73rd_United_States_Congress

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73rd United States Congress

73rd United States Congress
73rd United States Congress

Major legislation
First Session
The first session of Congress, known as the "Hundred Days," took place before the regular seating and was called by President Roosevelt specifically to pass two acts: • 1933-03-09 — The Emergency Banking Act (ch. 1, 48 Stat. 1) was enacted within four hours of its introduction. It was prompted by the "bank holiday" and was the first step in Roosevelt’s "first hundred days" of the New Deal. The Act was drafted in large part by officials appointed by the Hoover administration. The bill provided for the Treasury Department to initiate reserve requirements and a federal bailout to large failing institutions. It also removed the United States from the Gold Standard. All banks had to undergo a federal inspection to deem if they were stable enough to re-open. Within a week 1/3rd of the banks re-opened in the United States and faith was, in large part, restored in the banking system. The act had few opponents, only taking fire from the farthest left elements of Congress who wanted to nationalize banks altogether. • 1933-03-10 — The Economy Act of 1933. Roosevelt, in sending this act to Congress, warned that if it did not pass, the country faced a billion dollar deficit. The act balanced the federal budget by cutting the salaries of government employees and cutting pensions to veterans by as much as 15 percent. It intended to reassure the deficit hawks that the new president was fiscally conservative. Although the act was heavily protested by left-leaning members of congress, it passed by an overwhelming margin. The session also passed several other major pieces of legislation: • 1933-03-31 — The Civilian Conservation Corps Reforestation Relief Act (ch. 17, 48 Stat. 22) established the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) as a means to combat unemployment and poverty.

United States Capitol (1956) Duration: March 4, 1933 – January 3, 1935 President of the Senate: President pro tempore: Speaker of the House: Members: John N. Garner Key Pittman Henry T. Rainey 96 Senators 435 Representatives 5 Non-voting members Democratic Democratic

Senate Majority: House Majority: Sessions

1st: March 9, 1933 – June 15, 1933 2nd: January 3, 1934 – June 18, 1934 Special: March 4, 1933 – March 6, 1933 <72nd 74th>

The Seventy-third United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from March 4, 1933 to January 3, 1935, during the first two years of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s presidency. Because of the newly-ratified 20th Amendment, this Congress was actually about 2 months short of 2 years in duration. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Fifteenth Census of the United States in 1930. Both chambers had a Democratic majority.

Major events
• March 4, 1933 Franklin D. Roosevelt became President of the United States

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73rd United States Congress
that reversed anti-trust laws and permit trade associations to cooperate in stabilizing prices within their industries while making businesses ensure that the incomes of workers would rise along with their prices. It guaranteed to workers of the right of collective bargaining and helped spur major union organizing drives in major industries. In case consumer buying power lagged behind, thereby defeating the administration’s initiatives, the NIRA created the Public Works Administration (PWA), a major program of public works spending designed to alleviate unemployment, and moreover to transfer funds to certain beneficiaries. The NIRA established the most important, but ultimately least successful provision: a new federal agency known as the National Recovery Administration (NRA), which attempted to stabilize prices and wages through cooperative "code authorities" involving government, business, and labor. The NIRA was seen hailed as a miracle, responding to the needs of labor, business, unemployment, and the deflation crisis. The "sick chicken case" led to the Supreme Court invalidating NIRA in 1935.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs the Tennessee Valley Authority Act • 1933-05-12 — The Agricultural Adjustment Act (ch. 25, 48 Stat. 31) was part of a plan developed by Roosevelt’s Secretary of Agriculture, Henry A. Wallace, and was designed to protect American farmers from the uncertainties of the depression through subsidies and production controls. The act laid the frame for long-term government control in the planning of the agricultural sector. In 1936 the act was ruled unconstitutional by the United States Supreme Court because it taxed one group to pay for another. • 1933-05-12 — The Federal Emergency Relief Act (ch. 30, 48 Stat. 55) established the Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA) which develop public works projects to give work to the unemployed. • 1933-05-18 — The Tennessee Valley Authority Act (ch. 32, 48 Stat. 58) created the Tennessee Valley Authority to relieve the Tennessee Valley by a series of public works projects. • 1933-06-05 — The Securities Act of 1933 (ch. 38, 48 Stat. 74) established the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) as a way for the government to prevent a repeat of the Stock Market Crash of 1929. • 1933-06-12 — The Glass-Steagall Act of 1933 (ch. 89, 48 Stat. 162) was a follow up to the Glass-Steagall Act of 1932. Both acts sought to make banking safer and less prone to speculation. The 1933 act, however, established the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. • 1933-06-16 — The National Industrial Recovery Act ("NIRA," ch. 90, 48 Stat. 195) was an anti-deflation scheme promoted by the Chamber of Commerce

Second Session
• 1934-06-06 — The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (ch. 404, 48 Stat. 881) grew out of the Securities Act of 1933 and regulated participation in financial markets. • 1934-06-26 — The National Firearms Act of 1934 (ch. 757, 48 Stat. 1236) regulated machine guns, short-barreled rifles and shotguns.

Constitutional amendments
• The Twentieth Amendment to the United States Constitution became effective in January 1934. It had been ratified during the previous Congress on January 23, 1933. The amendment changed both the date for convening Congress and the date for beginning each term. Thus the first session of the 73rd Congress convened in March 1933, but the second session convened in January 1934. • The Twenty-first Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified on

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December 5, 1933. This amendment repealed the eighteenth amendment which mandated national prohibition in the United States, which had been in effect since the Volstead Act of 1919. The amendment is unusual due to the fact that it ratified by convention of states instead of the state legislatures.

73rd United States Congress
last hearing the Committee held in early 1936, attacked former Democratic President Woodrow Wilson, suggesting that Wilson had withheld essential information from Congress as it considered a declaration of war. Democratic leaders, including Appropriations Committee Chairman Carter Glass of Virginia, unleashed a furious response against Nye for "dirtdaubing the sepulcher of Woodrow Wilson." Standing before cheering colleagues in a packed Senate chamber, Glass slammed his fist onto his desk in protest until blood dripped from his knuckles, effectively prompting the Democratic caucus to withhold all funding for further hearings. Although the "Nye Committee" failed to achieve its goal of nationalizing the arms industry, it inspired three congressional neutrality acts in the mid-1930s that signaled profound American opposition to overseas involvement.

Hearings
"Merchants of Death"
• : United States Senate Special Committee on Investigation of the Munitions Industry • : Senator Gerald P. Nye (R) • : September 4, 1934-February 24, 1936 The Senate Munitions Committee came into existence solely for the purpose of this hearing. Although World War I had been over for sixteen years, there were revived reports that America’s leading munition companies had effectively influenced the United States into that conflict, which killed 53,000 Americans, hence the companies’ nickname "Merchants of Death." The Democratic Party, controlling the Senate for the first time since the first world war, used the hype of these reports to organize the hearing in hopes of nationalizing America’s munitions industry. The Democrats chose a Republican renowned for his ardent isolationist policies, Senator Gerald P. Nye of North Dakota, to head the hearing. Nye was typical of western agrarian progressives, and adamantly opposed America’s involvement in any foreign war. Nye declared at the opening of the hearing "when the Senate investigation is over, we shall see that war and preparation for war is not a matter of national honor and national defense, but a matter of profit for the few." Over the next eighteen months, the "Nye Committee" (as newspapers called it) held ninety-three hearings, questioning more than two hundred witnesses, including J.P. Morgan, Jr. and Pierre du Pont. Committee members found little hard evidence of an active conspiracy among arms makers, yet the panel’s reports did little to weaken the popular prejudice against "greedy munitions interests." The hearings overlapped the 73rd and 74th Congresses. They only came to an end after Chairman Nye provoked the Democratic caucus into cutting off funding. Nye, in the

Party summary
For details, see Changes in Membership, below.

Senate
There were 48 states with two Senators per state gave the Senate 96 seats. Membership changed with four deaths, one resignation, and two appointees who were replaced by electees.

House of Representatives
Membership changed with twelve deaths and three resignations.

Leadership
Contents: Senate: Majority (Democratic) leadership • Minority (Republican) leadership

House of Majority (Democratic) Representatives: leadership • Minority (Republican) leadership

Senate
• President of the Senate:[1] John Nance Garner (D) • President pro tempore: Key Pittman (D)

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73rd United States Congress
Total

Party (shading indicates majority caucus) Democratic Begin (1933-03-04) 1933-03-11 1933-05-24 1933-06-24 1933-10-06 1933-10-19 1933-11-03 1933-11-06 1934-01-01 1934-11-07 Latest voting share 63% 36% 1% 58 59 60 60 59 34 35 59 Republican 36 35 Farmer-Labor 1

Vacant 96 95 96 95 94 95 94 95 96 0 1 0 1 2 1 2 1 0

Majority (Democratic) leadership
• Majority Leader and Democratic Conference Chairman:[2] Joseph T. Robinson • Assistant Majority Leader (Majority Whip): J. Hamilton Lewis

Senate
Senators are popularly elected statewide every two years, with one-third beginning new six year terms with each Congress. Preceding the names in the list below are Senate class numbers, which indicate the cycle of their election. See also: Category:United States Senators See also: Category:United States congressional delegations by state

Minority (Republican) leadership
• Minority Leader: Charles L. McNary • Assistant Minority Leader (Minority Whip): Felix Herbert • Republican Conference Chairman: Charles L. McNary

Alabama
• 3. Hugo Black (D) • 2. John H. Bankhead II (D)

Nevada
• 1. Key Pittman (D) • 3. Patrick A. McCarran (D)

House of Representatives
• Speaker: Henry T. Rainey (D), March 9, 1933 – August 19, 1934 (Vacant thereafter)

Arizona
• 1. Henry F. Ashurst (D) • 3. Carl Hayden (D)

New Hampshire
• 2. Henry W. Keyes (R) • 3. Fred Brown (D)

Majority (Democratic) leadership
• Majority Leader: Joseph W. Byrns • Majority Whip: Arthur H. Greenwood • Democratic Caucus Chairman: Clarence F. Lea

Arkansas
• 2. Joseph Taylor Robinson (D) • 3. Hattie Carraway (D)

New Jersey
• 1. Hamilton F. Kean (R) • 2. William Warren Barbour (R)

Minority (Republican) leadership
• Minority Leader: Bertrand H. Snell • Minority Whip: Harry L. Englebright • Republican Conference Chair: Robert Luce

California
• 1. Hiram Johnson (R) • 3. William G. McAdoo (D)

New Mexico
• 2. Sam G. Bratton (D), resigned 1933-06-24

Members
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73rd United States Congress
Total

Party (shading indicates majority caucus) Democratic Begin (1933-03-04) 1933-04-22 1933-04-29 1933-05-12 1933-05-17 1933-06-19 1933-06-22 1933-06-24 1933-07-05 1933-08-27 1933-09-23 1933-10-03 1933-10-19 1933-11-05 1933-11-07 1933-11-14 1933-11-28 1933-12-19 1933-12-19 1933-12-28 1934-01-16 1934-01-30 1934-04-01 1934-05-01 1934-05-29 1934-06-08 1934-07-07 1934-08-19 1934-09-30 Latest voting share 72.4% 312 313 312 114 26.4% 1.2% 312 313 115 310 311 312 313 113 114 115 116 308 309 115 114 311 312 311 310 309 308 307 308 309 116 Republican 117 Farmer-Labor 5

Vacant 433 434 433 432 431 430 429 430 431 430 429 430 429 428 429 430 431 432 431 432 433 434 433 434 433 432 433 432 431 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 5 4 5 6 5 6 7 6 5 4 3 4 3 2 1 2 1 2 3 2 3 4

Colorado
• 2. Edward P. Costigan (D) • 3. Alva B. Adams (D)

Carl Hatch (D), appointed 1933-11-06 • 1. Bronson M. Cutting (R)

Connecticut
• 1. Frederic C. Walcott (R) • 3. Augustine Lonergan (D)

New York
• 1. Royal S. Copeland (D) • 3. Robert F. Wagner (D)

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73rd United States Congress

Delaware
• 2. Daniel O. Hastings (R) • 1. John G. Townsend, Jr. (R)

North Carolina
• 2. Josiah William Bailey (D) • 3. Robert R. Reynolds (D)

Louisiana
• 2. Huey P. Long (D) • 3. John H. Overton (D)

Tennessee
• 1. Kenneth D. McKellar (D) • 2. Nathan Lynn Bachman (D)

Florida
• 3. Duncan U. Fletcher (D) • 1. Park Trammell (D)

North Dakota
• 1. Lynn Frazier (R) • 3. Gerald P. Nye (R)

Maine
• 1. Frederick Hale (R) • 2. Wallace H. White, Jr. (R)

Texas
• 2. Morris Sheppard (D) • 1. Thomas T. Connally (D)

Georgia
• 2. Walter F. George (D) • 3. Richard B. Russell, Jr. (D)

Ohio
• 1. Simeon D. Fess (R) • 3. Robert J. Bulkley (D)

Maryland
• 3. Millard E. Tydings (D) • 1. Phillips Lee Goldsborough (R)

Utah
• 1. William H. King (D) • 3. Elbert D. Thomas (D)

Idaho
• 2. William E. Borah (R) • 3. James P. Pope (D)

Oklahoma
• 3. J. W. Elmer Thomas (D) • 2. Thomas P. Gore (D)

Massachusetts
• 1. David I. Walsh (D) • 2. Marcus A. Coolidge (D)

Vermont
• 3. Porter H. Dale (R), died October 6, 1933 Ernest W. Gibson (R), appointed 1933-10-19 • 1. Warren R. Austin (R)

Illinois
• 2. James H. Lewis (D) • 3. William H. Dieterich (D)

Oregon
• 2. Charles L. McNary (R) • 3. Frederick Steiwer (R)

Michigan
• 2. James Couzens (R) • 1. Arthur H. Vandenberg (R)

Indiana
• 1. Arthur Raymond Robinson (R) • 3. Frederick Van Nuys (D)

Pennsylvania
• 1. David A. Reed (R) • 3. James J. Davis (R)

Minnesota
• 1. Henrik Shipstead (FL) • 2. Thomas D. Schall (R)

Virginia
• 2. Carter Glass (D) • 1. Harry F. Byrd (D)

Iowa
• 2. L. J. Dickinson (R) • 3. Richard L. Murphy (D)

Rhode Island
• 2. Jesse H. Metcalf (R) • 1. Felix Hebert (R)

Mississippi
• 2. Pat Harrison (D) • 1. Hubert D. Stephens (D)

Washington
• 1. Clarence C. Dill (D) • 3. Homer T. Bone (D)

Kansas
• 2. Arthur Capper (R) • 3. George McGill (D)

South Carolina
• 3. Ellison D. Smith (D) • 2. James F. Byrnes (D)

Missouri
• 1. Roscoe C. Patterson (R) • 3. Joel Bennett Clark (D)

West Virginia
• 1. Henry D. Hatfield (R) • 2. Matthew M. Neely (D)

Kentucky
• 3. Alben W. Barkley (D) • 2. Marvel M. Logan (D)

South Dakota
• 3. Peter Norbeck (R) • 2. William J. Bulow (D)

Montana
• 1. Burton K. Wheeler (D) • 2. Vacant since 1933-03-04

Wisconsin
• 1. Robert M. La Follette, Jr. (R) • 3. F. Ryan Duffy (D)

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John E. Erickson (D), appointed 1933-03-13 James E. Murray (D), elected 1934-11-07

73rd United States Congress
Massachusetts — Michigan — Minnesota — Mississippi — Missouri — Montana — Nebraska — Nevada — New Hampshire — New Jersey — New Mexico — New York — North Carolina — North Dakota — Ohio — Oklahoma — Oregon — Pennsylvania — Rhode Island — South Carolina — South Dakota — Tennessee — Texas — Utah — Vermont — Virginia — Washington — West Virginia — Wisconsin — Wyoming — Non-voting members

Wyoming
• 1. John B. Kendrick (D), died November 3, 1933 Joseph C. O’Mahoney (D), appointed 1934-01-01 • 2. Robert D. Carey (R)

Nebraska
• 2. George W. Norris (R) • 1. Robert B. Howell (R), died March 11, 1933 William H. Thompson (D), appointed May 24, 1933 Richard C. Hunter (D), elected November 7, 1934

Alabama
• 1. John McDuffie (D) • 2. J. Lister Hill (D) • 3. Henry B. Steagall (D) • 4. Lamar Jeffers (D) • 5. Miles C. Allgood (D) • 6. William B. Oliver (D) • 7. William B. Bankhead (D) • 8. Edward B. Almon (D), until June 22, 1933 • Archibald Hill Carmichael (D), November 14, 1933 – End • 9. George Huddleston (D)

New Jersey
• 1. Charles A. Wolverton (R) • 2. Isaac Bacharach (R) • 3. William H. Sutphin (D) • 4. D. Lane Powers (R) • 5. Charles A. Eaton (R) • 6. Donald H. McLean (R) • 7. Randolph Perkins (R) • 8. George N. Seger (R) • 9. Edward A. Kenney (D) • 10. Fred A. Hartley, Jr. (R) • 11. Peter A. Cavicchia (R) • 12. Frederick R. Lehlbach (R) • 13. Mary T. Norton (D) • 14. Oscar L. Auf der Heide (D)

House of Representatives
The names of members of the House of Representatives elected statewide at-large, are preceded by an "A/L," and the names of those elected from districts, whether plural or single member, are preceded by their district numbers. Many of the congressional district numbers are linked to articles describing the district itself. Since the boundaries of the districts have changed often and substantially, the linked article may only describe the district as it exists today, and not as it was at the time of this Congress. See also: Category:Members of the United States House of Representatives See also: Category:United States congressional delegations by state Section contents: Alabama — Arizona —Arkansas — California — Colorado — Connecticut — Delaware — Florida — Georgia — Idaho — Illinois — Indiana — Iowa — Kansas — Kentucky — Louisiana — Maine — Maryland —

Arizona
• A/L. Isabella Selmes Greenway (D)

Arkansas
• 1. William J. Driver (D) • 2. John E. Miller (D) • 3. Claude A. Fuller (D) • 4. William B. Cravens (D) • 5. Heartsill Ragon (D), resigned June 16, 1933

New Mexico
• A/L. Dennis Chavez (D)

New York
• 1. Robert L. Bacon (R) • 2. William F. Brunner (D) • 3. George W. Lindsay (D) • 4. Thomas H. Cullen (D)

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5. David D. Terry (D), elected December 19, 1933 • 6. David Delano Glover (D) • 7. Tilman B. Parks (D) • 5. Loring M. Black, Jr. (D) • 6. Andrew L. Somers (D) • 7. John J. Delaney (D) • 8. Patrick J. Carley (D) • 9. Stephen A. Rudd (D) • 10. Emanuel Celler (D) • 11. Anning S. Prall (D) • 12. Samuel Dickstein (D) • 13. Christopher D. Sullivan (D) • 14. William I. Sirovich (D) • 15. John J. Boylan (D) • 16. John J. O’Connor (D) • 17. Theodore A. Peyser (D) • 18. Martin J. Kennedy (D) • 19. Sol Bloom (D) • 20. James J. Lanzetta (D) • 21. Joseph A. Gavagan (D) • 22. Anthony J. Griffin (D) • 23. Frank Oliver (D), until June 18, 1934 Vacant to end • 24. James M. Fitzpatrick (D) • 25. Charles D. Millard (R) • 26. Hamilton Fish (R) • 27. Philip A. Goodwin (R) • 28. Parker Corning (D) • 29. James S. Parker (R), died December 19, 1933

73rd United States Congress
• 2. Fred N. Cummings (D) • 3. John A. Martin (D) • 4. Edward T. Taylor (D) • 29. William D. Thomas (R), elected to fill vacancy • 30. Frank Crowther (R) • 31. Bertrand H. Snell (R) • 32. Francis D. Culkin (R) • 33. Fred J. Sisson (D) • 34. John D. Clarke (R), died November 5, 1933 • 34. Marian W. Clarke (R), elected to fill vacancy

Connecticut
• 1. Herman P. Kopplemann (D) • 2. William L. Higgins (R) • 3. Francis T. Maloney (D) • 4. Schuyler Merritt (R) • 5. Edward W. Goss (R) • A/L. Charles M. Bakewell (R)

California
• 1. Clarence F. Lea (D) • 2. Harry L. Englebright (R) • 3. Frank H. Buck (D) • 4. Florence P. Kahn (R) • 5. Richard J. Welch (R) • 6. Albert E. Carter (R) • 7. Ralph R. Eltse (R) • 8. John J. McGrath (D) • 9. Denver S. Church (D) • 10. Henry E. Stubbs (D) • 11. William E. Evans (R) • 12. John H. Hoeppel (D) • 13. Charles Kramer (D) • 14. Thomas F. Ford (D) • 15. William I. Traeger (R) • 16. John F. Dockweiler (D) • 17. Charles J. Colden (D) • 18. John H. Burke (D) • 19. Sam L. Collins (R) • 20. George Burnham (R)

Colorado
• 1. Lawrence Lewis (D)

• 35. Clarence E. Hancock (R) • A/L. Wilbur L. • 36. John Taber (R) Adams (D) • 37. Gale H. Stalker (R) Florida • 38. James L. • 1. J. Hardin Whitley (R) Peterson (D) • 39. James W. • 2. Robert A. Green Wadsworth, Jr. (R) (D) • 40. Walter G. • 3. Millard F. Andrews (R) Caldwell (D) • 41. Alfred F. • 4. J. Mark Wilcox Beiter (D) (D) • 42. James M. • A/L. William J. Mead (D) Sears (D) • 43. Daniel A. Reed (R) Georgia • A/L. John • 1. Homer C. Fitzgibbons (D) Parker (D) • A/L. Elmer E. • 2. Edward E. Cox Studley (D) (D) • 3. Bryant T. North Carolina Castellow (D) • 1. Lindsay C. • 4. Emmett M. Warren (D) Owen (D) • 2. John H. Kerr • 5. Robert (D) Ramspeck (D) • 6. Carl Vinson (D) • 3. Charles Laban Abernethy (D) • 7. Malcolm C. • 4. Edward W. Pou Tarver (D) (D), died April 1, • 8. Braswell Deen 1934 (D) • 4. Harold D. • 9. John S. Wood Cooley (D), (D)

Delaware

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• 10. Charles H. Brand (D), died May 17, 1933 • 10. Paul Brown (D), elected to fill vacancy elected to fill vacancy

73rd United States Congress
• 20. Henry T. Rainey (D), died August 19, 1934. Seat remained vacant. • 21. J. Earl Major (D) • 22. Edwin M. Schaefer (D) • 23. William W. Arnold (D) • 24. Claude V. Parsons (D) • 25. Kent E. Keller (D) • A/L. Martin A. Brennan (D) • A/L. Walter Nesbit (D) • 15. Robert T. Secrest (D) • 16. William R. Thom (D) • 17. Charles F. West (D) • 18. Lawrence E. Imhoff (D) • 19. John G. Cooper (R) • 20. Martin L. Sweeney (D) • 21. Robert Crosser (D) • 22. Chester C. Bolton (R) • A/L. Charles V. Truax (D) • A/L. Stephen M. Young (D)

• 5. Frank Hancock, Jr. (D) • 6. William B. Umstead (D) • 7. J. Bayard Clark (D) Idaho • 8. J. Walter • 1. Compton I. Lambeth (D) White (D) • 9. Robert L. • 2. Thomas C. Doughton (D) Coffin (D), died • 10. Alfred L. June 8, 1934. Seat Bulwinkle (D) remained vacant. • 11. Zebulon Weaver (D) Illinois • 1. Oscar De Priest (R) • 2. P. H. Moynihan (R) • 3. Edward A. Kelly (D) • 4. Harry P. Beam (D) • 5. Adolph J. Sabath (D) • 6. Thomas J. O’Brien (D) • 7. Leonard W. Schuetz (D) • 8. Leo Kocialkowski (D) • 9. Frederick A. Britten (R) • 10. James Simpson, Jr. (R) • 11. Frank R. Reid (R) • 12. John T. Buckbee (R) • 13. Leo E. Allen (R) • 14. Chester C. Thompson (D) • 15. J. Leroy Adair (D) • 16. Everett M. Dirksen (R) • 17. Frank Gillespie (D) • 18. James A. Meeks (D) • 19. Donald C. Dobbins (D)

North Dakota
• A/L. William Lemke (Nonpartisan Republican) • A/L. James H. Sinclair (R)

Indiana
• 1. William T. Schulte (D) • 2. George R. Durgan (D) • 3. Samuel B. Pettengill (D) • 4. James I. Farley (D) • 5. Glenn Griswold (D) • 6. Virginia E. Jenckes (D) • 7. Arthur H. Greenwood (D) • 8. John W. Boehne, Jr. (D) • 9. Eugene B. Crowe (D) • 10. Finly H. Gray (D) • 11. William H. Larrabee (D) • 12. Louis Ludlow (D)

Oklahoma
• 1. Wesley E. Disney (D) • 2. William W. Hastings (D) • 3. Wilburn Cartwright (D) • 4. Tom D. McKeown (D) • 5. Fletcher B. Swank (D) • 6. Jed Johnson (D) • 7. James V. McClintic (D) • 8. Ernest W. Marland (D) • A/L. Will Rogers (D)

Ohio
• 1. John B. Hollister (R) • 2. William E. Hess (R) • 3. Byron B. Harlan (D) • 4. Frank Le Blond Kloeb (D) • 5. Frank C. Kniffin (D) • 6. James G. Polk (D) • 7. Leroy T. Marshall (R) • 8. Thomas B. Fletcher (D) • 9. Warren J. Duffey (D) • 10. Thomas A. Jenkins (R) • 11. Mell G. Underwood (D) • 12. Arthur P. Lamneck (D) • 13. William L. Fiesinger (R) • 14. Dow W. Harter (D)

Oregon
• 1. James W. Mott (R) • 2. Walter M. Pierce (D) • 3. Charles H. Martin (D)

Iowa
• 1. Edward C. Eicher (D) • 2. Bernhard M. Jacobsen (D) • 3. Albert C. Willford (D) • 4. Fred Biermann (D)

Pennsylvania
• 1. Harry C. Ransley (R) • 2. James M. Beck (R), resigned September 30, 1934. Seat remained vacant.

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• 3. Alfred Marpole Waldron (R) • 4. George Washington Edmonds (R) • 5. James J. Connolly (R) • 6. Edward Lowber Stokes (R) • 7. George P. Darrow (R) Kansas • 8. James • 1. William P. Wolfenden (R) Lambertson (R) • 9. Henry Winfield • 2. U. S. Guyer (R) Watson (R), died • 3. Harold Clement August 27, 1933 McGugin (R) • 9. Oliver • 4. Randolph Walter Frey Carpenter (D) (R), elected to • 5. William A. fill vacancy Ayres (D) • 10. J. Roland • 6. Kathryn Kinzer (R) O’Loughlin • 11. Patrick J. McCarthy (D) Boland (D) • 7. Clifford R. Hope • 12. C. Murray (R) Turpin (R) Kentucky • 13. George F. Brumm (R), died • A/L. John Y. May 29, 1934 Brown, Sr. (D) • 14. William • A/L. Cap R. Emanuel Carden (D) Richardson (D) • A/L. Glover H. • 15. Louis T. Cary (D) McFadden (R) • A/L. Virgil • 16. Robert F. Rich Chapman (D) (R) • A/L. W. Voris • 17. J. William Gregory (D) Ditter (R) • A/L. Finley • 18. Benjamin Hamilton (D) Kurtz Focht (R) • A/L. Andrew J. • 19. Isaac Hoffer May (I) Doutrich (R) • A/L. Brent Spence • 20. Thomas (D) Cunningham • A/L. Fred M. Cochran (R) Vinson (D) • 21. Francis E. Louisiana Walter (D) • 22. Harry L. • 1. Joachim O. Haines (D) Fernandez (D) • 23. J. Banks Kurtz • 2. Paul H. (R) Maloney (D) • 24. J. Buell Snyder • 3. Numa F. (D) Montet (D) • 4. John N. Sandlin • 25. Charles I. Faddis (D) (D) • 5. Lloyd Thurston (R) • 6. Cassius C. Dowell (R) • 7. Otha D. Wearin (D) • 8. Fred C. Gilchrist (R) • 9. Guy M. Gillette (D)

73rd United States Congress
• 26. J. Howard Swick (R) • 27. Nathan L. Strong (R) • 28. William M. Berlin (D) • 29. Charles N. Crosby (D) • 30. J. Twing Brooks (D) • 7. René L. • 31. M. Clyde Kelly DeRouen (D) (R) • 8. Cleveland Dear • 32. Michael (D) Joseph Muldowney (R) Maine • 33. Henry • 1. Carroll L. Beedy Ellenbogen (D) (R) • 34. Matthew A. • 2. Edward C. Dunn (D) Moran, Jr. (D) • 3. John G. Rhode Island Utterback (D) • 1. Francis B. • 5. Riley J. Wilson (D) • 6. Bolivar E. Kemp (D), died June 19, 1933 • 6. Jared Y. Sanders, Jr. (D), elected to fill vacancy

Maryland
• 1. T. Alan Goldsborough (D) • 2. William P. Cole, Jr. (D) • 3. Vincent L. Palmisano (D) • 4. Ambrose J. Kennedy (D) • 5. Stephen W. Gambrill (D) • 6. David J. Lewis (D)

Condon (D) • 2. John M. O’Connell (D)

South Carolina
• 1. Thomas S. McMillan (D) • 2. Hampton P. Fulmer (D) • 3. John C. Taylor (D) • 4. John J. McSwain (D) • 5. James P. Richards (D) • 6. Allard H. Gasque (D)

Massachusetts
• 1. Allen T. Treadway (R) • 2. William J. Granfield (D) • 3. Frank H. Foss (R) • 4. Pehr G. Holmes (R) • 5. Edith Nourse Rogers (R) • 6. A. Piatt Andrew, Jr. (R) • 7. William P. Connery, Jr. (D) • 8. Arthur D. Healey (D) • 9. Robert Luce (R)

South Dakota
• 1. Fred H. Hildebrandt (D) • 2. Theodore B. Werner (D)

Tennessee
• 1. B. Carroll Reece (R) • 2. J. Will Taylor (R) • 3. Sam D. McReynolds (D) • 4. John Ridley Mitchell (D)

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
• 10. George H. Tinkham (R) • 11. John J. Douglass (D) • 12. John W. McCormack (D) • 13. Richard B. Wigglesworth (R) • 14. Joseph W. Martin, Jr. (R) • 15. Charles L. Gifford (R) • 5. Joseph W. Byrns (D) • 6. Clarence W. Turner (D) • 7. Gordon Browning (D) • 8. Jere Cooper (D) • 9. Edward H. Crump (D)

73rd United States Congress
• A/L. Einar Hoidale (D) • A/L. Magnus Johnson (FL) • A/L. Harold Knutson (R) • A/L. Paul John Kvale (FL) • A/L. Ernest Lundeen (FL) • A/L. Francis Shoemaker (FL) • 17. Thomas L. Blanton (D) • 18. Marvin Jones (D) • A/L. Joseph Weldon Bailey, Jr. (D) • A/L. Sterling Price Strong (D) • A/L. George Butler Terrell (D)

Texas

• 1. Wright Patman (D) Michigan • 2. Martin Dies, Jr. • 1. George G. (D) Sadowski (D) • 3. Morgan G. • 2. John C. Lehr (D) Sanders (D) • 3. Joseph L. • 4. Sam Rayburn Hooper (R) (D) • 4. George Ernest • 5. Hatton W. Foulkes (D) Sumners (D) • 5. Carl E. Mapes • 6. Luther A. (D) Johnson (D) • 6. Claude E. Cady • 7. Clay Stone (D) Briggs (D), died • 7. Jesse P. Wolcott April 29, 1933 (R) • 7. Clark W. • 8. Michael J. Hart Thompson (D) (D), elected to • 9. Harry W. fill vacancy Musselwhite (D) • 8. Joe H. Eagle (D) • 10. Roy O. • 9. Joseph J. Woodruff (D) Mansfield (D) • 11. Prentiss M. • 10. James P. Brown (D) Buchanan (D) • 12. W. Frank • 11. Oliver H. James (R) Cross (D) • 13. Clarence J. • 12. Fritz G. McLeod (R) Lanham (D) • 14. Carl M. • 13. William D. Weideman (D) McFarlane (D) • 15. John D. • 14. Richard M. Dingell, Sr. (D) Kleberg (D) • 16. John Lesinski, • 15. Milton H. Sr. (D) West (D), elected • 17. George A. to fill vacancy Dondero (R) caused by Minnesota resignation of John Nance • A/L. Henry M. Garner when he Arens (FL) became vice • A/L. Ray P. Chase president (R) • 16. R. Ewing • A/L. Theodore Thomason (D) Christianson (R)

Mississippi
• 1. John E. Rankin (D) • 2. Wall Doxey (D) • 3. William M. Whittington (D) • 4. T. Jeff Busby (D) • 5. Ross A. Collins (D) • 6. William M. Colmer (D) • 7. Lawrence Russell Ellzey (D)

Utah
• 1. Abe Murdock (D) • 2. J. W. Robinson (D)

Vermont
• A/L. Ernest W. Gibson (R), resigned October 19, 1933 • A/L. Charles A. Plumley (R), elected to fill vacancy

Missouri
• A/L. Clarence Cannon (D) • A/L. James Robert Claiborne (D) • A/L. John J. Cochran (D) • A/L. Clement C. Dickinson (D) • A/L. Richard M. Duncan (D) • A/L. Frank H. Lee (D) • A/L. Ralph F. Lozier (D) • A/L. Jacob L. Milligan (D) • A/L. Milton A. Romjue (D) • A/L. James Edward Ruffin (D) • A/L. Joseph B. Shannon (D) • A/L. Clyde Williams (D) • A/L. Reuben T. Wood (D)

Virginia
• A/L. S. Otis Bland (D) • A/L. Thomas G. Burch (D) • A/L. Colgate W. Darden, Jr. (D) • A/L. Patrick H. Drewry (D) • A/L. John W. Flannagan, Jr. (D) • A/L. Andrew J. Montague (D) • A/L. A. Willis Robertson (D) • A/L. Howard W. Smith (D) • A/L. Clifton A. Woodrum (D)

Washington
• 1. Marion Anthony Zioncheck (D) • 2. Monrad C. Wallgren (D) • 3. Martin F. Smith (D) • 4. Knute Hill (D)

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
• 5. Samuel Billingsley Hill (D) • 6. Wesley Lloyd (D)

73rd United States Congress

Montana
• 1. Joseph P. Monaghan (D) • 2. Roy E. Ayers (D)

Non-voting members
• Alaska Territory. Anthony J. Dimond (D) • Hawaii Territory. Lincoln L. McCandless (D) • Philippines: Pedro Guevara (Nacionalista) • Philippines: Camilo Osias (Nacionalista) • Puerto Rico: Santiago Iglesias (Coalitionist)

West Virginia

Nebraska
• • • • •

• 1. Robert L. Ramsay (D) 1. John H. • 2. Jennings Morehead (D) Randolph (D) 2. Edward R. • 3. Lynn Hornor Burke (D) (D), died 3. Edgar Howard September 23, (D) 1933 4. Ashton C. • 3. Andrew Shallenberger (D) Edmiston, Jr. 5. Terry Carpenter (D), elected to (D) fill vacancy • 4. George William Johnson (D) • 5. John Kee (D) • 6. Joe L. Smith (D)

Nevada
• A/L. James G. Scrugham (D)

Changes in Membership
Senate House of Representatives

New Hampshire
• 1. William Nathaniel Rogers (D) • 2. Charles W. Tobey (R)

Wisconsin
• 1. George Washington Blanchard (R) • 2. Charles W. Henney (D) • 3. Gardner R. Withrow (Prog) • 4. Randolph Joseph Cannon (D) • 5. Thomas David Patrick O’Malley (D) • 6. Michael K. Reilly (D) • 7. Gerald J. Boileau (Prog) • 8. James Frederic Hughes (D) • 9. James A. Frear (R) • 10. Hubert H. Peavey (R)

Employees
• Architect of the Capitol: David Lynn

Senate
• Secretary of the Senate: Edwin A. Halsey • Chaplain: ZeBarney Thorne Phillips (Episcopalian) • Sergeant at Arms: Chesley W. Jurney

House of Representatives
• Clerk: South Trimble • Chaplain: James Shera Montgomery (Methodist) • Sergeant at Arms: Kenneth Romney • Doorkeeper: Joseph J. Sinnott • See also: Rules of the House: "Other officers and officials"

References
[1] The Vice President of the United States serves as the President of the Senate. See U.S. Constitution, Article I, Section 3, Clause 4 [2] The Democratic Senate Majority Leader also serves as the Chairman of the Democratic Conference.

Wyoming
• A/L. Vincent Carter (R)

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
State Senator Reason for Vacancy Died March 11, 1933

73rd United States Congress
Successor Date of Successor’s Installation May 24, 1933 November 6, 1933

Nebraska Robert Howell (R) New Mexico Sam Bratton (D)

William H. Thompson (D)

Resigned June 24, Carl Hatch (D) 1933 when appointed Associate Justice of the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit Died October 6, 1933 Died November 3, 1933 Ernest Gibson (R)

Vermont Porter Dale (R) Wyoming John Kendrick (D)

October 19, 1933

Joseph C. O’Mahoney (D) January 1, 1934 November 7, 1934

Nebraska William Thompson (D) Duly elected sucRichard Hunter (D) cessors qualified on James E. Murray (D) Montana John Erickson (D) November 6, 1934

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
District Vacator Reason for Vacancy

73rd United States Congress
Successor Date of successor’s installation April 22, 1933 October 3, 1933

Texas 15th Arizona Atlarge Texas 7th

Vacant Vacant

John Garner had resigned at the end of the previous Congress Lewis W. Douglas (D) had resigned at the end of the previous Congress Died April 29, 1933

Milton H. West Isabella Greenway (D) Clark W. Thompson (D) David D. Terry (D) Paul Brown (D) Jared Y. Sanders, Jr. (D)

Clay Stone Briggs (D)

June 24, 1933

Arkansas 5th Heartsill Ragon (D) Georgia 10th Charles H. Brand (D) Louisiana 6th Bolivar E. Kemp (D)

Resigned May 12, 1933 Died May 17, 1933 Died June 19, 1933

December 19, 1933 July 5, 1933 May 1, 1934

Alabama 8th Edward B. Almon (D)

Died June 22, 1933

Archibald Hill November 14, Carmichael 1933 (D) Oliver Walter November 7, Frey (D) 1933 Andrew Edmiston, Jr. (D) Charles A. Plumley (R) Marian W. Clarke (R) William D. Thomas (R) Harold D. Cooley (D) November 28, 1933 January 16, 1934 December 28, 1933 January 30, 1934 July 7, 1934

Pennsylvania Henry Win- Died August 27, 1933 9th field Watson (R) West Virgin- Lynn ia 3rd Hornor (D) Vermont At- Ernest W. large Gibson (R) New York 34th New York 29th North Carolina 4th John D. Clarke (R) James S. Parker (R) Edward W. Pou (D) Died September 23, 1933

Appointed U.S. Senator October 19, 1933 Died November 5, 1933 Died December 19, 1933 Died April 1, 1934 Died May 29, 1934 Died June 8, 1934 Resigned June 18, 1934 Died August 19, 1934 Resigned September 30, 1934

Pennsylvania George F. 13th Brumm (R) Idaho 2nd New York 23rd Illinois 20th Thomas C. Coffin (D) Frank Oliver (D) Henry T. Rainey (D)

Seat remained vacant until next Congress Seat remained vacant until next Congress Seat remained vacant until next Congress Seat remained vacant until next Congress Seat remained vacant until next Congress

Pennsylvania James M. 2nd Beck (R)

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/73rd_United_States_Congress" Categories: United States Congresses, 1933 in the United States, 1934 in the United States

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73rd United States Congress

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