5E Model Lesson Template - PowerPoint by zif54130

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									Lesson Planning and
Teaching in the Block
     Olympia Jones
     Annissa Macon
            Creating a Climate
   The environment where students spend time has
    a significant impact on their perception of the
    activities that occur within that setting
                               Thinking Inside the Block Schedule (Robbins, Gregory, Herndon)

   Teachers and students must have mutual
    respect
   Students need opportunities to work alone and
    with peers
   Time should be allocated for reflection on the
    learning
   Risk Taking should be encouraged
   The teacher must be prepared, proficient and
    creative
    COVERAGE OR MASTERY?
   A recurring dilemma in education is how much
    content/knowledge must be covered and how do
    you ensure that the students learn the most
    essential elements of the content
   Much has been added to state curriculums, but
    little has been removed; therefore, Teachers
    must give thoughtful consideration to the
    content and curriculum in order to determine the
    most important concepts and skills that need to
    be taught in order for students to be successful.
    COVERAGE OR MASTERY?
   In order to make those decisions, teachers
    must look at several things:
        The standards for their grade level and content
        The curriculum for their content and how it relates
         to other disciplines—Is there a way to integrate?
        The sequence and level of importance put on
         various topics within the curriculum
        The strategies that would most effectively produce
         authentic learning and understanding
    HOW DO YOU PLAN FOR THE
            BLOCK
   In order to plan for the block, one must
    look at the big picture
        Generate an overview of the course and what is to
         be taught. D2SC provides a general overview
         which helps teachers see the “big picture”.
        Select the resources that you feel would enhance
         the learning. Add some H.E.A.T.
       (Higher order thinking, engaging lessons, authentic work and integration of technology)

          Attempt to address key questions about the
           learning. Questions for the block.doc
HOW DO YOU STRUCTURE THE
         BLOCK
   Divide the time into three or four chunks
    to create a beginning, middle and end.
   Chunk the content so students can begin
    to create mental reference files to connect
    related ideas and information
   Create activities/assignments that
    incorporate Gardner’s multiple intelligence
    theory to ensure everyone has an
    opportunity to use his/her strengths.
    STRUCTURING THE BLOCK
   William Glasser (in Fogarty, 1995) reminds
    us that we learn:
        10%   of   what   we   read
        20%   of   what   we   see
        30%   of   what   we   hear
        50%   of   what   we   see and hear
        70%   of   what   we   discuss with others
        80%   of   what   we   experience
        95%   of   what   we   teach to someone else
    INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
   Joyce and Weil outline four core families
    of instruction in their book Models of
    Teaching (1986)
        The   information processing family
        The   personal family
        The   social family
        The   behavioral systems family
   In a 90 minute period, teachers should
    touch upon each of the families to ensure
    that instruction is varied and meeting
    students’ needs.
INCORPORATING INFORMATION
       PROCESSING
   Concept Attainment
   Concept Formation
   Inquiry
   Thinking Maps
   Memorization
   Constructing knowledge
         INCORPORATING THE
             PERSONAL
   Learner Centered
   Synectics(William Gordon, 1961)


   Expanding personal horizons/experiences
   Hosting a class meeting
    INCORPORATING THE NEED
          FOR SOCIAL
   Group Investigation
   Role play
   Simulations
   Cooperative learning
   Legal case studies
   Current issues and events
   Cooperative Learning
               BEHAVIORAL
   Direct Instruction (Madeline Hunter)
   Use of Lecture (Limited Use)
   Constructivism       (5E Model)
      WHAT ABOUT THE TIME
   Teachers should keep in mind that in
    order to stay consistent with your 50
    minute courses, you must teach twice as
    much material in the 90 minute block or
    students in the blocked class will fall
    behind their peers.
   Time management and organization is
    critical when teaching in the block.
   Block Schedule Template.doc
                REFLECTION
Estimates for the length of human attention span are highly variable
and range from 3 to 5 minutes per year of age in young children, to
a maximum of around 20 minutes in adults.
                                       http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Attention_span
        NON-NEGOTIABLES OF A
               BLOCK
   Multiple activities are a must
   Incorporating the multiple intelligences theory while
    providing kinesthetic, visual and auditory activities
    ensures each learner has an opportunity to grasp the
    material.
   Incorporating individual tasks as well as group tasks
    help students retain information.
   Daily review is essential
   Time management is a must—Follow the plan
   Facilitate instead of Dominate
   Strive to do better in each lesson because inevitably you
    will over or under plan.
           REFERENCES
Robbins, Gregory and Herndon. Thinking
 Inside the Block Schedule. Strategies for
 Teaching in Extended Periods of Time.
 Corwin Press, 2000.
Lesson Plan
Structures
IS THIS YOUR CLASS
Direct Instruction

  (1) Face-to-face interaction between
   instructor and student, as when the
   instructor provides a lecture, conducts
   demonstrations, or reviews a student’s
   performance; or
  (2) The administration and correction of
   student examinations by an instructor
   with subsequent feedback to the student.
 Definition provided by the FDA
Direct Instruction
 Direct Instruction (DI) is a model for
   teaching that emphasizes well-developed
   and carefully planned lessons designed
   around small learning increments and
   clearly defined and prescribed teaching
   tasks. It is based on the theory that clear
   instruction eliminating misinterpretations
   can greatly improve and accelerate
   learning.
 Definition provided by the National Institute of Direct Instruction
Direct Instruction
Madeline Hunter LPF
  Before the lesson is prepared, the
   teacher should have a clear idea of what
   the teaching objectives he or she will
   cover. What specifically should the
   student be able to do, understand, and
   care about as a result of the teaching.
  Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational
   Objectives
Bloom’s Reminder

        Old Version          New Version
  Evaluation            Creating
  Synthesis             Evaluating
  Analysis              Analyzing
  Application           Applying
  Comprehension         Understanding
  Knowledge             Remembering
 (high to low)
Madeline Hunter LPF
 Begin by stating the objectives.
 #1) Anticipatory Set
       List specific statements or activities
       you will use to focus students on the
       lesson for the day.
 Explain the objectives’ purposes.
 #2) Input
      What information is essential for the
      student to know before beginning and
      how will this skill be communicated to
      students?
Madeline Hunter LPF
  #3) Model
       If you will be demonstrating the skill or
       competence, how will this be done?
  #4) Check for Understanding
       Identify strategies to be used to
       determine if students have learned the
       objectives.
 5) Guided Practice
       List activities which will be used to
       guide student practice and provide a
       time frame for completing this practice.
Madeline Hunter LPF
 #6) Closure
     What method of review and evaluation
     will be used to complete the lesson?
 #7) Independent Practice
     List homework/seatwork assignment
     to be given to students to ensure they
     have mastered the skill without
     teacher guidance.
Constructivist
Definition provided by Jy Hsiao


   Basically, constructivism views that knowledge
    is not 'about' the world, but rather 'constitutive'
    of the world. Knowledge is not a fixed object, it
    is constructed by an individual through her own
    experience of that object. Constructivist
    approach to learning emphasizes authentic,
    challenging projects that include students,
    teachers and experts in the learning
    community. Its goal is to create learning
    communities that are more closely related to
    the collaborative practice of the real world.
Constructivist
Definition provided by B. Kristindiir


   In the view of constructivist, learning is a
    constructive process in which the learner is
    building an internal illustration of knowledge, a
    personal interpretation of experience. This
    representation is continually open to
    modification, its structure and linkages forming
    the ground to which other knowledge
    structures are attached. Learning is an active
    process in which meaning is accomplished on
    the basis of experience.
5E Model LPF
  Provide Introduction and Objectives
 #1) Engage
  Describe how the teacher will capture students’
    interest.
  What kind of questions should the students ask
    themselves after the engagement?
 # 2) Exploration
  Describe what hands-on/minds-on activities students
    will be doing.
  List “big idea” conceptual questions the teacher will use
    to encourage and/or focus students’ exploration
5E Model LPF

 # 3) Explanation
  Student explanations should precede
   introduction of terms or explanations by the
   teacher. What questions or techniques will the
   teacher use to help students connect their
   exploration to the concept under examination?
  List higher order thinking questions which
   teachers will use to solicit student explanations
   and help them to justify their explanations.
5E Model LPF
 #4)Elaboration
  Describe how students will develop a
   more sophisticated understanding of the
   concept.
  What vocabulary will be introduced and
   how will it connect to students’
   observations?
  How is this knowledge applied in our
   daily lives?
5E Model LPF

 #5) Evaluation
  How will students demonstrate that they
   have achieved the lesson objective?
  This should be embedded throughout the
   lesson as well as at the end of the
   lesson.
NIMITZ HIGH SCHOOL

  Nimitz High School teachers will develop
   lesson plans using the 5E Model or the
   Madeline Hunter Lesson Plan Format
  Each department will be expected to choose
   which format will be used for the teachers in
   that department.
  Department Chairpersons will ensure that
   teachers within the department are utilizing the
   lesson plan formats presented in this session.
Helpful Websites
 http://www.humboldt.edu/~tha1/models.htm
 http://coe.nevada.edu/ckeeler/LessonPlanTempla
   tes/hunter.html
 http://www.windows.ucar.edu/teacher_resources/
   sci_schools/HunterLessonP.pdf
 http://www.camden.rutgers.edu/dept-
   pages/education_ugrad/madeline_hunter.pdf
 http://www.cs.duke.edu/csed/alice/aliceInSchools
   /workshop08/lessonPlans/white/5ELessonPLa
   nInvitationtotheGame.pdf
Helpful Websites
  http://www1.appstate.edu/~goodmanj/elemscie
   nce/lessonplanning/5Elearningcyclelessonplan.
   htm
  http://www.siue.edu/~eabusha/FIVEELessonPl
   anLongLesson.doc
  http://www.salisbury.edu/biology/ESSA/Physics
   %20docs/physics%20files%2012%2006/bowlin
   g%20trip%20lesson%20plan%203%20mc.doc
  http://www.esi.utexas.edu/gk12/documents/200
   9%205E%20Lesson%20Plan%20Rubric.pdf
Helpful Websites

  http://www.roundrockisd.org/Modules/Sh
   owDocument.aspx?documentid=11118
  http://www.roundrockisd.org/Modules/Sh
   owDocument.aspx?documentid=11119
  http://www.roundrockisd.org/Modules/Sh
   owDocument.aspx?documentid=11120

								
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