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					The Landing Page Brain Dump




    Google Cash Third Edition
         Special Report




           Jeremy Wilson
                 and
           Chris Carpenter
                                                           Table of Contents

Introduction..................................................................................................... 3
Questions and Answers................................................................................... 5
   1. What is a landing page? ......................................................................................................................... 5
   2. What should the landing page try to accomplish? I’m trying to offer a view of the product without
   repeating too much of the information from the product sales page.......................................................... 6
   3. What type of products do landing pages work best with? ..................................................................... 8
   4. When should you not use a landing page?............................................................................................. 8
   5. How long should the page be?............................................................................................................... 9
   6. What information should be on the page? ........................................................................................... 10
   7. Does a landing page increase sales? If so, how?.................................................................................. 11
   8. I would really appreciate you clarifying the differences between web pages, domain pages, sub-
   domain pages, and squeeze pages. Are they the same but named differently? Do they have the same
   purpose and importance? ......................................................................................................................... 11
   9. After testing a pay-per-click campaign, what results would you need to see before setting up a landing
   page to direct traffic to that and other merchant sites? ............................................................................ 12
   10. It seems that landing pages are a necessity but how often are they required? ................................... 13
   11. Do I need a landing page because the methods of a direct vendor are fading?.................................. 13
   12. There seems to be many sorts of landing pages. There are large comparison pages, single
   endorsement pages, name squeeze pages, the trusted “review” page, and pages with Ad Sense. It would
   be nice to see these classified with your thoughts regarding the effectiveness of each. .......................... 14
   13. Which type of landing page tends to show the highest conversion to sales and click through? ........ 17
   14. From your experience, what kinds of web designs sell your products most effectively? .................. 17
   15. What do you find to be the best and cheapest tool to build landing pages with?............................... 17
   16. How can I get templates?................................................................................................................... 18
   17. What is the best hosting company?.................................................................................................... 19
   18. What is a simple and cheap way of generating header graphics for landing pages?.......................... 20
   19. Do you incorporate opt-in forms on your landing pages or make name squeeze pages?................... 20
   20. Is it a good idea to extract visitors’ names and emails from landing pages before they go to the
   merchant?................................................................................................................................................. 21
   21. Would it be better to use an exit pop to collect them after they’ve been to the merchant’s site
   assuming that the merchant’s site opens in a separate window?.............................................................. 22
   22. What are the major components that all good landing pages should have?....................................... 22
   23. What’s the best layout for a landing page? ........................................................................................ 23
   24. How long do you make your landing pages? Should they be one screen dynamic sales pitches or
   sales letters spanning several screen lengths?.......................................................................................... 23
   25. How much info do you include on your landing page? ..................................................................... 24
   26. If the landing page is part of an existing website should it lead back to the home page, or do we
   structure it so that the user moves off our site ASAP? ............................................................................ 25


                                                    www.AdwordMentor.com                                                                                     1
  27. Should we leave normal navigation on a landing page or is it better to leave them stranded there? . 26
  28. What do you feel is the maximum number of affiliate links you can put on a single landing page
  before it gets excessive? .......................................................................................................................... 26
  29. Using a review format for your landing page, how do you get actual products in order to write an
  honest review without spending a fortune? ............................................................................................. 28
  30. Can I use parts of the ad copy from the product sales page without being in violation of copyright
  law? Do I need express permission from the sales page owner? ............................................................ 30
  31. Is it appropriate to make a buy now pitch with a link directly to order? Or is it best to have the
  landing page link to a more in depth sales page?..................................................................................... 30
  32. I often see rules in directories prohibiting the use of landing pages? Can you explain why they reject
  them? ....................................................................................................................................................... 31
  33. Do you make landing pages keyword specific?................................................................................. 31
  34. For the affiliate landing page do testimonials work or should they be left for the main sales page?. 32
  35. Is it advisable to add Ad Sense ads on the landing page? .................................................................. 32
  36. Do I need a different domain name for every landing page or can I use sub-domains or generic
  domain names for all reviews? ................................................................................................................ 33
  37. Can I use web domain names or sub-domain names that include the affiliate product name without
  being in copyright violation? ................................................................................................................... 33
  38. What about using the name Yahoo or Google in domain names, sub-domain names, keywords or
  landing page content? .............................................................................................................................. 34
  39. How do you create a landing page for multiple products? I sell (and he gives what he sells) which
  come in various sizes. How do I get people to buy the specific one out of about eight models that I
  currently sell? .......................................................................................................................................... 35
  40. Is it better to have just one page for each product with all the reviews, pictures, etc. or is it better to
  have a page where you promote a group of similar products?................................................................. 36
  41. What is a typical click through rate between my landing page and the sales page that I should aim
  for?........................................................................................................................................................... 37
  42. How much does click through rate to the merchant drop when you add a landing page? ................. 38
  43. How much does conversion rate increase when you add a landing page?......................................... 38
  44. How long is ideal for a visitor to stay on the landing page? Is length a factor in their decision to click
  links in your sales page? .......................................................................................................................... 39
  45. Does a hover ad on the landing page distract the visitor from clicking once more to reach the affiliate
  company’s sales page? We use a hover ad to collect email addresses for our newsletter....................... 40
  46. Is split testing your landing page something you recommend, or do people get confused if they see
  different web pages on one URL? ........................................................................................................... 41
  47. How do you track split testing, and what software tools are out there that you recommend for split
  testing?..................................................................................................................................................... 41
  48. How do you optimize landing pages to improve conversion rates?................................................... 43
  49. After the landing page has shown some good results, would you expand it into a several page
  website of related subjects or leave it as it is? ......................................................................................... 43

Best Practices for Using Landing Pages....................................................... 45
Appendices of Recommended Links ............................................................ 54


                                                    www.AffiliateJackpot.com                                                                                     2
Introduction
Hello and welcome to the landing page Q & A recording. My name is Jeremy Wilson,
and I’m working with Chris Carpenter, the author of Google Cash, to bring to you a
comprehensive Q & A session on landing pages from the affiliate marketer’s perspective.


Chris sent out an email to his list and asked you to submit your questions. We have
received several hundred different questions, and we’ve gone through them, taken out the
duplicates, compiled the best questions, and broken them down into topics. Hopefully,
we can bring to you today something that’s really going to help you take your affiliate
marketing business to the next level.


The Google Cash method is brilliantly simple. You don’t have to create a website; you
don’t have to create a landing page; you don’t have to have web hosting; you don’t have
to register a domain. The Google Cash techniques still work, but now Google restricts
the number of ads that can link to a particular domain for a given keyword phrase. This
improves the search experience because you’re not going to see five ads that all link to
Ebay.com. You’ll only be able to see one ad. As a result, affiliates can’t go into a
market and throw up a “copy cat ad” to be shown immediately.


Since there is still money to be made in these situations, professional affiliate marketers
are creating a unique url as a stopping point between their ad and the affiliate url that is
presumably already being used for a given keyword phrase. This is called a landing
page, and it’s just a one page site that you can send your traffic to and then from there to
the merchant. Since the landing page has a unique url, your ad can be displayed with an
ad that links directly to the merchant. Both ads will go to the same merchant, but Google
will only be displaying unique urls to the searcher.


Now the problem with this is that you have to create a web page; you have to host a url;
you have to buy a domain name, etc. So, it’s kind of a big step, and I resisted it for I
would say 6 to 9 months after the Google policy changes. It wasn’t until, I guess, around
September of ’05 that I really started to build landing pages in earnest. This has allowed


                              www.AdwordMentor.com                                        3
me to go into very, very competitive markets and bid on very high traffic key words that
are higher priced. I can compete with the high bidders in a lower page rank position even
though we both are leading to the same merchant. I don’t have to outbid them so I can
stay profitable all because of building the landing page.


This is a powerful technique, and I’m going to go into more details. Your ability to
penetrate into competitive markets is greatly enhanced by learning how to build and
implement landing pages. It can change things literally overnight once you understand
the power of a landing page.


So that’s my introduction. Now, I’m just going to briefly describe what a landing page
is, and then I’m going to hop right into answering the questions. We’ve compiled the
questions and grouped them by topic. I’m going to read the question, and I’m going to
answer it in a straightforward and informal way. I’m going to try to get to the meat and
answer the questions that you guys had, trying to be as specific as I can.


After the questions, I offer a summary of my strategies and best practices that I use when
going into a new market where I want to build a landing page. I’ll explain exactly what I
do to get the information that I need on the landing page. I’ll explain how to make it live
on the Internet and how to direct your ads to your landing page.


So here’s what I’m not going to cover. I’m not going to go into detail on how to use
HTML code to create a web page. I’m not going to go into detail on how to get a web
host and upload your files to your site. I’m not going to go into how to get incoming
links to your landing page, and I’m not going to go into how to setup auto responders and
email sequencers and that kind of thing. Although these are important concepts, they are
beyond the scope of this recording, and I want to stay focused on landing pages.


I’m going to talk about landing pages for pay-per-click advertising, not for search engine
optimization. The landing pages I discuss are strictly for pay-per-click campaigns on
Yahoo, Google, and any other pay-per-click search engine. They are for the purpose of



                               www.AffiliateJackpot.com                                  4
promoting your affiliate products.        This recording is made specifically for the
professional affiliate marketer.


Questions and Answers
So that’s it. I’m not big on fluff and hype, so let’s just hop right in. The first thing we
need to cover is:

1. What is a landing page?


A landing page is nothing more then a web page that you send traffic to from your pay-
per-click ads, from your Adwords ads. Now, what makes this different from the home
page of a website is that the page is created, tailored, and targeted to a specific segment
of your market, of your audience.


Just as an example, say you are a dog food affiliate. You are promoting some dog food
affiliate program, and you’re bidding on different terms like, “low fat dog food,” “lean
dog food,” “puppy dog food,” “older dog dog food.” When someone is searching for
puppy dog food, you’re going to want to have a web page on your site that deals
specifically with puppy dog food. When a person clicks on your ad, they are sent to this
page that gives them a little information, specifically about puppy food. It tells them why
having puppy dog food is necessary and benefits your puppy instead of giving them
normal dog food. On this page, you want to list your product options for just puppy dog
food.


You would not want the searcher to search for puppy dog food, see your ad, click on it,
only to be taken to a page that lists all the other types of dog foods that you sell for older
dogs, younger dogs, fat dogs, skinny dogs, or low energy dogs. You don’t want your
landing page to list all of those different products because it’s not what the person is
searching for. A landing page is designed to meet or exceed the expectations of the
searcher. You want to provide them with the most detailed, accurate information that
they could expect. The more accurately you can match a searcher’s expectations with
your landing page, the higher your conversions and the more sales you will make.


                               www.AdwordMentor.com                                         5
So design your landing page to meet the expectations of the searcher and provide them
the information that they need. Now with that said, does this mean that you need a
landing page for every keyword? No. Again in the dog food example, if you have a
group of keywords on puppy dog food, on older dog food, on lean dog food, and on
organic dog food, you want to have a landing page for each group of dog food tailored
just to that group of dog food.


Additionally, if you have a really, really good keyword that generates a majority of your
sales, you might want to look into creating a landing page specific to that keyword, but it
would not be a good use of your time to create a landing page for every single keyword,
especially if you’re talking hundreds or even thousands of keywords.


So that is what a landing page is. The next question is:

2. What should the landing page try to accomplish? I’m trying to offer a view of the
product without repeating too much of the information from the product sales page.


Well, that’s a two part question. Again, a landing page tries to provide the information
that the searcher expects. It tries to provide them as much information on the product or
service that they’re searching for and answer some of their questions, their concerns, or
their doubts about a specific product.


Take the Internet marketing industry as an example. Let’s think about someone who is
looking to make money online. I remember almost five years ago when I started to try
and figure out how to market online, my concern was that all the information in these
making-money products were scams. They were lies; it was just hype; it really couldn’t
happen to me.


So, what I would be looking for in this particular instance is a review of one product or
an overview of several products that would give me the inside scoop. This information is




                              www.AffiliateJackpot.com                                   6
good. You can say stuff like it’s not as simple as this person claims on their webpage, but
the theories and the practices are sound. It’s not a scam.


So basically, I would be looking for reassurance. I would be looking for confirmation
that my belief that it is possible is actually true. So, that’s what a landing page is for. It
is trying to allay their fears, it’s trying to reassure their deepest thoughts. Oh man, they
want it to work, they want to believe that it’s possible to make money online, and now
this guy confirms it. He confirms that it’s possible and that makes you feel good; it
makes you more likely to buy the product. A landing page is trying to answer their
questions, allay their fears, reassure them, get rid of their skepticism, that sort of thing.


As far as writing a review without repeating too much of the information from the
product sales page, remember that the sales page is meant to sell, and they’re normally
full of hype. If I’m directing to a sales page that is a long form letter and already has a lot
of hype, what I do is I look for second hand opinions, third party opinions.


If I were looking to review Google Cash, for instance, I would type in Google Cash
Reviews, Google Cash Opinions, Google Cash thoughts, Google Cash first impressions,
Google Cash true or false, Google Cash scam, etc. I would look to see the responses and
the information that I found in the search results, and a lot of times that will take you to
forums related to the market that you’re in. You can then take this information, not steal
it, not copy it word for word, but reorganize it to give an inside look into what the
product is and what it truly offers without necessarily buying the product or buying every
single product that you’re looking to review.


You’ll be able to discover people’s doubts. You’ll be able to find the type of questions
people want answered. You’ll be able to read the opinions of those who own the product
and have enjoyed it. You’ll also learn what they did not liked and that is where you build
the basis for your review. You take that information and write a review based on that.




                                www.AdwordMentor.com                                            7
I don’t copy too much from the sales page other than if I was listing features, benefits, or
that sort of thing. You can take that information, but, as far as what the product is, the
sales page is going to be very, very biased. When you write the review, you want to list
both the good and bad things because no product is perfect. Very rarely does something
deserve a 10 out of a 10, 5 stars, etc. because nothing is perfect. There’s always a down
side to something. So when you’re writing the review, you want to list the good and the
bad.

3. What type of products do landing pages work best with?


Landing pages work well with just about any product that you can compare or review. It
works with just about everything. Now, as far as a review type site where I review
mortgage or insurance quote sites, I haven’t used landing pages. Maybe that’s something
someone could try and test. I don’t know how well it works for things like that, but they
work for anything else. They work for information products, software products, digital
cameras, picture frames, TV’s, etc. Landing pages work with pretty much anything.


I know that’s kind of broad, but it’s true. You can pre-sell and use a landing page for just
about any product. It doesn’t necessarily have to be a review site. If someone’s looking
for a steel, brushed metal, 8 x 10 picture frame, you can send them to a landing page
where it just has a bunch of 8 x 10 brushed steel picture frames and lists the prices from
lowest to highest or something like that. It will work because people, for a product like
that, aren’t so much worried about whether it’s going to work because it’s a picture
frame, it holds a picture. It’s going to do its job. Some people are going to want to buy
the nicest one. Some people are looking for the lowest price. In this case, a price
comparison landing page will work well.

4. When should you not use a landing page?


Like I said, for me personally, I use a landing page for just about any market I’m in now,
but at the same time, I always do a test against sending my ad directly to the merchant.
Sometimes, if you happen to stumble onto a group of keywords and a group of products



                              www.AffiliateJackpot.com                                    8
that has very little competition, you can still send your ads directly to the merchant. It’s
increasingly rare these days, but sometimes people do stumble onto very good markets
that are completely untapped.


In most cases, however, there’s already going to be somebody sending traffic directly to
the merchant. Whether it’s the merchant themselves or one of their affiliates, you’ll end
up in a bidding war. This typically occurs if a merchant’s page converts extremely well.
I’m talking in the 2 to 4 percent conversion range.


So you enter a market where there’s already somebody sending traffic to the merchant
page. Your ad starts showing because you’re bidding higher. The competitor is going to
bid higher so that their ad is showing again. You’re going to bid higher again, and pretty
soon, you’re in a bidding war. Now, this great converting product that was real profitable
becomes less profitable because you’re spending so much per click.


Now, if you use a landing page, your domain is unique so both ads can be displayed
because your ad sends them to a pre-sale page and then on to the merchant. You can bid
less per click, so I always use a landing page. With that said, if you’re the only affiliate
and your ad is showing and the merchant converts well, don’t use a landing page.


It is still possible to link your Adwords ads directly to a merchant’s sales page. It still
works because in my original campaigns that I started about three years ago now, I’m still
linking directly to the merchant. Even these days, the first thing that I do in a market is
test linking directly to the merchant, but most every time, after testing, I go with a
landing page. I’m going to go into more of this when I get into conversion rates and that
kind of thing, but I do test the merchant out, that is a direct link to the merchant, if I can,
and then I try a landing page.

5. How long should the page be?


Well, it just depends. There’s no set length. You could have a page that’s as simple as
having a little header graphic, a headline, a two paragraph introduction, a list of the


                                 www.AdwordMentor.com                                        9
products, and a one or two paragraph review with your links. All total, it will be about
one or two pages in links if you were to print it out.


That said, I have 8, 9 and 10 page landing pages where it’s almost kind of like a sales
letter unto itself. It’s just something to test. There’s no rule of thumb. If you want to see
how long it should be, just do a search on the keywords, and see what your competition is
up to. See what kind of landing pages they’re using and how long they are because they
work if they’re advertising. So that’s just one of those questions you can’t put a definite
answer on. To be kind of sarcastic about it, I guess it would be as long as it needs to be
because there’s no set rule.

6. What information should be on the page?


You want to have a good headline that restates the idea of your ad, that tells them what
they’re going to get, that describes what your landing page is about. Then you want to
have some sort of introduction that tells them why they need these products, why they
need to compare, what things they need to look out for, the good and the bad of the
industry. You can also mention that some products are faulty, some products are this,
some products are that. If you’re reviewing, give them an overview of the pros and cons
of your products. Finally, you want to list the products.


If you are reviewing a particular treadmill that you own and that you get great results
with, just tell them what you liked about it. Tell them how you lost weight with it, how
it’s given you more energy just by working on the treadmill for 10 minutes a day, or
something like that.


Again, it’s open to interpretation. Without question, you need a good headline because
that’s what captures and sucks people into your page. You need a product and you need a
link to the merchant. Those are things that you definitely need, but as far as the specific
content there’s no specific things that should or should not be included.




                               www.AffiliateJackpot.com                                   10
Take a few of the top keywords in the market that you’re in, do a search and see what
your competition is doing. Look at what information is included in their pages because
that’s the information that you need at a minimum. You know because your competitor
wouldn’t be spending money advertising that page if it didn’t work and if that wasn’t the
type of information people wanted to see. So, the simplest way is to just see what your
competition is doing. And you’re probably going to hear me say that about another 900
million times on this call because that is how you know.

7. Does a landing page increase sales? If so, how?


Yes without question.


The reason is that your confirming or contradicting people’s ideas. You’re relieving their
fears; you’re increasing their fears; you’re giving them more insight into the product;
you’re letting them know it’s not a scam; you’re letting them know it doesn’t work;
you’re letting them know that it’s high quality; you’re letting them know that the product
is low quality; you’re letting them know that it’s made cheaply; you’re letting them know
that it looks good, that it’s functional, whatever the product may be. You’re just giving
them more information and more insight into the product. People want information, and
people want to know that the things that they want and the things that they’re going to
buy are good and that they’re good choices. That’s what a landing page does.               It
reconfirms or affirms their thoughts and ideas about a product. So that’s how it can
increase conversions.


Here’s the next question:

8. I would really appreciate you clarifying the differences between web pages, domain
pages, sub-domain pages, and squeeze pages. Are they the same but named differently?
Do they have the same purpose and importance?


Well, a web page is just any page on a website. Domain pages and sub-domain pages are
pretty much all the same thing. A squeeze page is a little different in that the purpose of a
squeeze page is to force a person to give you their name and email address before they go


                              www.AdwordMentor.com                                        11
on to your product review site, product comparison site, pre-sale page or whatever. So the
purpose of a squeeze page is a little different.


Web pages, domain pages, and sub-domain pages, can all be landing pages.                 The
difference is that a landing page is specifically targeted to a certain product line, customer
type, or customer expectation. You have control over where you send people because
you’re paying for your ads and your keywords, and you can target them to the page of
your choice. So, all those are web pages and any of them can be a landing page. I hope
that answers that.


A web page, a domain page, and a sub-domain page are just web pages. A landing page
is also just a web page, but it is a web page that where you control who you send there
and who sees that page. That’s the difference.

9. After testing a pay-per-click campaign, what results would you need to see before
setting up a landing page to direct traffic to that and other merchant sites?


If I’m sending traffic directly to a merchant, and I’m getting sales but not breaking even
or I’m making a profit or I’m making a big profit, I’m still going to test a landing page
because there’s always the possibility and the probability that a landing page is going to
convert traffic even better than linking directly to the merchant. So there’s no particular
result that I need to see because if the campaign is doing poorly, if I’m not making any
sales or making very few sales, it doesn’t mean the product isn’t good. It just means the
message on the merchant site is not what people want to hear. They want get a little
more information about a product or another opinion, so a landing page there could prove
to increase sales.


Now if, on the other hand, I’m already getting a lot of sales, there’s always the thought in
the back of my mind that, “Wow! If I’m getting a lot of sales just by sending them
directly to the merchant, I might be able to get even more sales by sending them to a
landing page.” So in either case, I’m going to try a landing page because I know from
experience that they work.



                               www.AffiliateJackpot.com                                    12
If you’ve never built a landing page, if you’ve never used a landing page, it’s kind of
hard to understand that. For those of you who have used landing pages, you know what I
mean. I cannot believe the power of a simple one page site or just having a landing page
that is tailored to a specific product. They generate sales like crazy most of the time. Of
course, you do have to have a good product, and you have to have a keyword list, but
landing pages are so powerful that I would try them regardless of the results you’ve had
sending your ads directly to the merchant.

10. It seems that landing pages are a necessity but how often are they required?


Well again, they aren’t necessary. You can always link directly to the merchant, and you
can still make money that way. Because Google only displays one ad per domain, you’re
going to face more competition trying to show up for a specific URL with multiple
affiliates. Sometimes the merchants are even promoting that domain.


So landing pages are not necessary, and they’re not required. It’s just easier to rule out
that part of the equation by not having to worry about competing with other people to
show for the same domain. I just get my own domain and run traffic there. So they’re
not mandatory, but you’re going to have to bid higher to show for a specific domain
because of the affiliate competition to link to a single merchant’s domain for a given
keyword phrase. This leads nicely into the next question,

11. Do I need a landing page because the methods of a direct vendor are fading?


In one sense, you can say they’re fading, but typically the market niche is just more
competitive. When you’re linking directly to a merchant in a competitive market, you
have to worry about somebody coming in and replacing your ad because they’re bidding
higher on the same domain as you are. I don’t have to worry about that because I’ve built
landing pages. If you’re in a campaign for the long term, you should use landing pages
and not rely exclusively on linking directly to the vendor.




                              www.AdwordMentor.com                                      13
I think that’s just a change that needs to be made. It’s an evolution of the Google Cash
Method. It’s important to understand that the original Google Cash Method works. It
still works, but you can have greater success and face less competition if you just use
your own landing page because you are in control of your own destiny so to speak,
instead of relying on Google’s limitations for one ad per domain. I hope that answers
that question.


That finishes up the “What is a Landing Page?” segment, and we’re now going to move
right in to the different types of landing pages.

12. There seems to be many sorts of landing pages. There are large comparison pages,
single endorsement pages, name squeeze pages, the trusted “review” page, and pages
with Ad Sense. It would be nice to see these classified with your thoughts regarding the
effectiveness of each.


This is a great question! To me, large comparison pages are something like what you
find at Shopping.com, Bizrate, or even Amazon. These sites just list a ton of different
products on a bunch of different pages. I consider it a review site for everything.


I’m not saying that they don’t work but, first and foremost, building something large like
this will take a huge amount of time because you’re trying to include all the products in a
particular market or in a particular market segment to compare in a list. That just takes
too much time and you are giving people too many choices. It confuses them and
overwhelms them and it makes them less likely to buy. So, for me, a large comparison
like this is not that effective, and they take way too much time to build. I’m not sure if
this is what that person had in mind, but if it is, I don’t use them.


The single endorsement page works really well, specifically for information products.
Examples are Internet marketing products or even an e-book on dog training. The single
endorsement page works especially best when you give the pros and cons of a product
from your own experience. For example, you or someone you know has owned the
product, and you can describe tangible, real-world results. You describe how you used
the products successfully to train your dog or to lower your cholesterol in the case of a


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book on health and cholesterol. If it’s a recipe book, you explain how you followed the
recipes and served them at a dinner party or something. Just to give a real world
example, a twist, and make it sound authentic and genuine. Single endorsement pages
work. They work very well, so I do recommend them if there’s just one product that you
want to focus on and write a review about.


I’m going to skip the name squeeze page for now and move onto the “trusted review”
page. A review site is made by writing a little 2 to 3 paragraph review on each of
between 3 and 10 products. I like to use these, and they’re easy to make. It doesn’t give
a person too many choices, but it does show enough. What it really helps to do is show
enough unbiasness that people see that they have a range of options. You’re not harping
on how great one product is. Obviously, one product is going to be ranked number one,
but you still give good trustworthy reviews on other products. People like to look and
compare; that’s just how it is.


When I go into Best Buy, my favorite store, I just look around. A sales person comes
over and asks me if I want help. I say, “No, I’m just comparing prices, finding options,
and reading the backs of all these boxes.” People like to look, compare, and come to
their own conclusions. That’s what a “trusted review” page does or more accurately,
that’s what a “mini-review” page does. That’s why they do better, in my experience, than
the single endorsement page. When you write exclusively about one single product, and
you go on and on about it, whether it’s genuine or not, people become skeptical. They
think, “Why are they just so hung up on this one product? What about all these other
ones that are out here? Are they not good?” It can potentially raise more questions than
it answers. So I prefer the “trusted review” page and that’s what I use almost exclusively.


The name squeeze page again is a page that tries to capture, at a minimum, a first name
and email address before you send the visitor on to the merchant site. You entice them
with a free report, a free video, a free email course, or maybe a coupon of some sort.




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I don’t have a whole lot of experience using the name squeeze pages. That doesn’t mean
I don’t collect email addresses, but the times I’ve tried to use a name squeeze page, I
haven’t been too successful with them. The name squeeze pages work because plenty of
people are using them. You can assume that the people who are using them have tested
them and have made sure that they work. I don’t use them because, so far, I haven’t
found the secret sauce, or the best technique, to capture name and email for the particular
products that I promote.


For instance, I still promote a lot in the insurance and the mortgage industry. I haven’t
found a way to force people to sign up for my email course, or my bribe, before they go
on to fill out 3 or 4 pages of information to get an insurance quote. In this type of market,
name squeeze is not going to work very well. Maybe someone out there has figured it
out. If they have, they deserve their success. I just haven’t brainstormed the subject that
much or tested it enough to see if it works. I’m not going to tell you something that I’ve
never tested personally.


The last type of landing page is designed to promote Ad Sense campaigns. I don’t send
traffic through Adwords to pages specifically designed to capture Ad Sense. There are
people that do that, and I see it all the time. But again, that’s just something I don’t do. I
do have Ad Sense on some of my pages to capture some secondary income and that
works but the purpose of my landing pages is to sell my affiliate products, not to get Ad
Sense clicks.


So out of the five types of landing pages that I’ve discussed, the “trusted review” page is
the one I’ve used the most. I’ve also used the single endorsement page, but I don’t often
use the other three. So, that’s my first hand experience.


Now that I’ve said that, everyone will go out and make those kinds. Those of you who
are successful with the other types of pages will clean up because you’ve found a niche
that has done very well for you.




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Because of my previous comments, the next question has mostly been covered.

13. Which type of landing page tends to show the highest conversion to sales and click
through?


For me, the highest conversions come from the “trusted review” page where you compare
and review 3 to 10 products and just link to them with your affiliate links.

14. From your experience, what kinds of web designs sell your products most effectively?


Take your keywords, and put them in a search engine. Look at what your competition is
doing. Look at the types of sites and the types of landing pages that are used, specifically
by those who are affiliates. That’s the quickest, easiest, most effective way to find out
the type of landing page that you should build. It’s not glamorous. It’s not secret. It’s not
amazing. It’s not a break through in marketing, but that is what I do. And I do it every
day, and I do it every week. I just spy on my competition. And that will tell you the best
design to make. Don’t try to reinvent the wheel, don’t try to be the flashiest, don’t try to
be the best looking because ugly websites do sell.


If you spend all your time trying to make the best site, you’ll end up with a site that never
gets put out there and put into use. So for the best kind of design, just spy on your
competition. I can’t state that enough. If there’s one thing that you get from this call, it
is to spy on your competition. Again, SPY on your COMPETITION and you’ll get
results much faster, much more quickly.


In the next set of questions, I will discuss tools and resources.

15. What do you find to be the best and cheapest tool to build landing pages with?


I use Front Page, and I wouldn’t exactly say that it is the cheapest or the best product out
there. There’s Dream Weaver, and there’s XSite Pro. I’ve never used XSite Pro, but a
lot of people love that tool and think it’s a great tool for building web pages, especially
for affiliate marketers. If you know HTML, I would just go to Google, go to Yahoo



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whatever search engine you use and type in, free HTML editor, free web page creator,
free web page editor, and you’ll be able to find some free tools for building a landing
page.


But the tool that I use, and that I’ve used since the first version came out in 1997 and ever
since then is Front Page. I use Microsoft Front Page. It’s not necessarily because it’s the
best and the greatest and the easiest to use, but it’s the one that I’ve been using now for 8
or 9 years. I’m comfortable with it, and I know it pretty well and how to build pages with
it. So, the best for me is Front Page.


Others will disagree. Some people hate Front Page and use Dream Weaver. With Dream
Weaver or Front Page, you can’t go wrong. Again, XSite Pro is good, and if you’re
looking for a free one, just do a search for free web page editor or something like that on
Google. You’ll find a lot of choices.

16. How can I get templates?


Man, just get templates anywhere. If you’re looking for just web templates in general,
you can go to Template Monster. They have tons and tons of web templates. You also
have The Template Store, let me see, and there are probably plenty of free web templates
out there that you can use.


Now, if you’re looking for specific templates for landing pages, surely you can do a
search on landing page templates, that kind of thing, or you can just borrow the design of
your competition.


Obviously, you can’t copy someone’s design. You can’t steal their design because it’s
wrong, and if you happen to copy my design, I report you. I have no problem with that.
Some people might think that is being mean and too aggressive, but if I’m in a market
and I’ve researched that sucker and I’ve built my landing page and someone comes along
and blatantly copies it, I don’t know? If you see some elements of your landing page
borrowed but presented in their own way and in their own words, there’s not too much


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you can do, but if someone just copies and pastes my words and my design, then I report
them. I’ve no problem doing that. I’ll report them to Google; I’ll contact them and tell
them, “Hey you’re stealing my stuff.” That doesn’t happen too often. It’s only happened
on a couple of occasions.


But how can you get templates? Just look at what your competition is doing and most of
the time the website is nothing more then a white background with a black border around
it and a couple of graphics and some text. They don’t have to be anything great and
professional looking, but Template Monster, and The Template Store are good places to
start. You can do some searches for free web templates and that sort of thing. They’re
out there. There are so many places you can get web templates.


Again, these are all kind of very broad questions, but I just wanted to give you my
thoughts on the things that I use for these tools and resources. That leads to another very
broad, very open ended question.

17. What is the best hosting company?


Now there’s thousands upon thousands of hosting companies out there. The two that I
use, not necessarily because they’re the best or the cheapest, are iPowerWeb and
HostExcellence. They’re just the two that I use. I use iPowerWeb, and it’s as cheap as
$7 or $8 a month, if you buy a year’s hosting, or it’s like $10 a month if you pay month
to month. So, I use iPowerWeb for just about everything. I also use HostExcellence, and
they allow multiple domains to be hosted from one account. They’re pretty reasonable. I
can’t think of the price off hand, but it’s a pretty decent price. Their uptime is good, and
their server response is pretty good. So, those are the two that I use, iPowerWeb and
HostExcellence, and I’ve been happy with them.


Again, there are just tons and tons of web hosts, and you’re going to find different
opinions. I can’t say that they’re the best, but I’ve been pleased with them and have not
had any problems. So those are the two that I use.




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18. What is a simple and cheap way of generating header graphics for landing pages?


The easiest way that I’ve found, not necessarily the best way or the prettiest header
graphics, is Header Generator. You know Armand Morin, who is considered a guru in
the industry without question, has a product called Header Generator. I don’t know if he
has resale rights to this product or not, but you can go to Header Generator and use it to
create header graphics. They look pretty decent. They’re pretty generic, but I’ve used
the product. I don’t use it that much anymore because I don’t use header graphics on my
landing pages too much.       I’ve created my own where I’ve used Photoshop.          I’ve
outsourced them, and I used ProEcovers. They’re reasonably priced. The graphics were
good, and they were custom graphics. Header Generator is $67, and you can make pretty
decent looking graphics with it. It’s just a template based system. So, that’s probably the
cheapest way, and it’s simple. So that’s just a resource that I’ve used in the past. And
that’s all of the questions in the tools and resources section.


Next, we’re going to go over e-mail and name capture. Hopefully, I’m not breezing
through these too fast. The next question is,

19. Do you incorporate opt-in forms on your landing pages or make name squeeze
pages?


I don’t use name squeeze pages. That does not mean they don’t work, but I don’t use
them.


Do you incorporate opt-in forms on your landing page? Yes, I do. I normally will put an
opt-in form at the bottom, the very bottom of the page. I found that putting an opt-in
form at the very bottom of my landing pages, more often than not, rarely effects
conversion rate. My thinking behind this is that if someone gets to the end of your page
and they’ve skimmed over everything or they’ve read over everything, they might not
necessarily be ready to buy, or they might not be interested right now. So I might as well
try to capture their email to build a list and follow up with them over time. It’s worked
very well, and it doesn’t affect conversion rates. So, you have nothing to lose. I’ve



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practiced and tested things, putting them in the middle of the page, putting them in the
top of the page and that sort of thing. I’ve found, as far as affecting conversions, the
bottom of the page rarely does that. You don’t get as many opt-ins as you would if you
put it at the middle or top of the page, but that’s where I put the opt-in forms on my
landing pages for affiliate products.


Of course, people that are big email marketers would say that you get the name no matter
what, but I’m not big in email marketing. I’m big into affiliate marketing, and I put it at
the bottom and collect email addresses there.

20. Is it a good idea to extract visitors’ names and emails from landing pages before they
go to the merchant?


Again, this is the name squeeze technique where you force people to give you their name
and email before you send them to landing pages. Again, test it and try it. To be honest,
I’ve never seen a single affiliate that uses a landing page to force people to opt in. You
take that for what it’s worth. It doesn’t mean that it doesn’t work, but my theory is that
when you’re an affiliate, you’re working with smaller profit margins. You need to get as
much traffic as you can to your landing page in an effort to convert people onto the
merchant. If you add another level, the name squeeze, basically what you have is three
levels a person must go through. After they click on your ad, they have to go to the name
squeeze page, and then they have to go to your landing page after that, and then they have
to go on to the merchant.


Now, you could make the name squeeze page your landing page. They click on your ad;
you get them to sign up; and then after they sign up, you take them to the merchant. You
can take that extra level out, but I’ve never seen anybody do it. That doesn’t mean it’s
not being done because I’m obviously not in every market, but in the markets I’m in, I’ve
never seen anybody do that. It could be that we’re all terrified to test, or we haven’t
tested it enough. We haven’t perfected the technique, and it’s something that I should try
more. It’s the one area in my marketing that I’m not extremely strong on. I don’t mind
mentioning that because we all have room to grow in our marketing efforts, myself



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included. That’s the long convoluted way to say that I’m sure it works, but I haven’t
tested it first hand. You should try it. Do as I say not as I do in this case, but again, I’ve
never forced anyone to opt-in.

21. Would it be better to use an exit pop to collect them after they’ve been to the
merchant’s site assuming that the merchant’s site opens in a separate window?


You can’t use pop ups with Adwords. You could use the hover pop up ads that are really
just part of the HTML page on your landing page, but you can’t use an exit pop up when
you’re sending someone to the merchant. It’s against Google’s rules. You may be able
to get it to work for a while, but eventually, they find out that there’s a pop up on the
page, and they’ll turn your ad off until you fix it. So people use hover pop ups, and I’ve
seen those used in my market. I don’t use them, I just stick to the opt-in form at the
bottom of the page, and it’s not my primary focus to collect the email addresses.


I think that’s all the email related questions. Okay, these are content related questions,
and I have more questions on this than anything. I’ll just go over stuff that you should
include or have on your landing page.

22. What are the major components that all good landing pages should have?


I think a landing page must have a good headline, a strong headline in bigger, bolder,
broader text then anything else on the page. At the very top of the page, you should have
a strong introductory paragraph. I think you need to use the introductory paragraphs to
set expectations for the person, to let people know who you are, why you’re doing the
reviews, why you should be considered credible, etc. You don’t word it like, “I’m
credible because…” Just tell them how you tested things or why you tested things. They
need to know that you’re comparing these products.


You need to have that kind of information to set people’s expectations. You obviously
need the reviews, but those are the major components. You have to have a good headline
and a good strong introduction. Write a good review that is not all praise and cheer. If
there’s clearly a product that is better, tell them why it’s better, but also say, “Here are a


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couple of drawbacks about the product.” List a couple of bad things, not so glowing
things about the product.

23. What’s the best layout for a landing page?


Again, look at your competition. I know that it sounds like a cop out answer, but if you
look and see what your competitors are doing, here’s what you get. You are able to
mooch off or borrow from their experience. They’re in the market. They’ve been there.
They’re spending money, and they continue to spend money on their keywords while
sending people to that landing page.


Now, if they’re doing that and they’re doing it day in and day out, wouldn’t it stand to
reason that that page, its layout, and its style is working for them? So, if that’s the case,
then why not base your layout and design on what they’re doing. That is truly the best
way. I’ll tell you that I base all the stuff I do initially on what my competition is already
doing because it saves me from having to test a ton of stuff. It saves me from having to
spend all this time trying to think of a great design. I base my layout on that of my
competitors, and from there, I will test and tweak things to come up with a better landing
page. But very rarely does that testing and tweaking take me very far away from the
original layout and design.


So again, just look at your competition. It’s so simple and absurd that it can easily be
discounted as just every day, basic information, but truly, I urge you to see what your
competition is doing. I can’t stress that enough.

24. How long do you make your landing pages? Should they be one screen dynamic
sales pitches or sales letters spanning several screen lengths?


The length of your landing page is again open to interpretation. Look at your competition
and see what they’re doing. I’ve found that very rarely is it just one screen in length.
Rarely does everything fit on this screen and is above the fold. What I mean by “above
the fold” is that everything that a person needs to see can be seen without a person having
to scroll down on the landing page using the scroll bars.


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I do make sure that my headline and the first sentence or two of my introductory
paragraphs are above the fold, but I rarely have everything above the fold. Generally, my
pages are 3 or 4 pages in length. That includes all my paragraphs and all my reviews.
Again, I’ve found that compared to my competitors, I normally have much longer
paragraphs, introductions, and overviews that are located above my reviews then my
competitors do. Through the testing I’ve done, I split test everything, longer seems to do
better. I’m not writing 3 or 4 pages when my competition might have three very short 2
or 3 line paragraphs. I might have 3 or 4, 6 to 7 line paragraphs which is about three
times the length of what my competition is doing. It converts better then having the
shorter paragraphs with much less information.


Again, the length of your landing pages is really open to interpretation. My pages
normally go several screen lengths to several pages. I don’t make them one page or one
screen in length.

25. How much info do you include on your landing page?


How much info, again goes back to length. As far as a review, I’m going to do between
one and two paragraphs, at least five or six lines in length for the review. Some are much
longer. I have one review that’s almost a page length for each product. This particular
market requires a lot more pre-selling, and I found that people want a lot more
information about this particular product then just a couple of sentences on it.


Again, just look at what your competition is doing. If you do a search or a series of
searches and you see a particular affiliate site whose product descriptions are just 3 or 4
lines in length and if they have a link to the merchant and that’s all they have and you see
that same site there day after day, week after week, then you know it’s working. Either
that or they’re just dumb. And by working, that does not mean that they’re making $10
for every $1 they spend. The reality is that sometimes you may spend $1 and you make
$1.50 back and your profit is $.50 for every dollar you spend. That could be the reality,




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especially in a very competitive market, but it is profitable. It just depends on what your
expectations for profitability are.


If you’re in very competitive markets, don’t expect to make $3 to $4 for every dollar you
spend because the bid prices are higher. The reality is you might make $.25 to $.50 for
every dollar you spend, but the volume is so high and the number, the demand for the
products is so high that you could still make $600, $700, $800 a day in profit even with
lower profit margins. So that’s getting off topic, but it’s important to remember just
because you see someone in these high traffic, competitive markets day in and day out,
doesn’t mean they’re making $4,000 to $5,000 a day in profit. They might be willing to
take lower profit margins as long as it is profitable.


Getting back to information, just see what your competition is doing. If you take that
advice you will see your profits grow. I guarantee it. Next question:

26. If the landing page is part of an existing website should it lead back to the home page,
or do we structure it so that the user moves off our site ASAP?


On my landing page, I link to no other part of my site, if it’s a multi-page site. I link to
no other website that I might own at all. Every single link that heads out from my site is
an affiliate link that goes to the merchant or an Ad Sense link. I try to get people to
spend as little amount of time as possible on my page and get to the merchant as soon as
possible. I have no leaks or holes that can lead people out to places that are unrelated, to
other pages that are untargeted or to other sites where I can’t potentially earn an affiliate
commission of some sort. So, I have no navigation so to speak. As far as an “About Us”
page, I might have a contact form if people have questions, but I don’t send them to other
product pages or anything. It’s all about getting every person to click on my affiliate
link, go to the merchant, and make the purchase.


Ok, next question:




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27. Should we leave normal navigation on a landing page or is it better to leave them
stranded there?


Well, you’re not leaving them stranded, but you’re only giving them the option to either
leave your page altogether, leave your site altogether, or go on to the merchant. That’s
the kind of focus you need. You don’t want to get them browsing and clicking around to
all these different pages because eventually they’re going to get off on a tangent that’s
completely unrelated to their original search.


Think about when you’re surfing the web, and you do a search, looking for something in
particular. At first you’re pretty targeted. You’re pretty zoned in on what you’re looking
for, but all it takes is just one link, one article, or one headline about something else or
something that’s kind of related, and you click on that and an hour later you’re on to
something completely different.      You’ve lost focus of your original search and the
information that you were originally looking for. That’s why you don’t want to confuse
people or give people the option to just browse around to different pages on your site.


A landing page should be focused in that it’s trying to either capture an email, if you’re
using the name squeeze technique, or you’re trying to get them to go on to the merchant.
You have to be focused singularly on one purpose which is to get the sale. That’s why I
never use navigation to other sites that I own or other pages on a site. It’s all about
getting people to click on my affiliate link.

28. What do you feel is the maximum number of affiliate links you can put on a single
landing page before it gets excessive?


One review-landing page of mine has five products on it, and it’s got at least 50 affiliate
links. That’s no joke. I have links all over the place, and it’s not done in a way that’s
messy or excessive looking. They’re all placed in the right spots. If I have a picture of a
product, I make that picture clickable, and it has my affiliate link on it. People click on
images. Just think about all the things you browse around clicking on. Anything that a
person could potentially click on, I have a link to it. So if it’s a screen shot of the
product, if it’s an e-book cover, if it’s a CD box, if it’s a picture of a treadmill, if it’s a


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picture of a sports jersey, etc. that picture is clickable with my affiliate link, and it sends
them to the page where they can buy that product.


Under the image, I also have a link to the product. In my review, I might have several
links to the product. If I do a comparison chart, I have links to the product there. In my
introductory paragraph or paragraphs, I normally have a link or two to the top product
that I’m trying to sell. At the bottom of the page, I might restate my top product choice,
and I have a link there. 50 links may sound excessive, but if you have 10 images for 10
different products, that’s 10 links right there. If you put a link under each image to get
people to click on that, that’s 10 more links so that’s 20 links. If you have one link in
every review for 10 products, that’s another 10 links, so that’s 30 links right there. That’s
3 links for each product. So, you can quickly get a ton of links. I don’t know about the
maximum number of affiliate links, but if you have every other word highlighted in a
link, it looks bad. It looks excessive, so spread your links out, and use some in text links.
That’s where you say, “The top product is the Pro Tulone 750 Treadmill,” and you’re just
talking about it in a sentence. You want to make that clickable.


When you use standard text links, mix up how you use them. Say, “Click here to
download this e-book” or in the next link you might say, “If you would like to begin
maximizing your Adwords traffic, check out this book.” It’s worded differently. You
want to try and appeal to different mindsets with your link text. Also mix in graphic
images as links and that sort of thing.


So, I don’t know the maximum number of links, but I do know that generally people
don’t have enough links on their page because they are afraid to ask for the sale, they’re
afraid to ask people to click away, etc. It’s okay to ask for the sale. It’s okay to ask
people, to nudge people, or to kind of push people to do what you want them to do. Tell
them what you want them to do. Tell them that you want them to click here. Tell them
to visit this site. Tell them to check out this offer. It’s okay. That’s the purpose; it’s
okay to ask for that. It’s not going to offend people unless you make it excessive, and by




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excessive, I mean having 200 links with only 100 words of text. Don’t over do it. Do it
tastefully.

29. Using a review format for your landing page, how do you get actual products in
order to write an honest review without spending a fortune?


This is a great question, and I touched on this a little earlier. If it’s a software or
information product, chances are that you can probably purchase it. If I’m reviewing four
$30 software products or e-books or something like that, I will normally buy them and
use them myself. Then, I write a little bit about my first hand experience. Another thing
that you can do if you’re talking about buying relatively inexpensive products is buy
them and post a job on Elance or some site such as that and say, “Hey look, I have these
four products, I want you to review them.” You let them do the reviews for you. I’ve
done that.


Now, if you don’t want to buy anything or you don’t have the money to buy anything,
simply do searches for reviews that other people have done. Search for dog training
reviews, dog training e-book reviews, etc. Type in the specific title of the e-book and add
“review” after it or “opinions.” For example, try “thoughts on Google Cash,” “Opinions
on Google Cash,” that sort of thing. Go to industry related forums and search to see what
people’s opinions and thoughts are. Collect that information, and you can base your
reviews on that information.


Someone is going to say, “Well I loved it because of this. It gave me this kind of
information. I got this kind of advice from it. It was good.” That’s what someone got
from that. The next guy that posts might say, “Well yeah, that was good, but I really
didn’t like how it was laid out. It was kind of confusing how the information was
presented.” With that you could write a review that says:


        I learned how to train my dog rather easily, and I really enjoyed the technique on
        how they suggested using dog biscuits to quickly get a dog to do what you wanted
        them to do.   But at the same time, we found that how the information was



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       organized was a little confusing and wasn’t very intuitive. So we had to search
       around for the specific information that we needed.


And there you go. There’s a real quick, brief, short, concise review of the product and
you can just base your reviews on other people’s experiences that are posted online. For
almost every product, someone has reviewed it or stated their opinion on it. You just
have to do a little searching.


If you’re selling physical products, for example, and you’re using Commission Junction
to promoting exercise bikes, obviously, you can’t go out and buy five different exercise
bikes. You can’t go around and find somewhere where you can ride and use every model
of exercise bike that you’re promoting. What can you do? The simplest way is to go to
sites like Amazon.com or Epinions.com where people have posted reviews on just about
every single thing under the sun.


Epinions.com is a really great resource. People post reviews on just about every model
of digital camera, every model of athletic equipment, refrigerators, microwaves, printers,
computers, notebooks, laptops, remote control cars, I mean it’s all there. Amazon is the
same and has a huge database of customer reviews. Do searches for your products on
those sites. See what people are saying, and make note of the pros and cons. Don’t copy
these reviews word for word, as that would be stealing, but you can see the kinds of
things that people liked about it. You can see the kinds of things that people didn’t like
about it, and you can write reviews based on that.


Again, you could go to Elance, post a job and say, “Hey for $50, I want you to take these
five exercise bike models, go to Epinions.com, go to Amazon.com, type them in and
compile reviews to write a review based on the information that you find there.” Then,
you don’t have to do anything. Just pay them the $50, and in a couple of days you have a
bunch of bids. Pick the winning bidder, and they’ll write the reviews for you, and you’re
done. That’s how you can write an honest review without spending a fortune. I mean it
is an honest review because it’s based on real life information that people have provided



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based on their experience with the product. That’s how you can find it. That’s how you
can write reviews even if you don’t own a product or can’t afford to buy all the products.

30. Can I use parts of the ad copy from the product sales page without being in violation
of copyright law? Do I need express permission from the sales page owner?


If you’re going to copy big chunks of the sales page, then you probably are going to want
to get permission to do that. I don’t think that many merchants will mind because you are
promoting their products, but if you’re taking their sales page and using their words to
promote a competitor’s product, you’re going to have a problem. I wouldn’t copy any
part of their sales page verbatim unless somewhere on the sales page, they gave you
express permission to use bits and pieces of their sales letter. If you want to copy
something, you should ask for permission. That’s just the honest and right thing to do.
Normally, you won’t find the best information in the sales page. Just go back to my
answer on how to write honest reviews and get information on products, and use those
techniques. You’re going to get better information that consumers can relate to using
those techniques as opposed to just copying straight from the sales page.


Next question:

31. Is it appropriate to make a buy now pitch with a link directly to order? Or is it best to
have the landing page link to a more in depth sales page?


You can try this if you feel that you’ve done a really good job in promoting a product
such that a person is probably ready to buy after visiting your page. Then, you can link
directly to the order page. You just need to make sure with the merchant that, if you do
that, you’re going to get credit for the affiliate sale. I’ve seen a lot of people do that, and
I’ve done it some myself. It’s just something to test.


You want to compare sending them directly to the order page against sending them to the
merchant sales page or product page, just to see which one gets the best conversion.
There’s nothing wrong with doing that. You just want to make sure the merchant doesn’t
have a problem with it, and you want to make sure that you will get credit for the sale if


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you link directly to their “buy now” page and pass over or skip their sales page. So it’s
definitely a technique you should try and test.

32. I often see rules in directories prohibiting the use of landing pages? Can you explain
why they reject them?


It’s kind of like Google’s rule where they only want one ad per domain. A lot of
directories don’t want to be cluttered with sales pitch pages. One purpose of a good
directory is to give you the best resources and information sites related to whatever
category that is listed in the directory. Affiliate pages are designed for one purpose and
that is to sell, not to inform.        Directories normally want informative sites and
comprehensive informational resources on a particular topic. A directory is not focused
on providing sites that sell the products necessarily or that are just intermediaries between
the customer and the merchant. They’ll let the merchant normally be listed because
they’re selling the products directly, but if you’re just a page designed to push people
onto the merchant for profit, some of them have rules against that. They don’t want their
directory cluttered with affiliate pages.

33. Do you make landing pages keyword specific?


For some of my top converting keywords, I’ll try to tailor the headline, the intro
paragraphs, and the page title in my HTML to make sure I use that specific keyword.
Keywords in those key areas might help with relevancy. It also helps conversions a bit,
but I don’t do it for every single keyword.


There are some people who use landing pages with a script that will automatically insert
the keyword a person searched into their page. I haven’t messed with that because it’s
hard to use an automated method without making the content sound strange.                For
example, not every keyword is going to fit in the headline perfectly. Besides, chances are
if you have a hundred or a thousand keywords, probably only 5, 10, or 20 of those
keywords will bring in about 90% of your sales. So instead of creating 1,000 different
pages, why not just create 5 or 10 different pages tailored to a specific keyword? So, I do




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make landing pages keyword specific, but I only do it for a small collection of my best
converting keywords.

34. For the affiliate landing page do testimonials work or should they be left for the main
sales page?


Yes, testimonials do work. Putting them within the review of the product or at the end of
the review of the product will work very well. Make sure that you can use testimonials
from the merchant site. Testimonials do help, but you’ll have to test to see where they
are appropriate and if they work for your particular market. Testimonials do help with
conversions in some cases.

35. Is it advisable to add Ad Sense ads on the landing page?


Yes, that’s actually something I’m testing now. I’m experimenting with a few locations
on my landing page to place Ad Sense ads. The purpose of this is to try to make some
secondary income and to help cover a little bit of the cost of my advertising expenses. So
far, I’m not making a ton of money, but it’s enough to keep doing it, and my conversions
haven’t suffered as a result.


Normally, I’ll try to place the Adsense ads at the bottom or near the bottom of the page,
where you get the people who weren’t interested in whatever you were selling and who
might want to look for more information. If they’re going to leave your sight anyway,
you might as well try to get them to click on an ad where you’re going to make money. I
haven’t tested putting them prominently at the top of my page. I’m just in the early
stages of testing, but so far placing Ad Sense at the bottom of the page hasn’t affected my
sales, and it’s making me a little extra money. It’s not a ton of money, but it’s something
worth trying, and something worth testing, definitely.


Okay, so that covers the content related questions, as far as the types of things you should
have on the landing page. Next, are domain questions.




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36. Do I need a different domain name for every landing page or can I use sub-domains
or generic domain names for all reviews?


It really depends. I see a lot of people who use review sites will have domains like
bestreviews.com, top5reviews.com, or something like that. By having a generic name
like that, they can just have all their pages for the different reviews on one site, and
obviously, they’ll have one hosting account to deal with.


I don’t do that. For every market that I go into, I try to register a domain that sounds
relevant. I will try to use the main keywords or the main keyword from that market. It’s
kind of hard to find domain names now, but if you do enough thinking and
brainstorming, you can normally come up with a pretty good domain name with a .com
extension. People tend to respond to better to .com domain names. So, for every niche
or market I go into, I register a relevant domain and set up a hosting account.


My testing shows that click through rates and conversions have been higher with a
market related domain name instead of a generic domain name. It’s only $8 a year to
register a domain name and a few dollars a month to host it. To me, it’s worth having a
higher conversion rate and a higher click through rate. This is something I’ve tested, and
I use a different domain name for each market I go into.

37. Can I use web domain names or sub-domain names that include the affiliate product
name without being in copyright violation?


That’s something that you’ll have to take up with the merchant. You can definitely use
domain names with a keyword in it, but if it’s product specific, you may encounter
problems.     You wouldn’t want to go register GeicoInsuranceQuotes.com or
GeicoAutoInsuranceQuote.com or that kind of thing because GEICO will tell you to take
the name down, or they’ll sue your pants off. You definitely wouldn’t want to have
MicrosoftWord.com or something like that.


It really just depends on the merchant. Some of the bigger companies are going to
protect their trademarks and their product names really diligently, but others will say,


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“Sure, go right ahead. It’s more sales for us, no problem at all.” So, it’s definitely
something that you want to check out to make sure it’s okay with the vendor. If it’s a big
name company with a well-known product, you’re going to want to err on the side of
caution and make sure that you get permission to use their copyright.

38. What about using the name Yahoo or Google in domain names, sub-domain names,
keywords or landing page content?


You don’t want to use their names anywhere in the domain name, like
GoogleReviews.com or TopGoogleReviewSites.com. They’re not going to appreciate
that. For the most part, you can bid on a keyword phrase with those names in it without a
problem. Don’t use the vendors or company name in your ad because that will confuse
people. Confusion will turn off potential customers and cause concern for companies that
think you’re possibly diverting customers away from them.


Whether you can use trademarked names in you landing page content depends on how
you use it. If your header said, “Welcome Google Users, your search was for stereo
equipment,” I don’t think that would be a problem. On the other hand, if you’re saying,
“Google recommends this or Google approved this or we’re affiliated with Google,”
they’re not going to like that.


So, using trademarked names in your content is one thing, but I wouldn’t use Yahoo or
Google at all in your domain names. A perfect example is GoogleCash.com. It redirects
to AffiliateJackpot.com because Google cracked down on that name and said, “Hey you
need to change that name or you need to send people to a different page.”


The first website that I built to try and earn affiliate commissions was called
GooGuide.com, and it was just a play on Google. It was a website all about Google
search engine optimization, and that kind of thing. Google complained to me about that
site because the logo and the letters were the same colors as Google. Google’s lawyers
contacted me and said, “Hey you’re using a font that’s very close to ours, and you’re
using the same colors. Don’t use that.” Now, I probably could have fought that but it



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was simple enough to change. Even though I didn’t specifically use their name in the
domain name, they came after me. So, I wouldn’t take on the giants like that, but you
may be able to incorporate their names into your landing page in some way.


That concludes the questions about using domain names, having a different domain for
each product, or using the same domain for each market you’re in. Here is the next
question.

39. How do you create a landing page for multiple products? I sell (and he gives what he
sells) which come in various sizes. How do I get people to buy the specific one out of
about eight models that I currently sell?


Again, this is the purpose of a landing page. In this case, if you’re promoting something
that comes in different varieties, tailor the landing page to their search term. I’m sure
people are going to be searching on, in this case, specific models or specific sizes related
to this particular product. When they do, send them to a page tailored to that specific
item.


Using a different product for example, let’s say you’re promoting athletic jerseys for pro
sports. You would have soccer jerseys, football jerseys, baseball jerseys, and basketball
jerseys. If someone is searching for these things, they might search, “NFL football
jersey,” “NBA jersey,” “Authentic Soccer jerseys,” “Authentic major league baseball
jerseys,” things of that nature. When they’re searching on “authentic NFL jerseys,” you
may have a site that sells all kinds of jerseys, but you want to send them to a page
dedicated or tailored to your line of authentic NFL jerseys.


This can be broken down even further because within, authentic NFL jerseys, you have
different things. You have different teams, and you have different players. On your site
let’s say you’re selling a Peyton Manning (quarterback for the Indianapolis Colts)
authentic jersey. If someone searches on “Peyton Manning jersey” or “authentic Peyton
Manning jersey,” you’re going to want to send them to a page that showcases which
Peyton Manning jerseys you’re selling. You have this for your most popular players,



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your most popular teams, etc. You would have a number of separate pages, and that’s
how you would create a landing page for multiple products.


Now, if they’re just searching on “sports jerseys,” you can probably send them to a page
that lists all the types of jerseys that you sell. It’s a much more untargeted keyword
phrase and a much more untargeted search. But that would probably be your best
approach if someone is just searching on those generic terms. So, tailor the page to your
keywords or keyword groups when you’re dealing with multiple products or a line of
products.   I hope that answers that person’s question.         You look at your keyword
groupings and see if a unique, individual page can be created specifically tailored to those
search terms.

40. Is it better to have just one page for each product with all the reviews, pictures, etc.
or is it better to have a page where you promote a group of similar products?


If you are comparing multiple MP3 players that are all in the same class, all MP3 players
that can store 30 gigs of music, for example, you might compare all those on one page.
You could also write a single review, a one page review, or an entire landing page
dedicated to one particular model.       It depends on the approach you want to take.
Personally, I would review several choices. If giving them a basic overview or a shorter
review of multiple products along the same line doesn’t work, you might link to a more
in depth review page to give them more information.


It would be the same if you were promoting e-books. There are many, many e-books out
there that talk about basically what Google Cash does, promoting affiliate programs
through Adwords. There are probably half a dozen or more books out there. Not many
are as popular as Google Cash because Google Cash was the first to market, but some of
them are pretty good and people might not be aware of these. You might want to
compare 4 or 5 of those on one page, and let people know which one you think is best.
Google Cash would be my number one choice.




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So you can have one page for each product, but what I’ve found is multiple products that
are all related, Adwords marketing e-books for instance, are best located on the same
page. If you’re bidding on the specific keyword terms “google cash” or “adwords 123,”
which is another popular e-book about affiliate marketing with Adwords, try sending
somebody to a page that is dedicated to a review of that individual product. Since they
already know the product name and are searching for it, they are likely looking for more
information. For example, if someone is searching for “google cash review,” “google
cash opinion,” “google cash ratings,” use your experience and try sending them to a page
just dedicated to reviewing Google Cash to see if that converts better than a multiple
product comparison.


Generally, a review site with multiple products works really well, instead of just
individual reviews for every single product.        Those are the only two questions on
multiple products, and the answers fall along the lines of the best type of review site.


The next section contains questions about landing page performance and what you can
expect as far as clicks, conversions, tracking and that sort of thing. So let’s just hop right
into that.

41. What is a typical click through rate between my landing page and the sales page that
I should aim for?


That’s a good question. When you’re linking directly to the merchant using your affiliate
link in your Adwords ad, you know you’re getting 100% click through. You’re sending
every one of your visitors to that merchant. When using a landing page, I’m sending
people to an intermediary page. I’m sending somebody to my landing page and then
hoping from there that they go on to the merchant.


What I found is that you do get less click through to the merchant, but they’re much,
much, much more highly targeted then you would if you just sent them directly to the
merchant. I’m going to get into that in a minute, but to answer this question, generally
you can expect 30%, 50% sometimes 60% click through to the merchant. If you’re only



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getting 10% or 20% click through rate, try to modify your page. To improve your click
through rate, try to put links in a more prominent space. Also, try adding a couple more
affiliate links in different spots to try to capture people’s attention, and try to get them to
click through.


A click through rate of 30% or higher is what you should aim for. With my pages, 30%
is the low end. Some get 50 to 60 percent click through. If your CTR is lower then 30%,
I would start to question how well the page itself is doing.

42. How much does click through rate to the merchant drop when you add a landing
page?


This is essentially the same question. It could drop by about 2/3 if you’re getting a 30%
or 33% click through rate.      But again, that’s nothing to worry about because your
conversions will increase, and that actually leads into the third question in this section
which is:

43. How much does conversion rate increase when you add a landing page?


It increases exponentially. Say for instance, you’re sending all your traffic to a merchant.
Generally, you have around a 2% conversion rate. I know a lot of people say 1%, but I
really think that at this stage of the Internet and the Internet marketing industry’s
development, 1% is not a good conversion rate at all. I think you should really shoot for
at least 2% conversion when you’re sending people directly to the merchant. Anything
lower, and it’s going to be really hard to be profitable.


Let’s just use that as a measuring stick. You’re sending people to the merchant, and
you’re getting a 2% conversion rate. When you’re sending someone to a landing page
and you’re only getting 1/3 of the people to click through to the merchant site, it’s not
uncommon for that 1/3 of the people to convert at 6% or higher. So even though the
amount of people that you’re sending to the merchant is much lower, your conversion
rate can be 3, 4, or 5 times higher. Thus, you can make just as many if not more sales.




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That’s one thing that I’ve discovered. When you log into your Click Bank account,
you’ll often see those ads for merchants, and some of them will say, 25% conversion,
15% conversion and that kind of thing. Those numbers sound ridiculous. They sound
completely absurd if you’re thinking of it from the perspective of sending somebody
directly to the merchant. You’re thinking, “Wow! Boy if this thing converts at 15% and I
send 100 people to this and I make 15 sales, oh yeah game on. I’m definitely going to
convert that thing,” but then when you promote it, you might only get a 2% or 3%
conversion. You think, “Well they lied to me,” but the fact is, they aren’t lying. They’re
giving you conversion rates from their affiliates that are using landing pages.


I have one merchant that I promote using a landing page, and I get a 25% conversion rate.
I get about 1/3 of the people to click through to my site, but the ctr to the merchant from
my landing page is about 25%. So 1 out of 4 people that I’m sending to that site are
converting to a sale, and that’s the power of a landing page. I’m pre-selling them. I’m
answering their questions. If they’re worried about buying, I’m giving them some insider
information, especially if it’s a membership site or a piece of software. They want to
know how it performs, and you can tell them how it performs and what it’s done for you.
Tell them how they can benefit from the product. Mention some of the things that you
didn’t like about the product, and engage them in a conversation that is designed to
answer questions and allay fears. Because of that, you can get sky-high conversion rates,
and that’s no joke. Honestly, 25% conversion for a product.


In this particular market, there’s not a whole lot of traffic, but if you can get 1 of 4 people
that leave your site to buy, I’ll promote it every day of the week. So you can expect a
significant increase in conversion rate, and it’s not uncommon to triple or quadruple the
conversion rate of linking directly to the merchant.

44. How long is ideal for a visitor to stay on the landing page? Is length a factor in their
decision to click links in your sales page?


Based on my web stats, people don’t stay on my landing pages too long. Most all visitors
stay under a minute and a good portion of them less than 30 seconds. What that means to



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me is that people are scanning and clicking, so you want to use an engaging headline that
grabs their attention. Write a good opening sentence or two to pull people in even
further, and then get right to the reviews. Often, they’ll scan down to the reviews and
say, “Okay this sounds like what I’m looking for.” They scan down, and most of the
time, they’re going to click on your first choice.


On all my review sites, the vast, vast, majority of people click on the first
recommendation. Everything else gets very little click traffic, at least for the markets that
I’m in. Make sure whichever product you’re recommending is good because you don’t
want to get refunds and it needs to convert well. Do a good job pre-selling it, and chose a
merchant that does a good job of closing the sale. You’re only going to find that out
through testing different products. Again, if you look and see what the majority of your
competition is promoting and follow suit, you’ll get up to speed faster. That doesn’t
mean only promote what your competition is promoting, but use that as your starting
point. Then, test and refine further.


I don’t pay much attention to how long a visitor stays on my site. To me, it’s irrelevant.
All that matters is that I maximize conversions, and if that means they stay on the site for
5 seconds or 5 minutes, either is fine by me. So length is not really that important in this
case. At least, it’s not in my experience.

45. Does a hover ad on the landing page distract the visitor from clicking once more to
reach the affiliate company’s sales page? We use a hover ad to collect email addresses
for our newsletter.


This is something that you need to test. For some people, any kind of pop up, in any
shape or form, is going to make them leave your site. I read somewhere that pop ups are
one of the biggest turn offs for web users. People just hate pop ups. It doesn’t mean they
don’t work. It’s just something you’ll have to test. Your audience for the particular
market could be really averse to pop ups.




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If you’re promoting a pop up blocker software, you surely don’t want to have pop ups of
any kind on your web page. That will kill your credibility, but with another market, like
Internet marketing, this definitely works. Some markets respond well to the pop ups or
the hover ads, so it’s just something that you would have to test and see.

46. Is split testing your landing page something you recommend, or do people get
confused if they see different web pages on one URL?


Without question, you should be split testing your landing pages against another version.
Test the headlines, test the background colors, test your introductory sentence, test the
font you use on the page, test the layout of your reviews. You always want to be running
some sort of test without question. If you’re not testing, you’re losing sales, and you’re
losing a lot of sales. So, you should definitely be split testing your landing pages.


Tracking is beyond the scope of this recording, but you definitely need to split test your
landing pages.


As far as the second part of this question, do people get confused if they see different web
pages on one URL? Well, they’re not going to get confused because they’re only going
to see one version. Most tracking software and definitely all good tracking software
cookies the users when they click on your tracking link. That ensures that every time
they come to your site, as long as that cookie is still on their computer, they’re going to
see the same version of your landing page. If they saw a different page every time, they
would get confused. It would make them question what’s going on. It might turn them
off to the site, but when they’re cookied, they’ll only see one version of your split test for
as long as the cookie remains on their computer. So seeing multiple pages is really not a
problem.

47. How do you track split testing, and what software tools are out there that you
recommend for split testing?


Well, I use two tools, and I’ve just started using a third. One is reasonably priced, and
the other two are expensive and are more advanced tracking programs. The first one that


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I use is AdTrackZ, and you can do standard A/B split testing. AdTrackZ is easy to use.
You can test two landing pages at the same time, and it will keep track of the conversion
rates, the number of times it was clicked on, viewed, and that kind of thing.


In this case, to accurately do a split test for a conversion rate, the merchant needs to place
a little HTML code on their “thank you” page. That especially helps with Click Bank
products because they don’t already have tracking built in. If you can’t contact the
merchant or you just don’t want to bother with trying to get the merchant to place a
tracking code on their “thank you” page, you can open multiple Click Bank accounts.


On landing page “A,” you send all sales through one Click Bank account, and on landing
page “B,” you send all sales through a second Click Bank account. If you test for a week
to 10 days, there should be a clear winner. One account should have more sales than the
other and that way you will know which landing page converted better. That’s a simple
way to do it.


Another way to track is to enable, Google conversion tracking. You will again still have
to place your tracking code on the merchant’s “thank you” page. Then, you can split test
ads and send them to different destination URL’s and to different landing pages. In this
way, you can see which ad and which landing page converts better.


So that’s just kind of a quick run through of some of the testing tools. The more
advanced tools that I use are Armand Morin’s Multi-Track Generator. It’s a $500 piece
of software, but I can test 4 or 5 headlines at once with three different background colors
with two different product images. I can test all those things at the same time instead of
having to do 10 or 15 different landing pages that might take 3 or 4 months to accurately
test. I can run the same tests in a fraction of the amount of time. It’s a great piece of
software, and I’ve had a lot of success with it.


Another program that I just bought, but I’m still learning is Split Test Accelerator. It is
similar to Multi-Track Generator, but it looks like it has some more powerful features. It



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seems like I might be able to get a little more bang for my buck. Again, I think it was
$500 as well. So those are two pretty expensive pieces of software, and if you can’t
afford them, then obviously just start with AdTrackZ, and it will do just fine. Yeah,
AdTrackZ is my favorite. It’s just a plain ad tracking program, and I think it’s $77. It’s a
great program.


The next question is pretty darn broad, but I’ll go over some quick best practices.

48. How do you optimize landing pages to improve conversion rates?


First and foremost, you have to have some sort of tracking in place, AdTrackZ or
whatever. If you don’t have tracking in place, you can’t really optimize at all. First, you
want to test your headline. A headline can have the biggest impact because it is your first
major statement, and it is centered in a much bigger font. You want to test the font sizes
of your headline. Also test the font color and the font itself, whether it’s Arial to Homer,
Verdana, etc. Test the first couple of sentences of your introductory paragraphs. Test
your layout and the order your products are presented. If product “A” is number one and
product “B” is number two, try switching them. Maybe product “B” will convert better
in the first position instead of the second position.


Test your product images. Test how you word your links. Test the number of links.
There are all sorts of things you can do to try to improve conversion rate. This is a
process that you can do through taking action and testing. Background color is another
one.


The main elements that you should test to start off with are your headline, your
introductory paragraph, your first couple of sentences, and the order of the products that
you’re promoting to see which one will convert best. To test those three things is the
quickest way to see improvement in your conversion rate,

49. After the landing page has shown some good results, would you expand it into a
several page website of related subjects or leave it as it is?



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If a landing page has shown good results, I just let it run, but I will continually split test it
and try new things to get the conversion rate higher. I wouldn’t take it into a several page
website. I don’t want people clicking around, getting confused in the information, or
overwhelmed by choices. I keep it to the one page format.


If you are in a market that lends itself to entering similar markets, then I would try
starting new campaigns promoting different products in the related markets. I normally
don’t link to other sites. I don’t expand it into multiple pages. I just keep my one page
landing page focused on a particular type of product, and if I think of related products
that might go well with it, I’ll just start new campaigns. I’ll then make entirely new
landing pages. I hope that answers that question. Generally, I just leave it as it is and
work on increasing the conversion over time through split testing.


That’s all of the questions that we had regarding landing page performance. Again, you
just need to become comfortable with testing, and you will see noticeable improvements.
Your first few split tests, you’ll probably uncover a couple of things that will have a
significant impact on improving your conversion rate.


Over time, as you test and test and test, the gains become smaller because you’re trying to
squeeze everything you have out of that conversion rate. You’re never going to get a
100% conversion rate. You’re rarely going to get a 50% conversion rate. There’s a
definite ceiling in every market to how high a conversion rate is going to be. So, after
you’ve tested a lot, at least revisit the page every month or two with some new testing.


Don’t become test happy and addicted to testing such that you neglect other opportunities
or you don’t expand into new product lines with new landing pages. I say that because
I’m in one market where I tested so much that I really got burnt out on it. I wasn’t
making any huge gains, and I realized that I could spend my time going into other
markets instead of thinking of different things to test to try to squeeze a .1 or a .05
percent increase in conversion. It just wasn’t worthwhile.




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So you can definitely get addicted to testing. Let your tests run for a while, and after
you’ve run some tests and let it perform, go on to other markets. But test, test, test. You
must become comfortable with testing.


Okay so that’s it for our questions. And I guess we’re a little over the 2 hour mark, and
while the ball is rolling, I’m just going to run right into the summary of my Top Tips for
a landing page. This is the process or the steps I take when building a landing page. I’m
just going to be brief. I have 11 things listed here, and I’ll just go over each one in turn.


Best Practices for Using Landing Pages
So we’re starting from the point where we have already picked a market and a product.
We know we want to build a landing page and that’s where we want to start from. I’m
not going to go through how to pick a product. That’s another course in and of it self.
I’m just going to stay focused on landing pages.


So you’ve picked a market, and you have done a little bit of keyword research. First, do a
search on your top keywords in that market and see what your competition is doing.
That’s just about the easiest and best thing that you can do. Take the top half dozen
keywords and put them into Google. Make note of all the affiliate landing pages that are
used for those keywords. Study their layout and see what products they’re promoting.
That’s the easiest thing that you can do.


On top of that, I have a program called Copernic Checker. This software is a website
tracking program. With Copernic Checker, I can enter URL’s of any website, and every
day this program will go to that web page and look for any changes. I do this to keep an
eye on my competition. I can see if they’re running any tests or if they change their
website as far as the products that they’re promoting. If they change the order of the
products they’re promoting or change their top recommendation, perhaps they are having
better conversions with the new configuration.




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What I’ve noticed since last September when I started building landing pages is that there
are very, very few of my competitors who test anything at all. Some of the pages have
been exactly the same since last September, and it’s a big reason why, in many cases, I’m
in the positions that they once held. The reason is of course that I’m constantly trying to
improve, and they’re staying the same. You just can’t do that.


If you want to stay relevant in your market, you have to constantly test. It’s interesting to
see, and it’s a big confidence booster to see you are continually improving while they’re
staying the same. If you are continually testing, you know you’re doing everything you
can to become a better and better marketer.


Additionally with Copernic Checker, I can enter a URL from the search results. I go to
Google, and I type in “fruit baskets.” I get the search results, and if I look in my browser,
it will list the URLs from these search results. So, I just copy and paste that search result
and put it directly into this program. Since Copernic Checker will go out every day and
check for any changes in the search results, you can see new competitors enter and leave
the marketplace. You can see who sticks around and stays. If you do this for a week to
10 days, letting this program run for all the keywords that you want to track, it will allow
you to see the people who leave because they can’t cut it; they’re losing money. They’re
not profitable enough. You’ll also see the people that stick around and stay. Those
affiliates that stick around and stay, in theory, should be the ones making money, unless
they just love to lose money.


After 7 to 10 days, you really know which affiliates in your marketplace are doing well
and you know what their websites look like.           You know which products they’re
promoting, and you could just play off that. “Okay this website is designed like this, and
they’re promoting these products. I’m going to come up with a similar design. I’m going
to promote the same products, and that’s how I’m going to start things off. That’s my
starting point.”




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Look what you’ve done. You have not lost sleep or time over a website design. You’ve
not lost sleep or time or stress over which products to promote. You are relying on your
competitors to provide you with insider information that has made them successful. This
is information that they have sweated for, that they have toiled for, that they have tested
for, and that they have spent money on. With a simple program, you can track these
things and get the same information that they’ve possibly spent thousands of dollars
trying to get. So, that’s the very first thing that I do.


I looked around and Copernic Checker is $49. There’s another program called Website
Watcher. Website Watcher is slightly more expensive and has some advanced filtering
features that will ignore changing banner ads, etc. I’ve found another one that’s free, but
I don’t know how good it is. I don’t know anything about it. I’ve never used it, but it can
be found at infoic.com, and I think you can track up to 10 page websites with that. I
believe it’s completely free, but I don’t know anything about it. I’ve never used it.


So the first thing I would do is spy on your competition and track what’s going on in that
market.


Number two, base your design on that of your competitors as a starting point. Again,
you’re tracking these sites. You’re tracking these ads, and you see the same people
staying in the top spots. Their sites are working; their sites are making money, so start
your design thought process from there. What you’re going to find is that they’re
normally very simple sites. They’re not very complex, and they’re not very flashy. Just
base your design on what your competitor is doing. Don’t copy them outright; don’t steal
from them. Just base your design on what is successful for your competition.


Number three, make a list of the products that are most promoted by your competition.
Again, look for the ads that stick around, and make a list of maybe three out of four if
there are that many affiliates. Maybe three out of four promote one product as their top
recommendation. If the fourth guy promotes somebody else as a top recommendation,
who are you going to go with? If that fourth guy who is promoting something different is



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ranked higher then everybody else, I might go with whatever he’s promoting because
he’s ranked higher then everyone else, and he’s staying in that position. Next, split test
the alternative product against the more popular product, and see which one converts
better for you.


Let your competition tell you what is working. The information is just right there and
people are just starving to find a secret sauce, a secret code, a magic bullet, a service or
piece of software that’s going to tell them what to promote when it’s right there. You just
pick a market that you’re interested in, put in the URL from the search results for those
keywords and monitor that for a week to 10 days. You’ll have a list of the affiliates that
are doing well, and you can look and see which products they’re promoting. Bang!
Competition research, product research – done! Website design – done! Landing page
content ideas – done! All you’re doing is letting a piece of software go out and check a
page once or twice a day. Listen to your competition. They’re whispering, but they’re
telling you what to do and what to promote.


After you’ve got your design and product ideas based on your competition, the fourth
step is to research other products to test against those promoted by your competition.
What you’ve already done is just a starting point. You don’t want it to be your finishing
point because when you launch a new landing page in a new market, at that moment in
time, it is the worst that it will ever be. There is something that John Reese has said,
“People spend so much time getting everything perfect, getting the perfect design, writing
the perfect words, when they should just throw the site up.” Throw the site up because at
least you can start instantaneously getting feedback, and you can constantly improve it. It
will never be worse then it is then, and you can always improve it.


It’s important to look for new products to test because there is always going to be some
product that has been overlooked, that will convert well, that’s undiscovered or untapped.
I’m not saying spend a month of your life trying to find those products, just look and see
what’s out there, and test it. Test it for a couple of days, and you’ll be able to see pretty
quickly whether or not it’s going to convert better or worse. Who knows? You might



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stumble onto a product that converts better, but your competition stubbornly refuses to
promote it because everyone else, other then you, is promoting a different product as their
top choice.    The competition is following the crowd.         They’re following the herd.
They’re not going to try to break new ground. It’s something you need to test. Look for
other products to promote.


Number five, research your market to find questions, likes and dislikes about the product
or service you’re promoting. When you’re looking to promote a certain type of product,
look for reviews; look for questions people have about those types of products or specific
products.     Type in the product names with the word “reviews” or “opinions” or
“thoughts” or “likes” or “dislikes.” For example, type “Google Cash likes,” “Google
Cash dislikes,” and see what comes up. You’ll find reviews. You’ll find forums. You’ll
find newsletters. You’ll find all sorts of insider information from the people who are
actually using the products and services that you’re selling. You can use that information
to write your landing page.


For example, if the reviews and forums indicate that people are worried about having
their email address collected, getting scammed, spyware, viruses, or identity theft, you
can say, “Okay wow! That’s something….They’re worried about this, so what I need to
do is tell them that it’s okay or that’s not the case, and here’s why.”


So you know their fears. You know what they like. You know what they’re looking for.
You know what their disappointments are, and you use that information to write a really
killer couple of introductory sentences to your landing page. You’ll see your conversions
really increase and your sales take off as your credibility and your ability to communicate
well with that audience improves. The more you learn about them, just by doing a couple
of hours of searching and finding out what they like and dislike, the better you can
connect with that audience, your target audience. So, spend a little time researching your
market.




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Number six, chunk your website design process. Don’t think of the whole job at hand.
Think of each element of the page individually, and build each element, one at a time.
Because I’ve done a lot of testing, a landing page isn’t just a page. To me, I have a
headline I have to write. I have an introduction that I have to write with a really good
couple of sentences, and I have the reviews to write. Then, I have the product images. I
have my links. I have the outline, but do I add a bullet list?


I separate the tasks. I might write the headline and my introductory paragraph one day,
and that’s it. It might take an hour. The next day, I’ll write the reviews for the product,
and the third day, I’ll do any graphics I need to do and put my affiliate links in. Just
chunk the design process into the major components of the page, and it will build much
more quickly. You can knock out a headline no problem, it’s one sentence. Spend 30
minutes brainstorming a good headline, and go onto something else. The next day, write
your introduction, the next day write your reviews or do it all at once. In 2 or 3 hours,
you could create and polish a really good landing page. I’m a perfectionist, so I spend
longer then I should. Someone that’s not like that could probably knock out a good
landing page in an hour, hour and a half’s time, fully designed and uploaded. So, just
chunk the design process.


Number seven, don’t worry about making the perfect page. This is something I have to
constantly remind myself of because I always want to make it better. I’ll spend time
piddling with it and tweaking it, adjusting that border, centering this a little better, and
getting that white space just right, when I really should just upload it and send some
traffic to it to see how it responds and how it performs. So, don’t worry about making the
perfect page at the outset. Get it up there, have some tracking in place, and start to study
how it performs. Then begin to tweak, test, and track from there.


Number eight, set up some form of tracking from the very beginning. Do not ever, ever
put up a landing page without some form of tracking in place. It’s just a huge mistake,
and it’s a time killer. If you throw up a page and you have no tracking in place, there is
no way to track how your keywords and ads are performing, let alone how the page is



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performing. All you’re doing is spending money and hoping against hope that you make
more money then you spend.          That’s not tracking. That’s just throwing money at
something and hoping that more money will be thrown back at you. So, have some sort
of tracking in place from the moment that the page goes live and you begin sending
traffic to it.


Number 9, brainstorm different elements of you landing page to test. Try testing your
landing page with a header graphic versus without a header graphic. Test different
headlines. Test the color of the headlines, the size of the headlines, the length of the
headlines, the font used in the headlines, and make sure to try totally different headlines
to see how they perform. Try to use testimonials or not. Put the price on the landing
page versus not. Will the price deter people from buying or will having the price be what
someone is looking for? Maybe not having the price peaks people’s curiosity and makes
them move on to the merchant’s page. So test it.


Link directly to the order page, merchant page, or the sales letter. Use a picture of the
product or no picture of the product. Change the number of affiliate links, 5 affiliate
links versus 6 affiliate links. Try red background versus a white background versus a
dark blue background. Think of different elements to test and begin to systematically do
split tests to find out which versions are better.


Testing is so, so critically important. Studying what your competition does and testing
and tracking are the two most important things that you can possibly do. If you get
nothing else, at the very least, understand the importance of looking at what your
competition is doing and making sure you have testing and tracking in place so you can
constantly try to make improvements through testing. It’s so critically important.


Number ten, the more detailed your tracking, the more effective the landing page can be.
What that means is test everything. Some people don’t test at all. They just hope that
they spend money and hope more money comes back. Then you have people who just
test on the campaign level. Then you have people who just test on the ad group level.



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Take it even further; in your campaign, test each ad group individually. In every ad
group, test each ad individually. In every ad, test every keyword individually. Get as
specific and granular as you possibly can because if you do this, you’ll be able to
eliminate so much waste and junk.


In one of the markets that I’m still in, there is a keyword that receives half a million
searches a month. It’s the most broad, generic term in that market, but it gets tons and
tons of traffic. There’s one affiliate that is constantly in the top positions in that market.
I spent a lot of time testing and tracking to compete in this marketplace. I competed for
this keyword, and when push came to shove, this keyword was costing me $45 a
conversion. I might spend $1,000 a day just on that keyword. That effort was getting 20
or 25 sales a day, but it was costing me more, significantly more, then I was making in
commission.


I was thinking, “Golly! I’ve got to test it. I can make so many sales out of this keyword,
if I can just increase the conversion.” Finally, I realized this was just ridiculous. So, I
completely eliminate this keyword. I lowered my bid to the point where it’s maybe on
the third or fourth page, and waited to see what happened. Sure enough, I went down
about 20 sales a day, but my profits increased significantly because I wasn’t spending
$1,000 a day on a keyword or twice as much per sale then what I was getting in
commission. It’s those stupid little stubborn things that we tend to do that harm us the
most. Just by eliminating this keyword, I increased my daily profits by a couple of
hundred dollars easily, even though I had significantly less sales.


If your data is consistently telling you that you are spending way too much money on a
keyword, even though you’re getting a lot of sales from that keyword, let it go. Let it go
because less sales can still mean more profits if you’re converting well for all your other
keywords and you’re not losing money trying to do well for a particularly high volume
keyword. So test everything. Get down to the details, find out which keywords are
converting, and eliminate the ones that aren’t. Don’t become married to a particular
keyword or group of keywords just because they get a lot of volume.



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Finally, number eleven, landing pages separate the super affiliates from the regular
affiliates, and I believe that. In Adwords marketing, the super affiliates who make five
figures a day in profits are constantly scaling up. They scale their operation and enter
new markets, and they do it with landing pages because they’re effective and they’re fast
once you get a system down, and they just work. It really does separate the super
affiliates from the regular affiliates.


Landing pages work, and landing pages are really the key to breaking into competitive
markets. They’re the key to increasing profits without finding more keywords and
without increasing your bids. If you truly want to take affiliate marketing with pay-per-
click to another level, use landing pages. They’re not necessary to make money because
you can link directly to the merchant, but a landing page is a more effective sales tool to
make pay-per-click work for affiliate marketers or people selling their own product.


That’s all I have today. We went close to 2 ½ hours, and I hope I answered enough of
your questions. I also hope my answers did your questions justice and that the Top 10
tips help. There’s a lot of good information in this recording, so give it another listen.
Print off the transcripts. Read the transcripts and get busy building your landing pages,
because there are a lot of profits from a lot of sales in your future if you do.


So thanks for listening, and I hope you got a lot out of the call. Talk to you later.




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Appendices of Recommended Links
Google Cash is the step by step instruction guide and reference handbook for using
Google Adwords and affiliate programs to create a profitable home business. Lifetime
updates are free to all customers.

AdwordMentor is a professional affiliate marketer membership site with numerous
resources and helpful forums where professionals exchange the latest tips and tricks for
internet marketing.

Your Roadmap – Beyond Google Cash is Chris Carpenter’s sequel to “Google Cash”.
This complete home study course provides a road map to building an Auto Pilot Online
Business. The video courses, workbook, and related learning tools provide exercises for
you to develop your business ideas and a roadmap to create the systems that will run your
business. "Your Roadmap - Beyond Google Cash" will have you working on your
business and not in it.

iPowerWeb is a web hosting company that has excellent uptime and easy-to-use features
which allow users to protect their affiliate links from potential link theft with redirects
even without a website. Their prices are always competitive, and they are constantly
running promotions.

Host Excellence is a web hosting company that has excellent uptime and easy-to-use
features which allow users to protect their affiliate links from potential link theft with
redirects even without a website. Their prices are always competitive, and they are
constantly running promotions.

Adtrackz is a comprehensive tracking program for all of your affiliate campaigns down to
the keyword. Dynamic insertion allows you to create tracking links for large lists of
keywords. A simple interface also allows you to create cloaked redirects to hide your
affiliate links from potential link theft.

Copernic Tracker is a website tracking program that is used to monitor affiliate
competition, to find profitable niche markets, and to identify landing pages that are
converting well.

Website Watcher is a website tracking program that is used to monitor affiliate
competition, to find profitable niche markets, and to identify landing pages that are
converting well.

Split-Test Accelerator is a comprehensive split testing program that allows you to test
every aspect of your landing pages to insure that you are using the highest performing
combination of your landing page elements. Split testing is a systematic way to improve
your conversion rates.




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Pro Ecovers is a graphic design service that creates customized graphics for your landing
pages, mini-sites, and ebooks.

Template Monster is a template service that has thousands of templates that can be used
for landing pages, mini-sites, or even more comprehensive websites. Using templates
saves countless hours of design work and produces a professional level of design for your
sites and landing pages.

The Template Store is a template service that has thousands of templates that can be used
for landing pages, mini-sites, or even more comprehensive websites. Using templates
saves countless hours of design work and produces a professional level of design for your
sites and landing pages.

XSite Pro is a website design software that is specifically for affiliate markets and
internet entrepreneurs. The software keeps development time to a minimum, makes
changes easy, and has effective tutorials so that the user can focus on the business aspects
of his or her site.

Dream Weaver is a website design software that is ideal for a professional website
designer. It has effective tutorials and a long standing reputation as one of the best
website design programs.

Photo Shop is a versatile photo manipulation software that can be used to create your
own graphics for ebook covers, landing page headers, or other design elements in your
website.

Header Generator is a software that generates header graphics for your landing pages or
mini-sites. It is useful for quickly generating a variety of graphical headers to split test in
order to maximize the conversion rates of your landing pages.

Multi-track Generator is a comprehensive split testing software that enables you to test
multiple elements of a landing page or mini site at one time. This software makes
changes to various elements of your site to maximize your conversion rates.




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