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					 An Economic Impact Survey
 of the Calgary Corporate &
General Aviation Communities




         RP Erickson & Associates
    AVIATION CONSULTANTS To INDUSTRY
                 April 1998
                                   EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


This report documents the economic impact activity of 115 firms, operating within a 50 km radius of the
city of Calgary, who were identified as being active in 1997 in corporate aviation or in the general aviation
[GA] community.

The response rate to the survey questionnaire was exceptional: a 90 percent return rate to the actual
questionnaire and a 98 percent return rate for core data requests. Only two firms chose not to participate in
the survey.

In 1997, the Calgary area corporate and general aviation communities supported a significant level of
economic activity.

In direct terms, this sector contributed:

                  1534 full-time jobs
                  $69.2 million in annual labour income
                  $176.5 million in operations & maintenance expenditures
                  $36.8 million in annual tax base, including $3.1 million paid in municipal taxes
                  $310.4 million in gross revenue activity

When indirect and induced forms of economic activity are included, this sector contributed:

                  4938 ful1-time jobs
                  $207.5 million in annual labour income
                  $337.9 million in value-added GDP activity

Although GA activities in the Calgary area are scattered throughout 11 airports within a 50 km radius of the
city, the industry remains concentrated at the Calgary International airport. Aside from some minor charter
activity at the Springbank airport, all of Calgary's corporate aviation activities are conducted at the Calgary
International airport.

In addition to the above quantifiable economic benefits, the GA sector provides a sound foundation of
aviation expertise which is of substantial benefit to commercial aviation. Additionally, it provides a wide
expanse of social benefits to the residents of the Calgary area, ranging from recreational opportunities
through air tourism development to volunteerism. Corporate aviation's social benefits are more restricted
but also offer career development benefits to its employees and value-added time efficiencies to the
executives which it serves.

Unquestionably, in 1997 the corporate and GA sector in the Calgary area provided substantive economic
and social benefits to the local economy, within the province and to the economy of Canada as a whole.
            AN ECONOMIC IMPACT SURVEY
       OF THE CALGARY CORPORATE & GENERAL
              AVIATION COMMUNITIES


                                      Table of Contents
      Executive Summary                                                   ii
      Table of Contents                                                  iii
      List of Tables                                                     iv



Chapter I -          Introduction

      1.1   About this report                                             1
      1.2   Background                                                    2
      1.3   Inclusion criteria                                            3
      1.4   Study area                                                    5
      1.5   The economic impact modelling process                         6
      1.6   A word about the multipliers used in this study               8



Chapter II -         An EconomicImpact Survey of the Calgary Corporate
                     & General Aviation Communities
      2.1    Economic Impact of Corporate
            Aviation at the Calgary International Airport                12
      2.2   Economic Impact of General
            Aviation at the Calgary International Airport                14
      2.3   Economic Impact of the
            Aviation Community at the Springbank Airport                 16
      2.4   Economic Impact of the
            Aviation Community at all Other Airports                     18
      2.5   Total Economic Impact of the Calgary
            Corporate & General Aviation Communities                     20
      2.6   Other Significant Socio-economic Factors                     24
      2.7   Conclusions                                                  25



Appendices

      I        Survey Questionnaire
      II       Aviation Directories
List of Tables

       Calgary Corporate Aviation: 1997 Economic Impact        13
       Calgary General Aviation: 1997 Economic Impact          15
       Springbank Aviation Community: 1997 Economic Impact     17
       All Other Calgary Area Airports: 1997 Economic Impact   19
       Calgary Area Corporate & General Aviation:
       1997 Direct Economic Impact                             22
       Calgary Area Corporate & General Aviation:
       1997 Total Economic Impact                              23
                                          Chapter I

                                         Introduction




1.1     About this report

The report was undertaken by RP Erickson & Associates for the Calgary Transportation Authority under
the direction of Mr. Robert Edwards, Chairman, General Aviation Committee. The purpose of the study is

to provide a factual basis for understanding the economic impact of corporate and general aviation in the

Calgary region. It is felt that an understanding of these elements will assist in addressing the future
requirements of this industry segment.



Please direct any enquiries regarding this study to Mr. Don Brownie, Executive Director, Calgary
Transportation Authority at (403) 266-6716.
1.2      Background

Calgary's corporate and general aviation (GA) community is an integral part of a vibrant local commercial

aviation industry that pumps hundreds of millions of dollars in economic activity into the Calgary region.

Within a fifty kilometre radius of Calgary is Canada's fourth largest airport - the Calgary International

Airport ["y passenger activity], the country's fourth largest 'reliever' airport at Springbank [by aircraft

movements], and eleven smaller general aviation airports ranging from the Beiseker Airport in the NE to

the Okotoks AirPark south of the city. This infrastructure supports over one hundred firms offering diverse

services such as pilot & flight training; private & recreational flying; corporate aviation; small rotary and

fixed-wing charter firms; hot air ballooning; glider & sport parachuting; and, a range of specialized aviation

maintenance and support functions. Calgary's corporate aviation community is centred upon the Calgary

International Airport, where 21 major corporate flight departments exist.



In commissioning this study, the Calgary Transportation Authority and the Calgary Airport Authority have

recognized the importance of the corporate and GA sector to Calgary and a requirement to catalogue,

document and assess the socio-economic importance this sector provides to the community. The study will

assist Calgary's aviation practitioners by providing an important core data set upon which future

development and planning can be based.



The study will also provide its sponsors with a valuable communications tool. In particular, the economic

impact assessment will serve to heighten political, business and community awareness as to the relative

importance of the Calgary and area corporate and general aviation sectors. It will also serve as an important

base-line against which future development or investments may be measured.
1.3      Inclusion criteria

One of the earliest challenges faced by the consultants and the General Aviation Committee was to define

what general aviation is and what forms of economic activity would be included in this report. We

approached a number of national and supranational organizations seeking definitions for general aviation.

Defining corporate aviation activity was a far easier task, as we were able to obtain a comprehensive

definition from the Canadian Business Aircraft Association. Oddly, no consensus on what constituted GA

activity could be reached in our discussions with several provincial aviation councils, Transport Canada,

the Canadian Owners and Pilots Association, the Recreational Aircraft Association, the Air Transport

Association of Canada, the American Owners and Pilots Association, and the Federal Aviation

Administration nor were IATA or ICAO helpful. Ultimately we used the Canadian Aviation Regulations

[CARs]1 as a starting point for defining GA commercial activities, and later filled out our criteria through a

process of internal discussion with input from the Steering Committee.




Within this report, corporate aviation is defined as:


          "Corporate aviation is the use of aircraft, owned or leased, and operated by a corporation or a
          business firm for the transportation of personnel or cargo in furtherance of the corporation or
          firm's business in which the aircraft are operated by professional flight crews receiving a direct
          salary or compensation for the piloting services provided".

                                                                The Canadian Business Aircraft Association
                                                                                                  Ottawa




1Canada's aviation safety regulations are contained in Transport Canada's Canadian
Aviation Regulations [CARs]. The CARs contain precise definitions for commercial
aviation activity which the authors of this report have found useful for defining small-
scale, commercial aviation activity which we include in the GA category.
Within this report, general aviation is defined as:

               all aviation activity pursuant to the permitted activity contained in CARs
                 under: 'Aerial Work' [702.01]; 'Air Taxi' [703.01]; and, 'Commuter'
                 [704.01] regulations - essentially, all non-scheduled, non 'common
                 carriage' aviation activity performed for-hire by aircraft of less than
                 50,000 lb maximum take-off weight [MTOW] and operated with fewer
                 than 19 seats;

               all pilot and flight training activities;

               all aviation services which support private & recreational flying;

               all hot air ballooning activities;

               all glider/soaring and sport parachuting activities;

               all aviation maintenance & specialized repair or support functions;

               all educational, promotion or support efforts whose goal is to further
                 general aviation interests;

               that portion of government-provided services, also including NAV
                 CANADA, required by the general or corporate aviation community;
                 and,

               that portion of airport fuel sales utilized by the corporate or general
                 aviation community.
General aviation is not:
              any scheduled or charter commercial air carrier activity undertaken at the
                Calgary International airport main airport terminal building, and/or any
                activity operated under CARs [705.01];

               any mainline air freight or courier operations feeding trunk services into
                 major integrator hubs;

               any ad-hoc, air freight charter operations undertaken by turbine jet
                 aircraft with an MTOW of greater than 50,000 lb;

               on-airport, non-aviation commercial services, such as gas stations and
                 restaurants;

               off-airport support professional services in the fields of banking,
                 accounting, legal or medical services; and,

               aerospace manufacturing.
1.5      Study area

The RFP called for a review of airports within a 50 km radius of Calgary. The

1988 Alberta Air Facilities Map produced by the Alberta Aviation Council for

Alberta Transportation depicts nine 'general aviation' airports within a 50 km

radius of Calgary, in addition to the major Calgary International and

Springbank Airports.



These are:
                 Airdrie Airport ft                                 Beiseker Airport ft
                 DeWinton Airport ft                                DeWinton/Highwood ft
                 Okotoks Air Park ft                                Indus - Winters Aire Park ft
                 Strathmore/Nelson Airfield *                       Strathmore/Jackson Airfield *
                 Strathmore McClain Airfield *


             Certified aerodromes are those which require the operator to maintain and operate the site in
             accordance with applicable Transport Canada standards. Regular inspections are conducted by
             Transport Canada to confirm compliance.

             Registered aerodromes are those listed in the Canada Flight Supplement but are not certified.
             Information for these airports is provided by the owner/operator, and is verified by letter from
             the operator once a year with Transport Canada who maintain~ a three to five year inspection
             cycle for such airports.

       * Not in operation at the time of the survey.




All of the above airports were visited by the consultants and all aviation related, commercial activities

which met the Inclusion Criteria were reviewed. In addition to these airports two other airfields - located at

Okotoks West and wholly owned by the Cu Nim Gliding Club, and the Westport Heliport within the

western reaches of Calgary's city limits, were also reviewed.
1.6 The economic impact modelling process

Economic impact analysis is based on the premise that operations within various industries in an economy

are closely related or linked to each other; that is, an increase in the activity levels in one industry will

produce a positive 'domino' effect on other industries. Economists discuss the impact that one sector has on

another in terms of indirect and induced effects. The total economic impact is the sum of the direct, indirect

and induced effects.



In this report:


 Direct economic effects are those which include all of the economic activity required to mount a corporate
          or general aviation presence at any of the eleven airports in the study area.

 Indirect economic effects are those due to the parallel co-activities which support corporate or general
          aviation operations. Some broad examples would be: the inputs required to find, process and
          ship refined oil products used aboard aircraft, the office supply industry which supports aviation
          administration functions, or the construction industry which is impacted by expansion or
          renovation plans, etc. This economic activity is accounted for by multipliers which attempt to
          quantify the interactive linkages within the economy impacted by corporate and GA's direct
          activity.

 Induced economic effects are those due to the overall increase in the goods and services produced within
         an economy, arising from the spending power of direct and indirect employees. For example, the
         auto mechanic whose services are in demand by an employee of a corporate or general aviation
         firm who requires the use of his/her car to get to/from the airport, or the movie theatre operation
         which benefits from the disposable income of corporate or general aviation workers, etc. As in
         the case in calculating the indirect benefits, multipliers are used to identify induced activity.



Southern Alberta's aviation industry is a good example of a highly integrated sectoral industry which has

significant linkages throughout the domestic economy. The multipliers associated with the aviation sector

are higher than most primary sectors and, as such, the potential impact to the overall economy linked to an

increase in corporate or general activity is significant.
The most common economic measures used in economic impact surveys are employment
[broken down to include full-time equivalents [FTEs] and annual labour income], value-
added gross domestic product [GDP], taxes and total output - more commonly referred to
as gross revenue activity.


In this report:

         Employment is measured by direct FTEs and by annual income of the employees required to
         mount a corporate or general aviation presence. FTEs are expressed in person-years and labour
         income by dollar value. Employment multipliers are used to generate the associated indirect and
         induced impacts.

        Value-added Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is defined as the amount of value to the local
        economy created through operations and maintenance expenditures, net the cost of 'leakages' to
        other parts of the country. Leakages outside the Alberta economy are accounted for by a ratio
        multiplier produced by Statistics Canada. A GDP multiplier is used to generate the associated
        indirect and induced impacts.


         Total Taxes is the aggregate of all of the federal, provincial and municipal taxes paid. The
         questionnaire asked that municipal taxes be also stated separately~. No multiplier effort has been
         extended to taxes due to the differing federal, provincial and municipal tax tiers and since both
         commodity and non-commodity tax information has been sought.

         Gross Output/Total Revenues is the aggregate of all of the goods and services, capital costs and
         profits resulting from corporate or general aviation activities. However, this category is prone to
         the 'double counting' of inputs and also features significant leakages to other areas of the country.
         Thus, value-added GDP is an indicator generally preferred by economists as a more accurate
         reflection of local economic activity. No multiplier effort has been extended in this study to gross
         output/total revenue activity.




   is the consultant's observation from feedback received from the questionnaire
2 It
respondents that this category of data was the most difficult to accurately access. Most
noted that they were unable to precisely assess federal payroll contributions and the
varying levels of excise and provincial fuel taxes. As a result, it is suggested that this
category of data be cautiously interpreted.
  1.7      A word about the multipliers used in this report

  Multipliers are used to infer indirect and induced economic activity from a measure of direct economic

  activity. Multipliers are not directly observed; they are inferred from an economic model. By far the direct

  measure is the most accurate, however, multipliers are virtually the only tools available to researchers

  attempting to identify the overall impact of a sectoral activity within a national or regional economy.



  Considerable thought was directed at choosing the most appropriate multipliers for this report. The

  consultants have chosen an Alberta-specific, Statistics Canada open multiplier set derived from that

  agency's 1984 Input-Output Model, under the 'Air Transport & Services Incidentals' category contained in

  the Make/Use/Demand Matrix, The Input-Output Structure of the Canadian Economy, 1992, Statistics

  Canada, Cat. No 15-201. This is the latest Catalogue 15-201 available and was released in February, 1997.



  In this report, the absolute multipliers applied to the aggregate direct corporate and general aviation data

  collected are:

                                                                       Labour             Value-added
                                       Employment                      Income                   GDP
         Direct + Indirect                1.79                          1.55                     1.74
         Induced                          1.43                          1.45                      1.39
         Total                           3.22                           3.00                     3.13



A ratio multiplier of 1: 0.61179 is used to convert Operations and
Maintenance expenditures to value-added GDP, that is for every
$1,000,000 of O&M direct expenditure activity, the Statistics Canada
model identifies $611,790 of value-added. GDP activity as occurring in
Alberta.
                                      Chapter II
                    An Economic Impact Survey
                    Of the Calgary Corporate &
                   General Aviation Communities

The Calgary area supports an active corporate aviation sector. Since Calgary is the
headquarters for Canada's oil and gas sector, it is not surprising that a number of major
corporate flight departments exist to support the multi-billion dollar activities of these
companies. The level of corporate activity in the Calgary area has also provided
opportunities for the growth of several, significant corporate charter companies. Further,
two major corporate FBOs can also trace their presence to the overall level of corporate
aviation activity generated by Calgary's head office environment. Corporate aviation in
the Calgary area is centred within the McCall South and McKnight aviation parks at the
Calgary International Airport. Several, smaller charter firms operating from the
Springbank airport reported a "very minor amount" of corporate aviation activity.


General aviation in the Calgary area is a multi-faceted sector with diverse activities
ranging from private pilot operations, flight training, soaring, ballooning, sport
parachuting, small charter operations - both fixed and rotary wing - all of which are
supported by a multiform aviation sales, professional services, maintenance and support
sector. Calgary's GA community is located primarily in the McCall South and McKnight
aviation parks at the Calgary International airport and at the Springbank 'reliever' airport.
Some GA firms have located in the adjacent industrial parks surrounding the Calgary
International airport. Significant specific GA activities also occur at several of
the smaller airports within 50 km of Calgary; such as the concentration of sport
parachuting activities at the Airdrie airport and the soaring/gliding activity at the Okotoks
West airfield.


As this Chapter will depict, the economic impact of corporate and general aviation in the
Calgary area is significant. It has been measured in terms of employment [FTEs], labour
income, total operations and maintenance expenditures [converted to value-added GDP
output as detailed in Section 1.6], total taxes, municipal taxes, and gross revenues. Data
has been sought for the 1997 calendar year. These leading indicators are expressed in
dollar values and in person-years of employment [FTEs]. Direct, indirect and induced
forms of activity have been considered for employment and GDP output.


The data compiled in this study was obtained via a questionnaire circulated amongst 110
firms identified as meeting the Inclusion Criteria [Section 1.3], and located within the
Study Area [Section 1.4]. A copy of the Survey Questionnaire is located in Appendix I.
Where necessary, only that portion of a firm or agency's overall activities which met the
Inclusion Criteria has been included [e.g. all government organizations were asked to
differentiate and to only include their activities directly related to supporting corporate&
or GA]. Throughout the study, a conservative approach has been intentionally
undertaken.


Key principals at each identified firm were visited by the consultants where the
underlying rationale for undertaking the study was explained, where the objectives of the
study could be examined; the value of their participation fully explored; where the
confidentiality of their data could be assured; and, where each of the firms or
organizations could be invited to a Participants' Seminar. Further, this exposure permitted
the consultants an opportunity to enquire as to the geographic dimensions of a firm or
organization's overall activities. As noted, our intent was to undertake a conservative
approach in arriving at the economic impact attributable to GA and corporate aviation in
the Calgary area
Therefore, we only sought to document that economic activity which was benefiting the
Calgary area. Thus, where a firm may have maintained a head office function at Calgary
and field operations elsewhere in the province, Canada or abroad, we ensured that only
that economic activity which occurred in the Calgary area was documented.


This approach resulted in an exceptional response rate. Of the 115 firms surveyed, 104
returned or completed the questionnaire and another 9 provided incomplete information.
Two firms chose not to participate. This resulted in a 90 percent response rate to the
questionnaire, and a 98 percent response rate to what was considered the critical
information base - employment by FTEs, labour income, and O&M expenditures which
was provided by the 9 firms who returned incomplete results. The economic activities of
the two, smaller GA firms choosing not to participate were estimated.


The names of the firms and organizations surveyed are located in the Aviation
Directories included in Appendix II. It is noted that several firms operate under two or
more trade names, although we may have only included a single contact in a given
Directory for that organization's overall activities.


The economic impact of the Calgary area corporate and general aviation community is
provided in Section 2.5. The overall impact has been sub-divided into four categories; the
impacts associated with corporate aviation [Section 2.1]; the Calgary International airport
general aviation community [Section
2.2]; the aviation community at the Springbank airport [Section 2.3]; and, the combined
economic activity of all of the aviation firms located at the 11 other airports within the
study area [Section 2.4].
2.1      Economic Impact of Corporate Aviation at the Calgary
International Airport



Within Calgary's corporate aviation community 28 firms or organizations were identified as meeting the

Inclusion Criteria. Virtually all of this activity occurs on-airport at the Calgary International airport.



A total of 269 annual full-time equivalent employees can be attributed to Calgary's corporate aviation
sector. Their aggregate labour income for the 1997 calendar year was identified at $16.995 million. Total

O&M expenditures were $46.357 million. A total tax base of $8.930 million was identified, of which

$1.053 million was paid in municipal taxes to the City of Calgary. The gross revenues for this sector were

identified at $30.955 million, but it is important to note the 16 'not-for-profit' flight departments reporting

no revenue activity.



When the indirect and induced multipliers are applied to the above direct economic activity, the significant

impact of Calgary's corporate aviation sector on the local economy can be realized. Within the Calgary

area, 866 full-time, annual jobs are dependent upon corporate aviation, generating an annual labour income

of $50.985 million. The total value-added GDP activity created by corporate aviation in 1997 was $88.769

million.



This information is provided in tabular form on the following page.
2.2 Economic Impact of General Aviation at the Calgary International
                                                      Airport



Within the Calgary International airport's general aviation community, 58 on and off-airport firms or

organizations were identified as meeting the Inclusion Criteria.



A total of 1118 annual full-time equivalent employees can be attributed to the Calgary' International

airport's GA sector. Their aggregate labour income for 1997 was identified at $46.079 million. Total O&M

expenditures were $1 13.987 million. A total tax base of $25.519 million was identified, of which $1.947

million was paid in municipal taxes to the City of Calgary. The gross revenues for this sector were

identified at $258.875 million.



When the indirect and induced multipliers are applied to the above direct economic activity, the significant

impact of Calgary's GA sector on the local economy can be realized. Within the Calgary area 3600 full-

time jobs are dependent upon GA, generating an annual labour income of $138.237 million. The total

value-added GDP activity created by GA at the Calgary International airport in 1997 was $2 18.274

million.


This information is provided in tabular form on the following page.
2.3 Economic Impact of the Aviation Community at the Springbank Airport




At the Springbank airport 21 firms or organizations were identified as meeting the Inclusion Criteria. All

of the direct economic activity created by the Springbank airport occurs on-airport.



A total of 117 annual full-time equivalent employees can be attributed to Springbank's GA sector. Their

aggregate labour income for 1997 was identified at $5.033 million. Total O&M expenditures were $15.299

million. A total tax base of $2.212 million was identified, of which $66,000 was paid in municipal taxes to

the Municipal District of Rockyview. The gross revenues for this sector were identified at $18.632 million.



When the indirect and induced multipliers are applied to the above direct economic activity, the significant

impact of Springbank's GA sector can be realized. Within the area 377 full-time jobs are dependent upon

GA, generating an annual labour income of $15.099 million. The total value-added GDP activity created by

GA at the Springbank airport in 1997 was $29.296 million.


                    This information is provided in tabular form on the following page.
2.4 Economic Impact of the Aviation Community at all Other Airports



At all other airports within a 50 km radius of Calgary only 6 on-site firms were involved in commercial

aviation activities, and all met the Inclusion Criteria.



A total of 29.5 annual full-time equivalent employees can be attributed to the other airports' GA sector.

Their aggregate labour income for 1997 was identified at $1.053 million. Their total O&M expenditures

were $812,000. A total tax base of $179,000 was identified, of which $20,000 was paid in municipal taxes

to the Municipal Districts. The gross revenues for this sector were identified at $1.918 million.



When the indirect and induced multipliers are applied to the above direct economic activity: within the

area, 95 full-time jobs are dependent upon GA, generating an annual labour income of $3. 159 million. The

total value-added GDP activity created by GA at the other airports in 1997 was $1.555 million.



This information is provided in tabular form on the following page.
2.5 Total Economic Impact of the Calgary Corporate & General Aviation
Communities



Within the Calgary area, 115 firms or organizations were identified as meeting the Inclusion Criteria.



A total of 1534 direct annual full-time equivalent employees can be attributed to the corporate and GA

aviation sector in the Calgary area. Their aggregate labour income for 1997 was identified at $69.160

million. Total O&M expenditures were $176.455 million. A total tax base of $36.840 million was

identified, of which $3.086 million was paid in municipal taxes. The gross revenues for this sector were

identified at $3 10.380 million.



When the indirect and induced multipliers are applied to the above direct economic activity, the significant

impact of the Calgary area corporate and GA sector on the local economy can be realized. Within the

Calgary area 4938 full-time jobs are dependent upon the corporate and GA sector, generating an annual

labour income of $207.480 million. The total value-added GDP activity created by this sector in the

Calgary area in 1997 was $337.894 million.



This information is provided in tabular form on pages 22 and 23.




               On a percentage basis by airport, the above economic benefits are distributed:

                                      Labour           Value-Added             Tax              Municipal Gross
                        FTEs          Income                 GDP                Base             Taxes Revenues
Corporate                    18%              25%                26%               24%                34%         10%
Calgary GA                   73%              67%                65%               69%                63%         83%
Springbank                    8%               7%                  9%                6%                  3%       6%
All Other                     2%               2%               P/o                  1%                  1%       1%
When the aggregate impact of the Calgary International airport is isolated, the above
economic benefits are distributed:




                    Labour Value-Added             Tax     Municipal          Gross
             FTEs Income             GDP           Base        Taxes         Revenues


Calgary Int 90%       90%             89%           92%         96%            92%

All Others   10%      10%             11%           8%           4%             8%




From the above table, it is obvious that the industry is overwhelmingly concentrated at
the Calgary International airport.




The percentage split of economic activity between Corporate and GA activity over the
study area was:




                    Labour           Value-Added     Tax        Municipal             Gross
             FTEs Income                    GDP          Base     Taxes              Revenues


Corporate     18%      25%                  26%          24%           34%              10%

GA            82%      75%                  74%          76%           66%              90%
2.6 Other Significant Socio-economic Factors


The Survey Questionnaire sought general comments from the respondents related to their views on other

important socio-economic factors which they felt were associated with corporate or general aviation.



The following trends are noted from the information collected:


        virtually all respondents commented on the employment opportunities, above average incomes,
taxes paid, local expenditures and generally positive benefits to the local and regional economy provided
by the corporate & GA sector;

        the sector was seen by others as a valuable development tool for creating and building a skilled
aviation workforce. Many of the GA participants noted that their sector provided a foundation of skilled
and experienced workers for commercial and corporate aviation and, as importantly, acted as a means for
furthering individual career development;

       several participants suggested that corporate and GA attracts business and industry to Calgary;

        The GA sector was noted as an important source of recreation for many local residents, including
the enjoyment by non-aviation residents of the Calgary area when airshows are undertaken at Springbank;

         a number of the corporate operators commented on enhanced productivity for senior
management's time and the ability to conduct business away from Calgary and to return in a day as positive
benefits;

       corporate and GA's generally 'clean' environmental record was noted;

       GA was seen as supporting inbound aviation tourism into the Calgary area,

       the sector provides vital support for air ambulance/medevac operations; and,
        as a valuable outlet for volunteerism - one organization noted that its existence
was entirely due to the goodwill of roughly 20,000 hours of volunteerism annually, and
that its presence materially improved the social well-being of its volunteer workforce.



Some of the respondents chose to voice their concerns for the future of the industry and
these comments included:

       numerous concerns were directed at the perception that increased levels of
taxation and new service fees, including the impending NAV CANADA fees on
recreational aircraft, would be harmful to the sector; and,

      a number of the Springbank-based operators voiced concerns that near-by land
development would negatively impact the future viability of the airport.




2.7      Conclusions

In 1997, the Calgary area corporate and general aviation communities supported a significant level of

economic activity in the Calgary area.



In direct terms, this sector contributed:


                           over 1500 full-time jobs
                           roughly $70 million in annual labour income
                           over $175 million in O&M expenditures
                           roughly $37 million in annual tax base
                           over $300 million in gross revenue activity


When indirect and induced forms of economic activity are included, this sector contributed:


                           roughly 5000 full-time jobs
                           over $200 million in annual labour income
                           a third of a billion dollars in value-added GDP activity
Although GA activities in the Calgary area are scattered amongst 11 airports, the industry
remains concentrated at the Calgary International airport. Aside from some minor charter
activity at the Springbank airport, all of Calgary's corporate aviation activities are
conducted at the Calgary International airport.


In addition to the quantifiable economic benefits, the GA sector provides a wide expanse
of social benefits to the residents of the Calgary area, ranging from recreational
opportunities through tourism development to volunteerism. Corporate aviation's social
benefits are more restricted but nonetheless offer career development benefits to its
employees and value-added time efficiencies to the executives which it serves.


Unquestionably, in 1997 the corporate and GA sector in the Calgary area provided
substantive economic and social benefits to the local economy, within the province and to
the economy of Canada as a whole.
    APPENDIX I




SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE
                                    SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE


 SURVEY OF THE ECONOMIC SIGNIFICANCE OF THE
   CALGARY CORPORATE & GENERAL AVIATION
                 COMMUNITY
  Please complete this survey using data for 1997 or for your most recent fiscal year. All data will be
     treated in strict confidence and will not be released in a disaggregated form to any individual or
     agency. Only aggregate industry data will be included in the final report.

  Please answer the questions as completely as you can. If you are not entirely certain of an answer,
     please give your best estimate - your estimate will surpass by far our best guess in accuracy.

  Feel free to direct any questions pertaining to this questionnaire or study to either:
     RP Erickson & Associates                                         Mr. Don Brownie
     Aviation Consultants to Industry                                 Executive Director
     Calgary, Alberta                                                 Calgary Transportation Authority
     Tel. (403) 241-9633                                              Tel. (403) 266-6716
     Fax. (403) 241-8696                                              Fax. (403) 269-4339




Section A: General Information

  (i) Name of firm, a contact person, and telephone number.




  (ii) Please circle the classification(s) that best describe your firm's activities.


                            Pilot or Flight Training
                            Private or Recreational Flying
                            Corporate Aviation
                            Air Taxi or Charter Operator
                            Aircraft Sales & Support
                            Maintenance & Overhaul
                            Other aviation support services
                            Other__________________
Section B: Employment, Expenditures and Tax Data
  We are seeking the impact from that portion of your firm's business activity which pertains to general
    aviation or corporate aviation. Round all financial data to the nearest $'000.




Employment - 1997

                (i)      Average number of employees working for your firm. Please estimate in full-
                time equivalents [e.g., 1 part-time worker @ 20 hrs/week = .5 full-time employee].




                (ii)   Total payroll expenses for employees including wages, salaries, and all
                employee benefits.


        $____________________




Expenditures for Goods and Services - 1997

                (i)     Total operating expenditures for goods and services, excluding wages, salaries,
                and employee benefits.


        $________




Taxes - 1997

                (i)      Total municipal, provincial, and federal taxes including payroll, sales, GST, fuel
                taxes and other applicable taxes.


        $____________________

                (ii)     Please estimate the percentage of the above tax total which your firm paid in
                         local municipal taxes.
Section C: Revenues

(i)           Gross annual revenues for 1997 or the last complete fiscal year from all sources.
       $_____________________




Section D: General Comments

               (i)      In your opinion, what are the principal socio-economic benefits of general or
               corporate aviation to the Calgary area.




(ii)    What are the major advantages to the community and region which result from
the existence of the airport.
(iii)   What, in your view, is the future of general or corporate aviation in the Calgary region.




           Any additional comments you feel may be appropriate can be added below or to the
             back of the questionnaire.


                 Your co-operation is very much appreciated - thank you,
    APPENDIX II




AVIATION DIRECTORIES

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Corporate Aviation Jobs document sample