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									Day 1
                  L.O.1
To multiply and divide whole numbers up
         to 10 000 by 10 or 100
                  69
Q. What will be the product if I multiply this by 10?
REMEMBER

  Digits move to the
       LEFT when multiplying

  Digits move to the
              RIGHT when dividing
                       COPY THIS INTO YOUR BOOK
Q. What will happen if I divide 10 by 10?



Q. What will happen if I divide 1 by 10?
L.O.2
To be able to use, read and write standard
metric units of length including their
abbreviations and relationships between
them.
To be able to convert larger to smaller units
of length
To know imperial units (mile)
Q. Tell me the name of a measurement of
    length.




                       Q. Which of these units is the longest?
Q. How many m. are there in 1 km.
ACTIVITY



Identify equivalent measures



           Explain to your partner why they are equivalent
Q. How do you remember the terms
       „kilo‟, „mile‟ and „centi‟?
3.2 m. 3200mm.

3.2cm. 32mm.
                450

Q. If this were a measurement in mm. what would
       the equivalent in cm. be?
270


      3600

82

      560
By the end of the lesson children
should be able to:

Use correct abbreviations m/cm/mm
Convert between metric units of length
and know e.g.1.6m. = 160 cm.
Day 2
                 L.O.1
 To be able to use vocabulary related to
                measure.
To know and be able to use relationships
         between familiar units.
This is a metre stick
              2m.




                      Q. What is this measurement?




                        Q. What is this measurement in
                              m. , cm. and mm.




                1m.
This is a 2 metre stick
            3m

                     Write in your books the
                     different measurements
                     pointed to.




            1m
Use your sheet OHT 9.3 to answer these.
Record the answers in your book.
1.Which measurement is nearest to the width of your
    fingernail?
2. Which is nearest the length of the classroom?
3. Think of things which approximate to other
     measurements shown and record them.

            Prisms – 8 measurements
            Spheres – 6 measurements
            Tetrahedra – 5 measurements


Record your measurements in other units as well.
L.O.2
To be able to estimate / measure and
 draw lines to the nearest mm.
You will need a ruler which measures in mm.
          Work with a partner.

One of you draw a line 15cm. long - the other will check.
Now the other will draw a line 150mm. long which the
first will check.
Q. Why is it important to start measuring from
zero on the ruler and not from the end of           the
ruler?
Q. How did you decide on your estimate?



Q. Who was the closest to their estimate?




                             Explain your methods.
Continue playing the game.
Q. Did your methods of estimation change
   as you played the game?



Q. In which jobs might you need to
   measure so accurately?
To finish we are going to estimate then
measure the distances between the points
5 and 6 then 8 and13.
By the end of the lesson the children
should be able to:
Measure and draw lines to the nearest
millimetre.
Read and write standard units of
lengths, mm. cm. and m.
Day 3
              L.O.1
To be able to double or halve any
      whole number to 100
We are going to halve numbers then
double them.

     46          78            54

26          82            40

      25        56       37
  REMEMBER !
When we double we x 2;
                when we halve we /2
   L.O.2
To understand, measure and calculate the
perimeter of polygons.
To be able to express the formula for the
perimeter of a rectangle as “twice length,
twice breadth”.
Q. What is the correct mathematical term for finding the
distance around the outside edge of a 2-D shape?




 Q. How would we calculate this distance?

                                           Take and discuss answers.
Perimeter
Q .How can we calculate the perimeter of
   this shape?




Q. When we calculate the perimeter of a rectangle
do we need to measure all the sides?
We can use the formula

twice the length plus twice the breadth

This is often written as


          (2 x L) + (2 x B)
  In your book draw a rectangle which has
     two sides of 8cm. and two of 5cm.

Find the perimeter of your rectangle by using the
  measurements of only TWO sides.

Complete this equation by filling in the numbers:
           P=(2x )+(2x )
             =         +
             =        cm.
Q . Can you think of any shapes where
you would not need to measure every side
to calculate the perimeter.



          Answers please!
A regular hexagon would be six times
       the length of one side


  - its formula is   6xL
• LOOK at Activity Sheet 9.2

  Decide which shapes would need every side
  measuring and which ones could have short
  cuts.

  Write the letter for each shape in your book and
  next to it express the perimeter of that shape in
  words and in letters where appropriate.

e.g. Perimeter Shape A : Measure every side
                     B : Short cut
REMEMBER
When calculating the perimeter of a rectangle
we do not have to measure all four sides, only
two. We can then use the formula

           P = (2 x L) + (2 x B)

   or, if we use lower case letters….

            p = (2 x l) + (2 x b)
Calculate the perimeters of shapes D, E,
G and J.

Convert your answers to millimetres.

In each case write down the number of
sides you measured and show how you
worked out the perimeter.
By the end of the lesson children
should be able to:

Express the formula and calculate the
perimeter of a rectangle.
Day 4
                 L.O.1.
To be able to choose and use appropriate
  number operations to solve problems
               FOUR IN A ROW
                              Use Resource Sheet 9.2

Take turns with a partner to roll two 0 – 9 dice.

Any of the four number operations may be
applied to the numbers you roll e.g. if you roll a 6
and a 7 you could place counters on squares 42
( 6 x 7 ), 13 ( 6 + 7 ) and 1 (7 – 6 ).
The first person to get four in a row wins.
                    L.O.2
To understand, measure and calculate the
perimeter of rectangles and regular
polygons.
To be able to measure lines to the nearest
millimetre.
To be able to use, read and write standard
metric units of length, including their
abbreviations and relationships.
                      PROBLEM

A farmer is fencing off sections of land
using straight edges. For each section the
farmer uses 30 m. of wire. What different
shapes could each of the sections be?
Show at least 5 different shapes. In each
case show how you used the 30 m. of
wiring.
                                         10 minutes
I will ask you for your answers later!
• What kind of triangle is this and what is
  special about it?
• What kind of triangle is this and what is
  special about it?




 If the length of one side is 80 mm. what is the perimeter of this
 equilateral triangle in mm., in cm.?            Discuss in pairs.
One way to work out the answer is to use
the formula :


            P=3xL

Q. If a regular pentagon has a side of
   8 cm. what would its perimeter be?
Q. Where in real life do you think you
would need to calculate the perimeter of
something?

Q. If a rectangle has a perimeter of 20 cm.
what could be the lengths of its sides?

Q. If a regular hexagon has a perimeter of
75cm. What would the length of one side
be?
• Noe its your turn to invent some perimeter
  problems. Work with a partner but both of
  you write down all the problems you
  create. Try them on other people on your
  table.
• Prisms – 8 problems per pair.
• Spheres – 6 problems per pair
• Tetrahedra – 4 p. p. p.

                        8 minutes
By the end of the lesson the children
should be able to:
Work out and express in words a
formula for finding the perimeter of a
regular polygon.
Measure perimeters to the nearest
millimetre.
Day 5
                 L.O.1
To be able to convert larger to smaller
           units of measure
    (e.g. km. to m. and l. to ml. )
We are going to play the follow-on game.
       ……. quickly!
L.O.2
To be able to use knowledge of perimeter
and area to solve a given problem – and
explain methods and reasoning.
This square has a side of 20cm.


                             20cm.




                20cm.


Q. What is the perimeter of this square?
Q. What is the area of this square?
If the side of a square is 20cm. :

Its perimeter is 80cm.
( 20cm. + 20cm.+ 20cm. + 20cm)

Its area is 400 square cm.
(20cm. x 20cm.)
I have folded the square in half.


                      20cm.




             10cm.

Q. What is the area of the rectangle?
Q. What is the perimeter of the rectangle?
For the rectangle which has sides 20cm.
and 10cm. :

The area is L x B = 20cm. x 10cm.
                     = 200 square cm.

The perimeter is   2(L+B)
                    = 2 ( 20cm. + 10 cm.)
                    = 2 (30cm. )
                    = 60cm.
    I have folded the rectangle in half.

                             10cm.




                   10cm.




Q. What is the name and area of the shape now?
Q. What is the perimeter of the shape?
    The shape is now a square.


                          10cm.



                 10cm.


Its area is 10 cm. x 10 cm. = 100 square cm.
Its perimeter is 10cm. + 10cm. + 10cm. +10cm.
                           =40cm.
                 10cm.




       20cm.




Q. What has happened to the area of the original square?
Q. What’s happened to the perimeter of the original square ?
Q. What’s happened to the area / perimeter of the original
square?
Keep cutting out parts of the original square.

         You must keep the cuts
               PARALLEL
      to the edges of the original shape.

 What is happening to the area / perimeter
 of the square?
You should find that :


the perimeter stays the same

               but


      the area reduces.
I am using a line 60 cm. long to make
another square – Whoopee!




Q What is the perimeter / area of the square?
Using the same length of line I have made a
 rectangle.
Q. What is its area / perimeter?




                                  10cm.



                  20cm.
Yet another rectangle using the same
length of line.
Q. What is its area / perimeter?




                              12cm.




                    18cm.
        INVESTIGATIONS

How many different rectangles can you draw
which have a perimeter of :
   30cm. – prisms
   24cm. – spheres
   20cm. – tetrahedra
What is the biggest area you can make?


                        10 minutes !
Q. Did anyone use a system as they were
        working?

One way of working is to increase the length and at the
same time reduce the breadth like this :


   Perimeter          Length           Breadth
     24 cm.           11 cm.            1 cm.
     24 cm.           10 cm.            2 cm.
     24 cm.             9 cm.           3 cm.
We can extend this table:

Perimeter      Length         Breadth         Area
24 cm.         11 cm.           1 cm.       11 sq.cm.
24 cm.         10 cm.           2 cm.       20 sq.cm.
24 cm.          9 cm.           3 cm.       27 sq.cm.
24 cm.          8 cm.           4 cm.       32 sq.cm.


Q. What is the biggest area which can be made using a shape
      which has straight sides and a perimeter of 24cm.
The largest possible area for a shape with
straight sides and a perimeter of 24 cm. is
36 square cm.



                          6 cm.




               6 cm.
By the end of the lesson children
should be able to:
Use their knowledge of perimeter to
solve a problem.
Explain their methods and reasoning.
Realise the benefits of a systematic
approach when solving problems.

								
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