activities to deter drug
       or gang involvement such as Camp Fire, the Y Community Program, and
       skill building for parents to help them achieve self-sufficiency.
       Supplemental police services have been discontinued due to the lack of
       HUD funds.‖

Similar information for the Everett Housing Authority is available in the City of Everett’s
Consolidated Plan. The full strategies for both authorities are available directly from the
agencies themselves.


16. Lead-Based Paint Needs. The County has assigned five grants analysts of
the Office of Housing and Community Development unit to address and monitor issues
with lead-based paint in the various HUD formula-grant programs. These individuals
are responsible for coordinating the County’s compliance with all applicable lead-based
paint requirements.

The County’s three to five-year strategy for reducing the hazards of lead based paint
are:
     1. Provide information to the public regarding the hazards of lead based paint in
        the home, especially for young children as well as for the workers who deal
        with lead based paint during building renovations.
     2. Provide technical assistance and encourage training for recipients of funds for
        their program managers as well as front line workers performing renovations
        of buildings on lead based paint hazard reduction procedures.
     3. Include appropriate language in applications and contracts requiring
        compliance with lead base paint regulations.
     4. Monitor for compliance with lead based paint regulations during monitoring
        visits to agencies.

The County staff will send press releases to local newspapers addressing the dangers
of lead based paint to families and individuals in older homes and apartments.
Recipients of grant funds will be encouraged to provide information to their clients who
                                         109
may come in contact with lead based paint. They will be encouraged to train their
employees and/or contractors in dealing with lead based paint.

The County will offer technical assistance to recipients of funds in interpreting the
regulatory requirements, and offer guidance in developing and accessing technical
resources for compliance. Training will be encouraged and supported for County staff,
recipients of funds, and contractors who perform the renovations and demolitions of
structures containing lead based paint.

In the administration of all Community Development Block Grant, HOME Partnership,
Supportive Housing Program, Emergency Shelter Grant, Shelter+Care, and other
federal funding assistance to housing projects and programs, the County will assure
that federal lead-based paint notification, lead hazard evaluation, lead hazard reduction
and on-going maintenance requirements are imposed by legally binding contract upon
funds recipients, and will monitor recipients to verify that they are complying with the
applicable requirements in the conduct of the projects and programs.

The annual funding applications contain questions asking the applicant agencies to
describe how they will address lead based paint requirements including lead based
paint testing, evaluation, tenant notification, lead hazard reduction, and clearance
activities. The County will monitor the agencies to determine their compliance with the
lead based paint regulations. The recipients of funds will be required to evaluate each
project for possible lead based paint reductions

All appropriate contracts administered by the Office of Housing and Community
Development shall contain the requirements for addressing the lead based paint
hazards in demolition and renovation projects. During monitoring of recipients of grant
funds, the Office of Housing and Community Development will review procedures for
complying with lead based paint regulations.

The age of housing units in Snohomish County, reflected by the total number of housing
units in existence on past decennial census dates, is the only available indication of the
possible incidence of lead-based paint in the current inventory. The approximate
numbers of existing housing units on successive census dates were as follows: 1960 –
58,700; 1970 – 89,400; and 1980 – 131,200. Among these stocks, the incidence of use
of lead-based paint would be greatest in those built prior to 1960, decreasing for those
built between 1960 and 1970, and sharply lower for those built between 1970 and 1980.

The process of tracking and identifying elevated blood lead levels in Washington is
governed by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246.100.042 (―Reporting
Blood Levels‖). The WAC defines elevated blood level (EBL) as 10 micrograms or
greater per deciliter (mcg/dL) in children less than 15 years of age. The WAC requires
any medical laboratory that performs a blood level test on a Washington State resident
to forward the result to the State Department of Health (DOH). In turn, DOH notifies
local Health Departments (LHD) of all children within their jurisdiction with elevated
blood levels. Cases of blood levels between 10 and 19 mcg/dl are referred to the LHD
primarily to plot potential clustering geographically. (The County Department of
                                           110
Planning and Development Services Staff has arranged with the Health District to
receive addresses of any EBL.) When lead-based paint is suspected or found to be a
hazard, action will be taken to reduce the hazard. However, the goal is to prevent lead-
based paint poisoning by reducing lead hazards. Hazards are defined as (Housing
Conditions that cause human exposure to unsafe levels of lead from paint. These
conditions include deteriorated lead-based paint; friction impact or chewable painted
surfaces; lead- contaminated dust; or lead-contaminated soil). When a child is reported
to have an elevated blood lead level the County will monitor and ensure that the
following required steps are taken: risk assessment, interim controls and on-going lead-
based paint maintenance.

In an attempt to assess the incident of EBL in children from six months to six years of
age, where the potential damage from EBL is thought to be greatest, Snohomish
County along with King and Grays Harbor Counties participated in a study funded by
the University of Washington and King County Department of Health in 1991. For
Snohomish County, the report summarized as follows. The study population for
Snohomish County was drawn from homes built before 1950, identified through the
1980 Census. Eight census tracts with more than 50% of housing built before 1950
were selected from north Everett. Blood levels of 154 children were tested. 94.1% had
blood levels below 10 mcg/dl. Five children had EBL between 10 and 15 mcg/dl, and
two between 15 and 19 mcg/dl. None were above 20 mcg/dl.

When lead based-paint is found to be a hazard, Snohomish County will monitor and
ensure that reduction of the hazard in all programs and projects are completed in
accordance with acceptable procedures performed by certified workers and clearance
has been received by a certified inspector in accordance with standards delineated in
Department of Housing and Urban Development regulations (requirements for
Notification, Evaluation and Reduction of Lead-based Paint Hazards in Federally
Owned Residential Project and Housing Receiving Federal Assistance; final rule 25
CFR Part 35 et al. Sub Part R (Methods and Standard for Lead-based Paint Hazard
Evaluation and Reduction Activities)).


17. Barriers to Affordable Housing.             Providing affordable housing requires
knowing about, and responding to, the many forces that determine whether low-income
individuals and families can access decent shelter at a reasonable price. The
Snohomish County Community Development Block Grant Consortium has an extensive
history of working together to identify barriers to affordable housing and develop
strategies to address them. This section reviews the Consortium’s activities in
addressing barriers to affordable housing

The Interjurisdictional Response: Snohomish County and its cities are balancing the
need to develop and preserve affordable housing for all residents in the context of
growth which, while not as explosive as that experienced in the 1990s, is persistent.
Snohomish County is the third most populous county in Washington and the sixth-
fastest growing in the state. This growth is increasing demand for housing, exacerbating
the problems of low-income households seeking affordable units. As with most
                                            111
jurisdictions, the County’s financial resources for addressing affordable housing are far
outstripped by the need.

Snohomish County jurisdictions are working to address barriers to affordable housing in
three interjurisdictional forums, which include growth management planning, Snohomish
County Tomorrow, and the Continuum of Care.

Growth Management and Local Comprehensive Plans: Poorly regulated growth creates
a barrier for affordable housing. In 1990, Washington State enacted its Growth
Management Act (GMA). The County and its cities were each required to develop a
comprehensive plan to address the next twenty years’ projected population growth.
Those plans designate urban growth areas in which most growth, coordinated with the
availability of services, is to occur.

Under the provisions of GMA, jurisdictions must provide residential density at more than
4 units per acre. Formerly, low density in urban areas limited the land available for
development of affordable housing.

The Growth Management Act requires that the County and its cities first agree on a set
of principles to govern individual planning efforts. These ―countywide planning policies‖
allocated an affordable housing goal to each jurisdiction, based on an analysis of:
    1) the need for affordable housing in each jurisdiction;
    2) the existing affordable housing stock, and
    3) future needs as a result of projected growth.

In addition, as part of developing local comprehensive plans, all of the consortium
members conducted an analysis of their own housing conditions and specified goals
and objectives to remove affordable housing barriers.

Snohomish County Tomorrow: The County’s Snohomish County Tomorrow is an
outgrowth of an earlier initiative, Healthy Communities, that organized community
leaders into several working committees, including one devoted to Affordable Housing.
In 2000 the committee issued a Housing Strategy that listed as barriers to affordable
housing in Snohomish County:

   high housing and land prices;
   lack of local dollars to address affordable housing needs (in part due to loss of the
    Real Estate Excise Tax revenues for housing) by providing financing for such things
    as a predevelopment loan fund, bridge financing, land banking, and preservation of
    existing affordable units; and
   barriers along the housing continuum that render other affordable housing resources
    less effective.

Healthy Communities proposed two strategies to address the lack of local funds. They
were:
 to lobby State legislators to reinstate housing as an allowed use of REET funds; and

                                          112
   to propose that the state ―block grant‖ an equitable share of State Housing Trust
    Fund resources to Snohomish County based upon need.

As of 2005, both goals have yet to be realized. However, in 2002 SSB 2060 passed
into law, establishing a $10.00 surcharge to be collected at the county level on certain
classes of documents. Of the funds realized, the State receives 40% while the County
retains 60%. Snohomish County’s share of the funds must be used for housing projects
affordable to very-low income persons [those with incomes below 50% of the area
median income]. In 2003, the County created an Affordable Housing Trust Fund that is
funded with the proceeds from SSB 2060 and is used to augment its Community
Development Block Grant and HOME Investment Partnership funds for low-income
housing development.

In addition, a more long-term strategy is to educate begin a program of voters is
underway education to improve the prospects for a future housing subsidy bond or levy
measure.

The Committee also recommended that the County use CDBG funds and HOME funds
to create a seed loan program, and supported the plans of the Local Initiative Support
Corporation (LISC) to create a Washington Community Investment Fund for
predevelopment activities, bridge loans and Section 8 housing preservation. While the
seed loan program did not materialize, as an alternative the County did enact a CDBG
float loan program. Float loans have provided affordable housing developers access to
financial assistance that is not tied to the County’s annual formula funds application
cycle. To date, that program has cycled over $6,000,000 through 11 affordable housing
projects.

The Committee’s most lasting result, however, has been its transformation from a
temporary task force into the non-profit Housing Consortium of Everett and Snohomish
County, dedicated to advocating for affordable housing locally and statewide.

Snohomish County Homeless Policy Task Force Continuum of Care Plan: The Task
Force is a group of 60 representatives of City and County government, non-profit
agencies, advocacy groups, Indian tribes, service providers housing authorities,
developers, and philanthropic organizations. The Task Force develops the Continuum
of Care Plan and annual action plans for the County, with the goal of ensuring the
integration of housing and supportive services to benefit homeless and special needs
populations. The Task Force also engages in public education and advocacy,
maintains active working relationships with other state and local coalitions, and
allocates funding for HUD Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance and Washington
State Transitional Housing, Operating and Rental Assistance Program Funds.

Local Government Responses:: Many affordability issues, such as regulatory reform
and the adoption of more flexible development regulations, are best tackled at the local
level. The following matrix, produced as part of Snohomish County Tomorrow’s 2002
Housing Evaluation Report, shows the different actions taken by Consortium members
(not including Everett) at the local level. Accordingly, and spurred by HUD’s focus
                                          113
attention on the barriers to affordable housing, states and local jurisdictions have been
analyzing and reforming local policies, codes and permitting processes to reduce
government barriers. Washington State’s Growth Management Act (GMA) provides
incentives and a variety of voluntary techniques to facilitate affordable housing. The
GMA also requires jurisdictions to develop housing in urban areas at urban densities,
thus making affordable housing possible in areas with services and near jobs.

The following matrix, produced as part of Snohomish County Tomorrow’s 2002 Housing
Evaluation Report, shows what local jurisdictions (not including Everett) are doing to
make housing more affordable at the local level.


Actions are organized by the following categories:
 Design
 Mobile & Manufactured Homes
 Single Family
 Special Needs Housing
 Incentives & Requirements
 Regulatory Relief
 Siting
 Interaction with Other Organizations
 Government Actions




                                          114
                                                  Snohomish                                                                                              Granite      Lake
                                                    County    Arlington   Bothell    Brier   Darrington   Edmonds   Everett   Index    Gold Bar           Falls      Stevens
Single Family
   Small lots (less than/equal to 9600 sq. ft.)
   Accessory dwelling units (detached)
   Housing preservation
   Use by right permitting
   Increase in minimum density requirements
   Density bonus
   No maximum densities
Site Requirements
   Flexible parking requirements
   Street width reductions (less than 40ft)
   Credits for preserving open space
   zero lot line
   Flexibility with front and back setbacks
   Flexibility with sidewalk widths
   Allow use of alleys
   Flexibility in stormwater requirements
   Flexible curb standards
Design
   Cottage housing
   PUD (aka PAD or PRD)
   Mixed use
   Cluster subdivisions
   Infill development
Mobile & Manufactured Housing
   Allow in SF residential zones
   Designated parks
Incentives & Requirements
   Regulatory reform
   Impact fee waiver
   Streamlined permitting process
   Priority permitting
   Inclusionary Housing
Other Organizations
   Active partnership w/housing organizations
   Cooperate with other jurisdictions
Government Actions
   Financial Asst. Programs
   Displacement Resources
   Pursue Funding for Housing
                                                                                                                                      LEGEND
                                                                                                                                      Active Use
                                                                                                                                      Some Use (with restrictions)
                                                                                                                                      Allowed, not used/demanded
                                                                                                                                      Goal, but not implemented




                                                                                    115
                                                                                                 Mountlake
                                                  Lynnwood   Marysville   Mill Creek    Monroe    Terrace    Mukilteo   Snohomish    Stanwood            Sultan    Woodway
Single Family
   Small lots (less than/equal to 9600 sq. ft.)
   Accessory dwelling units (detached)
   Housing preservation
   Use by right permitting
   Increase in minimum density requirements
   Density bonus
   No maximum densities
Site Requirements
   Flexible parking requirements
   Street width reductions (less than 40ft)
   Credits for preserving open space
   zero lot line
   Flexibility with front and back setbacks
   Flexibility with sidewalk widths
   Allow use of alleys
   Flexibility in stormwater requirements
   Flexible curb standards
Design
   Cottage housing
   PUD (aka PAD or PRD)
   Mixed use
   Cluster subdivisions
   Infill development
Mobile & Manufactured Housing
   Allow in SF residential zones
   Designated parks
Incentives & Requirements
   Regulatory reform
   Impact fee waiver
   Streamlined permitting process
   Priority permitting
   Inclusionary Housing
Other Organizations
   Active partnership w/housing organizations
   Cooperate with other jurisdictions
Government Actions
   Financial Asst. Programs
   Displacement Resources
   Pursue Funding for Housing
                                                                                                                                    LEGEND
                                                                                                                                    Active Use
                                                                                                                                    Some Use (with restrictions)
                                                                                                                                    Allowed, not used/demanded
                                                                                                                                    Goal, but not implemented




                                                                                  116
Regulatory Reform: Through the passage of the State Regulatory Reform Act (HB 1724,
1995) and through local initiative, all Consortium member jurisdictions cities have
significantly streamlined the housing permitting process. Since 1995, Snohomish
County has:

   Upgraded permit tracking software & permit counter computer equipment;
   Made maps of areas off limits to development available to the public;
   Instituted a reservation system to facilitate staff-builder consultations;
   Provided additional training to permit staff;
   Enacted a Unified Development Plan Code to consolidate and streamline the County
    Code; and
   Adopted a provision to allow for areawide planning and provision of needed
    utilities/services.

In addition, in 2003 the Department of Planning and Development Services began an
intensive massive, multi-year restructuring of its business plan and entire mode of
operation to make itself as accommodating as possible to the needs of the public. The
resulting reduction in regulatory and procedural barriers will benefit housing affordability.

In 1995, the County established a demonstration program allowing waivers of certain
development requirements to benefit affordable housing projects and allow for more
design flexibility. Three projects were developed under the program. The program was
terminated, but only because builders and developers found that the other permanent
changes the County made in its code and permitting allowed for the flexibility they
needed and obviated the need for the temporary program.

Accessory Dwelling Units: Provisions in City and County Codes permit accessory
dwelling units (ADUs) and are required in all cities with populations in excess of 20,000.
Census figures continue to show that the average number of people per dwelling unit is
falling. A second unit within a single-family structure:
     1) increases the housing supply;
     2) may provide needed income to the homeowner to maintain the property;
     3) has a modest impact on the surrounding neighborhood, and
     4) can provide revenue to help lower income households afford the cost of
        homeownership.

Design Innovations and Flexibility: The County’s GPP encourages well-designed,
somewhat higher density developments but results from the County’s initial attempts to
foster such projects have been disappointing due in part to the public’s discomfort with
the affordable housing component. The Housing Consortium could has a role to play
here in actively pursuing educational programs to acquaint the county’s residents with
the successes that have been achieved around the country with similar projects well-
designed, somewhat higher density developments. The problem is two-fold:
    1) helping community residents become more comfortable with proven successful
       new designs; and


                                            117
    2) guiding the development community away from out-dated single family and
       multifamily development scenarios designs that legitimately produce negative
       neighbor reactions.
Resolving these issues can be achieved through active involvement with neighbors,
landowners, and with developers and builders who have shown that they can produce
affordable, high-quality developments.
Mill Creek, for example, is developing a new city center that will include transit-oriented,
compact, and affordable residential housing.

A potentially significant force in implementing design innovations and flexibility lies in
the County’s commitment to the urban centers concept. These are envisioned as ―self-
contained‖ mixed-use, mixed-income developments offering a full range of residential,
employment and shopping uses. One of the County’s first attempts to introduce an
urban center, to have been located just east of I-5 on 128th St. SW, failed due to
opposition from local residents. Because much of that opposition centered on a
proposal to incorporate units of subsidized housing, it is clear that the advocates of
affordable housing have more work to do in educating the public about its benefits. As
of 2005, another prototype urban center is being developed just west of the intersection
of I-5 and 164th. St. SW, not far from the initial proposal. While not incorporating any
subsidized housing, perhaps the successful example set by that development will ease
the path of additional urban centers and offer other opportunities to create a true mixed-
use, mixed- income development.

Regulatory Incentives and Requirements: In hot housing markets public regulatory
intervention is often required to produce affordable housing as a proportion of new
housing. For example, the City of Monroe requires that a percentage of new units be
affordable to lower income households. The Cities of Marysville and Snohomish provide
density bonuses for the affirmative inclusion of low-income units in a project, and three
others cities list it as an option. The County and a number of jurisdictions allow density
bonuses through special overlay programs for good design.

Builders may not build to the maximum permitted density if they believe it is more
profitable to build larger units as lower densities. Minimum density requirements can
establish a density ―floor.‖ beyond GMA requirements. Monroe employs this tool, and
Marysville and Mill Creek use a version of it.

Snohomish County Tomorrow’s ―Fair Share Housing Allocation‖ program is another
aspect of regulatory incentives and requirements addressing barriers to affordable
housing. ―Fair Share‖ analyzes the need for housing for low-income households and
requires jurisdictions to address identified needs in their comprehensive land use
planning activities.

Mobile Homes and Manufactured Housing: Mobile homes and manufactured housing
provide less costly housing opportunities, particularly for homeownership. According to
Washington State Office of Financial Management figures released in 2004, mobile
homes and manufactured housing accounted for 8% of the County’s total housing stock,
a figure which climbs to 12% when considering the unincorporated County alone. Many
                                          118
rural communities in the Consortium rely have a large supply of mobile homes and
manufactured housing to meet affordable housing needs. In five communities the
percentage of mobile homes and manufactured housing equals or exceeds the rate for
the unincorporated county. These are Bothell (12%), Darrington (24%), Gold Bar,
(28%), Marysville (12%) and Sultan (15%).

Every Consortium city now allows manufactured housing wherever it would be legal to
place a stick-built, single family home, as required by HUD. The Snohomish County
Housing Authority has gained a nationwide reputation for their high quality and
innovative use of manufactured housing to serve low-income families and individuals.
Mountlake Terrace has a mobile home park zone to protect existing mobile home parks.

Taxes: Like other Washington jurisdictions, Snohomish County has a program to
reduce the tax burdens on its senior citizens. In addition, the County employs current
use taxation in its rural areas so that long-time residents are not hit with tax bills
disproportionate to their incomes.

In 1995, Washington passed a law that allows Washington cities to designate residential
areas within urban central cities for a tax abatement program. The value of newly
constructed multifamily housing, or the value of rehabilitating vacant units, can be
exempted from property taxes for ten years. No Consortium jurisdiction has yet taken
advantage of this opportunity.

Development of Multi-family Housing: As a general rule, multifamily housing rents for
costs less to produce than single family housing and, therefore, is affordable to a wider
range of the population.

However, some cities, in an effort to increase the percentage of homeowners, have
chosen to encourage single-family housing development over multi-family housing
development. Others have seen large increases in multifamily housing and have
instituted policies to promote more balanced development patterns. These efforts may,
or may not, be creating barriers to affordable development, but. However, their impact
on affordability should be carefully monitored over time.


18. Fair Housing. Snohomish County and the City of Everett were required, as
recipients of HUD funds, to complete analyses of fair housing choice within one year of
the effective date of the Consolidated Plan rule (February 5, 1995). The analyses are
not required to be submitted as part of the Consolidated Plan, but the jurisdictions
certify that they have completed the required analyses, are taking appropriate actions to
overcome the effects of any impediments identified through the analyses, and that they
maintain records reflecting the analyses and actions in this regard.

19. Anti-poverty Strategy. Household income levels are dependent upon many
conditions and factors, many of which are beyond a local general government’s direct
influence. These include: employment opportunities; households' qualifications for
employment; levels of public and private assistance available to persons who are not
                                         119
employable; and how individuals cope with daily life and the requisites for self-
sufficiency. The latter specifically includes the level of resources applied to enabling
persons who are inherently capable, but have not attained self-sufficiency above a
poverty level, to develop their personal capability to progress.

Among the relevant areas which local general government can influence are the public
schools and professional/technical training institutions of all kinds; basic public services,
regulatory policy and tax policy that affect the private business environment; and
supplementing the funding and operation of services and facilities for self-sufficiency
initiatives. Since nearly all income support for persons who are temporarily or
permanently not employable comes from the state and federal governments, local
government has limited direct influence over this. Another area of potential impact is
public policy affecting the business climate, and the use of public infrastructure
investment more directly, where appropriate, to encourage and support private business
capital investment.

Briefly summarized, Snohomish County's strategies with respect to these areas are as
follows.

Schools and educational/training institutions: The County general government will
continue to support joint planning among school districts, and support all initiatives to
enhance and expand post secondary school education and professional/technical
training facilities and programs.

Public policy regarding the business environment: The County’s continuing process of
review and reform of development permitting processes and standards will benefit
commercial and industrial developers as well as residential developers, with the same
potential cost saving and certainty-enhancing effects. The "Economic Development"
element of Snohomish County’s adopted General Policy Plan establishes a series of
eight objectives, with specific implementing policies related to each, all expressly
designed to create a supportive regulatory environment, supply supportive and
technically advanced infrastructure, facilitate small business, maximize the potential of
port and airport resources, and promote various industrial and business sectors.

In addition, Snohomish County anticipates investigating use of HUD CDBG funds to
underwrite float-loan activities. While the initial impetus for this has been to widen the
array of financing tools available to providers of affordable housing, the history of float-
loan activity in other jurisdictions suggests that float loans will be attractive to the private
sector as an economic development mechanism. If this holds true for Snohomish
County, float loan activity will comprise another element of the County’s anti-poverty
strategy.


20. Priority Non-Housing Community Development Needs.                 Snohomish
County’s priority non-housing community development needs are presented below,
broken out by HUD-prescribed categories, and discussed in detail in the following
section II. 20, ―Community Development Strategies and Objectives.‖    The dollar
                                      120
amounts assigned to each need category were developed through a combination of
discussions with jurisdictions’ and non-profit agencies’ staffs, advocates for HUD-
eligible populations, and an assessment of cumulative formula grant allocations
countywide. Because these forecasts are subject to a wide range of variables and
unknowns, they are offered as approximations rather than absolutes.
 Public Facility Needs: These needs include neighborhood facilities, parks and
    recreation facilities, health facilities, parking facilities, solid waste disposal
    improvements, asbestos removal, non-residential historic preservation, and other
    public facility needs. Snohomish County estimates its aggregate need for this
    category during the years 2005-2009 to be $7,248,778.

   Infrastructure Needs: These needs include water/sewer improvements, street
    improvements, sidewalks, sewer improvements, flood drain improvements, and
    other infrastructure needs. Snohomish County estimates its aggregate need for this
    category during the years 2005-2009 to be $7,387,161.

   Public Service Needs: These needs include disabled services, transportation
    services, substance abuse services, employment training, health services, and other
    public service needs. Snohomish County estimates its aggregate need for this
    category during the years 2005-2009 to be $1,730,518.

   Youth Programs: These needs include youth centers, childcare centers, youth
    services, child care services, and other youth programs. Snohomish County
    estimates its aggregate need for this category during the years 2005-2009 to be
    $807,284.

   Senior Programs: These needs include senior centers, senior services, and other
    senior programs. Snohomish County estimates its aggregate need for this category
    during the years 2005-2009 to be $629,277.

   Planning: Planning includes costs associated with: preparation of Consolidated and
    Annual plans; interlocal and interagency consultation; countywide public consultation
    and citizen participation; affordable housing planning; fair housing activities; project
    selection, evaluation and monitoring; financial planning; and program audit.
    Snohomish County estimates its aggregate need for this category during the years
    2005-2009 to be $3,575,503.

   Anti-Crime Programs: These needs include crime awareness and other anti-crime
    needs. While the County places a high priority on the safety of populations eligible
    for HUD formula grant funds, and in particular strongly endorses the anti-crime and
    anti-drug initiatives of the County’s housing authorities, none of the County’s HUD
    formula grant funding is anticipated to be programmed for these purposes.

   Economic Development: These needs include rehabilitation of publicly- or privately-
    owned commercial and industrial assets, commercial/industrial infrastructure
    development,   other commercial/industrial  improvements,        micro-enterprise
    assistance, economic development technical assistance, and other economic
                                     121
   development needs.          Because economic development is a new area of
   concentration for Snohomish County, within the context of the formula grant funds,
   no estimate of dollar need is available at this time. As work continues in refining
   goals and estimates of need, the Consolidated Plan will be amended to reflect those
   new data, including quantification of need.

The principle barrier to non-housing community development continues to be economic.
The entire Pacific Northwest region has lagged the rest of the nation in its recovery from
the late-90s-early-00s recession.         Sluggish economic activity and a substantial
unemployment rate have resulted in stagnating tax revenues for local jurisdictions as
well as for the State, two prominent funding sources for the kinds of projects eligible for
assistance under the Community Development Block Grant program. In past years the
County has been able to budget some of its general fund revenues to non-housing
community development purposes but now law and justice costs account for over 70%
of the County’s general fund and are projected to continue to increase, leaving little if
any room for discretionary spending. In addition, a series of recent voter-approved
ballot measures has further limited the capacity of local governments, including
Snohomish County, to fund public facilities and services. Finally, as this is written the
Washington State legislature is discussing major cuts to address a state budget deficit
on the order of $2 billion so the likelihood of assistance from that quarter is dim.

These factors can be mitigated to some degree by, to the extent possible, targeting
what resources do remain at specific project areas to leverage the components of a
funding stream. This is what is anticipated in the ―Consolidated Community Project‖
concept discussed below.


21. Community Development Strategies and Objectives. This section of
the strategic plan addresses public facilities, public improvements, and public services
that are eligible for funding under the Community Development Block Grant Program.
It illustrates how the needs for these facilities and services by low- and moderate-
income populations, neighborhoods and communities will be addressed for the period
from 2000 through 2004. The following information is organized around the general
categories presented in section II. 19, ―Priority Non-Housing Community Development
Needs.‖ For each of those identified needs, a strategy is presented which is followed by
one or more objectives and activities describing how the need category will be
addressed.

The strategies, objectives and activities were developed as part of the consultation and
citizen participation processes described in section I. 5, ―Citizen Participation‖, and
section I. 6, ―Interagency Consultation.‖

For the period covered by this Consolidated Plan, Snohomish County will initiate an
allocation methodology for a portion of public facilities CDBG funds through a
―Consolidated Community Projects‖ (CCP) program.           The objectives the County
anticipates addressing with the CCP include the following:

                                           122
      Leverage the County’s CDBG investment by partnering in projects that include
       significant non-federal funding;
      Use CDBG funds to stimulate downtown revitalization and facilitate the
       development of urban centers as visualized in the County’s land use
       Comprehensive Plan;
      Concentrate the impacts of CDBG funding to provide high-visibility results and
       allow for better tracking of investment outcomes;
      Enhance local economies by infusing significant allocations of CDBG funding
       quickly and efficiently that will result in significant local employment and materials
       acquisition; and
      Focus the impacts and benefits of CDBG funding in areas of greatest need by
       rating and ranking projects on criteria designed to meet that objective;

A CCP project must meet the following core requirements:

      A city or town will be the applicant and primary sponsor with additional partners
       comprising non-profits and/or other public agencies;
      The application will consist of single large coordinated project with multiple sub-
       projects in a low/moderate income area;
      The portion of the project proposed for CDBG funding must be an activity eligible
       for CDBG assistance (e.g., street, sewer and sidewalk improvements, community
       centers, senior centers, youth centers, low/moderate income childcare centers,
       etc.);
      The project will include a strategy for giving priority to hiring local workers and
       utilizing local business and suppliers;
      The project must include consistent and measurable outcomes derived from the
       County’s Consolidated Plan and any relevant County or local plans such as land
       use Comprehensive Plans, transportation improvement plans, capital
       improvement plans, strategic economic development plans, etc.; and
      All project components must be secured and the project must be ready to begin
       construction immediately upon release of funds.

Other aspects of a competitive CCP application will include such elements as:

      Marketing weatherization, homebuyers and rehabilitation programs to the
       immediate area.
      The CDBG-funded portion of the project will be augmented by a significant
       number of elements funded by non-CDBG sources.
      Citizen participation in the development of the project itself and/or the underlying
       larger initiative of which the CCP proposal is a portion.

It is important to note that the CCP initiative does not signal a change in project
eligibility; all of the Community Development Block Grant funds allocated to public
facilities during the period covered by this Consolidated Plan will continue to be used for
the same types of eligible projects the County has historically funded. Rather, the CCP
is a strategy to encourage clusters of projects. The County will continue funding
                                            123
individual public facilities projects in the same manner it always has. Non-profit and
public agencies will continue to be eligible to apply for funding for individual projects that
are otherwise eligible for CDBG funding and are consistent with the Consolidated Plan.
Examples include senior center rehabilitation, youth clubs, sewer and water projects,
street overlays, sidewalks, etc. In any year in which the County may receive no CCP
applications, all normally available CDBG public facilities funds will be available for non-
CCP projects.

Example Of a CCP: Working together, citizens, non-profits, and elected officials would
identify an area of the County that could benefit from a project, of which a portion would
qualify for CDBG public facilities assistance, then craft a suitable project proposal and
apply for funding under terms of the CCP program. For example, a City might assume
the lead in a public process to define an area in its jurisdiction that it wishes to target for
intervention with a CCP proposal, perhaps in a run down or lower income
neighborhood. Consistent with a strategic development concept, the city would apply
for CDBG funds for a neighborhood park and rehabilitation of the roads leading to the
area. Also within the area, a partner non-profit would participate by rehabilitating an
older building for a childcare center, a youth club would rehabilitate the exterior of its
building, and a senior center would be developed. Under terms of a successful CCP
application, all of individual projects would be undertaken together as a single large
project with the goal of improving the neighborhood using local contractors, architects,
and workers as much as possible. It would not be necessary for County CDBG
resources fund every CDBG-eligible piece of the project and additional non-CDBG
eligible elements included in the project (e. g., mixed-use commercial and market rate
residential, infrastructure improvements that do not directly benefit CDBG-eligible
populations, or implementing a business recruitment strategy) would boost the
proposal’s competitiveness. As appropriate to the nature of the project, existing
collateral programs such as Minor Home Repair and First Time Homebuyers assistance
could be marketed to the surrounding neighborhood to compliment the project, further
enhancing the proposal’s competitive score.

             NON-HOUSING COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES

Priority: Public Facilities

STRATEGY CD-1. To provide a suitable living environment for, and expand the
economic opportunities available to, persons of low- and moderate-income and to
special needs populations, Snohomish County will address the public facility needs,
prioritized at the municipal an community level, of low-income households and
predominately low- and moderate-income neighborhoods and communities, and other
HUD-eligible populations throughout the County.

                          Public Facility Objectives for 2005-2009
Objective PFO-1: Support rehabilitation projects designed to bring up to 15 public
facilities into compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act accessibility standards.


                                             124
Objective PFO-2: Support construction, repair and rehabilitation of up to 7 senior
centers.
Objective PFO-3: Construct and/or rehabilitate up to 10 public facilities which will
principally benefit low- and moderate-income households, special needs populations,
the homeless and those at risk of homelessness or abuse.
Objective PFO-4: Support construction or rehabilitation of up to 10 neighborhood
facilities to principally benefit low- and moderate-income neighborhoods.
Objective PFO-5: Support the Public Facility needs of up to 5 Consolidated Community
Projects.
Objective PFO-6: Improve our ability to retrieve and respond to community priorities and
provide technical assistance on Consolidated Community Projects.
Objective PFO-7: Support up to 15 other Public facility projects including but not limited
to parks and recreation, solid waste, food banks, and fire stations to principally benefit
low- and moderate-income persons in low/moderate income geographical areas.
                       Activities to Achieve Public Facility Objectives
Activity 1: Rehabilitate, for purposes of safety, security and accessibility, facilities which
benefit HUD-eligible populations including but not limited to, youth, the homeless, and
the elderly and special needs populations.
Activity 2: Construct and/or rehabilitate, as appropriate, public facilities which enhance
educational, recreational, health, social and equivalent quality-of-life opportunities for
seniors.
Activity 3: Construct and/or rehabilitate as appropriate, public facilities that increase
safety and livability for special needs populations, the homeless and those at risk of
abuse.
Activity 4: Construct and/or rehabilitate, as appropriate, clusters of Public Facility
projects in targeted low/moderate income to promote larger impacts on the local
economy and improve the aesthetics of the living environment.

Activity 5: Provide technical assistance and presentations about Consolidated
Community Projects to 20 individual City and Town governments.

Activity 6: Request feedback from 30 small Cities and Towns on Consolidated
Community projects by developing and distributing a survey.

Priority: Infrastructure

STRATEGY CD-2. In order to provide for the health, safety and welfare of Snohomish
County’s low- and moderate-income neighborhoods, Snohomish County will address
the unmet basic infrastructure needs, prioritized at the municipal and community levels,
of low- and moderate-income households and predominately low- and moderate-income
neighborhoods and communities throughout the county.

                           Infrastructure Objectives for 2005-2009
                                             125
Objective IO-1: Support up to 25 street improvement projects which will benefit
neighborhoods with a predominance of low- and moderate-income households.
Objective IO-2: Support up to 10 sidewalk rehabilitation projects in neighborhoods with
a predominance of low- and moderate-income households and/or which promote
accessibility and mobility for the disabled.
Objective IO-3: Support up to 10 other infrastructure projects, including but not limited
to, water/sewer projects, flood drain improvements and other eligible flood mitigation
needs to principally benefit low- and moderate-income households and the other HUD
formula-grant eligible populations.
Objective IO-4: Support the infrastructure needs of up to 5 targeted Consolidated
Community Projects.
                       Activities to Achieve Infrastructure Objectives
Activity 1: Enhance integration of the disabled into the community by mitigating
infrastructure barriers that impede the mobility.
Activity 2: Improve the safety and livability of predominately low- and moderate-income
neighborhoods by rehabilitating deteriorated streets and sidewalks, by ensuring the
presence of adequate sewers and storm water drainage systems, and by providing for
water lines and reservoirs.
Activity 3: Improve the general appearance, accessibility and economic vitality of
targeted low/moderate income areas in small cities and towns, by constructing and
rehabilitating infrastructure.
Priority: Youth Programs

Strategy CD-3: Snohomish County will support programs that provide for the well-being
of youth, both homeless and the children of low- and moderate-income families, by
providing services including but not limited to housing, case management, life-skill
training, health care and recreation.

                         Youth Programs Objectives for 2005-2009
Objective YPO-1: Provide case management and support services for up to 250 child
victims of sexual abuse/assault and non-offending family members each year for the
next five years for a total of 1,250 children served. Provide sexual abuse/assault
prevention education and violence prevention education for up to 1,500 children and
youth each year for the next five years for a total of 7,500 children served.

Objective YPO-2:         Provide assistance with the costs of providing recreational
opportunities such as attending summer camp, participating in sports activities, and
attending youth clubs for up to 250 children of low- and moderate-income families each
year for a total of up to 1,250 children served.

Objective YPO-3: Provide parenting skills training and case management services for
up to 75 low- and moderate-income pregnant or parenting teens each year for the next
five years for a total of up to 375 youth served.

                                          126
Objective YPO-4: Provide case management services and transitional housing for up to
7 homeless single teen mothers and their children each year of the next five years for a
total of up to 35 families (70 persons).

Objective YPO-5: Provide emergency and transitional housing and case management
and supportive services for up to 200 homeless youth per year for each of the next five
years for a total of up to 1,000 homeless youth.

Priority: Senior Programs

Strategy CD-4: Provide support services to assist low-and moderate-income elderly
citizens to continue to live independently in all housing settings appropriate to their
individual needs.

                        Senior Programs Objectives for 2005-2009
Objective SPO-1: Provide in-home chore services, in-home monitoring and case
management for up to 325 elderly persons per year for five years to benefit a total of up
to 1,625 elderly persons.

Objective SPO-2: Provide daycare respite services for frail elderly persons for up to 70
elderly persons per year for each of five years for a total of up to 350 benefited elderly
persons.


Priority: Public Services

                       Public Services Objectives for 2005-2009
Strategy CD-5: In order to provide a suitable living environment for the homeless, low-
and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and members
of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at the
municipal and community levels, that address the most urgent needs of those groups.

Objective PSO-1: Provide health services for up to 500 low- and moderate-income
and/or homeless persons each year for five years to benefit a total of up to 2,500
persons.

Objective PSO-2: Provide transitional housing and related case management and
supportive services for up to 35 single parent homeless families and their children per
year for each of the next five years for a total of up to 175 benefited families (400
persons).

Objective PSO-3: Provide supportive services to homeless individuals and families
including, but not limited to, meals, dental health care, prescription medication, and
transportation assistance, for up to 1,500 persons per year for each of the next five
years to benefit a total of up to 7,500 persons.


                                           127
Objective PSO-4: Provide homeless prevention services including, but not limited to,
security deposit/first month’s rent assistance for homeless persons and short-term rent
and utility costs for those who are at risk of becoming homeless to up to 35 persons
each year for five years for a total of 175 persons served.

Objective PSO-5: Provide emergency shelter, transitional housing, and related case
management and supportive services for up to 300 victims of domestic violence and
their children for each of the next five years to benefit up to 1,500 persons.

Objective PSO-6: Provide emergency shelter and/or transitional housing and related
case management and supportive services for up to 200 homeless families per year for
each of the next five years for a total of up to 1,000 benefited families (2,500 persons).

Objective PSO-7: Provide permanent housing and related case management and
employment and training supportive services for homeless individuals with special
needs, including but not limited to, chronic mental illness, substance abuse and/or
multiple episodes of homelessness, for up to 25 homeless individuals per year for each
of the next five years for a total of up to 125 persons served.

Objective PSO-8: Provide case management and support services to assist up to 40
persons with special needs, including but not limited to, persons with HIV/AIDS and
persons with developmental and physical disabilities, to live independently in all housing
settings appropriate to their needs for each of the next five years for a total of 200
persons served.

Objective PSO-9: Each year for the next five years, provide counseling, parenting skills
training and support services to up to 65 families with children at risk of abuse or
neglect per year benefiting a total of up to 325 families (700 persons) over five years.

Objective PSO-10: Provide information on landlord/tenant and fair housing laws,
conciliation and mediation services to help resolve disputes between landlords and
tenants, and fair housing counseling to individuals who believe they are experiencing
discrimination in housing for up to 1,500 persons each year of the next five years for a
total of 7,500 persons.

Objective PSO-11: Provide case management for up to 80 low-income families per
year to return them to self-reliance for each of the next five years for a total of up to 400
families (1,000 persons) benefited. Additional activities in support of this strategy will be
found in the housing strategies and objectives section of this Consolidated Plan.

Priority: Planning and Administration
STRATEGY CD-6. In support of HUD grant programs, Snohomish County will
undertake planning and administration activities including but not limited to: preparing
five-year Housing and Community Development Consolidated Plans, Annual Action
Plans and Consolidated Annual Program Evaluation Reports; conducting interlocal and
interagency consultation;  pursuing countywide public consultation and citizen
                                            128
participation; undertaking affordable housing planning; conducting fair housing
activities; pursuing economic development activities which principally benefit low- and
moderate-income persons;       managing project selection, evaluation and monitoring;
conducting financial accounting; and fulfilling program audit obligations.
                           Planning Objective for 2005-2009
Objective PO-1: Plan for and administer HUD grant programs for each of the five
program years from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2010 consistent with the capacities
enabled by federally authorized limits on recovery of local program administrative costs.
Objective PO-2: Make maximum use of technology to leverage the resources available
to the Office of Housing and Community Development for administration of housing and
non-housing community development activities, particularly those associated with the
federal formula funds
                              Activities to Achieve Objective
Activity 1: Each year for the next five years and in a manner fully consistent with the
County’s approved public participation policy, manage a process for: announcing
availability of formula funds; providing technical assistance to applicants; conducting
eligibility- and merit-based assessments of project proposals; facilitate Technical
Advisory Committee and Policy Advisory Board review of the proposed projects for a
total of 15 meetings 2005-2009.
Activity 2: Each year for the next five years and in a manner fully consistent with the
County’s approved public participation policy, prepare an Annual Action Plan for
submission to HUD along with any requisite amendments to the Consolidated Plan for a
total of five Annual Action Plans.

Activity 3: Each year for the next five years and in a manner fully consistent with the
County’s approved public participation policy, prepare and submit an annual
Consolidated Annual Program Evaluation Report (CAPER) for a total of five CAPERs.

Activity 4: Deploy a commercial grants management software package within the Office
of Housing and Community Development that interfaces with IDIS and make maximum
use of its tracking and reporting capabilities to enhance OHCD’s program management.
ANTI-CRIME PROGRAMS:
While the County places a high priority on the safety of populations eligible for HUD
formula grant funds, and in particular strongly endorses the anti-crime and anti-drug
initiatives of the County’s housing authorities, none of the County’s HUD formula grant
funding is anticipated to be programmed for these purposes.
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT:
While no CDBG funds are presently programmed expressly for economic development,
much of what the County expends federal formula funds on now has an economic
development component. Construction and rehabilitation of affordable housing puts
money directly into circulation in the local economy in wages, materials purchased and
taxes paid. Stable housing promotes a stable workforce that in turn makes the county
an attractive place to do business. Public services like affordable childcare and

                                          129
workforce training also promote a stable workforce. Public facilities investments make
communities more attractive places to live by leveraging local tax dollars to create
results greater in magnitude than the sum of their parts. Following are a few examples
of the County’s commitment to facilitating and promoting economic development with its
federal funds.
         In developing this Consolidated Plan, the County has conferred with the
          Snohomish County Economic Development Council (EDC) to ensure that the
          community development goals and priorities it includes will be informed by the
          strategies the EDC is pursuing on a larger scale. The purpose is, where
          practical and appropriate, to coordinate the investment of the County’s federal
          formula funds in a way that leverages the EDC’s commitment to
          strengthening the County’s economy for all, including those of low- and
          moderate-income.
         The County has developed a float loan program whereby CDBG funds
          committed to the County but not yet obligated can be lent to CDBG-eligible
          projects for periods of up to 30 months. At present, the cost is limited to 2%
          simple interest annually. While the program has so far been used exclusively
          for acquisition and development of subsidized housing, float loan funds are
          available for economic development projects also.
         Though no projects have been proposed to take advantage of CDBG section
          108 loan guarantee funding, the County qualifies for the program and will
          consider participating if presented with a viable proposal.
         In 2004 the County Executive, with the full support of the County Council,
          undertook a public initiative to establish priorities for the expenditure of
          County funds. The purpose of the program, called Priorities of Government,
          was for County policy makers to engage in a dialog with citizens about what
          they, the citizens, believed to be the most compelling challenges facing the
          County and for the identified issues to serve as a basis for allocating
          increasingly scarce public resources. In virtually all cases, economic
          development had either a direct bearing, such as striving to create and retain
          the maximum number of family-wage jobs, or an indirect bearing, such as
          pursuing quality-of-life objectives that yield the collateral economic
          development dividends of making the county an attractive place to do
          business and to live.        During the 2005-2009 effective period of this
          Consolidated Plan, the County will develop strategies for integrating the
          Priorities of Government, including those relating to economic development,
          into the process governing allocation of federal formula funds.
         In 2004 the County began an update of its General Policy Plan as mandated
          every ten years by provisions of Washington State’s Growth Management
          Act. The draft in circulation at the time this Consolidated Plan was written
          included five economic development goals and over three dozen
          implementing policies. Many of these provide the latitude for incorporating
          the County’s federal formula funds in their implementation. When the update
          is approved by the Council, and consistent with the federal limitations on use
          of funds, the County will integrate the GPP goals and policies, including those


                                          130
          relating to economic development, into its decision-making process for
          allocating federal formula funds.
         The County’s Urban Centers initiative is an example of an area in which it
          anticipates that CDBG, HOME and ESG funds can be combined with other
          public and private resources for broad public purposes, including economic
          development. Urban centers are envisioned as ―self-contained‖ mixed-use,
          mixed-income developments offering a full range of residential, employment
          and shopping uses. The County’s federal formula funds can be powerful
          tools in ensuring that opportunities for low- and moderate-income families are
          fully integrated into urban centers as they develop. Consequently, the County
          will monitor the evolution of the urban centers concept for appropriate
          opportunities to program its federal funds.
         In the past the County has programmed CDBG funding in support of
          organized downtown revitalization efforts such as the Main Street program
          and remains open to such uses, particularly when integrated into a multi-
          faceted, focused strategy which targets a specific area and includes
          measurable outcomes.          Similarly, because the County has made a
          fundamental commitment to preserving the economic viability of its
          agricultural base, agriculture may also present opportunities for promotion of
          economic development with formula funds.

   During the life of this Consolidated Plan, Office of Housing and Community
   Development staff will work with the public and the members of the Housing and
   Community Development Block Grant Consortium to ensure that economic
   development is:
        an eligible use for federal formula funds;
        a consequence of the investment of those funds; and
        a criterion for allocating the use of those funds.
This will be accomplished by integrating economic development into the continuing
process of developing and refining the priorities governing project funding decisions and
the evaluation of project success.


22. Outcomes. One of the hallmarks of the CDBG, ESG and HOME formula grant
program is its accountability to the public. HUD requires entitlement jurisdictions to
develop their programs collaboratively with service providers, other units of local
government and with citizens. Snohomish County demonstrates its commitment to that
principle through several avenues including: holding several public hearings each year
to provide oral and written testimony on the programs; ensuring direct stakeholder
participation in the project technical review and funding recommendation steps of the
program; and issuance of documents like this action plan which sets forth our annual
objectives and our annual CAPER which reports on how we have performed in
comparison with our goals. Recently, HUD has begun urging entitlement jurisdictions to
augment their reporting and evaluation processes using program outcomes as a further
mechanism for assessing program performance.


                                          131
Snohomish County fully supports HUD’s move to greater program accountability as set
forth in CPD Notice 03-09. The County already provides substantial information on
program ―outputs‖ in terms of measurable results (i.e., numbers of bed nights provided
the homeless in shelters, the number of affordable housing units created or preserved,
the number of public facilities rehabilitated, etc.). Outcomes comprise a broader, more
subjective assessment of program impacts; they seek to establish the quality of life
benefits conferred by the investment of formula grant funds in Snohomish County. For
example, have neighborhood home values generally increased in the wake of HUD
funds being used to assist low-income persons improve their homes? Have public
safety and medical assistance calls been reduced in number as a consequence of
initiatives funded with CDBG, ESG and HOME resources? What have been the
identifiable social benefits of programs to keep elder homeowners in their homes and
out of care facilities for extended periods?

As of January 2005 the County had made the following commitments to implementing
outcomes-based evaluation.
    As a member of the National Association for County Community and Economic
       Development (NACCED), the County is a partner with NACCED as it worked with
       several national organizations of local and state grantees to refine a
       ―Performance Outcome Measurement System‖ framework.                    The effort is
       expected to lead to a comprehensive approach to the measurement of outcomes
       for HUD’s four major community development grant programs (CDBG, HOME,
       ESG and HOPWA). Once completed, the system will include objectives,
       outcomes and indicators for each type of activity undertaken with funds made
       available from these programs.
    The staff of the Office of Housing and Community Development is integrating
       County Executive Aaron Reardon’s outcome-based ―Priorities of Government‖
       into its evaluation of projects and expects to fold the results of that effort into the
       results of the NACCED initiative cited above. The expectation is that outcomes-
       based proposal review and project management will be inaugurated in time to
       benefit projects commencing July 1, 2006.
    While the County is working with NACCED as a partner in a nationally based
       system, Snohomish County has begun some initial work in developing an
       outcomes-based performance measurement system. While firm decisions on the
       format of the system will await the results of the NACCED effort, the County
       anticipates that the system will, to the extent practicable, use data already
       available. Only new data deemed essential to producing a useful system will be
       sought from sub-grantees. Consistent with HUD guidelines issued in support of
       this initiative, the County will consider including some or all of the following data
       sets in the performance measurement system it develops:

             multi-year goals and objectives;
             annual goals and objectives;
             the expected units of accomplishments upon completion of a project or
              activity;
             actual units of accomplishment upon completion of a project or activity;

                                            132
             expected units of accomplishment during each program year of the project
              or activity;
             actual units of accomplishment during each program year of the project or
              activity;
             aggregation of actual units of program year accomplishments to annual
              and multi-year numeric goals and objectives; and
             outputs resulting from HUD funding will be shown separately and linked
              with proposed and actual outcomes.


23. Float Loans. Snohomish County annually receives approximately $3.3 million
in Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds through the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development (HUD). CDBG funds are available to the Consortium
of Snohomish County to support a variety of activities directed at improving the physical
condition of neighborhoods through the provision of housing; public improvements and
facilities; creating employment; or improving services for low and/or moderate-income
households.

These funds are committed annually through an application process that awards grants
or loans among many competing interests. Those organizations receiving funding
proceed to draw down CDBG funds, as they are needed to carry out programs or fund
approved project costs. Generally, Snohomish County has a fund balance with the
Federal Treasury, awaiting draw requests from the County to pay invoices submitted by
organizations carrying out CDBG activities. Over time, the level of this fund balance
and the general cash flow needs of the CDBG Program can be predicted.

Federal regulations allow Snohomish County to use the CDBG Program to further
support eligible and credit worthy community development projects by making short
term loans from its CDBG fund balance that is available but not yet needed by grant
recipients. These funds are called ―float loan funds‖ and federal regulations allow their
use as ―float loans‖ under specific guidelines.

Snohomish County can provide CDBG float loan funds to public, private non-profit and
private for-profit organizations for projects in Snohomish County that meet the following
policies and program guidelines.

Snohomish County’s purpose in providing this program is to support projects that will
assist the County in accomplishing specific CDBG-eligible housing, community and
economic development goals through the availability of short-term, lower-rate financing.
Specific program goals include:

   1. Provide short-term financing for housing, community and economic development
      projects that are consistent with Consolidated Plan goals and get them
      completed;
   2. Generate sufficient income interest payments to fund the costs of the program;

General policies guiding the CDBG Float Loan Program include:
                                         133
   1. The department of Planning and Development Services’ Office of Housing and
      Community Development will administer the CDBG Float Loan program.

   2. The use of funds and loan purposes must conform to requirements of the
      Snohomish County Consolidated Plan as well as regulations governing the
      CDBG Program;

   3. Other Federal regulations required by the use of CDBG funds apply to CDBG
      Float Loans. These include, NEPA Environmental Reviews, ESA compliance,
      Labor Standards (i.e., use of prevailing wages in construction), uniform relocation
      requirements, and others;

   4. The collateral to be provided by borrowers is an unconditional, irrevocable Letter
      of Credit from a financial institution acceptable to the County. The Borrower as
      additional security will also sign a Loan Agreement and Promissory Note.

   5. Float loans are provided as Demand Notes with Snohomish County having the
      right to require full or partial prepayments at any time. There are no minimum
      loan terms, but the maximum loan term is 30 months. (Federal regulations
      require that Snohomish County have access to funds to meet required CDBG
      cash flow needs. This may require partial draws on required Letters of Credit. If
      partial draws occur, authority will be provided to disburse funds back to the
      borrower in the amount drawn on the Letter of Credit, once additional CDBG
      funds are available.)

   6. Interest rates will be negotiated based on project underwriting and staff
      determinations of what is ―appropriate‖ in accordance with CDBG regulations. In
      general, rates will range from 1% to 5% based on the financial need of the
      project and interest costs may be included in the loan amount.

Projects selected for funding must satisfy the following criteria:

   1. The project(s) responds to needs identified in the Consolidated Plan.

   2. The project(s) meets a CDBG National Objective, is an eligible activity, and complies
      with all other applicable CDBG requirements.

   3. The applicant provides evidence of the ability to provide a Letter of Credit.

   4. Environmental reviews, pursuant to NEPA and other applicable statutes, indicate that
      the project can proceed.

   5. The project minimizes displacement of existing residents and businesses and produces
      copies of all required notices provided to tenants.




                                              134
   6. The funding amount requested, including the interest rate and term, are necessary to
      accomplish the stated goals of the project and is judged to be ―appropriate‖ under CDBG
      regulations.

   7. All other funds needed to complete the project are available.

   8. The applicant can, and will, provide documentation of the required public benefits
       from the project in order to fulfill the CDBG National Objective.

Float loan application process and procedures. Staff in the Snohomish County Office of
Housing and Community Development can be reached at (425) 388-3504 and are
available at any time to discuss and pre-screen potential float loan applicants. If there is
sufficient balance of float funds available to satisfy the project need and the proposed
float loan project meets eligibility requirements, staff will provide potential applicants
with an application and directions for completing the application. Completed application
materials should be sent to:

                           CDBG Float Loan Program
          Snohomish County Office of Housing and Community Development
                         3000 Rockefeller Ave., MS#604
                                Everett, WA 98201
                                  425-388-3605
                         blambert@co.snohomish.wa.us

A complete application includes the following:

   1. Project Description - Location and nature of project, detailed description of public
      benefits to be provided (i.e., detailed listing of jobs to be created or housing
      provided), description of projected beneficiaries, description of how public benefit
      requirements will be documented; project pro forma with interim and permanent
      funding sources and uses.

   2. Name and legal nature of borrower - Description of the organization, its mission,
      history, board structure, by-laws and most recent audited financial statement.

   3. Applicant’s demonstration of ability to produce the required unconditional,
      irrevocable letter of credit from a bank acceptable to the County. This could be
      provided via a bank confirmation letter.

   4. Evidence of site control and needed financial resources to complete project.

   5. Relevant technical submissions listed below:
       Scope of environmental review and clearance requirements;
       Employment Agreements, if needed;
       Housing Eligibility Agreements, if needed;
       Davis Bacon - Construction Prevailing Wage Project Review;
       Section 3 - Equal Opportunity Review;
                                             135
       Uniform Relocation Requirements, if applicable, and a plan for relocation of
          any tenants to be displaced;
       Other Federal requirements including ESA;
       Local Procurement Rules; and
       Property Appraisal.

Initial Project/CDBG Review. Elements of the review include:

  A. Assessment of Community Development Block Grant eligibility

         1. Must be an eligible use of funds as defined in the CDBG regulations (24
            CFR 570.201 to .204 and .209; copy attached in the appendix); and

         2. National Objective Must meet one of the three following objectives (a, b, or
            c) in the manner defined in the CDBG regulations (24 CFR 570.208):
            a) Benefit to low and moderate-income persons through:
               1. Creation or retention of jobs for low and moderate income persons;
                or
               2. Provision of needed facilities to a low- and moderate-income
                    residential area; or
               3. Rehabilitation of low- and moderate-income housing; or
               4. Other public service or community development activities as
                    prescribed in federal regulations.
            b) Activities that aid in prevention or elimination of slums and blight:
               1. On an area wide basis; or
               2. On a spot basis; or
               3. In an urban renewal area.
            c) Activities designed to meet community development needs having a
               particular urgency.
         3. Consistent with CDBG Consolidated Plan. Must be consistent with the
            needs and strategies identified in Snohomish County’s CDBG
            Consolidated Plan in addition to any other community plans, program
            strategies, Land Use Plans, etc.

  B. Evaluate financial feasibility – underwriting the loan

   Initial Project Review - Preliminary Approval Recommendations - Materials for
   review include:

         1. Final Project Description; and
         2. Block Grant eligibility determination; and
         3. Statement from commercial lender confirming its involvement and interest
            in providing the Letter of Credit; and
         4. A report prepared by OHCD staff subsequent to a site visit to the
            proposed project and inspection of existing structures. The report will
            identify any issues that may impinge on a decision to fund or not to fund
            the proposed project and may include recommendations for remedial
                                          136
             actions to be taken by the applicant prior to any additional work on the
             application. Identified issues, and proposed remedies, may become part
             of the final loan memorandum sent forward to the County Council for
             projects recommended for funding. Fulfillment of any remedies will be a
             performance indicator for maintaining the loan, if granted, and for
             consideration in future loan requests.

   Federal/County Requirement Review - This involves review and concurrence in the
   initial review recommendations, assesses whether sufficient float funds are
   available in view of any competing needs, and evaluates the technical submissions.

I Loan Reservation- If the loan is approved, then work proceeds to County Council and
   federal regulatory review and approval requirements

    Environmental Review and Clearance- Investigations or studies arranged and
    funded by the loan applicant may be required. County certifies final compliance to
    HUD and obtains HUD ―release of funds.‖ Applicants are urged to build sufficient
    flexibility into their timelines to allow for the federal environmental review process.
    The timeframe for HUD’s ―release of funds‖ is entirely out of the County’s influence
    and can amount to several months.

    Public Review, Comment, and Loan Preparation - Public notice of the proposed
    activity is published, application materials are made available for public review, and
    final recommendations are prepared for referral to County Council.
        A summary of the proposal and County Executive Department
           recommendations, and a proposed Motion to authorize the Float Loan, are
           drafted and referred to County Council; and
        Proposed loan documents, (Loan Agreements and Promissory Note) are
           drafted; and
        Letter of Credit commitment provided.

    County Council Approval - At least 30 days after publication of public notice.
       If approved, Office of Housing and Community Development, NDC and the
         County Prosecutor’s Office negotiate final Loan Agreements; and
       OHCD closes on the loan and disburses funds.

    Disbursement -
     1. Finalize documents and set closing date; and
     2. Finalize Bank Letter of Credit (The AMOUNT of the Letter of Credit should
         include the loan amount PLUS one payment amount. The TERM of the Letter
         of Credit should be the term of the loan PLUS sixty days for closing out the
         loan); and
     3. Confirm CDBG Funding Availability - Draw on Federal Line of Credit; and
     4. Close and Disburse funds.



                                           137
CDBG Float Loan Administration - OHCD staffs administer program requirements,
i.e. employment agreements, housing occupancy, required loan payment invoices
and review federal regulatory requirements.
    CDBG Float Loan Payment and Potential County Pre-payment Draws - Loan
      payments and any required County Pre-payment Draws will be handled as
      follows:
    Loan Payments – Borrowers will normally be invoiced quarterly, but at the
      County’s discretion may be invoiced monthly, for required loan payments.
      Payments are due by the 7th of each billing month.
    Pre-Payment Draws – In the case that Snohomish County requires a pre-
      payment on the Float Loan to meet required CDBG cash flow needs, thirty
      (30) days notice will be provided to the Borrower with the amount required
      and the date needed. The Borrower has the option to pay those funds
      directly to the County or to have a draw made on the Letter of Credit used as
      security for the loan. This draw will reduce the outstanding loan balance and
      reduce required payments. Once the County has sufficient CDBG funds, the
      amount of any pre-payment can be redisbursed to the Borrower for the
      balance of the loan term.
    The close out and final payments required on the loan will be done through a
      draw on the Letter of Credit. After this final payment of the Float Loan and the
      loan is paid, then the Loan Agreement and Promissory Note will be returned
      to applicant.




                                      138
VII. CONSOLIDATED PLAN: Program Year 2005 Action Plan


1. Sources of Funds.          Snohomish County anticipates receiving the following
amounts in federal formula grant funds for program year 2005:
   Community Development Block Grant: $3,667,000
   Emergency Shelter Grant: $137,428
   HOME American Dream Grant: $444,660
   HOME Investment Partnership: $2,397,273

In addition, the County anticipates that the following resources will also be available
during all or portions of program year 2005 to leverage the HUD formula grant funds:
     Supportive Housing Program: $1,658,798
     First-time homebuyer loan pool: $2,874,255
     Washington State Housing Trust Fund: $2,041,143
     HUD 202: $2,686,380
     Federal Home Loan Bank: $55,992
     Housing agencies’ aggregate project debt: $2,391,499
     Transitional Housing, Operating and Rent Program: $174,496
     Emergency Shelter Assistance Program: $342,912
     Snohomish County General Fund: $27,500
     Gates Foundation: $70,000
     Snohomish County Affordable Housing Trust Fund: $1,300,000
     Miscellaneous grants and charitable gifts: $125,000
     In-kind and cash project match: $3,000,000

Snohomish County has no proceeds from Section 108 loan guarantees, no surplus
funds from any urban renewal settlement for community development or housing
activities, and no grant funds returned to the line of credit for which the planned use has
not been included in a prior statement or plan.

For any projects assisted with HUD funds and which require matching funds, evidence
of matching resources will be required as part of the contracting process. Part of
subsequent monitoring activities will focus on documenting that required match was, in
fact, expended by the subgrantees.


2. Description of Projects. Descriptions of the projects to be undertaken by
Snohomish County in program year 2005 will be found in HUD Table 3 format at the
end of this section.


3. Geographic Distribution of Projects. Because the needs addressed by the
Snohomish County Community Development Housing and Community Development
Block Grant consortium are found in all parts of the County, project locations are

                                           139
likewise spread throughout the County. Locations of projects may be ascertained by
checking the addresses on the project sheets found at the end of this document.


4. Homeless and Other Special Needs Populations.                          For lists and
descriptions of projects addressing the emergency shelter and transitional housing
needs of homeless individuals and homeless families with children (including
subpopulations), to prevent low-income individuals and families with children (especially
extremely low-income) from becoming homeless, to help homeless persons make the
transition to permanent housing and independent living, and addressing the special
needs of persons who are not homeless but require supportive services, please see
section V. 3, ―Description of Projects.‖


5. Public Housing. Neither of the two public housing authorities in Snohomish
County, the Everett Housing Authority and the Housing Authority of Snohomish County,
is considered ―troubled‖ by HUD. Indeed, they have both been recognized as high
performers. For a review of projects to be undertaken in program year 2005 which
support the needs of public housing, please see section V. 3, ―Description of Projects.‖

The two operating housing authorities in the County were required to develop Public
Housing Agency Plans for the first time in 1999. These five-year plans coincided with
the 5-year time frame for the Snohomish County and Everett Consolidated Plans. Joint
meetings and public hearings were conducted to develop all four of the 5-year plans.
Annual updates are done independently by each agency but with consultation with the
others’ related plans.


6. Anti-poverty Strategy.             Household income levels are dependent upon
numerous conditions and factors, many of which are beyond a local general
government’s direct influence. Incomes are dependent upon employment opportunities;
households' qualifications for employment; levels of public and private assistance
available to persons who are not employable; and upon how individuals cope with daily
life and the requisites for self-sufficiency. The latter specifically includes the level of
resources applied to enabling persons who are inherently capable, but have not
attained self-sufficiency above a poverty level, to develop their personal capability to
progress.

Among the relevant areas which local general government can influence are the public
schools and professional/technical training institutions of all kinds; basic public services,
regulatory policy and tax policy that affect the private business environment; and
supplementing the funding and operation of services and facilities for self-sufficiency
initiatives. Since nearly all income support for persons who are temporarily or
permanently not employable comes from the state and federal governments, local
government has limited direct influence over this. Another area of potential impact is
public policy affecting the business climate, and the use of public infrastructure

                                            140
investment more directly, where appropriate, to encourage and support private business
capital investment.

Briefly summarized, Snohomish County's strategies with respect to these areas are as
follows.

Schools and educational/training institutions: The County general government will
continue to support joint planning among school districts, and support all initiatives to
enhance and expand post secondary school education and professional/technical
training facilities and programs.

Public policy regarding the business environment: The County’s continuing process of
review and reform of development permitting processes and standards will benefit
commercial and industrial developers as well as residential developers, with the same
potential cost saving and certainty-enhancing effects. The "Economic Development"
element of Snohomish County’s adopted General Policy Plan establishes a series of
eight objectives, with specific implementing policies related to each, all expressly
designed to create a supportive regulatory environment, supply supportive and
technically advanced infrastructure, facilitate small business, maximize the potential of
port and airport resources, and promote various industrial and business sectors.

In addition, Snohomish County aggressively employs HUD CDBG funds to underwrite
float-loan activities. While the initial impetus for this has been to widen the array of
financing tools available to providers of affordable housing, the history of float-loan
activity in other jurisdictions suggests that float loans will be attractive to the private
sector as an economic development mechanism. If this holds true for Snohomish
County, float loan activity will comprise another aspect of the County’s anti-poverty
strategy.

Snohomish County’s anti-poverty strategy is also informed by the distribution of
minorities throughout the County. The attached data set entitled ―Snohomish County
Areas of Minority Concentration by Census Tract‖ summarizes minority population
distribution throughout the County’s census tracts. In funding projects, Snohomish
County seeks to balance the competing goals of providing services and amenities in
areas populated by HUD-eligible citizens as a cost-effective, economy-of-scale strategy
while at the same time discouraging additional concentration of low- and moderate-
income persons in specific areas. Exemplifying an element in the County’s plan for
avoiding concentration is the County’s ―fair share‖ low-income housing strategy,
whereby each community is assigned a proportionate share of the County’s total low-
income housing need.         Snohomish County continually monitors its programs to
maintain a balance between the two goals of non-concentration and delivery of services
and amenities to in-situ low- and moderate-income persons.


7. M/WBE Policy.         Snohomish County has a policy of ensuring that business
enterprises owned by minorities and by women (M/WBEs) are given an equal
opportunity to compete for projects funded in part with County HUD funds. Whenever a
                                          141
sub-grantee’s project is sent out for bid, OH&CD ensures that a mass mailing is sent to
all contractors in the database maintained by OH&CD, including M/WBEs. The office
maintains a database of contractors registered with the office as well as a special
database subset of M/WBEs. The County’s policy in M/WBE opportunity is also
included in the standard language of each contract executed for projects. Finally,
M/WBE requirements are discussed at pre-bid and pre-construction meetings with sub-
grantees.


8. Lead-based Paint Hazards.            No CDBG funds are currently programmed
specifically for lead-based paint abatement. However, lead-base paint and other
hazardous materials abatement as required by regulation will be addressed and
budgeted in individual housing and public facility projects in accord with the strategies
set forth in Snohomish County’s 2005-2009 Housing and Community Development
Consolidated Plan.


9. Other Actions. In addition to the activities listed in section V. 3, ―Description of
Projects‖, Snohomish County will undertake the following initiatives during program year
2005 in support of the County’s housing and non-housing community development
goals.

   Perpetuate the float-loan program to provide greater flexibility to the County’s
    affordable housing provider network and to offer a tool for encouraging economic
    development activities.

   Continue to investigate the feasibility of implementing a Section 108 loan guarantee
    program for Snohomish County to enhance economic opportunities for low- and
    moderate-income wage earners.

   Manage preparation of the program year 2005 McKinney Act application for federal
    homelessness mitigation funds and submit the resulting consolidated application.

   Periodically review the County’s administration of the HUD formula grant programs
    and update and record policies for and procedures as necessary.

   Continue to provide staff support to the Community Housing Revitalization Board,
    and the Homeless Policy Taskforce.

   Investigate establishing a fair housing ordinance for Snohomish County.

   OHCD staff will develop and implement a new commercial project reporting and
    tracking database to augment IDIS, standardize subgrantee project service reporting
    units, and develop a common format for soliciting matching/leveraging data from
    subgrantees.


                                          142
   Historically Snohomish County has capitalized and maintained a CDBG Housing
    Contingency Fund to assist housing projects that encounter cost overruns. This
    fund has been underutilized.       Snohomish County proposes to modify the
    contingency fund and rename it the Opportunity Fund. The Opportunity Fund will be
    capitalized at a lower annual amount and fund an expanded array small projects.

   On an annual basis, Snohomish County has consistently funded a successful
    homebuyer down payment assistance and homebuyer education/counseling
    program administered by the Housing Authority of Snohomish County. To promote
    program stability and predictability, Snohomish County committed to a 3-year period
    of annual allocations of formula funds to this program (beginning in program year
    2001). Contingent on satisfactory program performance and availability of future
    funding, the County will maintain this commitment for the homebuyer program in
    program year 2005.

   On an annual basis, Snohomish County has consistently funded successful housing,
    minor home repair and weatherization programs administered by the Housing
    Authority of Snohomish County and the Snohomish County department of Human
    Services. To promote program stability and predictability, Snohomish County
    committed to a 3-year period of annual allocations of formula funds to this program
    (beginning in program year 2001). Contingent on satisfactory program performance
    and availability of future funding, the County will maintain this commitment for the
    minor home repair and weatherization programs in program year 2005.

   Consistent with legislative authority granted by the Washington State legislature in
    2002, Snohomish County has implemented an Affordable Housing Trust Fund
    (AHTF) capitalized by a tax on real estate transactions in the County. The fund will
    generate approximately $1,300,000 annually and the County will continue to
    integrate AHTF into its housing programs.

   Snohomish County has a substantial interest in enhancing the capacity of its non-
    profit housing development community. This is part of a strategy to leverage the
    agencies’ resources to the maximum benefit of the County’s low- and moderate-
    income households. One of the resources available for that purpose is the CHDO
    (Community Housing Development Organization) operating allocation of HOME
    Investment Partnership funds received annually by the County from HUD. As part of
    this strategy, the County distinguishes between ―senior‖ and ―non-senior‖ CHDOs.
    Senior CHDOs are defined as those that have successfully and effectively, as
    determined by the County, pursued one or more low-income housing development
    projects each year for the last five years immediately preceding the year in which a
    CHDO operating grant is sought. One of the services expected of senior CHDOs is
    the mentoring of non-senior CHDOs to develop their capacities. Two-thirds of
    program year 2004’s CHDO operating fund will be divided equally among qualifying
    senior CHDOs with the balance to be allocated among qualifying non-senior
    CHDOs. All CHDOs, including senior CHDOs, must demonstrate need for operating
    funds each year and meet CHDO qualifying criteria.

                                          143
10.   Monitoring. Monitoring of all activities assisted in whole or in part with HUD
funds administered by Snohomish County and the City of Everett pursuant to this Plan
will be carried out by staff of the County Department of Planning and Development
Services and the City Department of Community Development, respectively, in accord
with the specific compliance monitoring requirements prescribed by regulation for each
of the HUD programs. All program compliance requirements and reports required of
subrecipients and project sponsors will be specified in the County's and City's funding
award contracts. Monitoring procedures and practices will assure that reports are
submitted, reviewed and assessed, and that any noncompliance reflected in reports is
investigated and resolved. County and City staff will also conduct a risk assessment of
all agencies being funded to assist in determining which projects must be monitored at
more frequent intervals. On-site monitoring will be done to examine subrecipients' and
project sponsors' operations and records, as required by HUD regulations, to validate
reports and verify compliance. These monitoring operations will be conducted in accord
with written operating procedures and schedules. The substantive results of funded
activities will be monitored in relation to the Consolidated Plan objectives.

Activities incorporated in the Strategic Plan which are assisted with funds administered
by another County or City department, by one of the housing authorities, or by another
independent public agency, will be monitored for regulatory compliance in accordance
with their funding source regulatory terms by the administering department or agency.
County and City planning and community development staff will obtain annual reports of
the substantive results of these activities from the administering agencies to monitor for
progress against the Plan objectives.

Snohomish County will execute 60 project agreements with agencies in program year
2004. It is our goal to monitor projects every 2 years after completion, or more often if
required by regulation.

HOME eligible projects are reviewed and inspected (if applicable) for consistency with
the Consolidated Plan, program targeting/income verification of clients, HOME
investment per unit, property standards and administrative requirements. An exhaustive
list of these items is reviewed and verified within each application. On going monitoring
includes these items in a detailed check list format and report created by the analyst
and staff as part of a schedule of monitoring activities this office conducts annually.


11.    Development of Program Outcomes Measures. One of the hallmarks
of the CDBG, ESG and HOME formula grant program is its accountability to the public.
HUD requires entitlement jurisdictions to develop their programs collaboratively with
service providers, other units of local government and with citizens. Snohomish County
demonstrates its commitment to that principle through several avenues including:
holding several public hearings each year to provide oral and written testimony on the
programs; ensuring direct stakeholder participation in the project technical review and
funding recommendation steps of the program; and issuance of documents like this
action plan which sets forth our annual objectives and our annual CAPER which reports
                                            144
on how we have performed in comparison with our goals. Recently, HUD has begun
urging entitlement jurisdictions to develop an additional reporting and evaluation
regimen using program outcomes as a further mechanism for assessing program
performance. The County already provides substantial information on program
―outputs‖ in terms of measurable results (i.e., numbers of bed nights provided the
homeless in shelters, the number of affordable housing units created or preserved, the
number of public facilities rehabilitated, etc.). Outcomes comprise a broader, more
subjective assessment of program impacts; they seek to establish the quality of life
benefits conferred by the investment of formula grant funds in Snohomish County. For
example, have neighborhood home values generally increased in the wake of HUD
funds being used to assist low-income persons improve their homes? Have public
safety and medical assistance calls been reduced in number as a consequence of
initiatives funded with CDBG, ESG and HOME resources? What have been the
identifiable social benefits of programs to keep elder homeowners in their homes and
out of care facilities for extended periods?

Snohomish County is in the initial stages of developing an outcomes-based
performance measurement system. While no firm decisions have yet been reached on
the format of the system to be developed, the County anticipates that the system will, to
the extent practicable, use data already available. Only new data deemed essential to
producing a useful system will be sought from sub-grantees. Consistent with HUD
guidelines issued in support of this initiative, the County will consider including some or
all of the following data sets in the performance measurement system it develops:

             multi-year goals and objectives;
             annual goals and objectives;
             the expected units of accomplishments upon completion of a project or
              activity;
             actual units of accomplishment upon completion of a project or activity;
             expected units of accomplishment during each program year of the project
              or activity;
             actual units of accomplishment during each program year of the project or
              activity;
             aggregation of actual units of program year accomplishments to annual
              and multi-year numeric goals and objectives; and
             outputs resulting from HUD funding will be shown separately and linked
              with proposed and actual outcomes.

Snohomish County anticipates developing and implementing its performance
measurement system as a part of its 2005-2009 Consolidated Planning process and the
County will report on progress in its next submission, the Consolidated Annual Program
and Evaluation Report, which is due in September of 2005.




                                           145
             U.S. Department of Housing                                                                       OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
             and Urban Development                                                                                         (Exp. 8/31/2005)



                                                               Table 3
                                                 Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

             Applicant’s Name: Boys and Girls Club of Snohomish County

             Priority Need: Youth Programs – Snohomish County will support programs that provide
             for the well-being of youth, both homeless and the children of low- and moderate-income
             families, by providing services including but not limited to housing, case management,
             life-skill training, health care and recreation.

             Project Title: Scholarships

             Project Description:         Project will provide general club memberships, sports
             scholarships, and one-week summer day camp scholarships for youth ages 6-18 to
             participate in club activities to benefit approximately 250 low- and moderate-income
             children.

            Location: 4322 Rucker Ave, Everett, WA 98203

  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
  CD-3; YPO-2                                                                           CDBG                              $14,613
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  05D Youth Services                    24 CFR 570.201(e)                               HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                    24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  Persons Served                        250                                             Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                             $14,613
  CDBG-S 2005 #01                       250

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                         146
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                        OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                              (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Camp Fire: Snohomish County Council

  Priority Need: Youth Programs – Snohomish County will support programs that provide for the
  well-being of youth, both homeless and the children of low- and moderate-income families, by
  providing services including but not limited to housing, case management, life-skill training,
  health care and recreation.

  Project Title: Camp Willie Grief Camp

  Project Description: Project will provide grief counseling in a six-day camp setting for
  approximately 10 children, 18 years of age and under, who have experienced the death of a
  close loved one.

  Location: 4312 Rucker Ave, Everett WA 98203


  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
      CD-3; YPO-2                                                                       CDBG                                 $4,008
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  05D Youth Services                    24 CFR 570.201(e)                               HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                    24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  People                                10                                              Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                                $4,008
  CDBG-S 2005 #02                       10


The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities    Public Housing Needs




                                                                     147
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                   (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Catholic Community Services

  Priority Need: Public Services – In order to provide a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and
  members of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at
  the municipal and community levels, which address the most urgent needs of those groups.
  Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the homeless, low-
  and moderate-income and special needs populations, Snohomish County will increase the
  number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at 50% or less of AMI,
  support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing units, provide minor
  home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the processes for utilizing
  the County’s housing and community development resources, enhance housing construction
  resources, provided for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise of housing providers
  to maintain and expand the County’s inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Volunteer Chore Services

  Project Description: Project will provide approximately 3,000 hours of in-home volunteer
  chore services to approximately 90 low-income elderly and disabled adults at risk of losing their
  independency and/or safety at home.

  Location: 1918 Everett Ave, Everett WA 98201


  Objective Number                      Project ID
  CD-4, SPO-1; H-3,                                                                     Funding Sources:
  HO-9                                                                                  CDBG                             $20,459
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  05A Senior Services                   24 CFR 570.201(e)                               HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                    24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  People                                90                                              Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                            $20,459
  CDBG-S 2005 #03                       90

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                    148
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                         Table 3
                                           Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Cocoon House

  Priority Need: Youth Programs – Snohomish County will support programs that provide for the
  well-being of youth, both homeless and the children of low- and moderate-income families, by
  providing services including but not limited to housing, case management, life-skill training,
  health care and recreation. Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living
  environment for the homeless, low-and moderate-income and special needs populations,
  Snohomish County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to
  households at 50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and
  transitional housing units, provide minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate
  homeownership, improve the processes for utilizing the County’s housing and community
  development resources, enhance housing construction resources, provided for rental housing
  mediation, and utilize the expertise of housing providers to maintain and expand the County’s
  inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Teen Shelter & Transitional Housing

  Project Description: Project will provide case management services and operating costs for
  emergency and transitional housing program for approximately 200 homeless youth, ages 13 to
  17, providing approximately 6,000 bednights of emergency and transitional shelter.

  Location: 2929 Pine Street and 2726 Cedar Street, Everett WA 98201

  Objective Number                    Project ID
  CD-3, YPO-5; H-2,                                                                     Funding Sources:
  HO-6                                                                                  CDBG                              $38,219
  HUD Matrix Code                     Citation                                          ESG
  05D Youth Services                  24 CFR 570.201(e)                                 HOME
  Type of Recipient                   CDBG National Objective                           HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                  24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                              Total Formula
  Start Date                          Completion Date                                   Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                          06/30/2006                                        Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator               Annual Units                                      PHA
  People                              200                                               Other Funding
  Local ID                            Units Upon Completion                             Total                             $38,219
  CDBG-S 2005 #04                     200


The primary purpose of the project is to help: X the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                     149
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                         Table 3
                                           Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Cocoon House

  Priority Need: Youth Programs – Snohomish County will support programs that provide for the
  well-being of youth, both homeless and the children of low- and moderate-income families, by
  providing services including but not limited to housing, case management, life-skill training,
  health care and recreation. Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living
  environment for the homeless, low-and moderate-income and special needs populations,
  Snohomish County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to
  households at 50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and
  transitional housing units, provide minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate
  homeownership, improve the processes for utilizing the County’s housing and community
  development resources, enhance housing construction resources, provided for rental housing
  mediation, and utilize the expertise of housing providers to maintain and expand the County’s
  inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Teen Shelter & Transitional Housing

  Project Description: Project will provide operating costs for an emergency shelter and a
  transitional housing shelter to provide approximately 200 homeless youth, ages 13 to 17, with
  approximately 6,000 bednights of emergency and transitional shelter and related case
  management services.

  Location: 2929 Pine Street and 2726 Cedar Street, Everett WA 98201



  Objective Number                    Project ID                                        Funding Sources:
  CD-3, YPO-5; H-2,                                                                     CDBG
  HO-6                                                                                  ESG                               $18,915
  HUD Matrix Code                     Citation                                          HOME
  03T Operating Costs                 24 CFR 576.21(a)(3)                               HOPWA
  Type of Recipient                   CDBG National Objective                           Total Formula
  Private Non-Profit                  N/A                                               Prior Year Funds
  Start Date                          Completion Date                                   Assisted Housing
  07/01/2005                          06/30/2006                                        PHA
  Performance Indicator               Annual Units                                      Other Funding
  People                              200                                               Total                             $18,915
  Local ID                            Units Upon Completion
  ESG 2005 #01                        200


The primary purpose of the project is to help: X the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs

                                                                    150
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005)
  5)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Community Health Center of Snohomish County

  Priority Need: Public Services - In order to provide a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and
  members of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at
  the municipal and community levels, which address the most urgent needs of those groups.

  Project Title: Primary Medical and Dental Care

  Project Description: Project will provide approximately 700 primary medical and dental care
  visits to approximately 400 low-to-moderate income individuals without Medicaid or other health
  insurance coverage.

  Location: 5929 Evergreen Way Suite 200, Everett WA 98201


  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
  CD-5, PSO-1                                                                           CDBG                              $74,041
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  05M Health Services                   24 CFR 570.201(e)                               HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                    24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  People                                400                                             Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                             $74,041
  CDBG-S 2005 #05                       400



The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                    151
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                   (Exp. 8/31/2005)
  )


                                                         Table 3
                                           Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Community Health Center of Snohomish County

  Priority Need: Public Services – In order to provide a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and
  members of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at
  the municipal and community levels, which address the most urgent needs of those groups.

  Project Title: Health Care for Homeless Children

  Project Description: Project will provide approximately 175 primary medical and dental care
  visits to approximately 100 homeless children and youth without Medicaid or other health
  insurance coverage.

  Location: 5929 Evergreen Way Suite 200, Everett WA 98201



  Objective Number                    Project ID                                        Funding Sources:
  CD-5; PSO-1                                                                           CDBG
  HUD Matrix Code                     Citation                                          ESG                              $21,000
  05M Health Services                 24 CFR 576.21(a)(2)                               HOME
  Type of Recipient                   CDBG National Objective                           HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                  N/A                                               Total Formula
  Start Date                          Completion Date                                   Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                          06/30/2006                                        Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator               Annual Units                                      PHA
  People                              100                                               Other Funding
  Local ID                            Units Upon Completion                             Total                            $21,000
  ESG 2005 #02                        100



The primary purpose of the project is to help: X the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                    152
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

       Applicant’s Name: Community Housing Resource Board

       Priority Need: Housing – To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for
       the homeless, low- and moderate-income households and special needs populations,
       Snohomish County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to
       households at 50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and
       transitional housing units, provide for minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate
       homeownership, improve the processes for utilizing the County's housing and community
       development resources, enhance housing construction resources, provide for rental housing
       mediation, and utilize the expertise of housing providers to maintain and expand the
       County's inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: CHRB: Fair Housing Seminars for the Community-CDBG

  Project Description: The CHRB sponsors approximately 5 workshops to assist the Realtors of
  Snohomish and Island Counties implement the Voluntary Affirmative Marketing Agreement they
  have entered into with HUD.

  Location: Community Wide

  Objective Number                      Project ID
  H-1; HO-3                                                                             Funding Sources:
  HUD Matrix Code                       CDBG Citation                                   CDBG                              3,000
  21 D                                  570.208 (a) (3)                                 ESG
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOME
  Non-profit                            24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            HOPWA
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Total Formula
  07/01/05                              06/30/06                                        Prior Year Funds
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    Assisted Housing
  People                                500                                             PHA
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Other Funding
  CDBG-A 2005 #02                       500                                             Total                             3,000

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                    153
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Deaconess Children’s Services

  Priority Need: Youth Programs – Snohomish County will support programs that provide for the
  well-being of youth, both homeless and the children of low- and moderate-income families, by
  providing services including but not limited to housing, case management, life-skill training,
  health care and recreation.

  Project Title: Teen Parent Advocacy

  Project Description: Project will provide parenting skills training and case management for
  approximately 80 low-income pregnant and parenting teens.

  Location: 4708 Dogwood Drive, Everett WA 98203



  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
  CD-3, YPO-3                                                                           CDBG                              $17,806
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  05D Youth Services                    24 CFR 570.201(e)                               HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                    24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  People                                80                                              Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                             $17,806
  CDBG-S 2005 #06                       80


The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                     154
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                   (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Edmonds, City of

  Priority Need: Public Facilities - To provide a suitable living environment for, and expand the
  economic opportunities available to, person of low and moderate-income and special needs
  populations, Snohomish County will address the public facility needs, prioritized at eh municipal
  and community level, of low-income households and predominantly low and moderate-income
  neighborhoods and communities, and other HUD eligible populations, throughout the County.

  Project Title: South County Senior Center Fire Detection System and Entry Vestibule and
  Walkway Canopy

  Project Description: Project consists of two related sub-projects at the South County Senior
  Center: 1) an upgrade of the fire detection system, and 2) construction of a new entry vestibule
  and walkway canopy.

  Location: 220 Railroad Avenue, Edmonds, WA 98020



  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
  CD -1, PFO-2                                                                          CDBG                             $200,000
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  03A                                   570.201 (c)                                     HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Non-profit                            24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  10/15/2005                            10/15/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  Public Facilities                     One public facility                             Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                            $200,000
  CDBG-F 2005 #01                       One public facility


The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                    155
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                 OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                 (Exp. 8/31/2005




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Elderhealth Northwest

  Priority Need: Senior Programs – Snohomish County will support programs that assist low-
  income elderly citizens to remain in their homes, where appropriate and cost-effective, by
  providing housing repairs and reasonable modifications to accommodate disabilities and by
  supporting provision of supportive services in all housing settings appropriate to their individual
  needs.

  Project Title: Day Break Senior Respite Program

  Project Description: Project will provide out-of-home day care for approximately 65 frail
  elderly persons, providing approximately 1,900 days of respite care for primary caregivers.

  Location: 12322 Airport Road, Everett WA 98204



  Objective Number                      Project ID
  CD-4, SPO-2; H-3,                                                                  Funding Sources:
  HO-9                                                                               CDBG                              $30,201
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                     ESG
  05A Senior Services                   24 CFR 570.201(e)                            HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                      HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                    24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                         Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                              Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                   Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                 PHA
  People                                65                                           Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                        Total                             $30,201
  CDBG-S 2005 #07                       65

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS X Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                    156
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Everett, City of

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-Income households and special needs populations, Snohomish
  County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at
  50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing
  units, provide for minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the
  processes for utilizing the County's housing and community development resources, enhance
  housing construction resources, provide for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise
  of housing providers to maintain and expand the County's Inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Community Housing Improvement Program

  Project Description: Community Housing Improvement Program - This project will honor the
  terms of an interlocal agreement In effect between the City of Everett and Snohomish County
  by which 21% of the County's HOME allocation is reserved for the City's use for supporting
  HOME-eligible activities including housing rehabilitation, acquisition and new construction.


  Location: 2930 Wetmore Ave., Everett WA 98201; citywide activity


  Objective Number                      Project ID
  H-4, HO-10                                                                            Funding Sources:
  HUD Matrix Code                       CDBG Citation                                   CDBG
  14A Rehab; Single-                    92.205                                          ESG
  Unit Residential                                                                      HOME                                  $473,260
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Local Government                      N/A                                             Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/05                              06/30/06                                        Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  People                                40                                              Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                                 $473,260
  HOME-H 2005 #05                       40

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                    157
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                            (Exp. 8/31/2005)


                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Everett, City of

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-Income households and special needs populations, Snohomish
  County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at
  50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing
  units, provide for minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the
  processes for utilizing the County's housing and community development resources, enhance
  housing construction resources, provide for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise
  of housing providers to maintain and expand the County's Inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: ADDI Negotiated Set-aside

  Project Description: This project will honor the terms of an interlocal agreement In effect
  between the City of Everett and Snohomish County by which 21% of the County's HOME
  American Dream Downpayment Initiative allocation is reserved for the City's use for supporting
  eligible activities that promote homeownership for low- and moderate-income persons.


  Location: 2930 Wetmore Ave., Everett, WA 98201; citywide


  Objective Number                      Project ID
  H-5, HO-13                                                                            Funding Sources:
  HUD Matrix Code                       CDBG Citation                                   CDBG
  N/A                                   N/A                                             ESG
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOME                                  $21238
  Local Government                      N/A                                             HOPWA
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Total Formula
  07/01/05                              06/30/06                                        Prior Year Funds                      68,809
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    Assisted Housing
  People                                150                                             PHA
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Other Funding
  ADDI 2005#2                           150                                             Total                                 $90,047

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                    158
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                         Table 3
                                           Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Everett Gospel Mission

  Priority Need: Homeless and HIV/AIDS - Snohomish County will provide support for operation
  of existing homeless shelters and construction of needed shelters in underserved areas and for
  underserved populations; increase the inventory of transitional housing for households needing
  assistance to move from homelessness to self-sufficiency; and provide comprehensive case
  management for persons living with HIV/AIDS.

  Project Title: Meals and Medication

  Project Description: Project will provide approximately 9,000 meals to 1,500 homeless
  persons and provide prescription medication to approximately 65 homeless persons.

  Location: 5118 S. 2nd Ave, Everett WA 98203 and 3711 Smith Ave, Everett WA 98201



  Objective Number                    Project ID                                        Funding Sources:
  H-2, HO-6                                                                             CDBG                              $24,356
  HUD Matrix Code                     Citation                                          ESG
  05 Public Service                   24 CFR 570.201(e)                                 HOME
  Type of Recipient                   CDBG National Objective                           HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                  24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                              Total Formula
  Start Date                          Completion Date                                   Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                          06/30/2006                                        Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator               Annual Units                                      PHA
  People                              1,565                                             Other Funding
  Local ID                            Units Upon Completion                             Total                             $24,356
  CDBG-S 2005 #08                     1,565


The primary purpose of the project is to help: X the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                    159
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005


                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Habitat for Humanity of Snohomish County

  Address: 2716 Colby Avenue, Everett, WA 98201

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income households and special needs population, Snohomish
  County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at
  50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing
  units, provide for minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate home ownership, improve the
  processes for utilizing the County's housing and community development resources, enhance
  housing construction resources, provide for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise
  of housing providers to maintain and expand the County's inventory of subsidized housing

  Project Title: CHDO Operating Grant HOME

  Project Description: This is a Community Housing Development Organization (CHDO) grant
  to sustain a portion of the organization's costs incurred in developing affordable housing in
  Snohomish County. Examples of such costs include staff salaries and benefits expenses,
  training and administrative support.

  Location: 2716 Colby Avenue, Everett WA 98201

  Objective Number                      Project ID
  H-8, HO-24
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        Funding Sources:
  211 HOME CHDO                         92.208                                          CDBG
  Operating Expenses                                                                    ESG
  (subject to 5% cap)                                                                   HOME                              $18,593
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                    N/A                                             Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/05                              06/30/06                                        Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  Organization                          1                                               Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                             $18,593
  HOME-CH 2005 #01                      1




The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                    160
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005


                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: HomeSight

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income households and special needs population, Snohomish
  County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at
  50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing
  units, provide for minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate home ownership, improve the
  processes for utilizing the County's housing and community development resources, enhance
  housing construction resources, provide for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise
  of housing providers to maintain and expand the County's inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Puget Sound Homebuyers Assistance

  Project Description: HomeSight will offer deferred loans that will be supplemented with
  private 1st and 2nd mortgages for 14 low and moderate-income first-time homebuyers (at or
  below 80% of median income). HomeSight will also provide first-time homebuyers with buyer
  education courses and financial counseling. The allocation includes $220,000 of ADDI funds.

  Location: Countywide


  Objective Number                      Project ID
  H-5, HO-13                                                                            Funding Sources:
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        CDBG
  05R                                   92.205                                          ESG
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOME                              280,000
  Private Non-profit                    N/A                                             HOPWA
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Total Formula
  7/1/05                                6/31/05                                         Prior Year Funds
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    Assisted Housing
  Households                            14                                              PHA
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Other Funding - ADDI              220,000
  HOME-H 2005 #01                       14                                              Total                             500,000

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS     Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                    161
  U U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                   (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Housing Authority of Snohomish County

  Address: 12625 4th Avenue W, Suite 200, Everett WA 98204

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income households and special needs population, Snohomish
  County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at
  50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing
  units, provide for minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate home ownership, improve the
  processes for utilizing the County's housing and community development resources, enhance
  housing construction resources, provide for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise
  of housing providers to maintain and expand the County's inventory of subsidized housing

  Project Title: Fairview

  Project Description: Project will rehabilitate 24 units of low-income permanent housing and
  construct 6 units of low-income transitional housing at Fairview Apartments in City of Monroe.
  All units will serve households at or below 30% or area median income.

  Location: 14624 179th Ave SE, Monroe WA 98272


  Objective Number                      Project ID
  H-1, HO-1                                                                             Funding Sources:
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        CDBG
  12 Construction of                    92.205                                          ESG
  Housing                                                                               HOME                             $750,000
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                    N/A                                             Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
   07/01/2005                           06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  Housing Units                         31                                              Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                            $750,000
  HOME-H 2005 #02                       31
The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                    162
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Housing Authority of Snohomish County

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low-and moderate-income and special needs populations, Snohomish County will
  increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at 50% or less of
  AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing units, provide
  minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the processes for
  utilizing the County’s housing and community development resources, enhance housing
  construction resources, provided for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise of
  housing providers to maintain and expand the County’s inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Single Family Rehabilitation Loan Program

  Project Description: Program provides low-interest loans to low- and moderate-income (at or
  below 80% of area median income) families, seniors, and disabled persons for the purpose of
  maintaining their homes including critical health and safety repairs. The rehabilitation loans are
  made with homeowners throughout Snohomish County except in the City of Everett.

  Location: 12625 4th Avenue West, Suite 200, Everett WA 98204



  Objective Number                      Project ID
  H-5, HO-13                                                                            Funding Sources:
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        CDBG                                  $354,245
  14A                                   570.202                                         ESG
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOME
  Public Non-profit                     24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            HOPWA
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Total Formula
  01/01/2006                            12/31/2006                                      Prior Year Funds
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    Assisted Housing
  Housing units                         40                                              PHA
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Other Funding
  CDBG-H 2005 #01                       40                                              Total                                 $354,245

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                    163
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                         Table 3
                                           Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Housing Hope

  Priority Need: Public Services – In order to provide a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and
  members of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at
  the municipal and community levels, which address the most urgent needs of those groups.
  Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the homeless, low-
  and moderate-income and special needs populations, Snohomish County will increase the
  number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at 50% or less of AMI,
  support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing units, provide minor
  home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the processes for utilizing
  the County’s housing and community development resources, enhance housing construction
  resources, provided for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise of housing providers
  to maintain and expand the County’s inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Avanti and New Century Houses

  Project Description: Project will provide approximately 5,500 bednights of transitional housing
  and related case management services to approximately 24 persons (12 teen/young mothers
  ages 16-26 and their children).

  Location: 5830 Evergreen Way, Everett WA 98203



  Objective Number                    Project ID
  CD-5, PSO-9; H-2,                                                                     Funding Sources:
  HO-5                                                                                  CDBG                              $24,356
  HUD Matrix Code                     Citation                                          ESG
  05D Youth Services                  24 CFR 570.201(e)                                 HOME
  Type of Recipient                   CDBG National Objective                           HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                  24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                              Total Formula
  Start Date                          Completion Date                                   Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                          06/30/2006                                        Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator               Annual Units                                      PHA
  People                              24                                                Other Funding
  Local ID                            Units Upon Completion                             Total                             $24,356
  CDBG-S 2005 #10                     24

The primary purpose of the project is to help: X the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                  Table 3
                                                                    164
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                      OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                (Exp. 8/31/2005)


                                        Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Housing Hope

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income households and special needs populations, Snohomish
  County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at
  50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing
  units, provide for minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the
  processes for utilizing the County's housing and community development resources, enhance
  housing construction resources, provide for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise
  of housing providers to maintain and expand the County's Inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: 6615 Broadway Project-CDBG Float

  Project Description: Project will finance acquisition of a four-unit multi-family development
  located at 6615 Broadway Ave. in Everett, Washington. The units will be targeted at
  households earning 60% or less of the area median income. Terms of the loan are: principal,
  $300,000; interest accruing to Snohomish County, $12,400; duration of loan, 24 months
  (August 31, 2004 – August 30, 2005). The loan is backed by an irrevocable letter of credit
  issued by Frontier Bank of Everett, Washington, a commercial lender, which cites Snohomish
  County as the beneficiary. The full amount of the float-funded activity is unconditionally
  available to the County in the amount of any shortfall within 30 days of the date that the float-
  funded activity fails to generate the projected amount of program Income on schedule.

  Location: 6615 Broadway Ave., Everett, WA

  Objective Number                  Project ID
                                                                             Funding Sources:
  HUD Matrix Code                   CDBG Citation                            CDBG                            $300,000
  01 Acquisition of Real            570.201 (a)                              ESG
  Property                                                                   HOME
  Type of Recipient                 CDBG National Objective                  HOPWA
  Non-profit                                                                 Total Formula
  Start Date                        Completion Date                          Prior Year Funds
  08/31/2004                        08/30/2005                               Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator             Annual Units                             PHA
  Housing Units                     4                                        Other Funding
  Local ID                          Units Upon Completion                    Total                           $300,000
                                    4
The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public
Housing Needs




                                                                165
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005)



                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Housing Hope

  Address: 5830 Evergreen Way, Everett WA 98203

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income households and special needs population, Snohomish
  County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at
  50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing
  units, provide for minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate home ownership, improve the
  processes for utilizing the County's housing and community development resources, enhance
  housing construction resources, provide for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise
  of housing providers to maintain and expand the County's inventory of subsidized housing

  Project Title: Avondale

  Project Description: Housing Hope proposes to develop 14 units of new housing in Arlington.
  The project will include 8 units of permanent housing and 6 units of transitional low-income
  housing for homeless families. The households served will have incomes at or below 50% of
  area median.

  Location: 12605 Avondale Road, Everett WA 98204


  Objective Number                      Project ID
  H-1, HO-1                                                                             Funding Sources:
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        CDBG
  12 Construction of                    92.205                                          ESG
  Housing                                                                               HOME                              $330,000
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                    N/A                                             Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
   07/01/2005                           06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  Housing Units                         15                                              Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                             $330,000
  HOME-H 2005 #03                       15
The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                    166
U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                       Table 3
                                         Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

Applicant’s Name: Housing Hope

Priority Need: Public Services – In order to provide a suitable living environment for the
homeless, low- and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and
members of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at
the municipal and community levels, which address the most urgent needs of those groups.
Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the homeless, low-
and moderate-income and special needs populations, Snohomish County will increase the
number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at 50% or less of AMI,
support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing units, provide minor
home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the processes for utilizing
the County’s housing and community development resources, enhance housing construction
resources, provided for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise of housing providers
to maintain and expand the County’s inventory of subsidized housing.

Project Title: Homeless Services

Project Description: Project will provide approximately 60 homeless persons (25 homeless
families with children) with 17,000 bednights of transitional housing and related case
management and employment and training support services. Project will provide approximately
30 persons with 9,000 bednights of permanent housing and related case management and
employment and training support services.

Location: 5830 Evergreen Way, Everett WA 98203



Objective Number                    Project ID                                     Funding Sources:
CD-5, PSO-6; H-2,                                                                  CDBG                                 $30,201
HO-6                                                                               ESG
HUD Matrix Code                     Citation                                       HOME
05 Public Services                  24 CFR 570.201(e)                              HOPWA
Type of Recipient                   CDBG National Objective                        Total Formula
Private Non-Profit                  24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                           Prior Year Funds
Start Date                          Completion Date                                Assisted Housing
07/01/2005                          06/30/2006                                     PHA
Performance Indicator               Annual Units                                   Other Funding
People                              90                                             Total                                $30,201
Local ID                            Units Upon Completion
CDBG-S 2005 #09                     90

 The primary purpose of the project is to help: X the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs


                                                                   167
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                      OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                (Exp. 8/31/2005)


                                                      Table 3
                                        Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Housing Hope

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income households and special needs populations, Snohomish
  County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at
  50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing
  units, provide for minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the
  processes for utilizing the County's housing and community development resources, enhance
  housing construction resources, provide for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise
  of housing providers to maintain and expand the County's Inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: 2503 Howard Project-CDBG Float

  Project Description: Project will finance acquisition of a nine-unit multi-family development
  located at 2503 Howard Ave. in Everett, Washington. The units will be targeted at households
  earning 60% or less of the area median income. Terms of the loan are: principal, $632,200;
  interest accruing to Snohomish County, $29,503; duration of loan, 28 months (August 31, 2004
  – December 31, 2005). The loan is backed by an irrevocable letter of credit issued by Frontier
  Bank of Everett, Washington, a commercial lender, which cites Snohomish County as the
  beneficiary. The full amount of the float-funded activity is unconditionally available to the County
  in the amount of any shortfall within 30 days of the date that the float-funded activity fails to
  generate the projected amount of program Income on schedule.

  Location: 2503 Howard, Everett, WA

  Objective Number                  Project ID
                                                                             Funding Sources:
  HUD Matrix Code                   CDBG Citation                            CDBG                            $632,200
  01 Acquisition of Real            570.201 (a)                              ESG
  Property                                                                   HOME
  Type of Recipient                 CDBG National Objective                  HOPWA
  Non-profit                                                                 Total Formula
  Start Date                        Completion Date                          Prior Year Funds
  08/31/2004                        12/31/2005                               Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator             Annual Units                             PHA
  Housing Units                     9                                        Other Funding
  Local ID                          Units Upon Completion                    Total                           $632,200
                                    9

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public
Housing Needs



                                                      Table 3
                                        Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects
                                                        168
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005)




  Applicant’s Name: Housing Hope

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income households and special needs populations, Snohomish
  County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at
  50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing
  units, provide for minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, Improve the
  processes for utilizing the County's housing and community development resources, enhance
  housing construction resources, provide for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise
  of housing providers to maintain and expand the County's inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Stanwood Expansion-CDBG Float Loan

  Project Description: Project will finance acquisition of a 2-acre site to be developed to provide
  a total of 21 units of housing comprising 20 new and one rehabilitated unit, all affordable to low-
  and moderate income households. Site is located within Snohomish County in the City of
  Stanwood, Washington. Terms of the loan are: principal, $808,000; interest accruing to
  Snohomish County, $26,933; duration of loan, 20 months (August 2004 - April 2005) Loan is
  backed by an irrevocable letter of credit issued by Frontier Bank of Everett, Washington, a
  commercial lender, which cites Snohomish County as the beneficiary. The full amount of the
  float-funded activity is unconditionally available to the County in the amount of any shortfall
  within 30 days of the date that the float-funded activity fails to generate the projected amount of
  program income on schedule.

   Location: 5830 Evergreen Way, Everett WA

  Objective Number                      Project ID
  H-1, HO-1                                                                             Funding Sources:
  HUD Matrix Code                       CDBG Citation                                   CDBG                               $808,000
  01 Acquisition of Real                570.201 (a)                                     ESG
  Property                                                                              HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-profit                    24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  08/20/03                              04/19/05                                        Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  Housing Units                         21                                              Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                              $808,000
                                        21
The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                                     169
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Housing Hope

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income households and special needs populations, Snohomish
  County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at
  50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing
  units, provide for minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the
  processes for utilizing the County's housing and community development resources, enhance
  housing construction resources, provide for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise
  of housing providers to maintain and expand the County's inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Sultan 5-Plex - CDBG Float Loan

  Project Description: Hope will use the proceeds of the loan to augment agency funding
  resources to acquire a multi-family development located at 519-4th St. in Sultan to provide 5
  units of affordable rental housing to be targeted to households earning 50% or less of area
  median income; up to 3 units will be designated as transitional housing with supportive services
  under Housing Hope's participation in the Sound Families program. Terms of the loan are:
  principal, $320,000; interest accruing to Snohomish County, $9,600; duration of loan. 18
  months (January 2004 - July 2005). Loan is backed by an irrevocable letter of credit issued by
  Frontier Bank of Everett, Washington, providing that the full amount of the float funded activity
  is unconditionally available to the County in the amount of any shortfall within 30 days of the
  date that the float-funded activity fails to generate the projected amount of program income on
  schedule.

  Location: 519, 4th St., Sultan WA

  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
  H-1, HO-1                                                                             CDBG                               $320,000
  HUD Matrix Code                       CDBG Citation                                   ESG
  01 Acquisition of Real                570.201 (a)                                     HOME
  Property                                                                              HOPWA
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         Total Formula
  Private Non-profit                    24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Prior Year Funds
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Assisted Housing
  01/29/04                              07/29/05                                        PHA
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    Other Funding
  Housing Units                         5                                               Total                              $320,000
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion
                                        5

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs


                                                                     170
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005)


                                                         Table 3
                                           Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Housing Hope

  Priority Need: Public Services – In order to provide a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and
  members of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at
  the municipal and community levels, which address the most urgent needs of those groups.
  Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the homeless, low-
  and moderate-income and special needs populations, Snohomish County will increase the
  number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at 50% or less of AMI,
  support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing units, provide minor
  home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the processes for utilizing
  the County’s housing and community development resources, enhance housing construction
  resources, provided for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise of housing providers
  to maintain and expand the County’s inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Transitions

  Project Description: Project will provide operating costs for emergency and transitional
  shelter facilities for approximately 185 persons (70 families with children), providing 22,000
  bednights of emergency and transitional housing and related case management and supportive
  services.

  Location: 5830 Evergreen Way, Everett WA 98203



  Objective Number                    Project ID
  CD-5, PSO-6; H-2,                                                                     Funding Sources:
  HO-6                                                                                  CDBG
  HUD Matrix Code                     Citation                                          ESG                               $20,000
  03T Operating Costs                 24 CFR 576.21(a)(3)                               HOME
  Type of Recipient                   CDBG National Objective                           HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                  N/A                                               Total Formula
  Start Date                          Completion Date                                   Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                          06/30/2006                                        Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator               Annual Units                                      PHA
  People                              185                                               Other Funding
  Local ID                            Units Upon Completion                             Total                             $20,000
  ESG 2005 #03                        185

The primary purpose of the project is to help: X the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs


                                                         Table 3
                                           Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects
                                                                    171
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                   (Exp. 8/31/2005)




  Applicant’s Name: Housing Hope Properties

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income households and special needs populations, Snohomish
  County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at
  50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing
  units, provide for minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the
  processes for utilizing the County's housing and community development resources, enhance
  housing construction resources, provide for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise
  of housing providers to maintain and expand the County's Inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Avondale Homes-CDBG Float

  Project Description: Project will finance acquisition of a .9-acre site to be developed to
  provide a total of 10 new units of housing affordable to low- and moderate-income households.
  Site Is located within Snohomish County on Avondale Way, approximately 1 mile south of the
  Everett, Washington. Terms of the loan are: principal, $210,000; interest accruing to Snohomish
  County, $10,500; duration of loan, 30 months (March 14, 2003 – September 13, 2005) Loan is
  backed by an irrevocable letter of credit issued by Frontier Bank of Everett, Washington, a
  commercial lender, which cites Snohomish County as the beneficiary. The full amount of the
  float-funded activity is unconditionally available to the County in the amount of any shortfall
  within 30 days of the date that the float-funded activity fails to generate the projected amount of
  program Income on schedule.

  Location: 12605 Avondale Way, Everett WA 98204



  Objective Number                      Project ID
  H-1, HO-1                                                                             Funding Sources:
  HUD Matrix Code                       CDBG Citation                                   CDBG                             $210,000
  01 Acquisition of Real                570.201 (a)                                     ESG
  Property                                                                              HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-profit                    24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  03/14/2003                            09/14/2005                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  Housing Units                         10                                              Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                            $210,000
                                        10
The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs

                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Housing Hope Properties

                                                                    172
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                   (Exp. 8/31/2005)


  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income households and special needs population, Snohomish
  County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at
  50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing
  units, provide for minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate home ownership, improve the
  processes for utilizing the County's housing and community development resources, enhance
  housing construction resources, provide for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise
  of housing providers to maintain and expand the County's inventory of subsidized housing

  Project Title: CHDO Operating Grant HOME

  Project Description: This is a Community Housing Development Organization (CHDO) grant
  to sustain a portion of the organization's costs incurred in developing affordable housing in
  Snohomish County. Examples of such costs include staff salaries and benefits expenses,
  training and administrative support.

  Location: 5830 Evergreen Way, Everett WA 98203


  Objective Number                      Project ID
  H-8, HO-24
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        Funding Sources:
  211 HOME CHDO                         92.208                                          CDBG
  Operating Expenses                                                                    ESG
  (subject to 5% cap)                                                                   HOME                             $25,165
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-profit                    N/A                                             Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  Organization                          1                                               Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                            $25,165
  HOME-CH 2005 #02                      1


The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           173
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Human Services Department of Snohomish County

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low-and moderate-income and special needs populations, Snohomish County will
  increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at 50% or less of
  AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing units, provide
  minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the processes for
  utilizing the County’s housing and community development resources, enhance housing
  construction resources, provided for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise of
  housing providers to maintain and expand the County’s inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Heating System Repairs and Replacement

  Project Description: Program will repair or replace dangerous, failed or failing heating
  systems in the homes of very low-income individuals and families at no cost to the homeowner.
  This program serves homeowners with incomes at or below 50% of the area median income.
  The program will assist 40 very low-income households throughout Snohomish County except
  in the City of Everett.

  Location: 2722 Colby Avenue, Suite 104, Everett WA 98201

  Objective Number                      Project ID
  H-3, HO-11                                                                            Funding Sources:                      $40,000
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        CDBG
  14A                                   570.202                                         ESG
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOME
  Local Government                      24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            HOPWA
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Total Formula
  12/01/2005                            11/30/2006                                      Prior Year Funds
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    Assisted Housing
  Housing units                         40                                              PHA
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Other Funding
  CDBG-H 2005 #04                       40 homes                                        Total                                 $40,000

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           174
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                   (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Human Services Department of Snohomish County

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low-and moderate-income and special needs populations, Snohomish County will
  increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at 50% or less of
  AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing units, provide
  minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the processes for
  utilizing the County’s housing and community development resources, enhance housing
  construction resources, provided for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise of
  housing providers to maintain and expand the County’s inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Weatherization Related Minor Home Repairs

  Project Description: Program provides health and safety related minor home repairs needed
  in order to make weatherization improvements at no cost to the homeowner. This program
  serves homeowners with incomes at or below 50% of the area median income. The program
  will assist 75 very low-income households throughout Snohomish County except in the City of
  Everett.

  Location: 2722 Colby Avenue, Suite 104, Everett WA 98201


  Objective Number                      Project ID
  H-4, HO-11                                                                            Funding Sources:
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        CDBG                             $125,000
  14A                                   570.202                                         ESG
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOME
  Local Government                      24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            HOPWA
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Total Formula
  12/01/2005                            11/30/2006                                      Prior Year Funds
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    Assisted Housing
  Housing units                         75                                              PHA
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Other Funding
  CDBG-H 2005 #03                       75 homes                                        Total                                 $125,000

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           175
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                         Table 3
                                           Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Interfaith Association of Snohomish County

  Priority Need: Public Services – In order to provide a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and
  members of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at
  the municipal and community levels, which address the most urgent needs of those groups.
  Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the homeless, low-
  and moderate-income and special needs populations, Snohomish County will increase the
  number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at 50% or less of AMI,
  support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing units, provide minor
  home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the processes for utilizing
  the County’s housing and community development resources, enhance housing construction
  resources, provided for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise of housing providers
  to maintain and expand the County’s inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Interfaith Family Shelter

  Project Description: Project will provide case management services and operating costs for
  homeless emergency shelter for approximately 275 persons (100 homeless families with
  children), providing 9,000 bednights of emergency shelter.

  Location: 2520 Cedar Street, Everett WA 98201


  Objective Number                    Project ID
  CD-5, PSO-6; H-2,                                                                     Funding Sources:
  HO-6                                                                                  CDBG
  HUD Matrix Code                     Citation                                          ESG                               $12,500
  03T Operating Costs                 24 CFR 576.21(a)(2-3)                             HOME
  Type of Recipient                   CDBG National Objective                           HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                  N/A                                               Total Formula
  Start Date                          Completion Date                                   Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                          06/30/2006                                        Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator               Annual Units                                      PHA
  People                              275                                               Other Funding
  Local ID                            Units Upon Completion                             Total                             $12,500
  ESG 2005 #04                        275

The primary purpose of the project is to help: X the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           176
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                   (Exp. 8/31/2005




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Lake Stevens, City of

  Priority Need: Public Facilities – To provide a suitable living environment for, and expand the
  economic opportunities available to, persons of low- and moderate-income and to special
  needs populations, Snohomish County will address the public facility needs, prioritized at the
  municipal an community level, of low-income households and predominately low- and
  moderate-income neighborhoods and communities, and other HUD-eligible populations
  throughout the County.

  Project Title: Senior Center Rehab.

  Project Description: Project consists of the renovation of a single-family home into a senior
  center.

  Location: 2302 Soper Hill Road, Lake Stevens WA 98258


  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
  CD-1, PF-2                                                                            CDBG                             $120,300
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  03A                                   570.201(c)                                      HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Local government                      24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  10/15/2005                            10/15/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  Public Facilities                     1 Public Facility                               Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                            $120,300
  CDBG-F 2005 #02                       1 Public Facility


The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           177
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                   (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Low Income Housing Institute (LIHI)

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income households and special needs population, Snohomish
  County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at
  50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing
  units, provide for minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate home ownership, improve the
  processes for utilizing the County's housing and community development resources, enhance
  housing construction resources, provide for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise
  of housing providers to maintain and expand the County's inventory of subsidized housing

  Project Title: CHDO Operating Grant HOME

  Project Description: This is a Community Housing Development Organization (CHDO) grant
  to sustain a portion of the organization's costs incurred in developing affordable housing in
  Snohomish County. Examples of such costs include staff salaries and benefits expenses,
  training and administrative support.

  Location: 4811-5011 168th St., Lynnwood WA


  Objective Number                      Project ID
  H-8, HO-24
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        Funding Sources:
  211 HOME CHDO                         92.208                                          CDBG
  Operating Expenses                                                                    ESG
  (subject to 5% cap)                                                                   HOME                             $25,165
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                    N/A                                             Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  Organization                          1 organization                                  Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                            $25,165
  HOME-CH 2005 #03                      1 organization


The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           178
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                   (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Low Income Housing Institute

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income households and special needs population, Snohomish
  County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at
  50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing
  units, provide for minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate home ownership, improve the
  processes for utilizing the County's housing and community development resources, enhance
  housing construction resources, provide for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise
  of housing providers to maintain and expand the County's inventory of subsidized housing

  Project Title: HomeSight: Meadowdale Apartments

  Project Description: Low Income Housing Institute (LIHI) will use funds to acquire a 108-unit
  apartment building that will provide affordable housing for working families at or below 50% of
  median income. Fifteen units will be set aside as transitional housing for the homeless. LIHI
  received $260,000 of 2003 and 2004 HOME funds in 2004 for this project.

  Location: 4811 - 5011 168th Street SW, Lynnwood WA

  Objective Number                      Project ID
  H-1, HO-1                                                                             Funding Sources:
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        CDBG
  01                                    92.205                                          ESG
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOME                             39,436
  Private Non-profit                    N/A                                             HOPWA
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Total Formula
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Prior Year Funds
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    Assisted Housing
  Units                                 10                                              PHA
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Other Funding
  HOME-H 2005 #04                       10                                              Total                            39,436

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           179
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Lynnwood, City of

  Priority Need: Infrastructure – In order to provide for the health, safety and welfare of
  Snohomish County’s low- and moderate-income neighborhoods, Snohomish County will
  address the basic infrastructure needs, prioritized at the municipal and community levels, of
  low- and moderate-income households and predominately low- and moderate-income
  neighborhoods and communities throughout the county.

  Project Title: 60th Avenue West Sidewalk Project

  Project Description: This sidewalk project consists of constructing 600 feet of five-foot wide
  concrete sidewalks along the eastern edge of 60th Avenue West between200th Street SW and
  202nd Street SW. The northern 300 feet will be raised and will have a handrail. The southern
  300 feet will at grade.

  Location: 60th Avenue West between 200th Street 2002nd Street SW, Lynnwood WA



  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
  CD-2, IO-1                                                                            CDBG                               $148,500
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  03L                                   570.201(c)                                      HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Local government                      24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  10/15/2005                            10/15/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  People                                600                                             Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                              $148,500
  CDBG-F 2005 #03                       600


The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           180
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Marysville Food Bank

  Priority Need: Public Facilities – To provide a suitable living environment for, and expand the
  economic opportunities available to, persons of low- and moderate-income and to special
  needs populations, Snohomish County will address the public facility needs, prioritized at the
  municipal an community level, of low-income households and predominately low- and
  moderate-income neighborhoods and communities, and other HUD-eligible populations
  throughout the County.

  Project Title: Marysville Food Bank Expansion Project

  Project Description: Construction of a new 7,880 square foot facility on a vacant lot.

  Location: 4200 88th Street N.E. Marysville WA 98270


  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
  CD-1, PF)-3                                                                           CDBG                               $100,000
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  570.201 (c)                           03A                                             HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-profit                    24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  10/15/2005                            10/15/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  Public Facilities                     1 Public Facility                               Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                              $100,000
  CDBG-F 2005 #04                       1 Public Facility


The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           181
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                             (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Mountlake Terrace, City of

  Priority Need: Infrastructure - In order to provide for the health, safety, and welfare of
  Snohomish County’s low- and moderate-income neighborhoods, Snohomish County will
  address the basic infrastructure needs, prioritized at the municipal and community levels, of
  low-income households and predominantly low-and moderate-income neighborhoods and
  communities throughout the County.

  Project Title: Cedar Terrace ADA Sidewalk Improvements

  Project Description: This project consists of adding 750 feet of sidewalks and 25 sidewalk
  ramps that meet ADA requirements to link this low-income neighbor hood to the Cedar Plaza
  shopping center.

 Location: 230th Place SW, 233rd Street SW, 46th Avenue, Cedar Way in Mountlake Terrace,
 WA 98043



  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
  CD-2, IO-2                                                                            CDBG                               $163,100
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  03L Sidewalks                         570.201(c)                                      HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Public                                Low/moderate income area                        Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  10/15/2005                            10/15/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  People                                200                                             Other Funding
  Local ID                              1
                                        Units Upon Completion                           Total                              $163,100
  CDBG-F 2005 #05                       200



The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           182
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Open Door Theatre

  Priority Need: Youth Programs – Snohomish County will support programs that provide for the
  well-being of youth, both homeless and the children of low- and moderate-income families, by
  providing services including but not limited to housing, case management, life-skill training,
  health care and recreation.

  Project Title: Personal Safety Outreach

  Project Description: Project will provide sexual abuse/assault and violence prevention
  education for children in grades K-12. Approximately 20 performances will be given to 1,500
  children.

  Location: 135 S. French, Arlington WA 98223



  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
  CD-3, YPO-1                                                                           CDBG                               $12,434
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  05D Youth Services                    24 CFR 570.201(e)                               HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                    24 CFR 570.208(a)(1)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  People                                1,500                                           Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                              $12,434
  CDBG-S 2005 #11                       1,500


The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           183
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Providence Everett Medical Center

  Priority Need: Youth Programs – Snohomish County will support programs that provide for the
  well-being of youth, both homeless and the children of low- and moderate-income families, by
  providing services including but not limited to housing, case management, life-skill training,
  health care and recreation.

  Project Title: Child Victim Assistance

  Project Description: Project will provide case management and supportive services to
  approximately 250 child victims of sexual assault/abuse and non-offending members of their
  families.

  Location: 916 Pacific Ave, Everett WA 98201



  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
  CD-3, YPO-1                                                                           CDBG                               $24,245
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  05N Abused Children                   24 CFR 570.201(e)                               HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                    24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  People                                250                                             Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                              $24,245
  CDBG-S 2005 #12                       250


The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           184
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                    OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005




                                                         Table 3
                                           Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Salvation Army

  Priority Need: Public Services – In order to provide a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and
  members of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at
  the municipal and community levels, which address the most urgent needs of those groups.

  Project Title: New Tomorrows Emergency Services

  Project Description: Project will provide vouchers for emergency shelter, prescription
  medications, and transportation assistance for approximately 85 homeless persons.

  Location: 2525 Rucker Ave, Everett WA 98201


  Objective Number                    Project ID                                        Funding Sources:
  CD-5, PSO-4                                                                           CDBG
  HUD Matrix Code                     Citation                                          ESG                                $7,500
  05 Public Services                  24 CFR 576.21(a)(2)                               HOME
  Type of Recipient                   CDBG National Objective                           HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                  N/A                                               Total Formula
  Start Date                          Completion Date                                   Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                          06/30/2006                                        Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator               Annual Units                                      PHA
  People                              85                                                Other Funding
  Local ID                            Units Upon Completion                             Total                              $7,500
  ESG 2005 #05                        85



The primary purpose of the project is to help: X the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           185
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                   (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Senior Services of Snohomish County

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income households and special needs population, Snohomish
  County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at
  50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing
  units, provide for minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate home ownership, improve the
  processes for utilizing the County's housing and community development resources, enhance
  housing construction resources, provide for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise
  of housing providers to maintain and expand the County's inventory of subsidized housing

  Project Title: CHDO Operating Grant HOME

  Project Description: This is a Community Housing Development Organization (CHDO) grant
  to sustain a portion of the organization's costs incurred in developing affordable housing in
  Snohomish County. Examples of such costs include staff salaries and benefits expenses,
  training and administrative support.

  Location: 8225 44th Ave W., Suite O, Mukilteo WA 98275-2811


  Objective Number                      Project ID
  H-8, HO-24
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        Funding Sources:
  211 HOME CHDO                         92.208                                          CDBG
  Operating Expenses                                                                    ESG
  (subject to 5% cap)                                                                   HOME                             $25,165
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private non-profit                    N/A                                             Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/05                              06/30/06                                        Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  Organization                          1 organization                                  Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                            $25,165
  HOME-CH 2005 #04                      1 organization
The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           186
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Senior Services of Snohomish County

  Priority Need: Senior Programs – Snohomish County will support programs that assist low-
  income elderly citizens to remain in their homes, where appropriate and cost-effective, by
  providing housing repairs and reasonable modifications to accommodate disabilities and by
  supporting provision of supportive services in all housing settings appropriate to their individual
  needs. Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low-and moderate-income and special needs populations, Snohomish County will
  increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at 50% or less of
  AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing units, provide
  minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the processes for
  utilizing the County’s housing and community development resources, enhance housing
  construction resources, provided for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise of
  housing providers to maintain and expand the County’s inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Housing Social Services

  Project Description: Project will provide in-home case management/service coordination for
  approximately 175 elderly and disabled persons residing in senior housing complexes to enable
  continued independent living.

  Location: 8225 44th Ave W, Suite O, Mukilteo WA 98275



  Objective Number                      Project ID
  CD-4, SPO-1; and H-                                                                   Funding Sources:
  3, HO-9                                                                               CDBG                               $20,459
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  05A Senior Services                   24 CFR 570.201(e)                               HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                    24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  People                                175                                             Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                              $20,459
  CDBG-S 2005 #13                       175

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           187
U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                 OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
and Urban Development                                                                                                  (Exp. 8/31/2005




                                                                Table 3

                                          Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

Applicant’s Name: Senior Services of Snohomish County

Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
homeless, low-and moderate-income and special needs populations, Snohomish County will
increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at 50% or less of
AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing units, provide
minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the processes for
utilizing the County’s housing and community development resources, enhance housing
construction resources, provided for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise of
housing providers to maintain and expand the County’s inventory of subsidized housing.

Project Title: Minor Home Repair Program

Project Description: Program provides health and safety repairs at no cost to elderly and
disabled homeowners with incomes at or below 50% of median income in Snohomish County
outside the City of Everett.
Location: 8221 44th Avenue W., Suite O, Mukilteo WA 98275


 Objective Number                      Project ID
 H-4, HO-11
 HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                    Funding Sources:
 14A Rehab; single                     570.208(a) (2)                              CDBG                                   $400,000
 unit residential                                                                  ESG
 Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                     HOME
 Private Non-profit                    24 CFR 570.208 (a)(2)                       HOPWA
 Start Date                            Completion Date                             Total Formula
 01/01/2006                            12/31/2006                                  Prior Year Funds
 Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                Assisted Housing
 Households                            400 households                              PHA
    Completed home
 Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                       Other Funding
 CDBG-H 2005 #02                       400 households                              Total                                  $400,000
The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                         188
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Sherwood Community Services

  Priority Need: Public Services – In order to provide a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and
  members of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at
  the municipal and community levels, which address the most urgent needs of those groups.

  Project Title: Family Support Counseling Project

  Project Description: Project will provide counseling to approximately 65 families with children
  with special needs, ages birth to three, (approximately 180 persons) to decrease risk of child
  maltreatment and neglect.

  Location: 402 91st Ave NE, Everett WA 98205



  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
  CD-5, PSO-9                                                                           CDBG                               $22,406
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  05 Public Services                    24 CFR 570.201(e)                               HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                    24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  People                                180                                             Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                              $22,406
  CDBG-S 2005 #14                       180


The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           189
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Snohomish, City of

  Priority Need: Public Facilities - To provide a suitable living environment for, and expand the
  economic opportunities available to, person of low and moderate-income and special needs
  populations, Snohomish County will address the public facility needs, prioritized at the
  municipal and community level, of low-income households and predominantly low and
  moderate-income neighborhoods and communities, and other HUD eligible populations,
  throughout the County.

  Project Title: Snohomish Senior Center

  Project Description: Project consists of the construction of a 5,000 square foot senior center
  with associated landscaping and 45 parking stalls.

  Location: 171 Cypress Avenue, Snohomish, WA 98290



  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
  CD-1, PFO-2                                                                           CDBG                              $295,000
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  03A                                   570.201 (c)                                     HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Local government                      24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  10/15/2005                            10/15/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  Public Facilities                     1 Public Facility                               Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                             $295,000
  CDBG-F 2005 #06                       1 Public Facility


The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           190
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005


                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Snohomish County

  Priority Need: Planning and Administration – In support of HUD grant programs, Snohomish
  County will undertake planning and administration activities including but not limited to:
  preparation of five-year Housing and Community Development Consolidated Plans and related
  Annual Action Plans; interlocal and interagency consultation; countywide public consultation
  and citizen participation; affordable housing planning; fair housing activities; economic
  development activities which principally benefit low- and moderate-income persons; project
  selection, evaluation and monitoring; financial accounting; and program audit.

  Project Title: Contingency Fund - CDBG

  Project Description: The County will maintain a contingency fund to assist projects with
  eligible unanticipated project costs. Any appropriations from the contingency fund will be made
  in a manner consistent with the County’s approved public participation process for the CDBG
  program.
  Location: Communitywide


  Objective Number                      Project ID
  CD-6, PO-1                                                                            Funding Sources:
  HUD Matrix Code                       CDBG Citation                                   CDBG                               $133,954
  22 Unprogrammed                       24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            ESG
  Funds                                                                                 HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Local government                      24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  N/A                                   N/A                                             Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                              $133,954
  CDBG-F 2005 #03                       N/A

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           191
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005


                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Snohomish County

  Priority Need: Planning and Administration – In support of HUD grant programs, Snohomish
  County will undertake planning and administration activities including but not limited to:
  preparation of five-year Housing and Community Development Consolidated Plans and related
  Annual Action Plans; interlocal and interagency consultation; countywide public consultation
  and citizen participation; affordable housing planning; fair housing activities; economic
  development activities which principally benefit low- and moderate-income persons; project
  selection, evaluation and monitoring; financial accounting; and program audit.

  Project Title: Program Planning and Administration - CDBG

  Project Description: Project will allow the County to recover the costs of program
  administration at the HUD-allowed rate of 20% of the total program year 2005 CDBG allocation
  plus program income.
  Location: Countywide


  Objective Number                      Project ID
  CD-6, PO-1                                                                            Funding Sources:
  HUD Matrix Code                       CDBG Citation                                   CDBG                               $ 877,560
  21 A General Program                  570.206                                         ESG
  Administration                                                                        HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Local government                      24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  N/A                                   N/A                                             Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                              $ 877,560
  CDBG-A 2005 #01                       N/A

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           192
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Snohomish County

  Priority Need: Planning and Administration – In support of HUD grant programs, Snohomish
  County will undertake planning and administration activities including but not limited to:
  preparation of five-year Housing and Community Development Consolidated Plans and related
  Annual Action Plans; interlocal and interagency consultation; countywide public consultation
  and citizen participation; affordable housing planning; fair housing activities; economic
  development activities which principally benefit low- and moderate-income persons; project
  selection, evaluation and monitoring; financial accounting; and program audit.

  Project Title: HOME Program Administration

  Project Description:      Project will allow the County to recover its costs of program
  administration at the HUD-allowed rate of 10% of the County’s total program year 2005 HOME
  award (total includes $42,879 in ADDI funds).
  Location: Countywide


  Objective Number                      Project ID
  CD-6, PO-1                                                                            Funding Sources:
  HUD Matrix Code                       CDBG Citation                                   CDBG
  21H HOME                              92.207                                          ESG
  Admin/Planning Costs                                                                  HOME                               $268,240
  of PJ (subject to 10%                                                                 HOPWA
  cap)                                                                                  Total Formula
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         Prior Year Funds
  Local government                      N/A                                             Assisted Housing
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 PHA
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Other Funding
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    Total                              $268,240
  N/A                                   N/A
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion
                                        N/A




The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           193
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                    OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005




                                                         Table 3
                                           Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Snohomish County Center for Battered Women

  Priority Need: Public Services – In order to provide a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and
  members of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at
  the municipal and community levels, which address the most urgent needs of those groups.
  Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the homeless, low-
  and moderate-income and special needs populations, Snohomish County will increase the
  number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at 50% or less of AMI,
  support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing units, provide minor
  home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the processes for utilizing
  the County’s housing and community development resources, enhance housing construction
  resources, provided for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise of housing providers
  to maintain and expand the County’s inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Domestic Violence Services

  Project Description: Project will provide approximately 285 persons (victims of domestic
  violence and their children) with 18,000 bednights of emergency and transitional housing in
  confidential locations and related case management services. Project will also provide
  community support groups to approximately 500 victims of domestic violence and will provide
  information and referral and crisis intervention services for approximately 5,000 hotline calls.

  Location: 1310 Pacific Ave, Everett WA 98206



  Objective Number                    Project ID
  CD-5, PSO-5; H-3,                                                                     Funding Sources:
  HO-9                                                                                  CDBG                               $48,243
  HUD Matrix Code                     Citation                                          ESG
  05G Battered                        24 CFR 570.201(e)                                 HOME
  Spouses                                                                               HOPWA
  Type of Recipient                   CDBG National Objective                           Total Formula
  Private Non-Profit                  24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                              Prior Year Funds
  Start Date                          Completion Date                                   Assisted Housing
  07/01/2005                          06/30/2006                                        PHA
  Performance Indicator               Annual Units                                      Other Funding
  People                              285                                               Total                              $48,243
  Local ID                            Units Upon Completion
  CDBG-S 2005 #15                     285
The primary purpose of the project is to help: X the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs


                                                           194
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                    OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                         Table 3
                                           Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Snohomish County Center for Battered Women

  Priority Need: Public Services – In order to provide a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and
  members of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at
  the municipal and community levels, which address the most urgent needs of those groups.
  Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the homeless, low-
  and moderate-income and special needs populations, Snohomish County will increase the
  number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at 50% or less of AMI,
  support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing units, provide minor
  home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the processes for utilizing
  the County’s housing and community development resources, enhance housing construction
  resources, provided for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise of housing providers
  to maintain and expand the County’s inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Transitional Housing for Domestic Violence Victims

  Project Description: Project will provide approximately 55 persons (20 families -- victims of
  domestic violence and their children) with 13,000 bednights of transitional housing and related
  case management services.

  Location: 1310 Pacific Ave, Everett WA 98206


  Objective Number                    Project ID                                        Funding Sources:
  CD-5, PSO-5; H-3,                                                                     CDBG
  HO-9                                                                                  ESG                                $18,777
  HUD Matrix Code                     Citation                                          HOME
  05G Battered                        24 CFR 576.21(a)(2)                               HOPWA
  Spouses                                                                               Total Formula
  Type of Recipient                   CDBG National Objective                           Prior Year Funds
  Private Non-Profit                  N/A                                               Assisted Housing
  Start Date                          Completion Date                                   PHA
  07/01/2005                          06/30/2006                                        Other Funding
  Performance Indicator               Annual Units                                      Total                              $18,777
  People                              55
  Local ID                            Units Upon Completion
  ESG 2005 #06                        55



The primary purpose of the project is to help: X the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs



                                                           195
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Snohomish Health District

  Priority Need: Homeless and HIV/AIDS - Snohomish County will provide support for operation
  of existing homeless shelters and construction of needed shelters in underserved areas and for
  underserved populations; increase the inventory of transitional housing for households needing
  assistance to move from homelessness to self-sufficiency; and provide comprehensive case
  management for persons living with HIV/AIDS.

  Project Title: HIV/AIDS Case Management

  Project Description: Project will provide comprehensive case management services to
  approximately 40 persons living with HIV/AIDS.

  Location: 3020 Rucker Ave, Everett WA 98201



  Objective Number                      Project ID
  CD-5, PSO-8; H-3,                                                                     Funding Sources:
  HO-9                                                                                  CDBG                               $19,614
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  05 Public Services                    24 CFR 570.201(e)                               HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Municipal Corporation                 24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  People                                40                                              Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                              $19,614
  CDBG-S 2005 #16                       40

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless X Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                            196
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                   (Exp.
  8/31/200505)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Stillaguamish Senior Center

  Priority Need: Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income households and special needs population, Snohomish
  County will increase the number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at
  50% or less of AMI, support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing
  units, provide for minor home repair and weatherization, facilitate home ownership, improve the
  processes for utilizing the County's housing and community development resources, enhance
  housing construction resources, provide for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise
  of housing providers to maintain and expand the County's inventory of subsidized housing

  Project Title: CHDO Operating Grant HOME

  Project Description: This is a Community Housing Development Organization (CHDO) grant
  to sustain a portion of the organization's costs incurred in developing affordable housing in
  Snohomish County. Examples of such costs include staff salaries and benefits expenses,
  training and administrative support.
  Location: 18305 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington WA 98223


  Objective Number                      Project ID
  H-8, HO-24
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        Funding Sources:
  211 HOME CHDO                         92.208                                          CDBG
  Operating Expenses                                                                    ESG
  (subject to 5% cap)                                                                   HOME                             $18,593
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                    N/A                                             Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  Organization                          1 Organization                                  Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                            $18,593
  HOME-CH 2005 #05                      1 Organization
The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           197
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                  OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                   (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Stillaguamish Senior Center

  Priority Need: Public Facilities – To provide a suitable living environment for, and expand the
  economic opportunities available to, persons of low- and moderate-income and to special
  needs populations, Snohomish County will address the public facility needs, prioritized at the
  municipal an community level, of low-income households and predominately low- and
  moderate-income neighborhoods and communities, and other HUD-eligible populations
  throughout the County.

  Project Title: Exterior Rehab

  Project Description: The project consists of exterior painting of the main hall, classroom
  building and annex building and replacement of the roofs on the classroom building and the
  main hall.
  Location: 18308 Smokey Pt. Blvd. Arlington, WA 98223


  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
  CD-1, PFO-2                                                                           CDBG                             $109,495
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  03A                                   570.201 (c)                                     HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Non-profit                            24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  September 15, 2005                    September 15, 2006                              Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  Public Facilities                     1 Public Facility                               Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                            $109,495
  CDBG-F 2005 #07                       1 Public Facility


The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           198
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Sultan, City of

  Priority Need: Infrastructure – In order to provide for the health, safety and welfare of
  Snohomish County’s low- and moderate-income neighborhoods, Snohomish County will
  address the basic infrastructure needs, prioritized at the municipal and community levels, of
  low- and moderate-income households and predominately low- and moderate-income
  neighborhoods and communities throughout the county.

  Project Title: Date Avenue Reconstruction-Phase II

  Project Description: Repavement of 2000 sq yds. of failed asphalt on 1st Street to 8th Street.

  Location: Date Avenue from 1st Street to 8th Street.


  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
  CD-2, IO-1                                                                            CDBG                              $120,000
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  03K                                   570.201 (c)                                     HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Local Government                      24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  10/30/2005                            10/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  People                                400                                             Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                             $120,000
  CDBG-F 2005 #08                       400


The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           199
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005




                                                         Table 3
                                           Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Volunteers of America Western Washington

  Priority Need: Public Services – In order to provide a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and
  members of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at
  the municipal and community levels, which address the most urgent needs of those groups.

  Project Title: Emergency Housing Assistance

  Project Description: Project will provide case management services, operating costs and
  emergency shelter vouchers for emergency and transitional housing program, providing
  approximately 9,500 bednights of shelter for approximately 185 persons (27 homeless families
  with children).

  Location: 2802 Broadway, Everett WA 98201



  Objective Number                    Project ID
  CD-5, PSO-2; H-2,                                                                     Funding Sources:
  HO-6                                                                                  CDBG                              $53,552
  HUD Matrix Code                     Citation                                          ESG
  05 Public Services                  24 CFR 570.201(e)                                 HOME
  Type of Recipient                   CDBG National Objective                           HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                  24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                              Total Formula
  Start Date                          Completion Date                                   Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                          06/30/2006                                        Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator               Annual Units                                      PHA
  People                              185                                               Other Funding
  Local ID                            Units Upon Completion                             Total                             $53,552
  CDBG-S 2005 #17                     185

The primary purpose of the project is to help: X the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           200
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005


                                                         Table 3
                                           Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Volunteers of America Western Washington

  Priority Need: Public Services – In order to provide a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and
  members of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at
  the municipal and community levels, which address the most urgent needs of those groups.
  Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the homeless, low-
  and moderate-income and special needs populations, Snohomish County will increase the
  number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at 50% or less of AMI,
  support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing units, provide minor
  home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the processes for utilizing
  the County’s housing and community development resources, enhance housing construction
  resources, provided for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise of housing providers
  to maintain and expand the County’s inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Family Transitional Housing

  Project Description: Project will provide emergency shelter vouchers and operating costs for
  transitional housing shelter for approximately 15 homeless families with children (60 persons)
  providing approximately 13,000 bednights of shelter.

  Location: 2802 Broadway, Everett WA 98201



  Objective Number                    Project ID
  CD-5, PSO-6; H-2,                                                                     Funding Sources:
  HO-6                                                                                  CDBG
  HUD Matrix Code                     Citation                                          ESG                               $17,484
  03T Operating Costs                 24 CFR 576.21(a)(2-3)                             HOME
  Type of Recipient                   CDBG National Objective                           HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                  N/A                                               Total Formula
  Start Date                          Completion Date                                   Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                          06/30/2006                                        Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator               Annual Units                                      PHA
  People                              60                                                Other Funding
  Local ID                            Units Upon Completion                             Total                             $17,484
  ESG 2005 #07                        60

The primary purpose of the project is to help: X the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           201
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Volunteers of America Western Washington

  Priority Need: Public Services – In order to provide a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and
  members of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at
  the municipal and community levels, which address the most urgent needs of those groups.
  Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the homeless, low-
  and moderate-income and special needs populations, Snohomish County will increase the
  number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at 50% or less of AMI,
  support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing units, provide minor
  home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the processes for utilizing
  the County’s housing and community development resources, enhance housing construction
  resources, provided for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise of housing providers
  to maintain and expand the County’s inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Rental Housing Mediation/Fair Housing Counseling

  Project Description: Project will provide information and referral services on landlord/tenant
  laws, alternative dispute resolution services for landlords and tenants and fair housing
  information and counseling for approximately 1,500 persons.

  Location: 1230 Broadway, Everett WA 98201



  Objective Number                      Project ID
  CD-5, PSO-10; H-1,                                                                    Funding Sources:
  HO-3                                                                                  CDBG                               $75,000
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  05K Tenant/Landlord                   24 CFR 570.201(e)                               HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                    24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  People                                1,500                                           Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                              $75,000
  CDBG-S 2005 #18                       1,500

The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           202
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005)




                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Volunteers of America Western Washington

  Priority Need: Public Services – In order to provide a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and
  members of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at
  the municipal and community levels, which address the most urgent needs of those groups.

  Project Title: Sky Valley Resource Center

  Project Description: Project will provide case management and supportive services and
  program operating costs to assist approximately 557 low-income persons (186 families) to
  increase self-sufficiency.

  Location: 617 First Street, Sultan WA 98294



  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
  CD-5, PSO-11                                                                          CDBG                               $20,060
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  05 Public Services                    24 CFR 570.201(e)                               HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                    24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                            06/30/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  People                                557                                             Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                              $20,060
  CDBG-S 2005 #19                       557


The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS   Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           203
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                    OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                     (Exp. 8/31/2005


                                                           Table 3
                                             Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: Work Opportunities

  Priority Need: Public Facilities - To provide a suitable living environment for, and expand the
  economic opportunities available to, person of low and moderate-income and special needs
  populations, Snohomish County will address the public facility needs, prioritized at eh municipal
  and community level, of low-income households and predominantly low and moderate-income
  neighborhoods and communities, and other HUD eligible populations, throughout the County.

  Project Title: Vocational Evaluation and Technology Training Center

  Project Description: The project will consist of constructing a 1,200 square foot modular
  building to be used as a vocational and technology training center for low-income persons with
  severe disabilities.

  Location: 6515 202nd Street SW, Lynnwood, WA 98036



  Objective Number                      Project ID                                      Funding Sources:
  CD-1, PFO-7                                                                           CDBG                                     $19,510
  HUD Matrix Code                       Citation                                        ESG
  03B                                   570.201(c)                                      HOME
  Type of Recipient                     CDBG National Objective                         HOPWA
  Non-profit                            24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                            Total Formula
  Start Date                            Completion Date                                 Prior Year Funds                       $108,939
  10/15/2005                            10/15/2006                                      Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator                 Annual Units                                    PHA
  Public Facilities                     1 public facility                               Other Funding
  Local ID                              Units Upon Completion                           Total                                  $128,449
  CDBG-F 2005 #09                       1 public facility


The primary purpose of the project is to help:   the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           204
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005




                                                         Table 3
                                           Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: YWCA of Seattle/King/Snohomish County

  Priority Need: Public Services – In order to provide a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and
  members of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at
  the municipal and community levels, which address the most urgent needs of those groups.

  Project Title: Pathways Families in Transition

  Project Description: Project will provide case management and supportive services and
  operating costs for transitional housing program for approximately 60 persons (24 homeless
  mothers and their children), providing approximately 18,000 bednights of shelter.

  Location: 3301 Broadway, Everett WA 98201



  Objective Number                    Project ID
  CD-5, PSO-2; H-2,                                                                     Funding Sources:
  HO-6                                                                                  CDBG                              $43,904
  HUD Matrix Code                     Citation                                          ESG
  05 Public Services                  24 CFR 570.201(e)                                 HOME
  Type of Recipient                   CDBG National Objective                           HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                  24 CFR 570.208(a)(2)                              Total Formula
  Start Date                          Completion Date                                   Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                          06/30/2006                                        Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator               Annual Units                                      PHA
  People                              60                                                Other Funding
  Local ID                            Units Upon Completion                             Total                             $43,904
  CDBG-S 2005 #20                     60

The primary purpose of the project is to help: X the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           205
  U.S. Department of Housing                                                                                   OMB Approval No. 2506-0117
  and Urban Development                                                                                                    (Exp. 8/31/2005




                                                         Table 3
                                           Consolidated Plan Listing of Projects

  Applicant’s Name: YWCA of Seattle/King/Snohomish County

  Priority Need: Public Services – In order to provide a suitable living environment for the
  homeless, low- and moderate-income persons and households, the disabled, the elderly and
  members of special needs populations, Snohomish County will support services, prioritized at
  the municipal and community levels, which address the most urgent needs of those groups.
  Housing - To provide decent housing and a suitable living environment for the homeless, low-
  and moderate-income and special needs populations, Snohomish County will increase the
  number of subsidized rental apartments affordable to households at 50% or less of AMI,
  support, and add to, the inventory of emergency and transitional housing units, provide minor
  home repair and weatherization, facilitate homeownership, improve the processes for utilizing
  the County’s housing and community development resources, enhance housing construction
  resources, provided for rental housing mediation, and utilize the expertise of housing providers
  to maintain and expand the County’s inventory of subsidized housing.

  Project Title: Pathways Families in Transition

  Project Description: Project will provide case management services and operating costs for
  transitional housing program for approximately 60 persons (24 homeless mothers and their
  children), providing approximately 18,000 bednights of shelter.

  Location: 3301 Broadway, Everett WA 98201



  Objective Number                    Project ID
  CD-5, PSO-2; H-2,                                                                     Funding Sources:
  HO-6                                                                                  CDBG
  HUD Matrix Code                     Citation                                          ESG                               $18,308
  05 Public Services                  24 CFR 576.21(a)(2)                               HOME
  Type of Recipient                   CDBG National Objective                           HOPWA
  Private Non-Profit                  N/A                                               Total Formula
  Start Date                          Completion Date                                   Prior Year Funds
  07/01/2005                          06/30/2006                                        Assisted Housing
  Performance Indicator               Annual Units                                      PHA
  People                              60                                                Other Funding
  Local ID                            Units Upon Completion                             Total                             $18,308
  ESG 2005 #08                        60

The primary purpose of the project is to help: X the Homeless   Persons with HIV/AIDS    Persons with Disabilities   Public Housing Needs




                                                           206

								
To top