100G Technology Overview by vad49754

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									Lesson Overview

Grade Level:
    This unit was designed for a 6th grade Texas Technology
Applications class but could easily be modified for other subjects or
levels, especially 7th grade Texas history, or 4th grade Texas social
studies. As a technology teacher, and because this thematic plan
was developed as part of the Target II Technology Grant, the focus
of many of the activities is technology based, and the plan could
readily be integrated into any technology curriculum grades 4-7.
The activities also incorporate art and modeling skills, and a Texas
art teacher who wanted to incorporate core curriculum TEKS might
find this plan useful. Individual lessons could be readily adopted
into a mathematics or science curricular sequence. Teachers
outside of Texas could easily modify this lesson sequence to fit
either their regional area, or for Native Americans in general.

Unifying Theme:
   Rather than present a generic view of Native Americans, and
also because of the huge amount of information available, I chose
to focus the study on Texas Native Americans, and split them into
five geographical/cultural regions: Southwest Culture, Plains
Culture, Western Gulf Coast Culture, Southeast Culture and
Attacapan. By studying each region separately, students will have
an opportunity to explore the cultural differences and similarities of
Texas Native Americans based on their geographic and cultural
diversity. This Technology Applications unit is designed to
integrate other content areas including Math, Science, Language
Arts, and Social Studies.

TEKS Standards/Objectives:
  At the end of this unit of study students will be able to:
  1. Identify and understand some of the customs and traditions of
certain Texas Native American tribes.
  2. Explain ways Native American tribes lived and survived
  3. Access the Internet and retrieve and / or research information
  4. Create a PowerPoint slide presentation.

All lessons include Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS)
standard objectives for Technology Applications, at least two of the
four core curriculum subjects (English Language Arts, Mathematics,
Social Studies, and Science), and in some cases additional TEKS
from Skill for Living or Fine Arts.

Teachers from outside of Texas should find it easy to correlate the
TEKS included to national standardized objectives or their own
state standards.

Assessment:

   One or more assessment rubrics are posted with each lesson. In
the collaborative lesson plans, students within their own groups
should assess each other. When the lesson plans involve
presentation to an external audience such as the class, the entire
class should assess the presentation using the rubric. Some of the
lesson plans could involve both methods of assessment. The
students may also assess themselves, and the teacher may
complete the assessment rubrics as well. Incorporating the rubrics
into the lesson plan using a variety of these methods will assure in-
depth content knowledge and understanding for effective,
appropriate use of technology.

Assumptions:
   It is assumed that students have basic map skills and some
familiarity with computers and word processing. However, it is not
assumed that students will have had previous experience
accessing information from the Internet or using PowerPoint. In my
experience as a middle school technology teacher, students in
grades 4-8 need a great deal of guidance in Internet research.
Allowing them to ―Google‖ on their own usually results in wasted
time, and often results in returning embarrassing or inappropriate
sites. Steering them directly to appropriate sites is probably the
best bet. On the other hand, students take to PowerPoint quickly,
and you can often use your own G/T, or other exceptional students
to peer-teach, coach or facilitate those who are having difficulties.

Modifications/Equity:
   The teacher will provide modifications for students as needed.
 Alternative activity suggestions for special education and/or
gifted/talented students are provided throughout the sequence.
These are only meant as suggestions, since any teacher will know
how best how to deal with their own modifications.

Cultural Sensitivity/Inclusion:

  Appropriate Methods When Teaching About Native American
Peoples

Parental Involvement:

   Opportunities to include caregivers and/or persons significant to
the students as teachers or co-learners in the lesson sequence are
provided as much as possible. At the very least, the lessons
include ways to engage other members of the students' families or
their own out of school experience.

Tentative Timeline:
   At a minimum, this unit will take approximately one week or five
class periods. Each lesson is about 90 minutes in length, but
additional time will be needed to complete some of the projects.
  Realistically, this sequence will probably take two to three times
that amount of time. Some of the project activities might be
assigned as homework.
Opportunities to expand or enrich this unit are practically limitless.
Additional topics could easily be added depending on the interest of
your students and the time you have available for this project.


Introduction:
   The teacher will introduce this unit to students with a PowerPoint
slide presentation, or a lecture/class discussion.. It will discuss the
First Americans and where they came from (across the Bering
Strait) and the five main geographical/cultural groups of Texas
Native Americans that eventually evolved . Students can use
colored pencils and a blank map of Texas to shade and label these
regions, create a Native American folder for this unit, and then
begin a chart that will eventually compare and contrast the four
major areas that will be studied within each group: shelter,
transportation, food, and myths/symbolism. Students will add
information to their chart after each lesson. As an initial homework
assignment, ask the students to talk with their parents and other
relatives about any Native American heritage in their own families.


Lesson 1
Topic: Technology, Social Studies, Fine Arts, English Language
Arts - Tejas Native Americans - Shelter

Objectives:

      Students will practice using the Internet by researching the
       homes of
       Texas Native Americans.

      Students will build a tipi, pueblo, rock shelter, slab house,
       grass house or wickiup.
      Students will give a presentation of their home when
       completed.

TEKS:

Technology--Information acquisition. The student uses a variety of
strategies to acquire information from electronic resources, with
appropriate supervision. The student is expected to: (A) use
strategies to locate and acquire desired information on LANs and
WANs, including the Internet, intranet, and collaborative software;
and (B) apply appropriate electronic search strategies in the
acquisition of information including keyword and Boolean search
strategies.

Social Studies--Geography. The student understands the impact of
interactions between people and the physical environment on the
development of places and regions. The student is expected to: (A)
identify and analyze ways people have adapted to the physical
environment in selected places and regions; (B) identify and
analyze ways people have modified the physical environment; and
(C) describe ways in which technology influences human capacity
to modify the physical environment.

Social Studies--Social studies skills. The student uses problem-
solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with
others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to: (A) use a
problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information,
list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages,
choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of
the solution; and (B) use a decision-making process to identify a
situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify
options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a
decision.


Fine Arts--Creative expression/performance. The student
expresses ideas through original artworks, using a variety of media
with appropriate skill. The student is expected to:
(A) express a variety of ideas based on personal experience and
direct observations;
(B) describe in detail a variety of practical applications for design
ideas; and
(C) demonstrate technical skills effectively, using a variety of art
media and materials to produce designs, drawings, paintings,
prints, sculptures, ceramics, fiber art, photographic imagery, and
electronic media-generated art.
English Language Arts--Listening/speaking/culture. The student
listens and speaks to gain and share knowledge of his/her own
culture, the culture of others, and the common elements of cultures.
The student is expected to: (A) connect his/her own experiences,
information, insights, and ideas with experiences of others through
speaking and listening (4-8);

Listening/speaking/audiences. The student speaks clearly and
appropriately to different audiences for different purposes and
occasions. The student is expected to:
(A) adapt spoken language such as word choice, diction, and
usage to the audience, purpose, and occasion (4-8);
(B) demonstrate effective communication skills that reflect such
demands as interviewing, reporting, requesting, and providing
information (4-8);
(C) present dramatic interpretations of experiences, stories, poems,
or plays to communicate (4-8);
(D) generate criteria to evaluate his/her own oral presentations and
the presentations of others (6-8);
(E) use effective rate, volume, pitch, and tone for the audience and
setting (4-8); and
(F) clarify and support spoken ideas with evidence, elaborations,
and examples (4-8).



Materials:

        Computers with access to the Internet.

        Assortment of craft and ―building‖ materials.

Links:

        Plains Indian Teepee

        Teepee Photos

        Wickiups

        Chiricahua Wikiup

        Native American Housing

        Native American Housing Types
      Prehistoric Houses

      Native American Shelters

   Procedure:

          The teacher will ask the students what Native Americans
           could use to build a house if there were no metal
           available. The students will write responses in their
           journal.

          A discussion will form and the teacher will give examples
           of Native American homes.

          Guide students to use specific Internet sites chosen by
           the teacher

          Students will identify the types of homes used by Texas
           Native Americans, learn how they were built, and
           determine the materials used to build them.

          The teacher will instruct the students to pair up and
           choose a home to build.

          The teacher will inform the students of the criteria
           necessary for this activity. The teacher will also show the
           students a model of a Native American home to set an
           example for the students to follow.

          Students will work with their partner to construct either a
           tipi, pueblo, rock shelter, slab house, grass house or
           wickiup.

          The teacher will walk around the room and check to see
           that everyone is working and answer any questions or
           concerns.



Modifications:

          Packing to Move – A coloring book image that fits the
           lesson, and would be appropriate for main-streamed
           special education students who might not be able to
           complete the main project.
          Gifted/Talented – Some students may discover shelter
           types that do not quite fit into the 6 examples (tipi,
           pueblo, rock shelter, slab house, grass house or
           wickiup). Possibilities include wigwams, long houses,
           etc. Allow these students to expand upon their
           discoveries, but require them to justify why they should
           be included.



Parental Involvement:

Students will be asked to interview their family about memorable
ancestral homes, or homes that have been visited or seen and
made an impression. For example, when I was around middle
school age I visited the first American home of my father's
ancestors, a two-story restored log cabin in rural Pennsylvania.
The home had historical significance because it had a primitive
spiral staircase fashioned from rough-hewn logs. Not all students
will have had such an experience, nor will their family members.
But any home that they have visited or seen (even if it was on the
MTV show Cribs) should be accepted and praised for this exercise.
These interviews may be presented as short (one minute) oral
presentations to the class.

Assessment:

          Teacher observation of interest, participation, and ability
           to work with a partner.

          The finished project

           Oral Presentation Rubric : Tejas Lesson 1




Lesson 2
Topic: Technology, Social Studies, Science, English Language
Arts – Texas Native -- Transportation

Objectives:

      Students will construct a clay canoe.
      Students will conduct a simple experiment using their canoe.

      Students will discuss the use of the travois as an alternative
       transportation form, and how friction comes into play.

TEKS

Science--Scientific processes. The student conducts field and
laboratory investigations using safe, environmentally appropriate,
and ethical practices. The student is expected to:
(A) demonstrate safe practices during field and laboratory
investigations; and
(B) make wise choices in the use and conservation of resources
and the disposal or recycling of materials.

Science--Scientific processes. The student uses scientific inquiry
methods during field and laboratory investigations. The student is
expected to:
(A) plan and implement investigative procedures including asking
questions, formulating testable hypotheses, and selecting and
using equipment and technology;
(B) collect data by observing and measuring;
(C) analyze and interpret information to construct reasonable
explanations from direct and indirect evidence;
(D) communicate valid conclusions.


Scientific processes. The student uses critical thinking and scientific
problem solving to make informed decisions. The student is
expected to:
(A) analyze, review, and critique scientific explanations, including
hypotheses and theories, as to their strengths and weaknesses
using scientific evidence and information;
(B) represent the natural world using models and identify their
limitations;
(C) evaluate the impact of research on scientific thought, society,
and the environment

English Language Arts--Listening/speaking/purposes. The student
listens actively and purposefully in a variety of settings. The student
is expected to:
(A) determine the purposes for listening such as to gain
information, to solve problems, or to enjoy and appreciate (4-8);
(B) eliminate barriers to effective listening (4-8);
(C) understand the major ideas and supporting evidence in spoken
messages (4-8).
Technology--Information acquisition. The student uses a variety of
strategies to acquire information from electronic resources, with
appropriate supervision. The student is expected to: (A) use
strategies to locate and acquire desired information on LANs and
WANs, including the Internet, intranet, and collaborative software;
and (B) apply appropriate electronic search strategies in the
acquisition of information including keyword and Boolean search
strategies.

Social Studies--Geography. The student understands the impact of
interactions between people and the physical environment on the
development of places and regions. The student is expected to: (A)
identify and analyze ways people have adapted to the physical
environment in selected places and regions; (B) identify and
analyze ways people have modified the physical environment; and
(C) describe ways in which technology influences human capacity
to modify the physical environment.

Social Studies--Social studies skills. The student uses problem-
solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with
others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to: (A) use a
problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information,
list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages,
choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of
the solution; and (B) use a decision-making process to identify a
situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify
options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a
decision.



Materials:

clay, ice cream sticks, a basin of water for each group, pennies,
computers

Links:

        Birch Bark Canoes

        History of Canoes

        Canoe Building

        Native American Watercraft
     Bark Canoes

     Dog Travois

     Horse Travois

Procedures:

     Guide students to understand that some Texas Native
      Americans traveled on foot and by canoe, rather than by
      horseback.

     Discuss the use of dog and horse travoises, and how
      geographic differences led to different modes of
      transportation.

     Because the Southeast, Attacapan, and Western Gulf
      regions contained many rivers, lakes, and streams, some
      Texas Native American Tribes became expert craftsmen of
      canoes. (Refer to map)

     A canoe needed to be strong and durable because they
      were used for hunting, fishing, travel, trade, and in times of
      war.

     Most canoes used by Texas tribes were of the dugout
      variety. Indians in other areas of North America built birch
      bark or plank canoes.

     Guide students to use specific Internet sites chosen by the
      teacher

     Each student will construct a canoe, conduct the experiment,
      and then use a computer to answer the following questions
      in their electronic science log.

  Investigation:


         1. Mold a piece of clay into a canoe
         2. When everyone in the group is ready, place the canoe
      in a container of water.
            Did it float?
         3. Place pennies in your canoe one by one. How many
      pennies did your canoe
            hold before it sank? Why do you think it sank?
          4. Make a second canoe. Try using ice cream sticks with
       the clay. Sticks can
             be used on the bottom or any part of the boat. How
       many pennies did your canoe carry ? Which of the boats
       carried the heaviest load?
          5. What makes some boats float better than others?
          6. Why are some boats able to carry heavier loads?

         (Background Information - A floating object pushes aside
       an amount of water equal to its weight. If the floating object
       weighs more than the water it pushes aside, it will sink. The
       design of a floating object greatly influences how well it floats
       and how much of a load it can carry. If the weight of an
       object is spread over a wider area, the weight of the water
       below will support a heavier weight.)

 Modifications:

          Horses on the Plains – A coloring book image that fits the
           lesson, and would be appropriate for main-streamed
           special education students who might not be able to
           complete the main project.

          Gifted/Talented – Write a short essay on how the
           Western American History might have been different had
           the Native Americans developed the wheel prior to 1500
           A.D.

Parental Involvement

Students will be asked to interview their family or other caregivers
about the most unique or fascinating mode of transportation they
have ever used--snow mobiles, ferries, camels, skateboards, etc.
These interviews may be presented as short (one minute) oral
presentations to the class.

Assessment:

          Teacher observation of interest, participation, and ability
           to work with a partner.

          The finished project.

       Lab Report : Floating Objects--A Canoe Investigation
Lesson 3
Topic: Technology, Social Studies, Math, Skills for Living – Texas
Native Americans - Food

Objectives:

      Students will identify major foods of the Texas Native
       Americans.

      Students will measure ingredients and prepare ―Yokeg‖
       Muffins, and gather and prepare nopalitos.

      Students will use the Internet to find and print a recipe.


TEKS

Mathematics--Measurement. The student solves application
problems involving estimation and measurement of length, area,
time, temperature, capacity, weight, and angles. The student is
expected to:
(A) estimate measurements and evaluate reasonableness of
results;
(B) select and use appropriate units, tools, or formulas to measure
and to solve problems involving weight;
(C) convert measures within the same measurement system
(customary and metric) based on relationships between units.

Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student adds,
subtracts, multiplies, and divides to solve problems and justify
solutions. The student is expected to:
(A) use addition and subtraction to solve problems involving
fractions and decimals;

Skills for Living--Personal management. The student exhibits good
nutrition and health practices that promote personal well-being and
achievement across the life span. The student is expected to:
(A) explain dietary needs of individuals across the life span;
(B) apply principles of good nutrition;
(C) relate the role of proper nutrition to well-being and achievement.

Technology Applications--Information acquisition. The student uses
a variety of strategies to acquire information from electronic
resources, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:
(A) use strategies to locate and acquire desired information on
LANs and WANs, including the Internet, intranet, and collaborative
software; and
(B) apply appropriate electronic search strategies in the acquisition
of information including keyword and Boolean search strategies.

Technology--Communication. The student delivers the product
electronically in a variety of media, with appropriate supervision.
The student is expected to:
(A) publish information in a variety of ways including, but not limited
to, printed copy, monitor display, Internet documents, and video

Social Studies--Geography. The student understands the impact of
interactions between people and the physical environment on the
development of places and regions. The student is expected to:
(A) identify and analyze ways people have adapted to the physical
environment in selected places and regions;
(B) identify and analyze ways people have modified the physical
environment; and
(C) describe ways in which technology influences human capacity
to modify the physical environment.

Materials:

        Recipe and ingredients for "Yokeg" (cornmeal) Muffins,
         Recipe and ingredients for nopalitos.

        Computers with access to the Internet

Links:

        Native Food Index

        Native Recipes

        Native American Recipes

        Mortars and Pestles

        Indian Foods and Recipes

        What’s For Dinner

        Hunting without Guns

        Nopalitos
Procedure:

      Discuss with students that Texas Native Americans were
       hunters, fishermen,
       gatherers, and farmers.

      The main protein part of their diet was usually bison or deer
       meat, but also included rabbit, squirrel, insects, etc.

      They learned to grow and dry corn, beans, and squash,
       known as ―the three sisters‖.

      Each family was responsible for its own food, but it shared
       with anyone whose supply was low.

      Most Indians ate only one meal, in the morning. Any
       leftovers stayed in the pot all day in case a visitor came or
       someone got hungry. They realized the importance of
       strong, healthy bodies and never overate or wasted food. If
       they took it, they ate it!

      Students will research how to gather and prepare nopalitos.

      Teacher will accompany students on a walking fieldtrip to
       gather nopalitos.

      Students will work with their group to measure ingredients
       and prepare muffins and nopalitos.

      Students will sample their corn muffins with nopalitos and
       butter.



How To Harvest and Prepare Nopalitos (Nopales)


Commercially two sizes of nopales pads are harvested which is
small, (less than 10 cm long) or (medium less than 20 cm, about
100g). The Nopales leaf pads are usually harvested between
spring and the end of summer. Select thin pads no longer than
20cm or 8 inches. Make sure to wear heavy gloves to harvest the
pads yourself. The pad will snap off easily or you can use a large
knife to sever the stem. Beware, there are large and fine thorns so
be sure to keep your hands protected. To prepare the pads remove
the thorns and the "eyes" with a vegetable peeler or a small paring
             knife or this new gadget designed just for spine removal. Wash the
             pads well with cool water and peel or trim off any blemished or
             discolored areas. Slice the pads in long slices or in pieces or leave
             whole depending on the dish you will prepare.

             How To Eat and Use Nopales


             Nopales is a vegetable that can be eaten grilled or boiled. Over
             cooking may give them a slightly "slimy" texture you may want to
             avoid. Frequently the nopales are added to eggs, or as a vegetable
             in soups, chilies or a filling in a tortilla.

             The best preparation we have tried is to prepare the nopal leaves
             (remove spines) then grill over hot coals till tender and slightly
             browned. Then slice into nopalitos strips and toss with a squeeze of
             lime and a little bit of olive oil. They are delicious.

             The information above came from GourmetSleuth.com.



              Corn Meal Muffins

              Ingredients: (for a group of 4)
              1/2 cup flour
              2 tsp. baking powder
              1/2 cup milk
              1/2 cup yellow cornmeal
              1/4 tsp. salt
              1/8 cup oil
              1/8 cup sugar
              1 egg

               Directions:

               (assign each student in a group a number from 1 - 4)
               Student #1 - Measure, add and mix the flour and cornmeal
               Student #2 - Measure, add and mix the sugar and baking powder
               Student #3 - Measure, add and mix the salt and egg
               Student #4 - Measure, add and mix the milk and oil
               Students #1 - 4 - Spoon the batter into muffin cups (fill 1/2 full)

               Ask cafeteria staff to bake at 425 degrees for 12-15 minutes/until
lightly browned on top.
While students wait for the muffins to cook, they will work with their
group to double the ingredients and neatly rewrite the recipe.


Students will use the Internet to find a recipe that they would like to
include in a class recipe book on Texas Native Americans. They
will also include the recipe they have obtained from their own
family.

Modifications/Equity:

      Woman Digging for Food – A coloring book image that fits
       the lesson, and would be appropriate for main-streamed
       special education students who might not be able to
       complete the main project.

      Gifted/Talented – Before the nopalitos field trip, have the
       students research other edible plants and animals that might
       be gathered, and have them look for them on the field trip.
       The G/T students may also be utilized to compile and
       produce the class recipe book.

Parental Involvement:

Students will be asked to interview family members or other
caregivers about a favorite family recipe, record it and bring it to
class for a class recipe book.

Assessment:

      Students will evaluate the snack prepared by their group.

      Collaborative Work Rubric

      Were students able to add fractions and double the recipe?


Lesson 4
Topic: Technology, Social Studies, English Language Arts, Fine
Arts – Texas Native Americans – Symbolism in Myth and Art

Objectives:
·   Students will read several Native American legends,
    memorize and retell a legend to the class, and write their
    own Native American Legend.

·   Students will acquaint themselves with the artwork of early
    Native Americans and examine how they incorporate
    aspects of their environment and everyday experiences in
    their art. They will then apply their observations to designs
    of their own.

TEKS:

English Language Arts--Listening/speaking/culture. The student
  listens and speaks to gain and share knowledge of his/her
  own culture, the culture of others, and the common elements
  of cultures. The student is expected to:
  (A) connect his/her own experiences, information, insights,
  and ideas with experiences of others through speaking and
  listening (4-8);
  (B) compare oral traditions across regions and cultures (4-8);
  and
  (C) identify how language use such as labels and sayings
  reflects regions and cultures (4-8).


English Language Arts--Listening/speaking/audiences. The
  student speaks clearly and appropriately to different
  audiences for different purposes and occasions. The student
  is expected to:
  (A) adapt spoken language such as word choice, diction,
  and usage to the audience, purpose, and occasion (4-8);
  (B) demonstrate effective communication skills that reflect
  such demands as interviewing, reporting, requesting, and
  providing information (4-8);
  (C) present dramatic interpretations of experiences, stories,
  poems, or plays to communicate (4-8);
  (D) generate criteria to evaluate his/her own oral
  presentations and the presentations of others (6-8);
  (E) use effective rate, volume, pitch, and tone for the
  audience and setting (4-8); and
  (F) clarify and support spoken ideas with evidence,
  elaborations, and examples (4-8).


Social Studies--Culture. The student understands the
   relationship that exists between artistic, creative, and literary
    expressions and the societies that produce them. The
    student is expected to:
    (A) explain the relationships that exist between societies and
    their architecture, art, music, and literature;
    (B) relate ways in which contemporary expressions of culture
    have been influenced by the past;
    (C) describe ways in which societal issues influence creative
    expressions; and
    (D) identify examples of art, music, and literature that have
    transcended the boundaries of societies and convey
    universal themes.

Fine Arts Historical/cultural heritage. The student demonstrates
   an understanding of art history and culture as records of
   human achievement. The student is expected to:
   (A) identify in artworks the influence of historical and political
   events;
   (B) compare specific artworks from a variety of cultures.

Technology--Information acquisition. The student evaluates the
   acquired electronic information. The student is expected to:
   (A) determine and employ methods to evaluate the
   electronic information for accuracy and validity;
   (B) resolve information conflicts and validate information
   through accessing, researching, and comparing data; and
   (C) demonstrate the ability to identify the source, location,
   media type, relevancy, and content validity of available
   information.

Technology--Communication. The student delivers the product
   electronically in a variety of media, with appropriate
   supervision. The student is expected to:
   (A) publish information in a variety of ways including, but not
   limited to, printed copy, monitor display, Internet documents,
   and video.



Materials:

·     Art supplies as needed

·     Computers with access to the Internet and Microsoft Word
    or another word processing program.

Procedures:
         ·   Discuss the nature of symbolism in Native American
             legends.

         ·   Discuss the nature of symbolism in Native American art.

Links:

   Native American Tales

   Traditional Stories, Legends and Myths

   Native American Legends, Myths and Lore

   Native American Legends, Folk Tales, and Stories

   Leather Bags and Pouches

   American Indian Bags

   Pueblo Pottery

   Rock Art Near El Paso Texas

   Rock Art Foundation

   Petroglyph National Monument

   Native American Symbols

   More Native American Symbols



Directions:

   ·     Instruct students to find and read a minimum of three Native
         American legends on the Internet.

   ·     Students will memorize one legend and present it to the
         class.

   ·     Students will write an original legend of their own, and
         present it to the class.

   ·   Instruct students to explore the web sites, and learn about
       the use of symbols in Native American art.
   ·    Students will complete one of the following projects,
        incorporating Native American symbols—a pouch, a coil pot,
        or a painted representation of a petroglyph.

Modifications/Equity

Gifted/Talented or other star students should be encouraged to
peer teach, coach or collaborate with those exceptional students
who have special needs, in addition to completing their own
presentations and projects.

Parental Involvement:

Students will interview family members or other caregivers about
favorite or powerful symbols that have affected their lives.
Examples might include the Christian emblem of the fish or the
crucifix, the ying-yang symbol, the Harley Davidson wings emblem,
or even a tattoo.

Assessment:

   Story Telling Rubric

   Story Writing Rubric

       Art Project Rubric

Lesson 5
Topic: Technology, English Language Arts – Texas Native
Americans - PowerPoint Presentation

Objective:

       Students will work with a partner to create a Powerpoint
        presentation on Texas Native Americans.

TEKS:

Technology--Communication. The student delivers the product
electronically in a variety of media, with appropriate supervision.
The student is expected to:
(A) publish information in a variety of ways including, but not limited
to, printed copy, monitor display, Internet documents, and video;
(B) design and create interdisciplinary multimedia presentations for
defined audiences including audio, video, text, and graphics.
English Language Arts--Viewing/representing/production. The
student produces visual images, messages, and meanings that
communicate with others. The student is expected to:
(A) select, organize, or produce visuals to complement and extend
meanings (4-8);
(B) produce communications using technology or appropriate
media such as developing a class newspaper, multimedia reports,
or video reports (4-8); and
(C) assess how language, medium, and presentation contribute to
the message (6-8).


Social Studies--History. The student understands the contributions
of individuals and groups from various cultures to selected historical
and contemporary societies. The student is expected to:
(A) explain the significance of individuals or groups from selected
societies, past and present; and
(B) describe the influence of individual and group achievement on
selected historical or contemporary societies.




Materials:

      Computers with access to the Internet and PowerPoint

Procedures:

      Teacher will provide students with a brief introduction to
       PowerPoint.

      Assign each student a partner.

      Students will work with their partner to create a short
       PowerPoint presentation on either the shelter, food,
       transportation, or mythology/art of a specific tribe of Texas
       Native Americans.

      Partners will choose a topic, brainstorm, plan, create, and
       present their project to the class.

      Students can use the school library, software available in the
       classroom, and Internet sites selected by the teacher to find
       pictures and additional information about their topic.
Assessment:

      PowerPoint Rubric


The following links to the Internet can be used by students and
/ or teachers to access information on Native Americans.


      Native Americans - Student info on Native Americans

      Notable Women Ancestors - Native Americans - Important
       Native American women

      Just Curious - Native Americans - Library page with Native
       American links for students

      Homework Center - Native American Sites - Many
       educational links

      Tribal Histories - Information on specific tribes of each
       geographical region.

      Native Americans of Texas

      Journeys of the First Americans

      The Caddo Confederacies

      Coastal Indians of Texas

      Plains Indians of Texas

      Rio Grande Region Indians of Texas

      Tonkawa Indians of Texas

      Wichita Indians of Texas

      Caddoan Mounds State Historic Site

      Caddo Cultures in Texas

      A History of the Caddo Indians

      Caddo Effigy Bowl
   Alabama Coushatta History

   Alabama-Coushatta Indians

   Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas

   Kickapoo Indians

   Kickapoo History

   Prehistoric Peoples

   Karankawas and the Austin Colony

   Karankawa Indian Camp Site

   Karankawa Hunter

   Native American Myths

   The Karankawas of Padre

   Tonkawa of Texas

   Tonkawa Nation

   Indians in Texas

								
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