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Egyptian Army

Egyptian Army
The Egyptian Army is the largest service branch within the Egyptian military establishment. It is estimated to number around 340,000, plus around 375,000 reservists for a total of 655-715,000.[1] The modern Egyptian army was formed in the 1830s by Muhammad Ali of Egypt. (See Military history of Ancient Egypt for the military arrangements during antiquity.) He sought to split Egypt away from the Ottoman Empire, and to do this he bought in European weapons and expertise and built an army that defeated the Sultan and seized control over Egypt, Syria, and parts of Arabia.[2] The Egyptian Army was involved in the following wars during the Mohamad Ali Dynasty: • The Greek War of Independence • The 1831 Egyptian-Ottoman War • The First Turko-Egyptian War • The Second Turko-Egyptian War • The Syrian War But the Europeans intervened on the Sultan’s behalf, and following their intercession the Egyptian army languished until Britain took control of Egypt in the 1882 Anglo-Egyptian War. In 1946, the British officers were ousted and Egyptians took full control.[3] The Free Officers Movement of the Army, masterminded by Nasser seized power from King Farouk of Egypt in the Egyptian Revolution of 1952. During the Cold War, the army actively fought in the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, the 1956 Suez Crisis, the North Yemen Civil War from 1962 to 1967, the 1967 Six Day War, the 1973 Yom Kippur War, and the 1977 Libyan–Egyptian War. It has been argued that only the relatively good performance of the Egyptian Army in the 1973 war, especially in Operation Badr and in Battle of Suez, which allowed the Egyptians to claim a level of victory and take part in the 1977 Camp David Accords without losing face. Since the 1980s the army has built closer and closer ties with the United States, as evidenced in the bi-annual Operation Bright Star exercises. This cooperation eased integration of the Egyptian Army into the Gulf War coalition of 1990-91, during which the Egyptian II Corps under Maj. Gen. Salah Mohamed Attia Halaby, with 3rd Mechanised Division and 4th Armoured Division, fought as part of the Arab Joint Forces Command North.[4]

Structure

Egyptian soldiers during Operation Bright Star.

Ministry of Defense
• Egyptian Military Operations Authority: H.Q. in Cairo (Tactical Defence Command) • Egyptian Army Chief of Staff H.Q. in Cairo (3 C4 H.Q.: 9 C4 field H.Q.)

Military Regions
• Central Military High Command: Heliopolis, Cairo • HQ, Central Military Region: Greater Cairo • Field HQ, Heliopolis, Central Military Region • HQ, Northern Military Region: Alexandria • Field HQ, Alexandria, Northern Military Region • Sub-Field HQ, Abou Qir, Northern Military Region • Sub-Field HQ, Mariout, Northern Military Region • Field HQ, Rashid, Northern Military Region • Field HQ, Damietta, Northern Military Region • HQ, Eastern Military Region: El Suez • Field HQ, Port Said, Northern Suez Canal Military Region

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
• Field HQ, Ismaelia, Central Suez Canal Military Region • Field HQ, El Mansoura, El Sharqueya, Eastern Delta Military Region • Field HQ, El Suez, Southern Suez Canal Military Region • Field HQ, Cairo-Suez Highway Military Region • Field HQ, Hurghada, Red Sea Military Region • HQ, Western Military Region: Mersa Matruh • Field HQ, Sidi Barrani, Western Military Region • Field HQ, Marsa Alam, Western Military Region • Field HQ, Salloum, Western Military Region • HQ, Southern Military Region: Assiut • Field HQ, Qena, Southern Military Region • Field HQ, Sohag, Southern Military Region • Field HQ, Aswan, Southern Military Region

Egyptian Army
• 1 Air Mobile Brigade (222nd) • H.Q. Ismaelia (H.Q. Command & 3 field H.Q.) • Field H.Q. in Port Said, Northern Suez Canal Military Zone • 1 Armored Division (2nd) • 1 Mechanized Division (7th) (former 2nd Infantry Division) • 2 Field Artillery Brigades (122nd & 123rd) • 1 Paratroops Brigade (412th) • 1 Special Forces Regiment (117th) • Field H.Q. in Ismaelia, Central Suez Canal Military Zone • 1 Armored Division (4th) • 1 Mechanized Division (17th) • 2 Field Artillery Brigades (124th & 125th) • 1 Special Forces Regiment (123rd) • Field H.Q. in El Mansoura, El Sharqueya, Eastern Delta Military Region • 1 Armored Division (7th) • 1 Mechanized Division (19th) • 1 Independent Infantry Brigade (219th) • 1 Field Artillery Brigades (126th) • 1 Heavy Mortar Brigade (815th) • H.Q. Suez (H.Q. Command & 3 field H.Q.) • Field H.Q. in Cairo-Suez Highway Military Region • 1 Armored Division (9th) • 1 Mechanized Division (23rd) • 1 Independent Mechanized Brigade (94th) • 1 Field Artillery Brigade (127th) • 1 Air Mobile Brigade (224th) • Field H.Q. in Suez, Suez Canal Military Zone • 1 Mechanized Division (36th) • 1 Independent Armored Brigade (44th) • 2 Field Artillery Brigades (128th & 129th) • 1 Heavy Mortar Brigade (816th) • 1 Special Forces Regiment(141st) • Field H.Q. in Hurghada, Red Sea Military Region • 1 Mechanized Division (16th) • 1 Independent Armored Brigade (82nd) • 2 Independent Mechanized Brigades (110th & 111th (Former 130th Amphibious Brigade)) • 1 Field Artillery Brigade (130th) • 1 Special Forces Regiment (147th)

Field Armies
• H.Q. in Cairo (H.Q. Command & 3 field H.Q.) • Field H.Q. In Heliopolis, Cairo, Central Military Region • 1 Republican Guard Armored Division (1st) • 1 Independent Mechanized Brigade (24th) • 2 Field Artillery Brigades (116th & 117th) • 1 Special Forces Regiment (135th) • Field H.Q. in Alexandria, Northern Military Region • 1 Mechanized Division (6th) • 1 Independent Armored Brigade (18th) • 1 Independent Infantry Brigade (218th) • 2 Field Artillery Brigades (118th & 119th) • 1 Special Forces Regiment (129th) • Field H.Q. in Assiut, Southern Military Region • 1 Mechanized Division (8th) • 1 Independent Armored Brigade (36th) • 2 Field Artillery Brigades (120th & 121st)

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Egyptian Army
• • • • (1 • ATGW Brigade (66th) ATGW Brigade (77th) ATGW Brigade (88th) H.Q. Command, 3 Field H.Q.) Republican Guard’s S/P Field Artillery Brigade (10th) • S/P Field Artillery Brigade (101st) • S/P Field Artillery Brigade (102nd) • S/P Field Artillery Brigade (103rd) • S/P Field Artillery Brigade (104th) • S/P Field Artillery Brigade (105th) • S/P Field Artillery Brigade (106th) • S/P Field Artillery Brigade (107th) • S/P Field Artillery Brigade (108th) • S/P Field Artillery Brigade (109th) • S/P Field Artillery Brigade (111th) • S/P Field Artillery Brigade (113th) • S/P Field Artillery Brigade (115th) • Field Artillery Brigade (116th) • Field Artillery Brigade (117th) • Field Artillery Brigade (118th) • Field Artillery Brigade (119th) • Field Artillery Brigade (120th) • Field Artillery Brigade (121st) • Field Artillery Brigade (122nd) • Field Artillery Brigade (123rd) • Field Artillery Brigade (124th) • Field Artillery Brigade (125th) • Field Artillery Brigade (126th) • Field Artillery Brigade (127th) • Field Artillery Brigade (128th) • Field Artillery Brigade (129th) • Field Artillery Brigade (130th) • Heavy Mortar Brigade (815th) • Heavy Mortar Brigade (816th) (1 H.Q. Command, 2 Field H.Q.) • Paratroops Brigade (414th) (1 H.Q. Command, 2 Field H.Q.) • Air Mobile Bridage (222nd) (1 H.Q. Command, 3 Field H.Q.) • Special Forces Regiment/Group (117th) • Special Forces Regiment/Group (123rd) • Special Forces Regiment/Group (129th) • Special Forces Regiment/Group (135th) • Special Forces Regiment/Group (141st) • Special Forces Regiment/Group (147th) • Special Forces Regiment/Group (153rd) • Special Forces Regiment/Group (159th) (1 H.Q. Command & 9 Field Signal H.Q.) • 18 Signal Battalions (601 to 619th) (H.Q. COM. & 6 Field Engineers Command H.Q.) • Field Engineers Brigade (35th) • Field Engineers Brigade (37th) • Field Engineers Brigade (39th) • Field Engineers Brigade (41st)

Corps
• (1 H.Q. Command) • Republican Guard Armored Division (1st) • Republican Guard Armored Brigade (33rd) • Republican Guard Armored Brigade (35th) • Republican Guard Mechanized Brigade (510th) • Republican Guard Mechanized Brigade (512th) • • SSM Brigade (1st) • SSM Brigade (2nd) • (1 H.Q. Command, 3 Field H.Q.) • Armored Division (2nd) • Armored Division (7th) • Armored Division (4th) • Armored Division (9th) • Independent Armored Brigade (18th) • Independent Armored Brigade (36th) • Independent Armored Brigade (44th) • Independent Armored Brigade (82nd) • Republican Guard Armored Brigade (33rd) • Republican Guard Armored Brigade (35th) • (1 H.Q. Command, 3 Field H.Q.) • Mechanized Division (6th) • Mechanized Division (7th) • Mechanized Division (8th) • Mechanized Division (16th) • Mechanized Division (17th) • Mechanized Division (19th) • Mechanized Division (23rd) • Mechanized Division (36th) • Independent Mechanized Brigade (24th) • Independent Mechanized Brigade (94th) • Independent Mechanized Brigade (110th) • Independent Mechanized Brigade (111th) (former 130th Amphibious Brigade) • Republican Guard Mechanized Brigade (510th) • Republican Guard Mechanized Brigade (512th) • (1 H.Q. Command, 2 Field H.Q.) • Independent Infantry Brigade (218th) • Independent Infantry Brigade (219th) • ATGW Brigade (33rd) • ATGW Brigade (44th) • ATGW Brigade (55th)

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
• Field Engineers Brigade (43rd) • Field Engineers Brigade (45th) (1 H.Q. Command & 9 Field Medical H.Q.) (18 Military Hospitals, 3 Hospital Ships, 4 Hospital Barges) • 27 Field Medical Battalions (1st to 27th) • 108 Field Medical Companies (201st to 308th) (1 H.Q. Command & 9 Field Supply H.Q.) • 36 Field Supply Battalions (501st to 536th) (1 H.Q. Command & 9 Field Quartermasters H.Q.) • 9 Central Military depots • 16 Regional Mililtary depots • 32 Field Military depots (1 H.Q. Command & 9 Field H.Q.) • 12 Inland MP Battalions (222, 224, 226, 228, 230, 232, 234, 236, 238, 240, 242, 244) • 12 Field MP Battalions (221, 223, 225, 227, 229, 231, 233, 235, 237, 239, 241, 243) (1 H.Q. Command & 5 Field H.Q.) • 20 Battalions: 12,000 men, mostly Bedouins, in a lightly armed paramilitary force equipped this force with remote sensors, night-vision binoculars, communications vehicles, and high-speed motorboats and responsible for: • Border surveillance: 10 battalions • General peacekeeping: 2 battalions • Drug interdiction: 5 battalions • Prevention of smuggling: 3 battalions

Egyptian Army
• 12 Mechanized Battalions (13th to 25th) • 24 Mechanized Companies • 4 Command Companies • 4 Signal/Recon Companies • 4 Armored Battalions (25th to 28th) • 12 Armored Companies • 2 Command Companies • 2 Signal/Recon Companies • 4 S/P Artillery Brigades (102nd, 104th, 106th, 108th) • 4 S/P Artillery Command H.Q. (Brigade level) • 16 S/P Artillery Battalions (36th to 51st) • 48 S/P Artillery Batteries • 8 H.Q. Commands (8 C3 H.Q.) [6] • 16 Mechanized Brigades (712th to 727th) • 36 Mechanized Battalions (111th to 145th) • 120 Mechanized Companies • 12 Command Companies • 12 Signal/Recon Companies • 18 Armored Battalions (30th to 47th) • 54 Armored Companies • 9 Command Companies • 9 Signal/Recon Companies • 8 Armored Brigades (10th to 17th) • 24 Armored Battalions (65th to 88th) • 80 Armored Companies • 8 Command Companies • 8 Signal/Recon Companies • 8 Mechanized Battalions (41st to 48th) • 24 Mechanized Companies • 8 Command Companies • 8 Recon Companies • 8 S/P Artillery Brigades (101st, 103rd, 105th, 107th, 109th, 111th, 113th, 115th) • 8 S/P Artillery Command H.Q. (Brigade level) • 24 S/P Artillery Battalions (6th to 29th) • 96 S/P Batteries • H.Q. Command (C3 H.Q.) • 2 Armored Brigades (33rd & 35th) • 4 Armored Battalions (118th, 119th, 120th, 121st) • 16 Armored Companies • 4 Command Companies • 4 Signal/Recon Companies

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Order of Battle
These commands include the following formations:[5] • 4 H.Q. Commands (4 C3 H.Q.) • 8 Armored Brigades (312th, 314th, 316th, 318th, 320th, 322nd, 324th, 326th) • 24 Armored Battalions (1st to 24th) • 80 Armored Companies • 8 Command Companies • 8 Signal/Recon Companies • 8 Mechanized Battalions (1st to 8th) • 24 Mechanized Companies • 4 Command Companies • 4 Signal/Recon Companies • 4 Mechanized Brigades (512th, 516th, 520th & 524th)

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
• 2 Mechanized Battalions (41st & 42nd) • 8 Mechanized Companies • 2 Command Companies • 2 Signal/Recon Companies 2 Mechanized Brigades (510th & 512th) • 6 Mechanized Battalions (41st, 42nd, 43rd, 44th, 45th, 46th) • 18 Mechanized Companies • 3 Command Companies • 3 Signal/Recon Companies • 2 Armored Battalions (116th & 117th) • 6 Armored Companies • 1 Command Company • 1 Signal/Recon Company 1 S/P Artillery Brigade (10th) Command H.Q. (Brigade level) • 4 S/P Artillery Battalions (1st to 4th) • 16 S/P Artillery Batteries 12 Armored Battalions (77th, 78th, 79th, 80th, 81st, 82nd, 83rd, 84th, 85th, 86th, 87th, 88th) • 36 Armored Companies • 6 Command Companies • 6 Signal/Recon Companies 4 Mechanized Battalions (91st, 92nd, 93rd, 95th) • 12 Mechanized Companies • 2 Command Companies • 2 Signal/Recon Companies 12 Mechanized Battalions (33rd, 34th, 35th, 36th, 37th, 38th, 39th, 40th, 41st, 42nd, 43rd, 44th) • 36 Mechanized Companies • 12 Com/Recon Companies 4 Armored Battalions (96th, 97th, 98th, 99th) • 12 Armored Companies • 2 Command Companies • 2 Signal/Recon Companies 4 Infantry Battalions (712th, 713th, 714th, 715th) • 10 Infantry Companies • 4 Command Companies • 2 Signal/Recon Companies 4 Mechanized Battalions (100th, 101st, 102nd, 103rd) • 12 Mechanized Companies • 2 Command Companies • 2 Signal/Recon Companies 2 Armored Battalions (17th & 18th) • 6 Armored Companies • 1 Command Company • 1 Signal/Recon Company

Egyptian Army
• (1 H.Q.) • 3 Air Mobile Mechanized Battalions (5th, 6th, 7th) • 9 Mechanized Companies • 1 Command Company • 1 Recon/Signal Company • 1 Air Defense Company • 1 Air Mobile Armored Battalion (56th) • 3 Air Mobile Light Armored Companies • 1 Air Mobile Command/Recon Company • (1 H.Q.) • 3 Paratroops Battalions (224th, 225th, 226th) • 10 Paratroops Companies • 1 Paratroops Command Company • 1 Paratroops Recon Companiy • 1 Paratroops Mechanized Battalion (176th) • 3 Mechanized Companies • 1 Command/Recon/Signal Company • (1 H.Q.) (of which 3 Lightning/Saaqa regiments and 3 Commandos regiments, the remaining 2 are the Marine Commandos and the Infiltration Antiterror units) • 18 Commandos Battalions: (230th to 247th) • 72 Commandos Companies • 3 Marine Commandos Battalions (515th, 616th, 818th) • 12 Marine Commandos Companies • 3 Infiltration Anti-terror Battalions (777th, 888th, 999th) • 12 Infiltration Companies • 15 S/P Artillery Command H.Q. (Brigade level) • 60 Artillery Battalions (314th to 373rd) • 240 Artillery Batteries (1st to 240th) • 8 S/P Heavy Mortar Command H.Q. (Brigade Level) • 8 S/P Heavy Mortar Battalions (333rd, 334th, 335th, 336th, 337th, 339th, 340th 341st) • 32 S/P Heavy Mortar Batteries (1st to 32nd) • • • 12 Engineers Battalions (65th to 82nd) • 6 Field Engineers Battalions (610th to 615th) • 6 Construction Engineering Companies • 6 Demolition Engineering Companies

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• 6 Mine Clearance Engineering Companies • 6 Maintenance & Logistics Engineering Companies • 4 Field Engineering Salvage Battalions • 2 Field Engineering Special Operations Battalions • , comprising: • 5 Batteries of Tactical Ballistic Missile System upgraded FROG-7 (license built) • 5 Batteries of Tactical Ballistic Missile System Sakr-80 (Indigenous built, based on Frog-7 design) • 4 Batteries of Theater Ballistic Missile System Scud-B (license built) • 2 Batteries of Theater Ballistic Missile System Scud-C (license built with North Korean assistance) • 2 Batteries of Theater Ballistic Missile System Project-T (indigenous built with Argentinian/French technology and North Korean assistance) • 1 Battery of Short Range Ballistic Missile System Al Badr 2000 (better known as an enhanced Scud-C variant) (Not the cancelled Badr 2000/Condor 2 Project with Argentina) • 1 Battery of Short Range Ballistic Missile System (MRBM) Nodong-1 • FN Minimi

Egyptian Army

Submachine Guns
• Port Said 9 mm (Out of service in 1970) • MP5 9 mm • UMP 9 mm

Sniper Rifle
• • • • Dragunov SVD 7.62X54 mm PSG1 7.62X51 mm M40A3 7.62X51 mm M21 7.62X51 mm

Crew Served
Heavy Machine Guns
• • • • • • ZPU-1 14.5 mm single (under licensed) ZPU-2 14.5 mm double (under licensed) KPV 14.5 mm single DShK 12.7 mm NSV 12.7 mm M2 HB 12.7 mm

Grenade Launchers
• RPG-7 A/T (20000+) (locally made) • AGS-17 (2400) • Maadi Egyptian copy of the M203 grenade launcher (15000+) • M79 Grenade launcher (5000)

Recoilless Rifles
• • • • SPG-9 (1500) (locally made) B-10 82 mm (900) B-11 107 mm (1100) (locally made) Carl Gustav recoilless rifle 84 mm (2200)

Weapons Inventory
Light Weapons
Pistols
• P226 • P228 • Beretta Model 92

Anti Tank Weapon Systems
• AGM-114 Hellfire a multi-platform, multitarget Semi-active laser homing Guidance anti tank missile (1000+) • Milan II wire-guided anti-armor missile system (220+) • Swingfire wire-guided anti-armor missile system (260+) (locally made) • BGM-71 TOW wire-guided anti-armor missile system (270+) • BGM-71 TOW II wire-guided anti-armor missile system (540+) • AT-3 Sagger upgraded wire-guided antiarmor missile system (1400+) (locally upgraded)

Assault Rifles
• • • • AK-47 AKM Misr assault rifle [2][3] [4] [5] M16

Paratroopers Carabines
• M4

Machine Guns
• • • • • PK / PKM / /PKMS RPK (under licensed) RPD (under licensed) M60 FN MAG (under licensed)[6]

Combat Vehicles

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Egyptian Army
eventually increase the weight of the tank to 65 tons. • 3) T-62 MBT (45 tons): out of over 1,300 remaining in 1980’s. RO-115 Mark I - T-62 main battle tank upgrade developed in early 1980s. While retaining the Soviet 115 mm gun, more powerful ammunition allows engaging a target at greater range. Some main guns were replaced by the Royal Ordnance L7 105 mm gun as offered by the Austrian firm NORICUM (See Austria section for details). Other modifications included a British diesel engine developing 750 hp (559 kW), 2-plane stabilizer, ballistic computer, laser rangefinder in an armoured box over the main armament, a cluster of six smoke grenade launchers on the right hand side of the turret, a fire control system from BMP-3 IFV and additional armor including reactive armor. The upgrades resulted in an increase of weight to 43 tonnes.[12][1][2] T-62E Mark II - Mid 1990s Egyptian refurbishment and modernization program. It fits the tanks with a license built German MTU engine developing 880 hp (656 kW). The tanks is armed with a license built 105 mm M68 tank gun. It also is fitted with an Italian fire control system with ballistics computer, infrared vision device, laser rangefinder, gun stabilizer, additional armor including reactive armour and armored side skirts, modernized suspension and six smoke grenade launchers on each side of the turret. It also has NBC protection system. T-62E Mark II also carries two Egyptian-made 2-round anti-tank missile launcher or two 2-round launchers for 80 mm D-3000 smoke rockets on an encroachment extension or a box-type launcher holding two Sakr smoke missiles on each side of the turret.[11]. RO-120 Mark III - T-62 main battle tank upgrade developed in 2004. It arms the tank with the 120 mm M-393 tank gun developed by FSUE. The gun is 5.30 m long and weighs 2.6 tonnes. The gun can be elevated or depressed between −7° and +15°. It was also upgraded with a new license built German MTU engine developing 890 hp (664 kW), additional armor including reactive armor and armored side skirts. The upgrades resulted in an increase of weight to 46.5 tonnes. The upgrading is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2008. • 4) T-55 MBT (44 tons): Out of over 1,650 remaining in 1980s.

Main Battle Tanks
• M1A1/M1A2 MBT (1,005) locally produced, and upgraded to A2 (see Note 1)[7] • M60A3 MBT (1,700) (see Note 2) • T-62 MBT (500) (see Note 3) • T-55 MBT (390) (see Note 4) • Ramses II MBT (260) (see Note 5) • 1) M1A1 (69.5 tons): assembled locally in four phases so far: • Phase I (1989-1998): 555 • Phase II (1999-2004): 200 • Phase III (2004-2007): 125 • Phase IV (2007-2009):125. All to be upgraded to M1A2 SEP standard by end of 2009. • 2) M60A3 MBT (57.8 tons): 735 M60A3 + 700 M60A1 brought up to A3 Standard from US Surplus in Germany between 1979-1988 + 265 M60A3 from Dutch Army Surplus in 1996.

Egyptian M60A3 during Operation Desert Storm. second upgrade for M60A3 tanks in Egyptian service are upgraded with better diesel engine of 1,080 hp (810 kW) output, modern fire control & ballistics computers, infrared devices, modern laser range-finders, and added armor including reactive armor & better suspension. A further conversion to the M60A3 is scheduled between 2009 and 2012 to about 1000 tanks out of the current fleet of 1700, to replace the current turret with the M1A1 turret with a major uparmoring of the chassis and replace the transmission and suspenssion systems with a better one to suit the added weight of the tank. Armor plating will be covering the front, back and the side skirts. A German 1,500 hp (1,100 kW) diesel engine will be replacing the current one, and the main armament will be the 120 mm smooth bore found on the M1A1. This will

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T-55E Mark 0 ("E" stands for Egyptian variant) - T-55 modernization fitted with a new Russian engine developing 580 hp. It came in two variants: T-55E Mark 0 fitted with a German AEG infrared/white searchlight on the left hand side of the main armament and a Yugoslav "Iskra" laser rangefinder.[17][13] T-55E Mark 0 fitted with DShK 1938/46 antiaircraft heavy machine gun and German AEG searchlight. T-55E MK I ("E" stands for Egyptian variant) - T-55 modernization fitted with a more powerful engine developing 650 hp, fire control system (which includes a ballistic computer), searchlight, laser rangefinders and appliqué armour. All those additions resulted in weight increasing to 41 tonnes. It retains the original 100 mm tank gun but the performance and ammunition were improved. T-55E MK II ("E" stands for Egyptian variant) - Refurbished and modernized T-55 in the mid 1990s. It is fitted with a German engine developing 880 hp, M68 105 mm tank gun, Italian fire control system (which includes an Italian ballistic computer), infrared device, laser rangefinder, stabilization system, modernized suspension, six smoke grenade launchers on each side of the turret, NBC protection system, appliqué armor and armored side skirts. All those additions resulted in weight increasing to 44 tonnes. Conversions are scheduled to be completed by the end of 2008

Egyptian Army
the T-54 available in the Egyptian Army arsenal. The upgrades and modifications resulted in an increase in the weight of the tank to 48 tons.

Armored Infantry Fighting Vehicles
• YPR-765 PRI with 25 mm KBA-B02 turret (634) • BMP-1 (220) • EIFV (Egyptian AIFV variant of the M113, locally built) (300) (900 on order to replace the YPR-765 PRI)[7] • Fahd 280-30 4X4 IFVs upgraded with BMP-2 turrets (265) (Locally built) • Fahd 280 4X4 IFV with B-208 French Turret (235) (Locally built)

Armored Personnel Carrier
Tracked • Upgraded BTR-50 PK (250) • BTR-50 PKM (100) • Upgraded OT-62 TOPAS (500) • M113A-2/A-3 (2,116) • M1058A2 EWC (72) Wheeled • Kader-320 4X4 (560) (Locally built) • Tiger Kader-120 4X4 (650) (Locally built) • Fahd 280 4X4 (635) (Locally built) • RG-32 4X4 (112) • BMR-600 6X6 (260) • Hotspur HUSSARD 6X6 (110) • BTR-152 6X6 (375) • Upgraded BTR-60 8X8 (250) • Upgraded OT-64 SKOT 2/2A 8X8 (300)

Armored Cargo Carrier and Smoke Generator
Tracked • M548A3 (290) • YPR-765-PRVR (82) • M1059A3 Lynx Smoke Generator (36) Egyptian modified T-55 during Operation Bright Star • 5) Ramses II MBT (48 tons): Late in 1989, Egypt signed a technical assistance agreement with TCM to support the continued Egyptian testing of the Ramses II, with testing commencing in the summer of 1990. The tank finally entered production/conversion in 2004-2005 with 260 units so far modified from the stock of Wheeled • Fahd 280 4X4 (185) • Fahd 280 4X4 Smoke Generator (72) • BTR-152 6X6 (275)

Armored Amphibious Troop and Cargo Carriers
• K-61 Tracked Amphibious Troop/Cargo Carrier (180) • PTS-M Heavy Tracked Amphibious Troop/ Cargo Carrier (170)

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• PTS-2 Heavy Tracked Amphibious Troop/ Cargo Carrier (180) • GSP Heavy Amphibious Troop/Cargo Transport Ferry (86)

Egyptian Army
• YPR-765-C3 Mortar Fire Control Vehicle (30) • YPR-765-C4 AA Fire Control Vehicle (25) Wheeled • M1145 4X4 Command Post (450) • Fahd 280 4X4 Command Post (140) (Locally built) • M934 6X6 Command Post (75)

Mechanized Anti Tank Armored Vehicles
Tracked • YPR-765 PRAT Armored TOW/ATGW Carrier (210) • M901A3 Armored TOW/ATGW Carrier (52) Wheeled • M1036 4X4 Armored TOW/ATGW Carrier (125) • M1045 4X4 Up-armored TOW/ATGW Carrier (200)

Logistic & Engineering Vehicles
M728 Tracket CEV (72) M88A2 Tracket ARV (126) BTS-4A Tracket ARV (52) BREM-1 Tracket ARV (36) M578 Tracket Light ARV (72) YPR-765-PRBRG Tracked Light ARV (38) Fahd 280 4X4 Light ARV (124) M984 8X8 ARV (210) MDK-2M Ditcher (48) PZM-2 Ditcher (36) BAT-2 Route clearer (72) M9 ACE Armored Demolition Caterpillar (120) • Caterpillar D9 (250) • Caterpillar D7 (240) • Caterpillar 930G Front Loader (270) • • • • • • • • • • • •

Armored Forward Observation Vehicles
Tracked • M981 FISTV Forward Artillery observation Vehicle (120) Wheeled • M1114 Forward Artillery observation Vehicle (375)

Armored Reconnaissance and Scout
Wheeled • M1043 4X4 Reconnaissance Scout (350) • BRDM-2 4X4 Reconnaissance Armored Vehicle/ATGW Carrier (300) • Commando Scout 4X4 Reconnaissance Scout (112) • Kader-320 4X4 Reconnaissance Scout (Locally built) (140) • Tiger Kader-120 4X4 Reconnaissance Scout (Locally built) (150)

Amphibious Bridging Engineering Systems
• TPP Tracked Pontoom Bridge (94) • PRG Motorized Bridge (112) • PMP Heavy Folding Pontoon Bridging Systems (42) • PMM-2 Amphibious Tracked Bridging System (56) • KMM Motorized Bridge Layer (medium) on Zil-157 truck (70) • TMM-3 Motorized Bridge Layer (heavy) on KrAZ-255B 6X6 truck (96) • M60A1 AVLB Tracked Bridge Layer (48) • MT-55 K/L Tracked Bridge Layer (56) • MTU-20 Tank Launched Bridge (48) • M104 Wolverine Heavy Assault Bridge (12) • BMK-T Bridging Boats (48) • BMK-130M Bridging Boats (48) • BMK-150M Bridging Boats (36)

Armored Command Post and Fire Control Vehicles
Tracked • M577A3 Command Post (52) • M1068A2 Standard Integrated Command Post (84) • YPR-765 PRCO-B Command Post Vehicle (48) • YPR-765 PRCO-C Command Post with 12.7 mm (52) • YPR-765 PRCO-C1 Battalion Command Post (40) • YPR-765-C2 Battalion Fire Control Vehicle (48)

Mine Clearing/Layer Systems
• Nather-1 Mine Carpet Clearing System (140) • Nather-2 Mine Carpet Clearing System (120) • Fateh 2/3/4 Anti Tank Rocket Clearing System (340)

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• Fahd 280 4X4 Mine Layer (75)

Egyptian Army
• M-818 Tractor Trailer (560) • M911 HETS Tractor with M746 trailer (450) • M1070 HETS with M1000 Trailer (320)

All Terrain and Logistic Vehicles
4x4 • M998 4X4 (675) • M1038 4X4 (450) • M1043 4X4 (510) • M1151 4X4 (465) (575 on order) • M996 4X4 Mini Ambulance (150) • M1043 4X4 Maxi Ambulance (140) • Fahd 280 4X4 Ambulance (120) • Tiger Kader-120 Ambulance (130) • Kader-320 4X4 Ambulance (240) • G320 4X4 (2,900) (Locally built) • Jeep CJ7 4X4 (10,650) (Locally built) • M151 MUTT 4X4 (4,750) • M274 4X4 (1,500) • GAZ-66 4X4 (5,100) • Pegaso 3046 4x4 (3,900) • FAP 1118 4X4 (1,250) • Mk23 4X4 (550) • MK25 4X4 (950) 6x6 • ZIL-157 6X6 (3,700) • ZIL-131 6X6 (1,800) • URAL-375D 6X6 (2,750) • Ural-4320 6X6 (2,500) (Locally built) • KrAZ-255 6X6 (850) • KrAZ-6322 6x6 (250) • FAP 2026 6X6 (860) • FAP 2228 6X6 (650) • Scania SBAT111 6X6 (590) • M35 6X6 (1,050) • M54 6X6 (950) • M923 6X6 (600) • M927 6X6 (600) • M931 6X6 (275) • MK27 6X6 (450) • MK31 6X6 (350) 8x8 • Ural-5323 8X8 (550) • ZIL-135 8X8 (380) • MAZ-543 8X8 (250) • MK36 8X8 (250) • M977 8X8 (375) • M985 8X8 (500) 10X10 • M1074 10X10 (110) • M1075 10X10 (90) • M1076 10X10 (70) Tractor Trailer • M970A1 Refueler Tanker (175) • M978 Refueler Tanker (275)

Artillery
Medium Range Ballistic Missiles
• Nodong Medium Range Ballistic Missiles (Range: 1,500 km) (24 units/6 launchers)

Short Range Ballistic Missiles
• Al Badr 2000 an enhanced Scud C Short Range Ballistic Missiles (Range: 1,200-1,500 km) (24 units/6 launchers)

Theater Ballistic Missiles
• Scud-C Theater Ballistic Missiles (Range: 550 km) (48 units/12 launchers)(Enhanced range) • Project-T Theater Ballistic Missiles (Range: 450 km) (72 units/18 launchers)(With North Korean assistance)

Tactical Ballistic Missiles
• Scud-B Tactical Ballistic Missiles (Range: 300 km) (96 units/24 launchers)(locally made)

Long range Battlefield Rockets
• Sakr-80 Long range Battlefield Rockets (Range: 80 km) (360 units/60 launchers [2 missiles per launchers])(Indegenious design) • FROG-7 Long range Battlefield Rockets (Range: 70 km) (288 units/48 launchers)(upgraded)(under licensed production) The Egyptian ballistic missile development program apparently continues, however, primarily as an Air Force sponsored research program rather than a production development program. The RS-120 Tactical Ballistic Missile Program is still in the developmental stage and should be shortly replacing the Frog-7 and supplementing the Sakr 80; by having a range of 120 km, it would be considered as an intermediate system between the Tactical Ballistic Missiles and the Theater Ballistic Missile Systems. Should, however, there be a dramatic change in its political climate and financial resources, Egypt possesses the technological and personnel resources to produce a Scud B/C, or possibly Nodong, equivalent missile.

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Egyptian Army
• Helwan UK-2 120 mm Egyptian version of the 2B11 (600) [9] • M30 107 mm (390) • M1937 82 mm (750) • Helwan M-69 82mm Egyptian version of the M1937 (1,250)[10] • M252 81 mm mortar system (1,750) • M224 Mortar 60 mm mortar system (1,800) • Helwan 60 mm Egyptian modified variant of the Chinese Type 63-1 (2,500) [11]

Self Propelled Artillery
• M109A1/A2 155 mm self-propelled howitzer (365) • M109A5 155 mm self-propelled howitzer (201) • SPH 122 mm 122 mm self-propelled howitzer (D-30 howitzer on M109 A2 chassis) (Locally assembled) (124) • SPH 122 mm self-propelled howitzer (D-30 howitzer on T-55 chassis) (Locally assembled) (76) • M110A2 203mm self-propelled howitzer (144)[8]

Training Artillery
Howitzers • M-30 122 mm towed field howitzer (200) • ML-20 152 mm towed field howitzer (100) Field Guns • A-19 122 mm towed field gun Model 1931/ 37 (50) Heavy Mortars • M1938 120 mm (100) Medium Mortars • M1937 82 mm (100)

Self Propelled Mortars
• M120 120 mm mortar carrier on modified T-34 & T-54 tank chassis (120) • M1064A3 self-propelled M120 120 mm mortar carrier (160) • M106A2 self-propelled M30 107 mm mortar carrier (150) • M125A2 self-propelled M29 81 mm mortar carrier (350)

Towed Field Artillery
Howitzers • GH 52 155 mm towed field howitzer w/APU (400) (Being manufactured locally under license - production as needed) • D-20 152 mm towed field gun howitzer (150) • D-30 122 mm towed field howitzer (600) (Manufactured locally - production as needed) Field Guns • S-23 180 mm towed field heavy gun (24) • M-46 130 mm towed field gun (420) (Manufactured locally - production as needed) • Type 59-1M 130 mm towed field gun (150) • D-74 122 mm towed field gun (148) • Type 60 122 mm towed field gun (148) • M1944 100 mm towed field gun (200)

Stowed Artillery
• D-20 152 mm towed field gun howitzer (120) • D-1 152 mm towed field howitzer (150) • ML-20 152 mm towed field howitzer (100) • M-30 122 mm towed field howitzer (150)

Multiple Launchers Rocket Systems
• VAP-80: 80 mm towed/self propelled nonguided rocket system of 40 tubes arranged in 4 rows of 10: Range: 6.5 km (250 Launcher Units) • M-51 130 mm towed non-guided rocket system of 16 tubes arranged in 4 rows of 4: Range 8.2 km (36 Launcher Units) • BM-13 132 mm towed non-guided rocket system of 16 tubes arranged in 2 rows of 8: Range 13 km (24 Launcher Units) • BM-21 122 mm non-guided rocket system of 40 tube arranged in 4 rows of 10: Range: 20.8 km (215 Launcher Units) • BM-11: North Korean version of the BM-21 non-guided rocket system of 30 tubes arranged in 2 rows of 15: Range: 20.8 km (96 Launcher Units) • Sakr-4:122 mm non-guided rocket system of a single tube based on a tripod stand: Range: 4 km, Egyptian modified version of the BM-11 (120 Launcher Units)

Towed Mortars
• M-240 240 mm (24) • M1943 160 mm (160) (modernized and built under license) • M-43 120 mm (240) (modernized and built under license) • 2B11 120 mm (300) (modernized and built under license) • M120 120 mm (560)

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
• Sakr-8:122 mm non-guided rocket system of 2 tubes based on a tripod stand or a Jeep: Range: 8 km, Egyptian modified version of the BM-11 (48 Launcher Units) • Sakr-10:122 mm non-guided rocket system of 4 tubes arranged in 2 rows of 2: Range: 10 km, Egyptian modified version of the BM-11 (50 Launcher Units) • Sakr-18:122 mm non-guided rocket system of 30 tubes arranged in 3 rows of 10: Range: 20.8 km, Egyptian modified version of the BM-11 (72 Launcher Units) • Sakr-30:122 mm non-guided rocket system of 40 tubes arranged in 4 rows of 10: Range: 30 km, Egyptian modified version of the BM-21(130 Launcher Units) • Sakr-36:122 mm non-guided rocket system of 40 tubes arranged in 4 rows of 10: Range: 36 km, enhanced range Egyptian modified version of the BM-21(50 Launcher Units) • Sakr-45: 227 mm battlefield rocket system, Range: 45 km, Egyptian licensed built version of the M270 rocket combined with the traditional Sakr-36 6X6 launching truck system of 12 tubes arranged in 2 rows of 6 (20 Launcher Units) • M270: 227 mm battlefield rocket system of 12 tubes arranged in 2 rows of 6: (26 Launcher Units) • Range with M26 rocket ammunition: 32 km • Range with M26A1/A2 ammunition: 45 km • Range with M30 ammunition: 45 km • BM-24: 240 mm non-guided rocket system of 12 tubes arranged in 2 rows of 6: Range 12 km (48 Launcher Units)

Egyptian Army
guns radar guided with Stinger SAM (3X2) (72) on M113) [13] • SA-9 forward area mobile short range quadruple short range SP SAM (20) • M1097 Avenger - forward area mobile short range air defense system w/Stinger SP SAM (50)+ (50 on order)

Anti Air Gun Systems
Self Propelled AA Gun Systems • BTR-152 Egyptian AA variant - selfpropelled quad 12.7 mm AA gun system (120)(in reserve; withdrawn from service in 1985.) • M163 A2 - self-propelled sextuple 20 mm chain gun system on M113 carrier (108) • ZSU-23-4 self-propelled quadruple 23 mm anti-aircraft gun system (218) with upgraded radar guidance • M53/59 Praga - self-propelled twin 30 mm AA radar guided gun system (100) • Upgraded ZSU-57-2 self-propelled twin 57 mm anti-aircraft gun system (190) with radar guidance Towed AA Gun Systems • M167 A3- towed sextuple 20 mm chain gun system (72) • ZPU-2 twin 14.5 mm stationary or towed AA gun system (250) • ZPU-4 quadruple 14.5 mm stationary or towed AA gun system (200) • ZU-23-2 upgraded twin 23 mm stationary or towed radar guided AA gun system (350) • Oerlikon-Contraves stationary/towed 35 mm twin radar guided AA guns (72) • M1939 37 mm anti-aircraft guns with upgraded radar guidance (700) • S-60 57 mm anti-aircraft guns with upgraded radar guidance (600) • M1939 85 mm anti-aircraft guns with upgraded radar guidance (400) • KS-19 100 mm anti-aircraft guns with upgraded radar guidance (200) • KS-30 130 mm anti-aircraft guns with upgraded radar guidance (120)

Army Air Defense Systems
Surface to Air Missile Systems
MANPADS • Sakr Eye Egyptian modified version of the SA-7 MANPAD short range SAM (2,500+) • Stinger MANPAD short range SAM (1,800+) • Igla MANPAD short range SAM (600+) Self Propelled SAM Systems • Nile 23 Upgraded version of the ZU-23-2 twin 23 mm self-propelled anti-aircraft guns radar guided (148) with Sakr Eye (2X2) SAM M113) [12] • Sinai 23 Upgraded version of the ZU-23-2 twin 23 mm self-propelled anti-aircraft

References
[1] International Institute for Strategic Studies, The Military Balance 2006, p.183 [2] Pollack, Arabs at War: Military Effectiveness, 1948-1991, Council on

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Foreign Relations/University of Nebraska, 2002, p.14 Pollack, ibid., p.15 http://www.tim-thompson.com/ gwobjfg.html, accessed February 2009 International Institute for Strategic Studies, The Military Balance 2006, p.183 Historical Notes and Scenarios Booklet, Suez ’73: The Battle of the Chinese Farm (boardgame), Game Designers’ Workshop, 1981 United Defense, EIFV[1]

Egyptian Army

Further reading
• Kenneth Pollack, Arabs at War • Steve Rothwell, Military Ally or Liability, The Egyptian Army 1936-42, accessed February 2009

[3] [4] [5]

[6]

See also
• Central Security Forces • List of countries by number of active troops

[7]

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egyptian_Army" Categories: Armies by country, Military of Egypt This page was last modified on 25 May 2009, at 23:03 (UTC). All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License. (See Copyrights for details.) Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a U.S. registered 501(c)(3) taxdeductible nonprofit charity. Privacy policy About Wikipedia Disclaimers

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