Oregon Abroad by liwenting

VIEWS: 93 PAGES: 101

									                                                                                                                2010-2011


University of Cantabria
                               An Academic Exchange Program of the Oregon University System




                                                                                             Santander


                                                                                                       Madrid




                                                                                       Oregon Abroad
                                                                                       Because Education is a Journey



 Eastern Oregon University            Oregon State University             Southern Oregon University             Western Oregon University
               Oregon Institute of Technology              Portland State University              University of Oregon
Oregon Abroad: Because Education is a Journey!
Dear Students:

Welcome! You are well on your way to an experience that will be one of the high points in your academic
career. As a result of this experience in Spain, we expect that you will grow and change in many different
ways. Your Spanish language skills will improve dramatically; you will gain many insights into a new
culture; and you will learn much about yourself and your home culture. You will, in fact, be part of a special
group of university students in the United States -- less than three percent of all undergraduates in our
colleges and universities study in another country. Think of the potential for your future career!

The Oregon University System (OUS) International Programs Office, based at Oregon State University,
works cooperatively with each of the other public universities throughout our state to make these
international opportunities available to all students in the OUS.

We have prepared this orientation booklet with the assistance of resident directors, faculty, and students who
have been involved in our foreign study programs. Its purpose is to guide you through the required
paperwork and program procedures as smoothly as possible and to answer some of the many questions you
may have about studying in Spain. Try to follow the various instructions and pieces of advice; they represent
the experience of many people.

Keep in mind that some procedures may differ slightly on each of the campuses so there may be variations on
particular items in this handbook. Your Campus Contact can help you with your home campus issues and
answer questions that may arise. (See addresses on previous pages.) It's likely that you have already spoken
with your Campus Contact as you gathered application materials and information about the program.

Every attempt is made to ensure the completeness and accuracy of the information; however, international
study is an extremely personal experience and what applies to one person may not apply to another.
Attempts have been made to reflect a variety of viewpoints. Take advantage of the opportunity to speak with
past program participants for more information, but remember that the experience you are about to have will
be unique to you.

While you are abroad, we encourage you to write to us if you have questions, problems, or concerns with
which we can help you. We will answer your questions as quickly as possible. We even like to hear from
you if you just want to say hello. Although we cannot write to each of you while you are away, we are in
constant contact with your Resident Director, and we are concerned for your welfare. Our staff works year-
round to give you the best educational opportunity overseas that we can. In return, we expect you to give
your best and learn the most from your experience.

We send you off with high hopes and best wishes. We hope you find your time overseas to be one of the
most exciting and challenging experiences of your life.

Sincerely,


Sara Phillips
Program Coordinator
OUS Programs in Spain




Maria Davila-Ash                                    Pam Roberts
Financial Officer                                   Billing Coordinator
OUS International Programs                          OUS International Programs




                                                      1
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                                         TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS.....................................................................................................3 
USEFUL ADDRESSES AND PHONE NUMBERS .........................................................9 
 OUS Program Office, Corvallis ...................................................................................................... 9 
 Centro de Idiomas de la Universidad de Cantabria, Santander, Spain ............................................ 9 
 OUS and Private Partner Campus Contacts .................................................................................. 10 
 International Office at the University of Cantabria ....................................................................... 11 
EMERGENCY CONTACT INFORMATION ...............................................................12 
BEFORE YOU GO ............................................................................................................15 
 Registration on Your Home Campus for Your Term(s) Abroad................................................... 15 
   EOU, PSU, SOU, UO, and WOU Students ............................................................................................. 15 
   OSU Students ........................................................................................................................................... 15 
 Graduation ..................................................................................................................................... 16 
 Academic Preparation ................................................................................................................... 16 
 Language Preparation ................................................................................................................... 16 
 Cultural Preparation ...................................................................................................................... 17 
   Websites and Resources ........................................................................................................................... 17 
 What to Take ................................................................................................................................. 18 
   Luggage ................................................................................................................................................... 19 
   Important Documents............................................................................................................................... 19 
   Electrical Items and Electricity in Europe................................................................................................ 22 
   Laptop Computers .................................................................................................................................... 23 
   Clothing ................................................................................................................................................... 23 
   Suggested Miscellaneous Items ............................................................................................................... 23 
 Shipping Personal Items................................................................................................................ 24 
 Considerations for Students with Accompanying Dependents ..................................................... 26 
GETTING THERE ............................................................................................................29 
 Program Dates ............................................................................................................................... 29 
 Airline Ticket ................................................................................................................................ 29 
 For travelling in Europe ................................................................................................................ 30 
 Eurail Passes ................................................................................................................................. 30 
 Getting to Santander...................................................................................................................... 30 
STUDYING IN SPAIN ......................................................................................................35 
 Orientation in Spain ...................................................................................................................... 35 
   Common Difficulties for American Students........................................................................................... 35 
LIVING IN SPAIN.............................................................................................................36 
 Host Family ................................................................................................................................... 36 
   School Activities ...................................................................................................................................... 37 
   Buses ........................................................................................................................................................ 37 
   Taxis ........................................................................................................................................................ 37 
 Conversion Charts ......................................................................................................................... 38 
   Conversion Chart – Kitchen ..................................................................................................................... 38 
   Conversion Chart – Oven Temperatures .................................................................................................. 38 
   Conversion Chart – Clothing ................................................................................................................... 39 
   Conversion Chart -- Temperature, Length, Liquids, Weight, Speeds ...................................................... 40 
 Telephone Calls............................................................................................................................. 41 
 Cell Phones ................................................................................................................................... 41 
 Mail ............................................................................................................................................... 41 
 Electronic Mail (e-mail): ............................................................................................................... 42 
 Visitors .......................................................................................................................................... 42 
 Accident and Sickness Insurance Plan .......................................................................................... 42 
                                                                                 3
SAFETY ..............................................................................................................................43 
  Security and Safety Issues Abroad ................................................................................................ 43 
  Conduct Issues .............................................................................................................................. 44 
  Alcohol .......................................................................................................................................... 44 
  Illegal Drugs .................................................................................................................................. 45 
  Advice to the Woman Traveling Alone ........................................................................................ 46 
  Sexual Harassment ........................................................................................................................ 46 
CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS ..................................................................................47 
  Your Role as a Cultural Ambassador ............................................................................................ 47 
  Adjusting to New Environments ................................................................................................... 47 
  The Intercultural Adjustment Cycle .............................................................................................. 48 
  Helpful Skills ................................................................................................................................ 50 
PERSONAL FINANCES ..................................................................................................53 
  Initial Expenses ............................................................................................................................. 53 
  Getting Funds to Spain .................................................................................................................. 53 
PROGRAM FINANCES ...................................................................................................55 
  Program Costs ............................................................................................................................... 55 
     Program Operations Fee........................................................................................................................... 55 
     Lodging/Meals Fee .................................................................................................................................. 55 
     Program Incidentals Fee........................................................................................................................... 55 
     Additional Expenses ................................................................................................................................ 55 
  Introduction to Cost Sheet and Payment Agreement .................................................................... 56 
BILLING INFORMATION ..............................................................................................57 
FOR SPECIFIC OUS UNIVERSITIES ...........................................................................57 
  OSU Billing Procedures ................................................................................................................ 58 
  OSU Billing Procedures – Frequently Asked Questions .............................................................. 59 
  PSU Billing Procedures................................................................................................................. 61 
  PSU Billing Procedures – Frequently Asked Questions ............................................................... 62 
  UO Billing Procedures .................................................................................................................. 64 
  EOU Billing Procedures................................................................................................................ 66 
  SOU Billing Procedures ................................................................................................................ 67 
  WOU Billing Procedures .............................................................................................................. 69 
  UO, EOU, SOU, and WOU Billing Procedures - ......................................................................... 71 
  Frequently Asked Questions ......................................................................................................... 71 
FINANCIAL AID ...............................................................................................................73 
  Financial Aid Timeline ................................................................................................................. 73 
  Overview of Financial Aid Process............................................................................................... 74 
  Financial Aid Information for Specific OUS Universities ............................................................ 76 
REFUND POLICY ............................................................................................................84 
  Program Refund Policy ................................................................................................................. 84 
  Withdrawal: A Word of Caution ................................................................................................... 85 
HOMEWARD BOUND .....................................................................................................88 
  Registration for the Term After Your Return Home ..................................................................... 88 
     Eastern Oregon University ....................................................................................................................... 88 
     Oregon State University ........................................................................................................................... 88 
     Portland State University ......................................................................................................................... 88 
     Southern Oregon University .................................................................................................................... 89 
     University of Oregon ............................................................................................................................... 90 
     Western Oregon University ..................................................................................................................... 91 
  Customs......................................................................................................................................... 91 
  Evaluating the Program ................................................................................................................. 91 
  At the End of Your Program ......................................................................................................... 92 
  Re-entry Shock .............................................................................................................................. 92 
  Maintaining your International Connections................................................................................. 93 
RETURNING OVERSEAS ...............................................................................................94 
                                                                             4
 Returning Overseas ....................................................................................................................... 94 
 IE3 Internship Program .................................................................................................................. 94 
 Cultural Ambassador..................................................................................................................... 94 
STUDENT COMMENTS and Tips ..................................................................................97 
 Student Tips .................................................................................................................................. 97 
 Popular Travel Destinations ........................................................................................................ 100 




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Section One
 Contact Information




          7
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   USEFUL ADDRESSES AND PHONE NUMBERS
OUS Program Office, Corvallis
Program Coordinator

Sara Phillips
OUS International Programs
444 Snell Hall
Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR 97331-1642
Tel: 541-737-6476
Fax: 541-737-6482
Email: sara.phillips@ous.edu

                                                      Your Academic Advisor
Billing Coordinator
Pam Roberts                                           Please write in your advisor’s address…
OUS International Programs
118 Ballard Hall
Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR 97331-1642
Tel: 541-737-6466
Fax: 541-737-6482
Email: pam.roberts@oregonstate.edu

Centro de Idiomas de la Universidad de Cantabria, Santander, Spain
                      On-site Coordinator

                      Madeline Lennon
                      OUS International Programs
                      Centro de Idiomas de la Universidad de Cantabria
                      Edificio de Derecho y Económicas. Planta -1
                      Avenida de los Castros, s/n.
                      39005 Santander España
                      Cell: 34 699611692
                      Home: 942 390 509 (Only dial 34 if you are outside
                      of Spain, dial 011-34 if you are calling from the
                      U.S)

                      Email: Madelinelennon@gmail.com




                                               9
OUS and Private Partner Campus Contacts

Portland State University                 Oregon State University
Andrea Price                              Sara Phillips
Office of International Affairs           Office of International Programs
PO Box 751, East Hall 101                 444 Snell Hall
Portland State University                 Oregon State University
Portland, OR 97207                        Corvallis, OR 97331
Tel: 503-725-5076                         Tel: 541-737-6476
FAX: 503-725-5065                         FAX: 541-737-6482
Email: pricea@pdx.edu                     Email: sara.phillips@oregonstate.edu

Southern Oregon University                Western Oregon University
Jen Yockey                                Michele Price
International Programs                    Study Abroad and International Exchanges
Stevenson Union, Room 321                 APS 501
Southern Oregon University                Western Oregon University
Ashland, OR 97520                         Monmouth, OR 97361
Tel: 541-552-8334                         Tel: 503-838-8905
Fax: 541-552-8195                         Fax: 503-838-8435
Email: yockeyj@sou.edu                    Email: pricemv@wou.edu


Eastern Oregon University
Janet Camp
Hunt Hall B305
International Programs
Eastern Oregon University
La Grande, OR 97850
Tel: 541-962-3406
Fax: 541-962-3618
Email: jcamp@eou.edu




                                  10
International Office at the University of Cantabria

Centro de Idiomas de la Universidad de Cantabria
Edificio de Derecho y Económicas. Planta -1
Avenida de los Castros, s/n.
39005 Santander España
Tel: 942-20-13-13
Fax: 34942201316

The secretary at the CIUC is Elena; Raúl López is in
charge of Spanish classes.




                                                  11
        EMERGENCY CONTACT INFORMATION
No one can guarantee your absolute safety while you’re abroad any more than we can guarantee your
safety on your home campus. Be assured, however, that we have taken precautions and routinely
monitor information about the issues and conditions in the locales where you will study. Throughout
this handbook you will find a range of advice to help you have a safe and productive year.

Below, please find an emergency contact list for the OUS Spain program. This serves as a partial list
of resources available to you. You may also find it helpful to note other emergency contact numbers
including family members and the number of the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate for areas where
you may travel.

    1. Please ensure your own safety first. In case of emergency while you are in Santander, dial
       112. 112 is the common European Union emergency helpline including Spain. You can call it
       from anywhere within the European Union.

    2. Contact Madeline Lennon your on-site coordinator for any emergencies:

        Cell: (34) 699611692, Home: 942 390 509. Dial 011+34 if you are calling from the U.S.

    3. In the unlikely event that Madeline Lennon is unavailable, please feel free to contact the
       OUS Spain Program Director in the United States:

                Sara Phillips:     Office Tel: 1-541-737-6476
                                   Cell phone: 1-541-740-8509
                                   E-mail: sara.phillips@ous.edu


The following is a list of phone number that might be of use in the case of an emergency:
- U.S. Embassy in Madrid                                                     (34) 91-587-22-00
- U.S. Consulate General in Barcelona                                        (34) 93-280-2227
  1-888-407-4747 toll free in U.S; outside the U.S, and Canada at            1-317-472-2328
- U.S. Department of State’s Citizen Emergency Center                        202-647-5225
- Check Information about travel advisories, safety and
  Crisis response at:                                              http://travel.state.gov
- For a complete consular report on Spain, go to         http://travel.state.gov/spain.html

Other medical contacts:
Centro Médico Santander tel. 942-275-222, Avenida Reina Victoria 12-14
Centro Psicología y salud, Pasaje de Artillero numero 3, tel. 942-213-012
Other emergency numbers: Policia Nacional 091; Policia local 092



Insurance

As a participant in an OUS study abroad program, you will be enrolled in an OUS Study Abroad
Insurance Plan. Due to pending changes in the broker of record for the OUS Study Abroad
Insurance Plan, specific details on this insurance – including phone numbers to call in case of
medical emergency -- were unavailable at the time this handbook went to press. As soon as details
are available, OUS International Programs will supplement this handbook with information about
the policy and your coverage. The cost of insurance is covered in your program fee.


                                                 12
Section Two
  Before You Go




        13
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                                   BEFORE YOU GO

Registration on Your Home Campus for Your Term(s) Abroad
EOU, PSU, SOU, UO, and WOU Students

You do not need to go through the standard registration process on your home campus for the terms
you will be abroad. The Study Abroad Office on your campus will register you as a full-time
student for each term that you are abroad, using a "generic" course number(s) as a place-saver until
your study abroad grade report is received listing your actual courses/credits.

Once all course equivalencies have been established, all the specific courses/credits - as approved
on your campus- will appear on your home university transcript and the grades you earn will be
counted in your GPA. Please be aware that it can take one to three terms for your study abroad
courses and grades to show up on your home campus transcript. Because the courses you take
abroad are not a regular part of the home campus curriculum, each course must be approved by the
appropriate department on your campus. This course equivalency process takes time, especially if
you are taking courses abroad that have not been reviewed and approved before. (For more
information, see “Academics” in the “While You’re There” chapter.)

Your OUS campus will assess you a registration or study abroad fee for each term that you are
abroad. The amount of this fee differs from campus to campus, but it will likely be in the range of
$250-$350/term. (See “Billing Procedures” for your campus in the “Finances” chapter, for details.)

OSU Students

The OSU Office of International Degree and Education Abroad will email your ONID Account the
proper CRN every term you are abroad and it will be your responsibility to REGISTER
YOURSELF through Online Services at
https://adminfo.ucsadm.oregonstate.edu/prod/twbkwbis.P_WWWLogin. You will register yourself
with the proper CRN provided to you from Abroad.Registration@oregonstate.edu each term you
are abroad, so keep checking your ONID account.

If you are on a semester or year-long program and will receive 2 or 3 terms worth of credits at
OSU, you will need to register for the CRN provided to you each term you are abroad as the
CRN will change from the previous term. This CRN is a place holder and does not show the actual
courses you are taking abroad. If you need your PIN number, contact your ACADEMIC advisor.

If you have a registration hold on your account (due to an outstanding balance, for example), you
must address that as soon as possible as the hold prevents you from registering.

If you fail to register while abroad, you will receive no OSU credit for your courses. Also, please
note that financial aid will NOT be disbursed until you are registered. If you register after the first
day of classes at OSU (while abroad) you will be charged a late registration fee of $50. Please
contact the International Degree and Education Abroad office if there is any reason why you will
not be able to register by the deadline.

   First day of classes for the 2010-2011 academic year:

   Summer term begins June 21
   Fall term begins September 27
                                                   15
   Winter term begins January 3
   Spring term begins March 28

Once we receive your grade report from abroad with the actual courses you have taken – and once
all necessary course equivalencies have been established – your OSU transcript will be changed to
reflect your actual courses and credit load. The grades you earn will be counted in your GPA.

Please be aware that it can take one to three terms for your study abroad courses and grades to
show up on your OSU transcript.

OSU will assess you a registration or study abroad fee for each term that you are abroad (currently
$325/term, $300 one-time charge for summer term). (See “OSU Billing Procedures” in the
“Finances” chapter, for details.)”

                                                                                       Revised 3/10

Graduation
If you are graduating, you should plan to graduate at least one term after you return to your home
university. We typically do not receive academic records from your overseas program until the
term following your program abroad. Be sure to inform your Campus Contact that you intend to
graduate shortly after the completion of your program so that the course equivalency and
transcripting process can be expedited.

You should also apply for graduation before you leave for your study abroad program.

Academic Preparation
It is very important that you meet with your academic advisor before leaving for Spain. While all
courses taken at the Universidad de Cantabria are guaranteed credit at the OUS institution through
which you will be enrolled, this guaranteed credit does not necessarily mean that the courses fulfill
either college or major requirements for graduation. Some departments, for instance, require that
students take a certain number of upper-division courses on campus to meet degree requirements.
Be prepared to have your advisor tell you that he/she does not know exactly how your courses in
Spain will be applied to your degree. The courses in Spain are different than those courses on your
home campus; therefore, unless an equivalency already exists, the advisor cannot guarantee that the
courses will count towards your degree. It will be your responsibility to complete any necessary
course equivalency forms to send back to your home campus.

Language Preparation
It is a good idea to start polishing your Spanish language skills before your departure. Begin
reading for pleasure in Spanish (i.e., novels, newspapers, and magazines), and start practicing
Spanish OUT LOUD, even if this means talking to yourself. Try tape recording yourself so that
you can hear your mistakes and your strengths. Locate groups of Spanish speaking students and
practice your conversational skills. In addition to improving your conversation skills, review verb
conjugations and expand your vocabulary. One method is to write verb conjugations or vocabulary
words on flash cards and carry them with you to practice and memorize while waiting in lines, in
between classes, during study breaks, etc.

You need also to get your ears accustomed to listening to the language. University language labs
or the local library have language tapes, CDs and DVDs available. Listen to Spanish music, poetry
readings, or news broadcasts. Attend local showings of Spanish films or rent Spanish videos. In
this way, you can become more familiar with Spanish culture and more sensitive to the rhythms
                                                 16
and intonations of the language at the same time.

It is also important to continue to work on your language skills throughout your stay in Spain.
While you will be exposed to Spanish on a daily basis, your ability to understand spoken Spanish
and to express yourself orally and in writing will be greatly enhanced if you seriously make an
effort to improve your listening comprehension (radio, TV, films, conversations), to build your
vocabulary, and to express yourself. It won’t happen by osmosis. It requires a constant and
conscious effort on your part.

Cultural Preparation
Besides attending the orientation and talking with students who have studied in Spain, doing some
reading about Spain and cultural issues is an invaluable tool for adjusting to the cultural, social,
economic, and environmental differences you are about to experience. The following bibliography
and website list provides a list of suggested readings and links to sites with good information on all
aspects of life in Spain, which can help you prepare for the new country and culture that awaits
you.

Other ways to prepare include meeting students here in Oregon on exchange from Spain and
seeking their advice on "do's and don'ts" while in Spain. In addition, many OUS campuses have
European Student Associations and/or International Student Associations. You might want to
contact either of these groups to meet international students, if you haven't already, and begin to
discover what it's like to be a "stranger in a strange land." If you need "cultural informants,"
contact your International Education office or your Spanish professors.


Websites and Resources

Dictionaries
* You will need a Spanish dictionary.

Franklin hand held electronic Spanish-English Dictionary, can be purchased at Best Buy or Circuit
City, approximately $50

Oxford Spanish-English Dictionary, new second edition . 24 regional varieties of Spanish. You
can buy this one here.

Diccionario del español usual en México. México, El Colegio de México-FCF, 1996

Diccionario Salamanca de la Lengua Española. Madrid, Santillana-Universidad de Salamanca,
1996

CD-ROM CLAVE Diccionario del uso del español actual. Prólogo de Gabriel García Márquez.
Madrid, SM, 1996

CD-ROM Diccionario de la Lengua Española, Real Academia Española, Madrid, Espasa-Calpe,
1995.

CD-ROM Diccionario general de la Lengua Española, Barcelona, Vox-Biblograf, 1997. Contiene
el Diccionario Avanzado de Sinónimos y Antónimos de Vox y está en Internet




                                                  17
General Information on Spain

   http://www.havetravelfun.com/spain/spain-information.htm

   http://www.spanish-town-guides.com/General_Information.htm

   http://www.lonelyplanet.com/spain

   http://www.focusmm.com/spain/sp_giamn.htm

General Information on Santander
http://portal.ayto-santander.es/
http://www.santander2016.eu/eng/
http://www.santanderciudadviva.com/
http://www.cantabriajoven.com/santander

Financial Information

   U.S./foreign currency conversion information: http://www.oanda.com

   Information on the EURO: http://europa.eu.int


Spanish Media Resources

   http://www.donquijote.org/spanishlanguage/press/

   http://www.ihes.com/bcn/spanish/media.html

   http://porlared.com/cinered/index.html

   http://www.mondotimes.com/1/world/es

   http://www.bbc.co.uk/mundo/

Government Website

   http://europa.eu/abc/european_countries/eu_members/spain/index_en.htm

   http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1024.html

   http://www.maec.es/en/Home/Paginas/HomeEn.aspx




What to Take
                                                18
You will no doubt be in a quandary as to what to take with you and what to leave at home. What to
pack is a personal matter and your decisions will reflect your tastes. Below are a few general hints
and suggestions which may help you meet this challenge of preparation.

First and most importantly, you must TRAVEL LIGHT! Remember, everything you pack, you
have to carry and eventually bring back. So to ease your burden, pack only the essentials. You'll
be surprised at how much you can do without. Don’t bring along the things you don't use in the
States; you won't use them in Spain either. This advice may seem self-evident, but take a hard look
at what you've assembled and decide if you'll really need or use it before you pack it. Leave room
also for the items you will wish to buy in Spain and bring back with you.

With few exceptions, most of the things you use in daily life in the States are available in Spain.
You will find it fun to experiment with new brands and foods when you can't find your standard
fare.

Here are some things to think about as you pack your bags...

Luggage
Many past participants recommend that you bring one large suitcase with wheels and a good-size
backpack. This is easier to deal with than multiple bags, even three of them. Anything that is not a
backpack should be on wheels! Check with all your airlines about weight and size restrictions.
 A backpack is an excellent idea, especially for train travel. Many manufacturers make packs that
convert into luggage when you need to check them as suitcases.

It is a good idea to take some "essentials" along in your carry-on bag in case your luggage doesn't
arrive with you. These essentials might include toothbrush, change of socks and underwear,
medication, etc. Be sure to inform yourself of any new restrictions that may exist for carry-on
luggage (items you’re not allowed to carry onto a plane, size, etc.).

Important papers as well as money should be kept in your carry-on luggage. Photocopies of these
important documents should be packed in a separate piece of luggage. You might also consider
buying or making a money belt or pouch (the type that goes around your waist rather than around
your neck is recommended by past participants).

Make sure that your carry-on bag and your luggage have proper identification tags on them. Put
your host family’s address on the luggage tag.

We also recommend that you put an address label on the inside of each of your suitcases. This can
be helpful if your luggage is damaged and/or the luggage tag on the outside of the suitcase is lost.



Important Documents
It is very important that you carry all of your documents and THIS BOOKLET in your CARRY-ON
piece of luggage. Be sure to photocopy all documents and keep them separate from the originals.

       Airline tickets

       Passport -- Your passport will be your main piece of identification while you're in Europe.
       You'll need it to enter the country, to open a bank account, to cash a check, and to buy a
       plane ticket, among other things. Don't pack it in your suitcase! Keep it handy when
       you’re traveling. Make a photocopy of your passport and keep it separate from your
                                                  19
passport. Having this photocopy on-hand will facilitate replacing your passport in case of
loss or theft. You may also wish to leave a photocopy of your passport with a friend or
family member in the U.S. A visa is not required for stays up to 90 days. Our program is
70 days, which leaves you with 20 days for traveling. If you plan to stay longer than 90
days, you will have to request a visa from the Spanish Consulate at 1405 Sutter Street,
San Francisco, CA 94109 in person. Here is the contact information (415) 922-2995 or
FAX (415) 931 97 06. You will need a letter from the University of Cantabria and you’ll
have to go in person to San Francisco. This process will take about 40 days, so act quickly if
you need a visa. Please ask us for help if you are purchasing one.


Residence Permit - U.S. citizens do not need visas to enter Spain; a U.S. passport is all that
is necessary.
                                                                                                       Travel tip:
Program Letter -- This letter has been useful for those students who’ve purchased only a               Since it isn’t
                                                                                                       possible to
one-way ticket and who were questioned by customs officials at the Spanish border.                     purchase Euro
                                                                                                       coins in the
Money – It is not necessary to convert a lot cash into Euros before you leave the U.S. We              States before
                                                                                                       you leave, it’s a
recommend having a debit card with a VISA symbol on it for your spending money in Spain                good idea to
and such cards can be used in airports and train stations very easily. A debit card from a             cash some bills
U.S. bank will allow you ready access to cash from the ATMs in Spain at a favorable                    as soon as you
                                                                                                       arrive in Spain.
exchange rate. There may be a charge for this – check with your bank. To minimize                       You might need
charges, you can withdraw large sums few times rather than small sums several times. (See              small change
                                                                                                       for bus fare,
“Personal Finances” section later in this handbook for more information.)                              train ticket
                                                                                                       machines,
                                                                                                       snacks on
                      A tip about carrying money when you travel: put it in less                       trains, pay
                      obvious places than your purse or wallet, particularly when                      toilets, etc.
                      visiting large cities or in train stations and airports. You
                      might want to purchase a money belt (not good for quick
                      access to your cash) or a pouch that hangs around your neck
                      and can be tucked inside your shirt.


Contact Information – Bring with you addresses and telephone numbers of everyone you
may need to contact (friends, banks, university offices, academic advisers, etc.).

Emergency medical information -- Type up the following emergency medical
information and keep the information with your passport when you travel:

       Allergies to foods and medications
       Dietary restrictions
       Current medications and dosages
       Blood type
       Immunization history (tetanus inoculations, etc.)
       Chronic ailments
       Type of health insurance and policy number
       A person to contact in case of emergency (name, phone number, addresses, etc.)
       Address and telephone number of your host family
       Students who have allergies or who have potentially serious medical conditions are
       strongly advised to purchase and wear a medical alert bracelet

Prescriptions -- Be sure to take prescriptions for eyeglasses, contacts, contraceptives, and
medications. If you are on a regular prescription, take a supply that will last for your entire stay
if possible, and be sure the medication is in its original container. Take a note from your doctor
explaining your medical condition and medications, and have your doctor give you the generic
name of your medication in case you need this information while you are abroad.

                                                 20
Dictionary and/or grammar book -- A Spanish-English dictionary or phrasebook and a basic
Spanish grammar book will also come in handy.

 Passport-size Photos – It is a good idea to carry one additional passport-quality photo with
you as you travel to Spain along with a photo of people traveling with you.

 International Student ID Card - Within Spain you will find that your
Oregon university I.D. will be useful for student discounts and for identification. However,
those buying an airplane ticket through STA Travel will be required to purchase an
international student ID card. The card can be purchased for $22 through some local travel
agencies or through the STA Travel website: http://www.statravel.com.

Youth Hostel Pass - If you plan to travel across Europe, youth hostelling is an inexpensive
way to go. Youth hostels are an inexpensive alternative to hotels and provide students with
the opportunity to meet other travelers. You can purchase a Youth Hostel Pass before your
departure by contacting a travel agent who sells them or by contacting Hostelling
International at website http://www.hiayh.org. You can also wait to purchase a card at any
youth hostel in Europe. The Youth Hostel Handbook for Europe helps make planning
easier. Some past participants have found that the Youth Hostel Pass is unnecessary;
others have found it useful.


Absentee Voting - Arrange for an absentee ballot with the county election board if there
will be an election in which you wish to vote while you're in Spain.
   Anyone registered to vote in Oregon may request an absentee ballot. Voters may request that the
   ballot be mailed to them at any address, even to an overseas location. Ballots requested by voters
   who are overseas are normally mailed six to eight weeks before an election, provided that they are
   requested far enough in advance. There is no set deadline for submitting an absentee ballot
   request, although voters must allow time for the ballots to be sent out through the mail and
   returned to the clerk by the Election Day deadline. In other words, do this as soon as you know
   the address where it can be mailed to you. The government will not incur extra cost to expedite
   your ballot.

   The completed ballot may be mailed or hand-delivered to the county clerk (mailed to your
   parents, and they deliver it, for instance). In order to be counted, the clerk must receive the ballot
   no later than 8:00 p.m. on Election Day. Even if the government sent the ballot to you on the slow
   boat to China, you need to make sure that it gets back to them by Election Day if you want it to
   count.

   In Oregon the county governments handle the voting process. In other words, to find Absentee
   Applications, go to the website that corresponds to the county where you are already registered.
   The process in each county is different. Most of these will require that you send a request in
   writing, stating that you are 18, a legal resident of said county, etc., although some have online
   forms.

      Benton County: http://www.co.benton.or.us/elections/
      Multnomah County: http://www.co.multnomah.or.us/dbcs/elections/1998-11/factsheet.shtml
          (see “How do I vote absentee?”)
      Washington County: http://www.co.washington.or.us/cgi/electhom/main.pl
      Lane County: http://www.co.lane.or.us/Elections/absentee.htm
      Linn County: http://www.co.linn.or.us/clerk.htm
        (here you especially need to reach out and make personal contact)
      Jackson County: http://www.co.jackson.or.us/HowDoI.asp?HowDoIID=25&SectionID=93
        (here again, it will require an email or phone call)
      Union County: http://www.union-county.org/ (contact the County Clerk)
      Polk County: http://www.co.polk.or.us/Clerk/default.asp
                                              21
              (here again, contact the County Clerk)
             Counties not listed: http://www.sos.state.or.us/elections/other.info/clerk.htm

          Sources: Democracy Network/Oregon; League of Women Voters, Oregon State Elections
          Division, ActivoteAmerica

        Taxes - Be sure to have someone from home send you tax forms, booklets and your W-2
        forms when tax time rolls around, or have them send you an extension form. Make sure
        that your W-2 from your employer is sent to this person.

Electrical Items and Electricity in Europe

The electrical current and plugs in Europe are different than what you are accustomed to in the
United States. You’ll need to make some adjustments to use electronic devices from home, and, in
some cases, it might be best simply to purchase a European version of the device/appliance once
you arrive in Spain.

A few important things to note:

    (1) The plug shapes, plug holes, plug sizes and sockets are different. It simply won’t be
        possible to plug your US device/appliance into a socket in Spain without a plug adaptor. A
        plug adaptor can be purchased at electronics or travel stores. Plugs and sockets vary
        between European countries so you’ll want to purchase an adaptor that works for Spain,
        but be aware that it might not work for other countries to which you might travel.

        BUT…BEWARE: Just because you use a plug adaptor doesn’t mean that your device or
        appliance will work properly. Plugging a device/appliance into a higher voltage electrical
        current can cause fireworks – literally! This reality brings us to point number two.

    (2) The electrical current in Europe is different than in the U.S. The standard in North America
        is 110 to 120 volts at 60Hz whereas the European standard is 220-240 volts. For this
        reason, you need to be careful when you plug in a device/appliance made for use in the
        U.S. In some cases, you can use a power convertor (or transformer) that will convert the
        220-240 volt current to the 110 volts that your device/appliance can handle. In other cases,
        you may have an appliance or device that will make the conversion to a different strength
        of electrical current on its own (some appliances have an input range that includes up to
        240 volts). Examples of such devices are newer laptops and digital camera battery
        chargers (double check to be sure).

         In all cases, you’ll want to confirm how well your devices/appliances will adapt to the
        220-240 volt current in Europe by consulting the product specifications and the
        manufacturer. You can then decide whether you need a convertor in addition to the plug
        adaptor to allow the device/appliance to function while you are abroad.

Battery chargers, shavers, hair dryers, curling irons and other small appliances should be reviewed
on a case by case basis. Because of their power requirements, hair dryers are particularly
problematic and are best left at home. In the past, students have preferred purchasing small
electrical appliances - like hair dryers - in Spain so that they don’t have to worry about using a
converter.

There are numerous websites that you can consult to get a sense of whether you need a converter
(or transformer) in addition to the adaptor in order to use a particular device/appliance while you
are abroad.

For more information, do a Google search on “European Electrical Plug.

                                                         22
Laptop Computers

It is not necessary to bring a laptop computer with you, but most past participants recommend that you
do so. If you do bring a laptop and have a Gmail or Yahoo account or some other account that has
worldwide services, you will have little difficulty in Spain working from any modem. You should be
aware, though, that to tap into Spanish phone connections you will have to buy the appropriate adaptor
for the wall socket. If you intend to use the university servers, you will have to configure your laptop to
those standards – and obtain an access code. All newer laptops will require only a simple two-prong
converter plug to utilize a direct connection to the Spanish electrical system. Your transformer that
comes with the computer will easily transform the 220 volt DC system to the voltage required for your
laptop (usually 12 volts).

Clothing

Spain can be wet and cold. You'll probably do a lot more walking and waiting for public
transportation than you do here, and a warm winter coat, sturdy and comfortable shoes/boots, lots
of wool or fleece, and long underwear will keep you more content while doing so. A rain slicker
and an umbrella are also good to have. The climate is very similar to that of the Oregon valley.
You need a raincoat. The temperature in most homes is colder than most American students are
accustomed to. You can buy items in Spain in order to save space and comfort when packing.
Students also find it helpful to bring a sweatshirt.


BE PREPARED: washing machines in Spain may not have a delicate cycle and some wash
cycles use boiling hot water. Dryers, most families don’t have them so be prepared to have your
clothes hung to dry outside. Pack apparel accordingly.

Suggested Miscellaneous Items

       Non-prescription drugs such as Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Aspirin, Dayquil, Nyquil, Midol – often
       more expensive in Spain
       Calculator
       Moleskin
       Sewing kit (thread, needles, scissors, and safety pins).
       Swiss Army Knife (with a corkscrew) (do not pack in your carry-on luggage)
       Travel clock or watch
       Camera
       Sturdy umbrella
       Favorite music
       Frisbee and/or hacky sack (make nice gifts when you leave)
       Diary or journal (a record of your thoughts and feelings as you embark and throughout the year may
       be your best “souvenir”)
       Pictures of your home, Oregon, family, friends
       Your checkbook, credit card and/or debit card (see “Personal Finances” section later in this
       handbook)
      Fanny pack
      Small gifts - e.g., T-shirts, Northwest candy, cookbooks with non-metric measuring
      Cups and spoons, calendars, myrtle wood items, posters or nature pictures of Oregon will be much
      appreciated
The following is a list of suggestions from past students regarding items that would have been
helpful:
- Raingear (jacket, sweatshirt, wool socks, gloves)        - Comfortable shoes
- A nice shirt or a blouse                                 - Black pants and/or dress-pants
- Prescription and Headache medicine                       - Journal
                                                    23
- Liquid dry soap                                         - Camera
- Money belt                                              - Good backpack
- ATM or credit card instead of traveler’s checks         - Adaptor/Converter for plug-in (the set
                                                          that works for many countries)
- Copy of your passport (Carry it with you at all
  times in case of an emergency)

To make your time in Spain more enjoyable, you will want to take with you your best attitude and
some very practical things such as:
*patience                        *alarm clock
*tact                            *vitamins
*prudence                        *peanut-butter                        *M & M’s
*sense of humor                  *music                                *magazines
*curiosity                       *books                                *sun tan lotion
*pictures of your dear ones, including your dog or favorite place

Shipping Personal Items
Limit what you ship to Spain. Please remember that everything you send over must
eventually be sent home again and Spanish postage and shipping rates are much higher than
in the U.S.

The US Postal Service no longer offers international shipping via boat/surface mail which had been
the least expensive shipping option. The only exception is printed matter weighing more than 11
pounds. A summary of international mailing options is listed at:
http://www.usps.com/international/welcome.htm.

There are many postal regulations for international shipping and we strongly recommend that you
get the latest custom’s information from your shipper. You may be charged Spanish duty fees
depending on the contents of your box(es) or because of the content, they may be sent back to the
U.S. and never arrive in Spain . Check with your shipper on sizes and weights before you pack a
box.

If you must send something airmail (high cost!), send it by regular U.S. post to avoid paying
additional duties, taxes, and customs fees in order to claim your box in Spain! When you send
something airmail through the U.S. Postal Service, depending upon what you are sending, you may
wish to state that everything is somewhere between $1 - $50 value to avoid having to pay high
customs duty and to avoid having your boxes delayed by three weeks or more. If your parents or
friends send any items to you with declared values posted on them, the customs office will charge
you a fee to pick up the item(s). These fees vary depending on the value that was initially declared
by the sender. (E.g., a former student reports that his parents sent him a laptop with a declared
value of $1500; customs wanted over $150 in custom fees before he could get his computer).
Often times declaring a value to send items to Spain does not necessarily mean the item will be
covered by insurance.

Depending on what you are sending, it may be a good idea to insure the boxes or packages. The
cost is minimal, and if the box is lost or delayed in shipment, you will have a postage receipt with a
specific number for your box. This will facilitate tracing the lost item. A customs declaration is
required for every package (be sure to write “used personal goods” on each customs declaration
form), so be sure to itemize the contents as you pack; it's the best way to ensure you'll remember
everything.
We recommend that you avoid United Parcel Service (UPS). UPS often charges additional
customs fees upon delivery in Spain and tends to complicate the delivery process.

Pass the above information on to anyone who might be sending you things during the year as well.
                                                    24
25
Considerations for Students with Accompanying Dependents
International study programs present interesting challenges for all students and special challenges
for students with spouses, significant others or children. While we want to make our international
programs accessible to as many students as possible, we also want to present a realistic picture of
how living and studying in an overseas context can challenge even the most resilient and organized
students. Before you commit yourself and your family to an international education program,
please consider the following points:

1. General support: On their home campus, most students with dependents have a network upon
   which they depend for financial, emotional, and logistical support. That network will not exist
   when you arrive at your overseas location, though it may develop during your stay.

2. Support for your children: While we understand the difficulties of trying to arrange housing,
   day-care, and schooling for children from afar, the OUS International Programs staff does not
   routinely offer support for these logistical services.

    Specifically, the OUS program staff should not be expected to provide day-care or make school
    arrangements for your dependents. While we may be able to provide some resources and
    information, you must personally handle those logistics. In some cases we will be able to assist
    with dependent visa arrangements; in other cases we will not be able to offer this assistance.

3. Housing costs quoted in the program cost figures are for single students. If we are able to
   make housing arrangements for students with accompanying dependents, you can anticipate
   that there will be additional costs. There is no specific formula for determining the additional
   costs. Those arrangements are made on a case-by-case basis and will vary according to
   program site and facilities available.

4. You must understand that your dependents will not be able to attend classes with you.

5. Field trips associated with your study program may not be available to your dependents.
   When participation is possible, dependents will be required to pay an excursion fee and to sign
   an OUS release of responsibility form.

While we have presented the “worst-case” scenarios here, we want to be realistic in representing
the considerations that you as a parent or spouse must make as an international program
participant. We have had many families participate in OUS International Programs over the years.
Those who are the most successful have been realistic and flexible in their expectations.




                                                 26
Section Three

   Getting There




         27
28
                                  GETTING THERE

Program Dates
Your host families are expecting you on September 24th, you will have a meeting on September
25th at 7pm en el Lisboa, Plaza Italia, al lado del Casino. Your host families are expecting you
to leave the Friday after finals, December 3rd.

Whatever your summer travel or work plans, it's important that you be in Santander on Friday
September 24th to get settled and meet with your host family.

Some students prefer to arrive in Spain a day or two earlier in order to recover from jet lag. If you
do so, prepare to stay in a hotel or youth hostel initially or offer to pay your host family 24 Euros
per day.

Airline Ticket
One of your biggest expenditures before departure will be the purchase of your airline ticket.
There are a variety of options and prices available; it’s best to consult a travel agent to make
arrangements. You should plan to purchase your ticket sometime between May and July (earlier is
better). We encourage you to make your arrangements well in advance of your departure.*

We suggest that you fly into Bilbao to cut down on travel time and expense getting to Santander.
Some people prefer Madrid or Barcelona as well. Later in this chapter, we give instructions to
Santander from each airport.

Here are some important considerations when booking your flight:

  • Consult with more than one travel agency: there can be substantial differences in cost between
    them depending on the agent’s expertise and ability to hook you up with charter or discount
    flights. You might want to contact the travel agency on your campus (if there is one) or STA
    Travel (http://www.statravel.com). They specialize in travel for students and might have
    special rates. Discount airfare services over the web are also worth a look (e.g.,
    www.studentuniverse.com). Ask about any restrictions that may apply to your ticket.

  • We recommend that you try to purchase a ticket for a non-stop direct flight from the U.S. to
    Europe rather than one that will involve changing planes in the U.S., if possible, to save
    yourself time and hassle. There is a Lufthansa direct flight from Portland to Frankfurt, and
    Northwest/KLM now offers direct service from Portland to Amsterdam.


  • As noted above, your host families are expecting you on September 24th through
    December 3rd but you may want to do some traveling in Europe before heading home.


*Note: the “shoulder season” for Lufthansa, when airfares will likely decrease from the high
summer season, will likely begin sometime in early September. For this reason, many people will
be trying to purchase Lufthansa tickets for this time period, and competition for seats may be
significant. Purchase your ticket early.




                                                  29
For travelling in Europe
Easyjet.com,
Ryanair.com (Beware that most airports are outside of the city so you need to plan for
transportation)
Jet2.com
GB Airways,
vueling.com
Lufthansa.com
AirBerlin.com
Germanwings.com;
Basiqair.com
WizzAir.com Budapest,
Katowice.com Poland

Spanish companies sometimes have good offers:
Aireuropa.com,
Spanair.com,
AirMadrid.com,
Viajesiberia.com

Be aware that most smaller European airline companies have a strict weight restriction and
will charge you if you are over the limit. Check each of the websites for more information.

Eurail Passes
For those planning to do a lot of traveling throughout Europe, a Eurail pass can be an excellent
deal. A variety of different packages are offered which allow you to travel by train for a certain
number of days through specified countries for a fraction of the normal cost. To find out more
about specific packages and prices, visit www.raileurope.com. You will need to purchase a Eurail
pass before you leave the U.S. since they are sold only in the U.S. It’s also possible to ask
someone in the U.S. to purchase and mail one to you.

There are also similar deals for Europeans that you may be able to purchase once you are there.

Getting to Santander

You have different options to travel to Santander. Check with your travel agent for the option that
best suits your time frame and wallet. Flying to Madrid and taking the train (5-6 hours Madrid-
Santander) or a bus (4-5 hours). You can also fly to Bilbao and take the bus to Santander
(one hour) or you could fly to Barcelona and take the bus (one night). There is an airport in
Santander for domestic flights. You can fly from Madrid or Barcelona to Santander (1 hour).
Another option is to fly to Amsterdam or Paris and take the train to Irun-Hendaya at the Spanish
border and then take the bus Turytrans to Santander. (www.alsa.es)

Another way to get to Santander is flying to London and then to Madrid or Bilbao, Spain. There
are different ways you can do this. Please check Easyjet (www.easyjet.com) from London to Spain.
Other sites to look at are; www.aireuropa.com. Spanair.com, Ryanair.com, vueling.com,
basiqair.com, wizzair.com, AirMadrid.com, Jet2.com, GB Airways. There you will find flights
going into and out of Spain from other European airports. You can also take a ferry from Plymouth
to Santander. Ferries depart from Plymouth Mondays at 8 AM and Wednesdays at noon and get to
Santander the same time the following day. Your travel agent can give more information or you
could check www.brittany-ferries.com.

                                                 30
Here is some information for trains and buses from Bilbao, Madrid and Barcelona to
Santander:

AIRPORT BILBAO TO SANTANDER ALSA-TURYTRANS, SA www.alsa.es phone: 94 439 5077
*Take a taxi to "Estación o Termibus de Garellano", in Bilbao
*Take Turytrans to Santander : it takes one hour
*Buses every hour or 45 minutes. Last bus 21:30

AIRPORT MADRID-BARAJAS TO SANTANDER, TRAIN
*Take the Metro or a taxi to "Estación de tren Chamartín"
*Tren Talgo to Santander:                          Departure 9:00            Arrival    14:35
                                                   Departure 16:30           Arrival    22:00
*Tren Estrella (night train)                       Departure 22:45           Arrival    8:00

MADRID TO SANTANDER, BUS
*Take a taxi to “El Intercambiador de Autobuses” which is in Avenida de America.
*Compañía Continental-Auto www.continental-auto Phone service: 902 33 04 00
*Departures Monday through Saturday: First Bus: 8:00am Last Bus: 7:00pm


BARCELONA-SANTANDER, BUS
*Autobús VIACAR
*Departures at 10:40 and 23:15
*Buy tickets in "Estació de Sants"
*Take the bus in Plaça Joan Peiro, in front of the Train Station.
*You can take the "Metro" to "Estació de Sants" (Sants station)

TRAVELING AROUND SPAIN

Buses in Spain are a very economical and comfortable way to travel. In addition, buses will often
get you to your destination faster than trains, as the train system in northern Spain has much to be
desired. Perhaps one of the greatest advantages of buses is that they are able to store your luggage
underneath whereas trains typically have very limited storage space. On average, you can buy a
first class bus ticket for less than it would cost for a train ticket. “Alsa” is the main bus service out
of Santander (www.alsa.es).




                                                   31
32
Section Four
 While You’re There




         33
34
                               STUDYING IN SPAIN

Orientation in Spain
The first Monday of the term will be devoted to an on-site orientation and a placement test.
After an initial placement test, students are placed into two different grammar groups. Your courses
will include grammar, conversation, Spanish culture and contemporary Spain. You will have
classes Monday-Thursday. Please see the calendar for specific times.

In addition, students will enjoy 4 different planned excursions. Please see the calendar for dates.

Each student who successfully completes the program shall receive around 16 upper division credit
hours in Spanish language and culture. (10 credits language and 6 credits culture)

Common Difficulties for American Students

"Because American students tend to rely rather heavily on their professors `in loco parentis,’ and
because student social life has been so accessible on the American university campus, it can be rather
difficult for American students to ‘adjust and feel at home’ in a Spanish university.

In addition, the average American student is an ‘extrovert’ in comparison to the more ‘reserved’ and
‘distant’ Europeans. Young adults in the United States tend to form friendships rather quickly; this
process takes longer for Europeans. As a result, Spanish students generally consider Americans to be
flighty and superficial, while American students often regard Spaniards as stilted, snobbish, and
aristocratic.

Another factor which contributes to discomfort is that European students generally are much better
informed about American life and culture than American students are about European life and culture.
The typical Spanish student displays a love of American pop-music and icons, but a rather harsh
criticism and rejection of the American political and social system. In discussions with Spanish
students, the average American student can rather quickly become insecure and defensive if he or she
does not have a firm grasp on the relative strengths and weaknesses of both the American and Spanish
systems.




                                                  35
                                   LIVING IN SPAIN

Host Family

During the 10-week program you will be living with families. The Centro de Idiomas de la
Universidad de Cantabria will make these arrangements for you. You will be given the
opportunity to indicate your preferences: A family with or without children and/or pets; vegetarian
meals or not; and smoking or not. Please keep in mind that you may not get exactly what you are
asking for. For instance, many people in Spain smoke, especially young people. If you are allergic
to smoke, we will do everything in our power to match you with a smoke-free family. You will
have the name and the address of the family you will be living within Santander prior to your
departure. Families are expecting you to stay with them from Friday September 24th until Friday
December 3rd. If you desire to stay with them outside of this time frame, you will need ask them
in advance and pay them directly for this service, around 24 Euros per day. Vegetarians; you will
be assigned a host family to accommodate your needs. However, when you meet the family, please
tell them what type of vegetarian you are. Do you eat fish, eggs, or milk? During the long field trip,
the travel agent will ask for vegetarian menus for you. However, we cannot guarantee that so
please bring snacks for the trip. Above all else please communicate with your host family if you
have certain dietary needs or restrictions.

It is a good idea to talk with a student or friend who has taken this program. They will have ideas
and suggestions that you would have never thought of until you are in Spain. Contrary to most
Americans, many people in Spain stay out later than you are accustomed. You are also probably
not accustomed to eating a small breakfast, eating lunch at 2 in the afternoon and a dinner around
10 o’clock at night. Also, the idea of a siesta, snacks during the afternoon and a small meal around
7 o’clock may seem strange to you. Little by little, the culture will seem less peculiar. Also, a lot
of people smoke whether you are on the street or in a bar, be aware that you will encounter second
hand smoke.

At first glance, Spanish culture can seem comfortingly similar to American culture. Yes and no.
Spain and the U.S. share a general western and Christian heritage, but it is very important to
remember some key factors in order to understand why Spain is different. The Spanish Civil War
literally destroyed the country, and the dictatorship under Franco still resonates in Spanish society.
While the conservatism and machismo attitudes of the past are fading, you will still encounter their
remnants. Right now there is a huge generation gap between the children born after Franco’s death
and their parents and grandparents who lived through the dictatorship and in some cases the war.
While saying that Spain is twenty years behind the rest of Europe is a bit of an exaggeration, it is
necessary to understand that in some ways it may be. Gender roles and characteristics are very
defined; while women do and can work, there is still a very traditional model of the family.

The Spanish schedule stems from the south, where the heat makes it impossible to work at midday,
but has been adopted nationwide and now forms part of the Spanish mindset. Desayuno is a light
breakfast of coffee or hot chocolate with cookies or pastry. El Almuerzo or el café is taken around
noon in order to make it through to lunch, or la comida around two or three in the afternoon. There
is a merienda or snack for kids in the late afternoon, and dinner, or la cena is usually around nine
or ten at night. In certain families and contexts, lunch is a big deal, consisting of two or three
courses, plus dessert, coffee and after dinner liquors. If you are invited to a lunch or a dinner,
expect it to last at least two or three hours. Because of the long Spanish lunch and the horario
partido that most workers have, most businesses are closed from 1:30pm to 4:30pm, reopening
again until eight or nine at night. There are some Lupa supermarkets that are open from nine am to
nine pm, as well as the big shopping centers. Nothing is open on Sunday except bakeries,
                                                  36
newsstands, bars, and a handful of grocery stores.

Greetings and relationships in Spain may surprise you. Spanish have the custom of giving two
kisses, either on the cheek or in the air when they are first introduced to someone, and then again
later when they have not seen that person in a while. Men usually shake hands, and kiss women.
Women greet both men and women with kisses, but may shake hands in business settings. Be
careful not to over-kiss, as this may send the wrong signals, especially to members of the opposite
sex. In conversation, Spanish stand closer to each other and talk more loudly, using gestures. It
may seem at first like everyone is always arguing. Don’t be alarmed. In general, Spanish people
make friends in childhood that will last them their entire lives. It is often difficult to begin a
friendship with someone, unless you are willing to work at it.

The Spanish concept of ‘casa’ and ‘calle’ is very different from the North American version. Most
foreigners complain that Spain is very dirty and would be surprised to know that most Spanish are
scrupulous housekeepers. This is due to the concept Spaniards have of personal and public space, a
concept that also influences relationships. The home is sacred, while the street belongs to nobody,
and therefore is different. Most Spanish young adults live at home until their late twenties.
However, because the home is separate from the street, in many cases they cannot or will not bring
friends to their parents house. For this reason most young Spanish people spend a lot of time in
public spaces – bars, cafes, the beach, where they are free to socialize and be themselves. If you are
invited into the family home (not a student apartment) of a Spanish person, understand that this is
an important step. Meeting the parents of your Spanish friend or significant other means that the
relationship is truly valued.




School Activities


The University of Cantabria has a “Servicio de Actividades Físicas y Deportes” which range from
weekend hikes to dance classes. You can also sign up for a pass to their weight room. For more
information on these and other services, go to the “Pabellón Polideportivo”, which is on the same
street as the Centro de Idiomas.

La Noche es Joven is a fun way to interact with other students your age. Join them on facebook and
receive information on events. http://www.facebook.com/nochejoven

The Universidad de Cantabria website has a list of all the leisure activities.
http://www.unican.es/en/living/Leisure.htm


Buses

Most students can easily walk to school and downtown but if you find youself using the city bus
often you can buy a bus pass at the “Estancos”.

Taxis

Taxis in Santander are relatively inexpensive and are a good option for getting home after the buses
have stopped running. When you arrive in Santander you will want to get a taxi to your host families
apartment.




                                                  37
Conversion Charts
Conversion Chart – Kitchen


US:                                    EUROPE:
1 cup sugar                            200 gr.
1 cup flour                            150 gr.
1 tsp.                                 5 gr.
1 tbsp.                                12 gr.
1 lb.                                  450 gr.
1 kilo                                 2.2 lb

                    Conversion Chart – Oven Temperatures

                              Celsius Fahrenheit

                                120        250

                                135        275

                                150        300

                                160        325

                                180        350

                                190        375

                                200        400

                                220        425

                                230        450




                                      38
                            Conversion Chart – Clothing

              WOMEN'S CLOTHING SIZE CONVERSION CHART

     Size                              USA                                       Spain
 X-Small                                2-4                                       32-34

     Small                              4-6                                       34-36

 Medium                                8-10                                       38-40

  Large                                12-14                                      42-44

 X-Large                               14-16                                      44-46

      1X                               16-18                                      46-48
      2X                               18-20                                      48-50
      3X                               22-24                                      50-52
      4X                               24-26                                      54-56

                                      Ladies Shoe Sizes

      EU       34           35         37          38         39        40       41        42

      US          4         5          6           7          8           9      10        11




              MENS CLOTHING SIZE CONVERSION CHART

Standard Sizing: X Small Small              Medium Large           X Large 2X Large 3X Large
US                    32 - 34 36 - 38 40 - 42 44 - 46 48                      50 - 52   54 - 56
Europe                42 - 44 46 - 48 50 - 52 54 - 56 58 - 60 62 - 64                   66 - 68
Chest (inches): 30 - 32 34 - 36 38 - 40 42 - 44 46 - 48 50 - 52                         54 - 56
aist (inches):        24 - 26 28 - 30 32 - 34 36 - 38 40 - 42 44 - 46                   48 - 50
Arms (inches):        28 - 30 32 - 33 33 - 34 34 - 35 35 - 36 36 - 37                   37 - 38

                                       Men's Shoe Sizes

     EU      38        39        40           42        43         44          46         47

     US      5.5      6.5        7.5        8.5         9.5        10.5       11.5        12.5




                                                   39
Conversion Chart -- Temperature, Length, Liquids, Weight, Speeds




                                       40
Telephone Calls
To call Spain from USA you need to dial 011-34. For calls to the U.S., dial “001-area code-
number.” Spain is NINE hours ahead of us. Please get a phone card and use it and make sure your
family has one too! Other solutions are to have your friends and family call you at a specific time
and day since it is cheaper to call from here. Especially if they call between 12 and 7 AM their
time. For instance, if someone calls you at 12 midnight Oregon time, in Spain it is 9AM. If they
call you at 7 AM it will be 4 PM in Spain, just in time for siesta. This is probably one of the
touchiest subjects for international students and host families. Why? Because sometimes students
leave with considerable unpaid bills. Many times this is done involuntarily, but it happens. Phone
cards are available at inexpensive rates. The Eurocity Card is a good one, $6 for 90 minutes, and
$12 for 180 minutes. The People Call card has comparable rates to Eurocity. These cards are
available at any news stand or tobacco stores called “Estancos”. However, be sure to bring a phone
card with you to Europe so that you can call your family upon arrival, as it can be difficult to figure
out the European phone system when you have jet lag.

Skype is also a cheap way to stay connected and is free to download. Check out skype.com for more
information. You will need a headset with a microphone that you can purchase ahead of time or while
in Spain.

Now, the most important thing: stay in touch with your family and loved ones in the United States,
often e-mailing or calling them. They have very good reasons to feel anxious during this time.
And always keep your coordinator, home-stay family, and instructors informed as to your
whereabouts if you plan to travel. The University of Cantabria has an annex in the downtown area
that provides students with computing facilities. It is known as Paraninfo. If you need it, the
University will provide you with an e-mail address. Downtown there are also a few cyber cafes.
The public libraries also have computers where you can check your email for free if you are
prudent in using them. Both libraries are in the same building in downtown Santander:
        Biblioteca Central de Cantabria: www.bcc.gobcantabria.es
        Biblioteca Menéndez Pelayo: www.unican.es/bibmp/bmp.htm



Cell Phones
Most people own and frequently use them as the easiest way to communicate. If you have friends
and family back home that want an easy way to contact you, a cell phone may be a good option to
consider. You can contact your cell phone carrier and ask them how expensive it will be to use in
Spain. Most companies charge and arm and a leg. Student typically purchase a pay by use cell
phone once arriving in Spain. Please research the cost of texting as it can be very expensive
compared to your U.S. plan.


     Tip from past participant: “Vodaphone seemed to provide the best service and have the nicest phones
     for what you pay. It is very easy to buy more minutes at any tobacco place (brown sign with yellow
     writing “Estanco”). All you do is give them your phone number, tell them how much you want to
     spend (5, 10, 20, 50euro) and it is applied to your phone right after they punch it in. Other students
     suggest getting yoigo.”


Mail
There is a post office in Santander near the big park.


                                                     41
Electronic Mail (e-mail):
One of the best ways to keep in touch with your friends and family while you are living overseas is
through e-mail. It’s quick, free, and easily accessible, if you know where to go. Most host families
do not have internet themselves, however you might have wireless in the building and at several
café’s downtown. The paraninfo is available for you to use on weekdays for free.


Visitors

 Some of you will want friends and/or family to come visit you during your study abroad. We do
ask your cooperation in holding off such visits until AFTER the program has concluded. If that is
not possible, please plan accordingly as it is unacceptable to miss class.



Accident and Sickness Insurance Plan
The Oregon University System Legal Affairs office mandates universal health insurance coverage
with a common provider for all Oregon public university students on international programs. The
Office of Risk Assessment reviews many policies and determines the insurance company/plan that
will provide the best coverage for the least cost to Oregon students.

As a participant in an OUS International Program, you will be automatically enrolled in this
medical insurance for the dates of your study abroad program plus approximately one week prior
and one week after your program dates. This insurance is intended to supplement either your own
personal insurance policy or the national health care plan of the country in which you are studying.
 The cost of this coverage is included in your program fee.

Due to pending changes in the broker of record for the OUS Study Abroad Insurance Plan, we were
unable to provide specific details on this insurance at the time this handbook went to press. As
soon as details are available, OUS International Programs will supplement this handbook with
information about the policy and your coverage.

                                                                                       Revised 4/10

Emergencies

In case of a medical emergency while you are in Spain, you should call the emergency telephone
number 112 (the equivalent to 911), which is the same everywhere in Spain.

If you have an emergency while traveling outside Spain but still in the European Union, dial “112,”
the common European Union emergency helpline. You can call this one number, anywhere,
anytime, for fast emergency aid in Europe. If help is needed, but you don’t know exactly where
you are, the EU has introduced technology that determines the exact geographic location of all 112
calls made by cell phones.

If you do have an emergency, please be sure to let the Resident Director know about it as soon as
possible. Although she may not be in your town, she may be able to find a way to help; the
Resident Director can also contact your parents, if you have not been able to do so.

Counseling: If you are having problems at your university and would like to see a counselor please
let Madeline know and she can help set up an appointment.

                                                 42
                                              SAFETY
Security and Safety Issues Abroad
Whether traveling abroad as a tourist, student, or intern, you will likely be
entering an unfamiliar environment. As a participant in an Oregon University
System International Program, you have the advantage of a program
infrastructure and/or individuals on-site to orient you to local safety issues and
to support you in the event of a security or safety emergency. You also have a
personal responsibility for your own safety and security.

Whenever you travel abroad, you should take certain precautions that will maximize your safety in
the event of a natural or political crisis. Although you are unlikely to experience an earthquake, be
involved in an accident, or find yourself caught in a difficult political situation, you should have a
plan of action to deal with these improbable events. Even though as a student the risk of your
being involved in a dangerous situation is statistically low, we advise you to take certain
precautionary measures against any risk. Your security will -- as always -- depend on your own
conduct.

We recommend the following precautions anytime you travel abroad:

1) Read the important emergency contact information in the first chapter of this handbook and
   carry that information – along with your medical insurance policy information - with you when
   you travel. In the case of emergency, you can dial “112” if you are traveling within Spain or
   “112” if you are traveling elsewhere within the European Union. “112” is the common
   European Union emergency helpline -- you can call this one number, anywhere, anytime, for
   fast emergency aid in Europe. If help is needed, but you don’t know exactly where you are, the
   EU has introduced technology that determines the exact geographic location of all 112 calls
   made by cell phones.

2) Register with the nearest U.S. consulate or your home country embassy (if not a U.S. citizen)
   so that in-country staff know how to contact you should the need arise. To register on-line
   with the U.S. Embassy, go to https://travelregistration.state.gov

3) Keep up-to-date on U.S. travel advisories or warnings for the country in which you reside or to
   which you might be traveling (http://travel.state.gov/). Do not travel in countries where travel
   advisories or warnings are already in effect. You can also obtain travel information and local
   conditions through a private company called “iJet Travel Intelligence.” Their web page is
   http://www.ijet.com. (OUS International Programs does not specifically endorse iJet and
   provides this source as an information resource only.) During your travels, the American
   Consulate services are good sources for up-to-date information.

4) Keep informed and alert of local issues/news. Stay informed by reading newspapers and
   magazines (both English-language and those of your host country). In times of political
   turmoil, stay tuned to the British Broadcasting Corporation, the Voice of America, and the
   Cable News Network broadcasts for U.S. State Department information.

5) Try to maintain a relatively low profile and integrate into the host culture as much as possible.
   Avoid political demonstrations and large groups or gatherings. Do not advertise that you are a
   US citizen and avoid American hangouts (in large cities or tourist centers, these might even be
   fast food restaurants, embassy’s, American bank branches, etc.)

6) Keep your local program leaders (program director, regional coordinator, or resident director),
                                                  43
    host organizations, host families/roommates, your family back home, and your instructors
    informed about your whereabouts if you plan to travel.

7) Do not carry baggage or parcels for other persons.

Incidences of either verbal or physical attacks toward Americans are relatively rare, yet they do occur.
You can protect yourself with some common sense and the simple tactics noted above. Keep in mind
that any comments directed at you are not personal. Don’t take them personally!

No one can guarantee your absolute safety while you’re abroad any more than we can guarantee your
safety on your home campus. Be assured, however, that we have taken precautions and routinely
monitor information about the issues and conditions in the locales where you will study. We have
communication procedures in place so that if an emergency occurs, you will know whom to contact for
information, counsel, and advice.

Even in the best of times, the above advice will intensify your cultural experience. Living and
learning in a culture different from one's own is a valuable experience. It is a time of reflection,
insight, and maturation. It is an opportunity to gain a broader perspective on global issues and U.S.
foreign policy. By being conscious of your appearance and conduct, you should enjoy an even
better integration into the life of your host country.

Pickpockets have long plagued visitors in large Europeans cities. Here is a list on how to keep your
possessions safe:
- In an airport, don’t place your computer bag on the ground while withdrawing currency.
- Don’t carry numerous bags on both shoulders.
- Don’t flash genuine designer sunglasses.
- Don’t study a map in a train or on a street corner while a handbag hangs over your shoulder.
- Don’t carry a camera over your shoulder, easily available to a nimble-fingered thief.
- Don’t hang your handbag over the back of a chair, where it can be easily lifted
- Don’t stop for pedestrians posing as “Good Samaritans” - they’re often robbers.
- If you carry a backpack for a day trip, carry it in front, with all the pockets security closed.
***In the case of robbery or loss of passport and other documents, contact the closest embassy
or consulate immediately along with your travel insurance company. The coordinator will try to
help you, but each student is fully responsible for his or her own possessions.



Conduct Issues
While you are on a university sponsored academic program in Spain, you are subject to the same
code of conduct that you would be at your home university. While we do not anticipate any
behavioral problems, please be aware that should you participate in activities that are counter to the
student code of conduct, you may be subject to student judicial procedures upon return to your
home campus.

Alcohol

It is legal to drink alcohol at 18 years of age in Spain. Alcohol is also a standard part of the social
life of young Spaniards. For many of you, this will be the first time that you are able to drink
legally. Be smart! It is easy to use alcohol to make social situations more comfortable, especially
when you have inhibitions about being in a foreign culture and speaking a foreign language. Be
aware of how much alcohol you are drinking, and don't depend on it to have a fun time.

 Being in control of your actions is extremely important. If you expose yourself to danger by being
out of control, you are jeopardizing yourself and the program.
                                                   44
When we encounter safety or conduct issues among program participants, it almost inevitably
results from excessive consumption of alcohol. You should understand that any irresponsible
behavior has broad repercussions for other program participants and on the relationship between
the Oregon University System and our partner institutions. We take a very dim view of incidents
that occur as a result of excessive alcohol consumption and sincerely encourage you to be
conscious of the potential results of your decision making.




Illegal Drugs
Drugs (including not only LSD, crack, marijuana and the like, but also pills like tranquilizers) are
absolutely prohibited in Spain. Please note that while in Spain you are subject to Spanish laws
exclusively-- not U.S. laws. You will be dismissed from the program immediately for drug use.




                                                  45
Advice to the Woman Traveling Alone
A woman traveling on her own may encounter more difficulties than a man by himself. Some of the
best methods of avoiding hassle are to fit in and try to understand the role of the sexes in the culture in
which you are traveling. Flexibility means observing how the host country's women dress and behave
and following their example. What may be appropriate or friendly behavior in the U.S. may bring you
unwanted, even dangerous, attention in another culture. Try not to take offense at whistles and other
gestures of appreciation, regardless of whether they are compliments, invitations, or insults. Realize
these gestures are as much a part of the culture as its food, history, and language. However, if your
intuition tells you a situation is dangerous, then act as if it is. Avoid being out alone at night in
unfamiliar territory -- on the street, in parks, on trams, in trains. If, for example, you suddenly find
yourself alone in a train car at night, move to another one where other people are sitting.

Be extra careful with giving your trust. This applies generally, but is especially important when
traveling alone.

Sexual Harassment
(We wish to give credit for the following section to Joan N. Savitt, Associate Director, Office of International Programs,
University of Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY.)

This section comes as a result of a concern about sexual harassment, which, in a study abroad
context, can be defined as any unwanted sexual advances from anyone with power over any aspect
of your stay overseas including your living arrangements and your educational or work
environment. Sometimes it is difficult to evaluate whether or not you are being harassed. For
example, Americans sometimes react with discomfort to the normal conversational distance
between people in a culture they are exploring, and you should be aware of your own feelings
within that context. However, no one, male or female, studying abroad should have to suffer from
unwelcome sexual pressure.

It is not uncommon when traveling abroad to encounter sexual harassment taking the form of a
request for company or sexual favors. Should you be the object of such advances, say no firmly.
Should it persist, inform the Resident Director.

OUS by no means wishes to suggest that sexual harassment is the norm, for it is not. You should
not interpret every invitation in the negative, but rather accept most invitations as a show of
hospitality and an effort to acquaint you with a new culture. However, if you find that you are the
target of what are clearly repeated sexual advances, then you should go to the appropriate person to
report it and to request his/her assistance.

Complaints of student to student harassment or complaints involving an OUS employee can be
directed to the OUS International Programs Office or to the student’s home campus following
regularly established protocols for reporting of such incidents.




                                                            46
                    CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS

Your Role as a Cultural Ambassador
You may not realize it right now, but you will be representing much more than just yourself when you
go abroad. There are several roles you will “play” while in Spain. As a participant in the Spain
Language Intensive program, you will be looked upon as a student from the Oregon program first; as
an “American” second (unless you’re an international student studying in Oregon); and lastly, you’ll be
looked at as an individual.

Given this role as a cultural ambassador, you’ll be expected to behave as a “diplomat”, perhaps a role
that you may not be accustomed to living in the United States where the emphasis is on the individual
instead of the group. This diplomatic persona means that you might find yourself listening, observing,
and thinking more about the ramifications of particular statements and actions than you do at home.
This is important because when you are living in an unfamiliar culture, the verbal and non-verbal
signals you think mean one thing may mean something completely different! Take time to process…
and realize that the words and actions you use will be used to judge many more people than just
yourself.

One of the major goals of an international experience is to help you develop social skills that can
be used in a number of different cultural settings. The broader those skills become, the wider your
opportunities become through meeting new people and incorporating new perspectives. Learning,
after all, is exposure to different ideas and perspectives. The abilities and skills you develop as you
work with diverse groups will be the key that unlocks many doors for you.

As a part of your term abroad you will be asked to reflect on cultural observations halfway through
the program. Be prepared to answer them via email.

Adjusting to New Environments
Although it might seem artificial to graph cultural adjustment on a cycle, many students have found the
following reading extremely useful. If nothing else, the cycle may remind you at a low moment that
nearly everyone goes through periods of depression (as well as elation) when entering and leaving a
new culture. Keep these thoughts in mind:

    (1) You may experience the stages in a different order, at different times.

    (2) Making friends right away might soften the initial culture shock.

    (3) Go with an open mind. Your integration into the new culture will be easier if you go with no
        preconceptions or expectations. Remember that their way of life is just as valid as your own.




                                                  47
The Intercultural Adjustment Cycle
(taken from: "Bring Home the World" by Stephen H. Rhinesmith)

As people move from one society to another and begin to deal with the cultural differences we have outlined,
experience has shown that there are some specific stages which they encounter in their adjustment process.
Indeed, it would be amazing if people could leave their communities, their families, and their homes and go
abroad for a period of time without feeling some anxiety. Naturally, the severity and length of adjustment
and the number of adjustment phases that they will go through depend upon the length of time they will be
away from home and the support they are given. Nevertheless, regardless of how short a time a foreign
visitor is here, you can be relatively certain that she/he will feel many of the emotions outlined in the
intercultural adjustment cycle below.

    2.Arrival/Fascination         4. Surface Adjustment        6. Acceptance/Integration   8.Reentry/reintegration



1. Application Anxiety      3. Initial Culture Shock   5. Mental Isolation       7. Return Anxiety



Obviously, this cycle describes a long-term adjustment process--usually over a one year period. If you are
involved in a program which involves a shorter term, it is still important to recognize the dynamics of this
process, because research has shown that the same basic pattern will occur, though perhaps less severely in a
short-term visit. Interestingly, the human psyche adjusts itself to the time it has available. In most cases, the
visitor will experience a dip in stage 3, about one-third of the way through his/her experience, and another dip
in stage 5, about two-thirds of the way through. The extent, depth, and length of these dips will depend on
the amount of support the visitor receives from people around him/her and the degree to which he/she can be
helped to understand the reasons for feelings of frustration and concern.

      1. Application Anxiety. When waiting for an opportunity to go abroad, you may experience anxiety
         over your chances of selection and your ability to handle the new opportunity. During this time,
         you might anticipate cultural differences, but have only a superficial awareness of potential
         adjustment problems.

      2. Selection/Arrival Fascination. When you hear that you will be going abroad, you may
         experience a tremendous amount of elation. This excitement continues (with some small exception
         just before departure, when anxiety may crop up again) until sometime after you arrive in the
         foreign country. During this stage, expectations for the visit are high and the pre-departure
         proceedings, as well as the arrival introductions, are overwhelming and blissful in their newness.
         Especially on arrival, you may tend to be the focus of attention and activity. You may be shown
         respect and concern which you seldom have received in your home community.

       3. Initial Culture Shock. The initial fascination, along with the rounds of introductions and parties,
          will soon fade if you are remaining in a community over a period of time, especially a period as
          long as six months or a year. Even with visitors coming to the United States on tour, or for
          Americans going abroad for a similar experience, the novelty of a foreign culture wears off after a
          few weeks and most people enter a decline known as initial culture shock. Characteristics of this
          period are possible changes in sleeping habits, disorientation about how to work with and relate to
          others, and probably language difficulties and mental fatigue from speaking and listening to a
          foreign language all day.

      4. Surface Adjustment. After this initial "down" which does not last more than a few days to a few
         weeks, an adjustment takes place and you settle into the new situation around you. Language
         ability improves so you can communicate basic ideas and feelings without fatigue, and you learn
                                                          48
    how to navigate within a small group of friends and associates.

5. Mental Isolation. At some point, however, the novelty wears off completely and the difficulties
   remain. Frustration increases, and a new and more pervasive sense of isolation can set in. Many
   times this period is accompanied by boredom and a lack of motivation as you may feel little
   stimulus to overcome the deeper and more troublesome difficulties you may be facing. There may
   be unresolved conflicts with friends, hosts, or peers, or basic language problems which continue to
   cause difficulty long after the initial language adjustment.

6. Integration/Acceptance. When you are finally at ease, with your professional or school interests,
   as well as with language, friends, and associates, you are able to examine more carefully the new
   society in which you are living. Deeper differences between you and others become
   understandable, and you find ways of dealing with them. You may complain of the lack of true
   friendships, but you have come to recognize that this may not be deliberate on the part of the
   people with whom you are associated. Eventually, you become more integrated into your
   surroundings and come to accept both your situation and yourself in it. Acceptance of these two
   realities will allow you to relax and feel at home in your new surroundings.

7. Return Anxiety. Once you are well settled in, the thought of leaving familiar friends, faces, and
   your new community raises anxieties similar to those you felt during stage 1, before your
   departure. You begin to sense how much you have changed because of your experience, and
   apprehension grows at the thought of leaving and returning home to people who will not
   understand you and your new feelings and awareness’s. You may even feel guilty for wanting to
   stay and not return home, because you know that there will be many people waiting for you.

    This is a time of great confusion and considerable pain due to the breaking of bonds that have
    grown close with no promise of renewal in the future. Especially for young people, oceans divide
    individuals not just by miles, but by time, because the expense of transportation means waiting a
    number of years before you can return.

8. Shock/Reintegration. Once you return home, the contrast of old and new may come as a shock.
   You probably will have changed a great deal while away, and it will be difficult for family and
   friends to accept many of the changes. Likewise, having been the center of attention in another
   country for a period of time, you will be forced after a few days to realize that you have lost your
   glamour. You then face the problem of adjusting to being one of the crowd again, while longing
   for the friends you have left.

    You often find that no one is as interested in the details of your stay abroad as you feel they should
    be. You may experience conflicts in readjusting to family members and old friends and may be
    frustrated by your inability to describe adequately the depth and nature of your life abroad. All of
    this makes the surroundings even more depressing.

    Final resolution of this stage involves a shift in perspective and an understanding of your own
    society and your future development. You must begin to become involved in new activities at
    home and to plan a life which is built upon the future rather than the past. Once this is achieved,
    you will be able to integrate usefully the experiences and learning of the recent past and be
    productive in your "new" old life.




                                                   49
Helpful Skills

   o to be able to change plans cheerfully

     to be able to ask honest questions

     to be able to laugh at yourself

     to be able to change your lifestyle

     to be able to listen carefully

     to be patient with (almost) all situations

   o to be alert and curious

   o to be flexible in all situations

   o to be able to speak another language without regard for mistakes

   o to be diligent about studying the language and culture




                                        50
Section Five
    Finances




       51
52
                             PERSONAL FINANCES
It's very difficult to cite a minimum dollar figure for expenses during your time abroad. Budgeting
and spending are personal matters varying greatly depending on individual habits. It's wise to give
considerable thought to your finances and budget before you leave.

In addition to the program costs, there are other expenses related to your stay in Spain that you will
be responsible for covering on your own. These are listed on the cost sheet in the pocket of your
folder and are referred to as “Estimated Personal Expenses.”

Some of these personal expenses will be incurred before you leave (airfare); other items will be
necessary soon after you arrive (such as train ticket, local bus pass, etc.). The remaining expenses
will be spread out over the year and will fluctuate greatly depending on your own personal habits
and budget.

Initial Expenses
The cost of living in Spain is high, especially due to the strong Euro, and you will find yourself
spending quite a bit of money initially to get established. You should expect the following
approximate initial expenses (in addition to your transportation expenses to Spain):

 It’s recommended that you carry your money in less obvious places than your purse or wallet,
particularly when visiting large cities or in airports, train stations, etc.



Getting Funds to Spain
If you run out of cash while abroad or do not wish to take all your money with you in the form of
traveler's checks, there are several ways for you to get money from the United States during your
stay in Spain. Please inform your parents or anyone else who might want to send you money in
Spain of the options below. Don't forget that there are charges for each of the options!

Most students have found that taking a debit card or U.S. dollar travelers' checks (or relying on a
combination) is the best way to handle their initial expenses and the rest of their spending money.

Debit Card

This is the best method for getting money from a U.S. account to you in Spain. In most cases, your
ATM card can function as an international debit card and will allow you to access your U.S.
checking account while you are abroad. You or your parents can deposit your financial aid or other
checks in your U.S. checking account and you can withdraw the money in Spain using your debit
card. Students in Spain have had good luck with this method since many ATM machines in Spain
and in Europe will accept these cards. Be sure your debit card carries the VISA symbol. Also, be
sure to notify your bank at home that you will be using your ATM card to withdraw money abroad,
the countries you think you’ll be visiting and check for details on your card and any charges you
might incur. If you don’t the bank will most likely put a freeze on your account thinking it’s stolen.

* Note: Some credit unions do not charge a fee for withdrawing money but you must check with
them first.



                                                  53
Traveler’s Checks/Local Currency

Although many students have relied entirely on debit card withdrawals and a small amount of cash
in EUROS at the beginning, we recommend you also consider bringing some of your travel money
in traveler’s checks. You can buy traveler’s checks at most large U.S. banks. American Express
and Thomas Cook traveler's checks have worked well for most students. Traveler’s checks have
the advantage of being replaceable if stolen and they are not reliant on your ability to find a
functioning ATM when you need one. Purchase traveler’s checks in large denominations (100)
because there is usually a charge for cashing them, and the smaller the amount, the larger the
relative charge. Please note that some smaller shops won’t accept traveler’s checks and
Santander has a lot of small shops.

In general, except for emergencies, you should exchange money AT A BANK, not in airports or
train stations. Banks will give you a better exchange rate and will give you a better rate for
travelers' checks than for cash.


Credit Cards

Although not accepted in all stores and restaurants, credit cards can also be used to get emergency
cash advances while you are traveling. Beware that there will most likely be charges for every use.
Check with the company.




                                                54
                               PROGRAM FINANCES

Program Costs

The OUS International Programs Office is housed within the Office of International Education at OSU
and works with the universities in Oregon to provide administrative support to the OUS international
study programs. The OUS International Programs Office is responsible for the financial aspects of
your participation in an overseas study program. Your program costs will include the following:

   1. Program Operations Fee
   2. Lodging and Meals Fee
   3. Program Incidentals Fee

These program costs, as well as estimated personal expenses, are detailed on the cost sheets
located in the pocket of your folder.

Program Operations Fee

The program operations fee is paid in lieu of OUS campus tuition. Students will receive credit
from their home institution as though they paid regular tuition. The program fee is intended to
cover the basic program operating expenses (administrative and salary expenses) and to
approximate the cost of tuition and fees on your home campus.

Individual OUS campuses will charge a campus-based study abroad fee that is not included in the
program cost given here. The individual campus costs will be approximately $250-$350 per term.
This charge will be placed on your account at your home campus at the start of the term.

You must remember that your Program Operations Fee is not tuition and, therefore, normal tuition
refund policies do not apply. Also, since you will be off-campus during your study abroad program,
you will not be paying campus fees -- e.g., the incidental fees, student health fees, building fees, etc. --
and will not therefore have access to those facilities if you happen to visit your home campus during a
program break.

Normal tuition rates and residency status will recommence after your study abroad program is finished.

Lodging/Meals Fee

This fee includes money for lodging (host family) and meals for each month that you are in Spain.


Program Incidentals Fee

The program incidentals fee includes such items as special orientations, language courses, field trips,
and the required Travel Insurance Services Plan.

Additional Expenses
We also provide estimates of other costs you will incur during the program based on comments
from past participants and information from Spain. What you actually spend is dependent upon
your individual habits, requirements, and needs. Fluctuations in the rate of exchange, the economic
climate in the host country, and unforeseen expenses can all deplete your money supply more
quickly than you may expect. Budget for contingencies.

                                                    55
Introduction to Cost Sheet and Payment Agreement

In the pocket of your handbook, you will find a cost sheet outlining the program costs and personal
expenses for this program. You will also find the corresponding payment agreement (two
copies). This payment agreement divides the program costs into a deposit and then installments
by term. You must sign one copy of the payment agreement and return it to the OUS International
Programs Office. By signing this payment schedule, you are agreeing to meet the payments as
listed. Keep the other copy for your records.

Those students receiving financial aid should make arrangements to have their aid applied to the
payments each term. (See financial aid information later in this chapter.)
For convenience, some students choose to pay for the total cost of the program before they leave the
U.S. or they make several payments at once. This manner of payment is fine with us, as long as the
payments are received no later than the dates listed on the payment agreement.
Interest will accrue monthly on unpaid balances.


IMPORTANT:
For detailed instructions regarding how the billing process works at each OUS university, please
see the “Billing Information for Specific Universities” section later in this chapter.




                                                   56
                   BILLING INFORMATION
               FOR SPECIFIC OUS UNIVERSITIES

The following section has been prepared by Pam Roberts, the OUS International Programs Billing
Coordinator. It explains the billing procedures as they relate to each OUS university and should
answer many of your questions. Please read the information dedicated to your particular
university very carefully.

If you have further questions about your program payments, please contact:

                        Pam Roberts, Billing Coordinator
                        OUS International Programs Office
                        118 Ballard Hall
                        Oregon State University
                        Corvallis, OR 97331-1642

                        Telephone: (541) 737-6466
                        Fax: (541) 737-6482
                        E-mail: pam.roberts@oregonstate.edu




                                               57
OSU Billing Procedures
Since the Oregon University System (OUS) International Programs Office is located on the OSU
campus, your program charge will be put on your regular OSU account. You will not receive a
paper billing statement. Instead, an e-mail will be sent each month to your ONID account
notifying you that your statement can be viewed via the OSU Ebill system at
http://mybill.oregonstate.edu. You may authorize someone else, such as your parents, to be able to
view your account by clicking on the “authorized users” button once you are in the system and
following the instructions. The bill is due by the last day of the month (July 31st for summer term,
October 31st for fall term, January 31st for winter term, and April 30th for spring term). You will be
charged a 1% interest charge per month (12%APR) on any unpaid balance still on your account
after the due date.

In addition to the program costs listed on your payment agreement, you will be charged an
administrative fee by OSU each term you are registered for the program. The charge will be
$300 for summer term and $325 for fall, winter and spring terms. This charge will also be
placed on your OSU account and is due at the same time as your exchange program bill.

Please note that failure to pay all your program costs by the end of your program will result in a
hold being put on your transcript and on fall term registration.

Advance payment up to the total amount may be made at any time.

        Financial aid students:

        It is very important that you read and follow carefully all the instructions in the “OSU
        Financial Aid” section later in this chapter.

        Your aid will be applied directly to your OSU account at the start of the term. If your aid
        will only cover part of the program cost and OSU administrative fee, you need to pay the
        difference by the due date to avoid interest charges. If your aid is greater than the program
        charges, you will receive a refund. You can sign up to have your refund directly deposited
        into your bank account (pick up a form at the Student Accounts window or the Cashiers, or
        sign up for direct deposit via the student on-line services). If you have not signed up for
        direct deposit, a refund check will be mailed to the current mailing address on the OSU
        billing system. It is your responsibility to update your current mailing address so that
        your refund is sent to the correct address.

               Please see next page for answers to “Frequently Asked Questions.”

Due to federal privacy regulations, the OSU Business Office will not discuss student accounts with
anyone other than the student. Therefore, it would be a good idea to give your parents/bill-payers
a copy of this page and the Frequently Asked Questions page that follows. Tell them that they
may contact Pam Roberts directly (e-mail is best) if they have questions concerning the OSU bill.
Pam will be able to assist them provided you have listed their names on the release section of the
OUS address form you completed.

                         Pam Roberts, Billing Coordinator
                         OUS International Programs Office
                         118 Ballard Hall, Oregon State University
                         Corvallis, OR 97331-1642
                         Telephone: (541) 737-6466
                          Fax: (541) 737-6482
                         E-mail: pam.roberts@oregonstate.edu

                                                  58
 OSU Billing Procedures – Frequently Asked Questions
1. My first program payment isn’t due until after the program starts. My program bill
   includes living expenses. Will this affect my room and board disbursements? If your
   program bill includes room and board, then you will be covered from the start of the program,
   regardless of when we receive your first program payment.

2. Can I pay my program bill with a credit card? Yes, you can pay with a credit card via the
   Student On-line Services.

3. Can I pay my program bill in monthly installments? Yes, you may pay in monthly
   installments if you prefer, dividing up your bill as necessary. However, be aware that you will
   be charged interest and that each term’s bill should be paid in full before the next term’s
   installment is due.

4. I am eligible for staff rates. Can I use that while I am on exchange? No, unfortunately you
   cannot. Since you are not paying regular tuition to OSU (you are paying a program fee to the
   OUS International Programs Office in lieu of tuition) you cannot use staff rates.

5. My OSU bill was greater than the amount listed on the payment agreement (plus the OSU
   administrative fee). Why? You might have had some old charges on your account that you
   didn’t pay before you left on exchange. You need to pay those. Also, new and transfer students
   are charged a one-time matriculation fee. Finally, sometimes health service charges will show
   up on your account after you’ve left for exchange. Often students stock up on prescriptions or
   have a physical as part of the visa application process. Usually, it takes a few months before
   those charges will be put on your OSU account, so don’t forget about them!

          NOTE: The Honors College will waive its resource fee for study abroad students provided
          you complete a form, which you can obtain from them.

 6. The financial aid that was applied to my OSU account was less than what I was expecting.
     What happened? A few loans (for instance the Ford loans) have a fee subtracted from the
    gross amount of the loan. Also, some private scholarships come in a little later in the term, so
    they might not be applied to your account by the time the bill is ready for you to view on-line.
     If your aid is significantly different than what you were expecting and you can’t account for
    the difference after you’ve carefully checked your aid award and OSU account, you should
    contact the OSU financial aid office (financial.aid@oregonstate.edu). Perhaps you neglected
    to complete some required paperwork.

7.    I have an alternative loan (a loan that you applied for directly with a bank, NOT the Ford
     sub or unsubsidized loan, Direct PLUS loan, or the Perkins loan). How do I have that
     applied to my OSU account? Most alternative loans can be applied directly to your OSU
     account like other types of aid. If you have any questions about your alternative loan, please
     contact Charlotte Hughbank in the OSU Cashiers Office. Her phone number is (541) 737-2597,
     and her e-mail is Charlotte.Hughbank@oregonstate.edu.

8.    I have an athletic scholarship. How are those funds disbursed? You should contact your
     scholarship administrator in the OSU Athletics Dept to discuss exactly what costs they will
     cover and how the funds will be disbursed.

9.    I received my financial aid refund at the start of the term. Yet, the next month my billing
     statement showed a balance due. Why wasn’t my account balance cleared with my aid
     before a refund was issued? OSU is trying to make sure that it is in strict compliance with
     Federal regulations regarding financial aid. The only charges that OSU will deduct from federal
     financial aid before it issues a refund are the current term’s tuition/fees/R&B charges (this
                                                 59
    includes your exchange program charges). OSU will NOT deduct previous term’s balances,
    emergency loans, fines (parking, library, etc), health service charges for pharmacy items etc.,
    from federal types of aid. Rather, OSU will issue a refund and then you need to pay those
    charges still on your account. I anticipate that this policy will affect you in only two
    circumstances: 1) You currently owe money to OSU from previous terms; 2) fines or health
    service charges are put on your account after you leave for exchange. If either of these
    circumstances applies to you, just make a payment to OSU to cover the charges that weren’t
    deducted from your aid.

         NOTE: State based aid and private loans (such as alternative loans) and scholarships will
         be applied to any past due balance you might have on your OSU account.

10. My financial aid contact address received a letter from the OSU Financial Aid Office at
   the end of the term that stated I am out of compliance and that my future aid is in
   jeopardy. Why? This is a computer-generated letter that goes out to all financial aid students
   who don’t have grades on the system after the end of the term. Your aid will continue to be
   released while you are on exchange (provided there aren’t other issues with your financial aid
   that existed prior to your study abroad program) and you can disregard the letter during the
   school year. However, at the end of the school year (spring term), the OSU Financial Aid
   Office will require that grades be on the system so that they can verify that you passed the
   required number of hours before any subsequent financial aid is released. (Your future
   aid is held, not canceled.) Make sure that you do everything you are supposed to do to ensure
   that we have the necessary paperwork to transcript your grades quickly (check with the program
   administrator or resident director). Of course, you must complete the necessary number of
   credits to retain your financial aid eligibility.

11. When I look at my “Cost of Attendance” screen on the OSU webpage, it shows a higher
   cost than my payment agreement, and the categories (tuition, room and board, etc.) don’t
   match my cost sheet either. What is going on? You are confusing your financial aid budget
   (the cost of attendance screen) with your program bill. We submit your exchange program
   budget to the OSU Financial Aid Office. They look at your total estimated costs, which include
   the program charge you pay to us, plus all the items on your cost sheet that we don’t bill for,
   such as airfare, etc. The Financial Aid Office compares the exchange program costs to the on-
   campus costs. If your exchange program cost is higher, the Financial Aid Office adds a lump
   sum to your budget to account for the higher cost of studying abroad. The Financial Aid Office
   doesn’t adjust the budget line items so that they match the categories of your particular
   exchange program; they just adjust the total figure. It is the total budget figure that is used to
   determine your aid package. The higher your budget, the more aid you may potentially be
   eligible for. Your aid package will also be determined by your eligibility for additional loans,
   family contribution, etc. You aren’t guaranteed that you will receive enough aid to totally cover
   all of your costs; in fact, most students don’t.

 NOTE: For other general FAQ regarding OSU Student Accounts, please see this website:

             http://oregonstate.edu/fa/businessaffairs/student

                                                                                         Revised 4/10




                                                  60
PSU Billing Procedures
The registration fee* and program fee will be charged to your regular PSU account. You will
receive a computerized statement from the PSU Business Affairs Office shortly before the due
date. The statement will be sent to the address listed in the PSU system. The same policies
regarding late fees, credit card payments, etc., will apply to your program billing. If you do not
receive a statement, please make your payment as scheduled and mail it to this address:

PSU Cashiers Office
Portland State University
PO Box 908
Portland, OR 97207-0751

All payments should be made payable to PSU. If you have any questions regarding your PSU
account, you should contact Andrea Price (503 725-5076, pricea@pdx.edu) in the PSU Office of
International Affairs.

You may also pay your bill on-line via the PSU Information system at www.pdx.edu. (Go to
‘current students’ and then click on ‘my.pdx.edu’ - once you log into the PSU system, please
follow directions on how to view and pay your PSU bill.)

Due dates for program and registration fees are by the end of the second week of the term here in
Oregon. If you do not pay by the second week of the term, an automatic late fee will be assessed
and charged to your account. If your balance is greater than $100, a registration hold will be placed
on your record, which prevents you from registering for a future term. It is very important that you
clear any outstanding balance before the beginning of the following term. If we cannot register you
for a future term, you will not receive academic credit for your program and your financial aid will
be delayed.

If you are participating in a year-long program or in a winter/spring semester program, your
program and PSU registration fees will be distributed over three (year-long) or two (winter/spring)
terms.

       Financial aid students:

       It is very important that you read and follow all the instructions in the “PSU Financial Aid”
       section later in this chapter.

       Your financial aid will be applied to your account at PSU at the start of the term here in
       Oregon. If your aid will only cover part of your program cost, you should pay the balance
       by the due date to avoid late charges. If your aid is greater than the program cost, you will
       receive a refund.

*This is the fee that PSU charges for registration and administration and is listed on your cost sheet
under “Additional Expenses.” The PSU registration fee will be $350 for each term that you are
abroad.


               Please see next page for answers to “Frequently Asked Questions.”




                                                  61
PSU Billing Procedures – Frequently Asked Questions
  1. My first program payment isn’t due until after the program starts. My program bill
     includes living expenses. Will this affect my room and board disbursements? If
     your program bill includes room and board, then you will be covered from the start of the
     program, regardless of when we receive your first program payment.

  2. Can I pay my program bill with a credit card?
     You can pay your bill on-line via the PSU Information System at www.pdx.edu. In order to
     do so, you will need your student ID number and your PIN.

  3. Can I pay my program bill in monthly installments?
     Yes, you may pay in monthly installments, if you prefer dividing up your bill. However,
     be aware that you will be charged interest and that each term’s bill should be paid in full
     before the next term’s installment is due.

  4. I am eligible for staff rates. Can I use them while I am on exchange?
     No, unfortunately you cannot. Since you are not paying regular tuition to PSU (you are
     paying an administrative fee to the OUS International Programs Office in lieu of tuition)
     you cannot use staff rates.

  5. My PSU bill was for more than the amount listed on the payment agreement (plus the
     PSU registration fee). Why?
     You might have had some old charges on your account that you didn’t pay before you left
     on exchange. You need to pay those. Also, new and transfer students are charged a one-
     time matriculation fee. Finally, sometimes health service charges will show up on your
     account after you’ve left for exchange. Often students stock up on prescriptions or have a
     physical as part of the visa application process. Usually, it takes a few weeks before those
     charges will be put on your PSU account, so don’t forget about them!

  6. The financial aid that was applied to my PSU account was less than what I was
     expecting. What happened?
     A few loans (for instance the Stafford loans) have a fee subtracted from the gross amount
     of the loan. Also, some private scholarships come in a little later in the term, so they might
     not be applied to your account by the time the bill is printed. If your aid is significantly
     different than what you were expecting and you can’t account for the difference after
     you’ve carefully checked your aid award and PSU account, you should contact Matthew
     Sagayaga in the PSU financial aid office (sagayagm@pdx.edu). Perhaps you neglected to
     complete some required paperwork.

  7. I have an alternative loan (a loan that you applied for directly with a bank; NOT
     Stafford loans, subsidized or unsubsidized loans, Direct PLUS loans, or Perkins
     loans). How do I have that applied to my PSU account?
     This type of loan is payable to you and, for many of the alternative loans, the bank (not
     PSU) requires that you endorse the check. If you have an alternative loan, you must
     contact the PSU Cashier’s Office at (503)-725-5332. Someone in the Cashier’s Office
     can tell you what your particular bank requires and work out a procedure with you
     regarding the check.




                                               62
8. I received my financial aid refund at the start of the term. Yet, the next month my
   billing address received a bill from PSU with a balance due. Why wasn’t my account
   balance cleared with my aid before a refund was issued?
   PSU is trying to make sure that it is in strict compliance with federal regulations regarding
   financial aid. The only charges that PSU will deduct from federal financial aid before it
   issues a refund are the current term’s tuition/fees/room & board charges (this includes your
   exchange program charges). PSU will NOT deduct previous term’s balances, emergency
   loans, fines (parking, library, etc), health service charges for pharmacy items etc., from
   federal types of aid. Instead, PSU will issue a refund, upon which you need to pay any
   outstanding charges on your PSU account. This policy will possibly affect you in two
   circumstances: you currently owe money to PSU from previous terms or fines, or health
   service charges are put on your account after you leave for exchange. If either of these
   circumstances applies to you, just deposit your refund check and write a check to PSU to
   cover the charges that weren’t deducted from your aid.

    NOTE: State based aid and private loans (such as alternative loans) and scholarships will
    be applied to any past due balance you might have on your PSU account.

9. My financial aid contact address received a letter from the PSU Financial Aid Office
   at the end of the term that stated I am out of compliance and that my future aid is in
   jeopardy. Why?
   This is a computer-generated letter that goes out to all financial aid students who don’t
   have grades on the system after the end of the term. Your aid will continue to be released
   while you are on exchange and you can disregard the letter during the school year.
   However, at the end of the school year (spring term), the PSU Financial Aid Office
   will require that grades be in the system so that they can verify that you passed the
   required number of hours before any subsequent financial aid is released. (Your
   future aid is held, not canceled.) Make sure that you do everything you are supposed to do
   to ensure that we have the necessary paperwork to transcript your grades quickly (check
   with the program administrator or resident director).

10. I have a tuition/fee remission and/or another PSU-based scholarship. Can I use that
    for my program?
    Yes (such as the Laurels, Diversity and Presidential Scholarship). The only scholarship that
    is NOT applicable to your study abroad program is WUE. (To accommodate this, OUS
    will charge WUE students the OUS resident program fee.)

                                                                                   Revised 4/10




                                             63
UO Billing Procedures

Since the Oregon University System (OUS) International Programs Office is located on the OSU
campus, your program charge will be put on the OSU billing system. Your billing address will
receive a computerized billing statement from the OSU Business Office by the middle of the
month. The bill is due by the last day of the month (July 31st for summer term, October 31st for
fall term, January 31st for winter term, and April 30th for spring term). You will be charged a 1%
interest charge per month (12%APR) on any unpaid balance still on your account after the due
date.

There have been instances when students have not received a billing statement. If this happens,
please make your payments as scheduled on the payment agreement. Make the check payable
either to “OUS International Programs” or “OSU” and mail the payment to Pam Roberts (see
below). Be sure to include a written statement indicating your name and the overseas program
name (e.g., your program country). This will insure that the payment will be credited properly.

In addition to the program costs shown on your payment agreement, the UO will charge you
$300 each term for registration, and your major college will charge you for any resource fees
they collect. The registration fee and resource fees will be put on your UO account, and you will
receive a separate bill from the UO that you must pay (if you don’t have financial aid to cover it).

NOTE: To waive the Honors College fee, you must petition the department before the charge is
placed on your account.

Please note that failure to pay all your program costs by the end of your program will result in a
hold being put on your transcript and on fall term registration.

Advance payment up to the total amount may be made at any time.

  Financial aid students

  It is very important that you read and follow carefully all the instructions in the “UO Financial
  Aid” section later in this chapter.

  Your aid will be applied first to your UO account to pay the $300 registration fee and any
  resource fees. After those charges are paid, the remaining aid will be transferred to OSU to be
  applied towards your program bill (provided you signed the necessary release form with Lois
  Yoshishige in the UO Business Office). The transfer may take a couple of weeks after the start
  of the term, so don’t be alarmed if your aid hasn’t been applied to the first bill of the term. Just
  pay any balance that isn’t covered by your aid (by the due date to avoid interest charges) and you
  will see your financial aid credited to your OSU program bill by the time the second bill of the
  term is mailed. (Any interest charges that accrue on the portion of your bill covered by your
  financial aid will be waived.) If your aid is greater than your program cost, the UO will send
  OSU only the amount you owe and release the remainder to whomever you designated or directly
  to your bank account, whatever arrangements you made with Lois. If necessary, your bill payer
  can contact Pam Roberts (see below) to confirm the amount of the aid transfer so that s/he can
  pay the correct amount by the due date.

  Please contact Lois Yoshishige in the UO Business Office by phone at (541) 346-1251 or email
  at loisy@uoregon.edu if you have any questions regarding the financial aid transfer to OSU or if
  you are having any trouble figuring out the activity on your UO account. Contact the UO FAO if




                                                  64
  you have specific questions about your UO financial aid (fawww@oregon.uoregon.edu )

                 Please see “Frequently Asked Question” later in this chapter.

Due to federal privacy regulations, the OSU Business Office will not discuss student accounts with
anyone other than the student. Therefore, it would be a good idea to give your parents/bill payers
a copy of this section and the “Frequently Asked Questions” section later in this chapter. Tell
them that they may contact Pam Roberts directly (e-mail is best) if they have questions concerning
the OSU bill. Pam will be able to assist them provided you have listed their names on the release
section of the OUS address form you completed.

                        Pam Roberts, Billing Coordinator
                        OUS International Programs Office
                        118 Ballard Hall, Oregon State University
                        Corvallis, OR 97331-1642
                        Telephone: (541) 737-6466
                         Fax: (541) 737-6482
                        E-mail: pam.roberts@oregonstate.edu

                                                                                     Revised 4/10




                                               65
EOU Billing Procedures
Since the Oregon University System (OUS) International Programs Office is located on the OSU campus,
your program charge will be put on the OSU billing system. Your billing address will receive a computerized
billing statement from the OSU Business Office by the middle of the month. The bill is due by the last day
of the month (July 31st for summer term, October 31st for fall term, January 31st for winter term, and April
30th for spring term). You will be charged a 1% interest charge per month (12%APR) on any unpaid balance
still on your account after the due date.

There have been instances when students have not received a billing statement. If this happens, please make
your payments as scheduled on the payment agreement. Make the check payable either to “OUS
International Programs” or “OSU” and mail the payment to Pam Roberts at the address below. Be sure to
include a written statement indicating your name and the overseas program name (e.g., your program
country). This will insure that the payment will be credited properly.

In addition to the program charge(s) listed on your payment schedule, you will be charged a $250 EOU
registration fee the first term that you are abroad. This charge will be placed on your EOU account and
you will receive a separate bill from EOU that you will need to pay, unless you have financial aid that will
cover it.

Please note that failure to pay all your program costs by the end of your program will result in a hold being put on your
transcript and on fall term registration.

Advance payment up to the total amount may be made at any time.

  Financial Aid Students:

  If you are a financial aid student, it is very important that you read and follow carefully all the instructions
  in the “EOU Financial Aid” section later in this chapter. In addition, please contact Sandy Henry in the
  EOU Business Office at (541) 962-3185 or by email at shenry@eou.edu to give her the necessary
  authorization so that she can transfer your aid to OSU.

  Your aid will first be applied to your EOU account to cover any charges there. Once your EOU account is
  cleared, EOU will transfer the remaining aid to be applied to your program charge at OSU. The aid
  transfer will take a couple of weeks after the start of the term here in Oregon, so don’t be alarmed if your
  EOU aid isn’t reflected in the first bill you receive from OSU. Just pay any balance that isn’t covered by
  your aid and you will see your aid credited to your OSU program bill by the time the second bill of the
  term is mailed. (Any interest charges that accrue on the portion of the bill covered by your financial aid
  will be waived.) If your aid is greater than your program cost, EOU will send OSU the exact amount owed
  for your program, and release the remainder to whomever you have designated. If necessary, your bill
  payer can contact Pam Roberts (see below) to confirm the amount of the aid transfer so that s/he can pay
  the correct amount by the due date.)

                         Please see “Frequently Asked Questions” later in this chapter.

Due to federal privacy regulations, the OSU Business Office will not discuss student accounts with anyone
other than the student. Therefore, it would be a good idea to give your parents/bill payers a copy of this
page and the “Frequently Asked Questions” section later in this chapter. Tell them that they may contact
Pam Roberts directly (e-mail is best) if they have questions concerning the OSU bill. Pam will be able to
assist them provided you have listed their names on the release section of the OUS address form you
completed.

                              Pam Roberts, Billing Coordinator
                              OUS International Programs Office
                              118 Ballard Hall, Oregon State University
                              Corvallis, OR 97331-1642
                              Telephone: (541) 737-6466
                               Fax: (541) 737-6482
                              E-mail: pam.roberts@oregonstate.edu                            Revised 4/10


                                                            66
SOU Billing Procedures
Since the Oregon University System (OUS) International Programs Office is located on the OSU
campus, your program charge will be put on the OSU billing system. Your billing address will
receive a computerized billing statement from the OSU Business Office by the middle of the
month. The bill is due by the last day of the month (July 31st for summer term, October 31st for
fall term, January 31st for winter term, and April 30th for spring term). You will be charged a 1%
interest charge per month (12%APR) on any unpaid balance still on your account after the due
date.

There have been instances when students have not received a billing statement. If this happens,
please make your payments as scheduled on the payment agreement. Make the check payable
either to “OUS International Programs” or “OSU,” and mail the payment to Pam Roberts (see
below). Be sure to include a written statement indicating your name and the overseas program
name (e.g., your program country). This will insure that the payment will be credited properly.

In addition to the program charge(s) listed on your payment agreement, you will be charged a
$275 SOU International Programs’ administrative (registration) fee each term you are
abroad. This charge will be placed on your SOU account, and you will receive a separate bill
from SOU that you will need to pay, unless you have financial aid that will cover it. (For the first
term, you will be charged a nonrefundable SOU application fee of $100 right after your interview
and then be billed for the remaining $175.)

Please note that failure to pay all your program costs by the end of your program will result in a
hold being put on your transcript and on fall term registration.

Advance payment up to the total amount may be made at any time.

    Financial aid students:

    It is very important that you read and follow carefully all the instructions in the “SOU
    Financial Aid” section later in this chapter.

    Your aid will be applied first to your account at SOU to cover the Office of International
    Programs’ administrative fee (and any account balance that you have). If your aid is greater
    than the SOU administrative fee, SOU will transfer the remaining aid to OSU to be applied to
    your program bill here. That transfer may take a couple of weeks after the start of the term
    here in Oregon, so don’t be alarmed if your SOU aid isn’t reflected in the first bill you receive
    from OSU. Just pay any balance that isn’t covered by your aid and you will see your aid
    credited to your OSU program bill by the time the second bill of the term is mailed. (Any
    interest charges that accrue on the portion of your bill covered by your financial aid will be
    waived.) If your aid is greater than your entire program cost, SOU will take the administrative
    fee, send OSU the exact amount owed for your program, and release the remainder to
    whomever you designated or directly to your bank account, whichever arrangement you made
    with the SOU Enrollment Services Center. If necessary, your bill payer can contact Pam
    Roberts (see below) to confirm the amount of the aid transfer so that s/he can pay the correct
    amount by the due date.

    If you have any questions regarding your aid disbursement, please contact SuAnne Cleveland
    in the SOU Enrollment Services Center, Britt Hall at (541) 552-6730 or by email at
    clevelas@sou.edu .

                  Please see “Frequently Asked Questions” later in this chapter.

Due to federal privacy regulations, the OSU Business Office will not discuss student accounts with
                                                 67
anyone other than the student. Therefore, it would be a good idea to give your parents/bill payers
a copy of this page and the “Frequently Asked Questions” section later in this chapter. Tell
them that they may contact Pam Roberts directly (e-mail is best) if they have questions concerning
the OSU bill. Pam will be able to assist them provided you have listed their names on the release
section of the OUS address form you completed.

                        Pam Roberts, Billing Coordinator
                        OUS International Programs Office
                        118 Ballard Hall
                        Oregon State University
                        Corvallis, OR 97331-1642

                        Telephone: (541) 737-6466
                        Fax: (541) 737-6482
                        E-mail: pam.roberts@oregonstate.edu


                                                                                     Revised 4/10




                                                68
WOU Billing Procedures

Since the Oregon University System (OUS) International Programs Office is located on the OSU
campus, your program charge will be put on the OSU billing system. Your billing address will
receive a computerized billing statement from the OSU Business Office by the middle of the
month. The bill is due by the last day of the month (July 31st for summer term, October 31st for
fall term, January 31st for winter term, and April 30th for spring term). You will be charged a 1%
interest charge per month (12%APR) on any unpaid balance still on your account after the due
date.

There have been instances when students have not received a billing statement. If this happens,
please make your payments as scheduled on the payment agreement. Make the check payable
either to “OUS International Programs” or “OSU,” and mail the payment to Pam Roberts (see
below). Be sure to include a written statement indicating your name and the overseas program
name (e.g., your program country). This will insure that the payment will be credited properly.

In addition to the costs listed on your payment agreement, WOU will charge a $300
registration/ administration fee each term you are registered for the program. Also, you will
be charged for one (1) credit hour of WOU tuition the first term you are abroad for the WOU
required capstone project. These charges will be put on your WOU account at the start of each
term you are abroad, and you will receive a separate bill from WOU that you will need to pay,
unless you have enough financial aid to cover it.

Please note that failure to pay all your program costs by the end of your program will result in a
hold being put on your transcript and on fall term registration.

Advance payment up to the total amount may be made at any time.

  Financial Aid Students

  It is very important that you read and follow carefully all the instructions in the “WOU Financial
  Aid” section later in this chapter.

  Your aid will first be applied to your WOU account to cover the charges listed above. If your aid
  is greater than these charges, WOU will transfer the remaining aid to be applied to your program
  bill at OSU. The aid transfer will take a couple of weeks after the start of the term here in
  Oregon, so don’t be alarmed if your WOU aid isn’t reflected in the first bill you receive from
  OSU. Just pay any balance that isn’t covered by your aid by the due date and you will see your
  aid credited to your OSU program bill by the time the second bill of the term is mailed. (Any
  interest charges that accrue on the portion of your bill covered by your financial aid will be
  waived.) If your aid is greater than your entire program cost, WOU will take the amount owed to
  them for their fees, send OSU the exact amount owed for your program, and release the
  remainder to whomever you designated. If necessary, your bill payer can contact Pam Roberts
  (see below) to confirm the amount of the aid transfer so that s/he can pay the correct amount by
  the due date.

  If you have any questions regarding your aid disbursement, please contact the WOU Business
  Office at (503) 838-8201.

                  Please see “Frequently Asked Questions” later in this chapter.

Due to federal privacy regulations, the OSU Business Office will not discuss student accounts with
anyone other than the student. Therefore, it would be a good idea to give your parents/bill payers
a copy of this page and the “Frequently Asked Questions” section later in this chapter. Tell

                                                 69
them that they may contact Pam Roberts directly (e-mail is best) if they have questions concerning
the OSU bill. Pam will be able to assist them provided you have listed their names on the release
section of the OUS address form you completed.

                        Pam Roberts, Billing Coordinator
                        OUS International Programs Office
                        118 Ballard Hall, Oregon State University
                        Corvallis, OR 97331-1642
                        Telephone: (541) 737-6466
                         Fax: (541) 737-6482
                        E-mail: pam.roberts@oregonstate.edu

                                                                                      Revised 4/10




                                                70
UO, EOU, SOU, and WOU Billing Procedures -
Frequently Asked Questions
1. My first program payment isn’t due until after my program starts. My program bill
   includes living expenses. Will this affect my room and board disbursements? If your
   program bill includes room and board, then you will be covered from the start of the program,
   regardless of when we receive your program payment.

2. Can I pay my OUS program bill with a credit card? Yes, by phone only. Please call the
   OSU Student Accounts Office at (541) 737-3775. Tell whomever you reach that you are a
   non-OSU student on an international program billed through OSU and that Pam Roberts told
   you to call this number because you want to pay your bill with a credit card. You will need to
   know your OSU account number, which is the 93x-xxx-xxx number on the OSU statement. If
   your parents call to make a credit card payment, they will have to know your account number
   and the balance due, as the Student Accounts Office cannot give them this information due to
   federal privacy regulations. NOTE: IF your home campus accepts credit card payments, you
   can pay your home campus charges with a credit card by any method that they accept – via the
   web, phone, etc. (UO students cannot pay their campus charges with a credit card.)

3. Can I pay my program bill in monthly installments? Yes, you may pay in monthly
   installments if you prefer, dividing up your bill as necessary. However, be aware that you will
   be charged interest and that each term’s bill should be paid in full before the next term’s
   installment is due.

4. I am eligible for staff rates at my home campus. Can I use staff rates for my study abroad
   program? No, unfortunately you cannot. Since you are not paying your home campus for
   regular tuition (you are paying a program fee to the OUS International Programs Office in lieu
   of tuition) you cannot use staff rates.

5. I have a tuition/fee remission. Can I use that for my program? Tuition and/or fee
   remissions waive tuition and fees at your campus. Again, since you are not being charged
   regular tuition and fees by your home campus, there is nothing to waive, so you will not be able
   to apply this type of aid to your program bill. Contact your Financial Aid Office if you are
   unsure whether or not your aid consists of a tuition or fee remission. UO: 1-800-760-6953
     SOU: (541) 552-6162 WOU: (503) 838-8475 EOU: (541) 962-3550

6. I received a bill from my home campus that was greater than the registration fee and my
   college’s resource fee. Why is that? Most likely, you have some old charges on your home
   campus account that you didn’t pay before you left for your overseas program. You need to
   pay those. (In fact, failure to pay past due charges on your home campus account may
   block your registration). Sometimes fines or health service charges might show up on your
   home account after you leave for exchange (students often stock up on prescriptions before
   leaving for exchange). Don’t forget about those charges!

7. The financial aid that was sent to OSU was less than what I was expecting. What
   happened? Your aid is first applied to your home campus account to pay any balance due.
   Thus, part of your aid might have gone towards a past due balance. Also, some loans (such as
   the Ford/Stafford loans) have a fee subtracted before they are applied to your account, or, if
   you have an alternative loan, it is possible it was released directly to you rather than directly
   applied to the account. You can check your aid award and home campus account via the web.
   If something appears to be missing, contact your home campus financial aid office. Most
   likely you forgot to complete some necessary paperwork.

8. When I look at my financial aid budget, it shows a higher cost than my payment
                                                 71
agreement, and the categories (tuition, room and board, etc.) don’t match my cost sheet
either. What is going on? You are confusing your financial aid budget with your program
bill. We submit your exchange program budget to your home campus Financial Aid Office.
They look at your total estimated costs, which include the program charge you pay to us, plus
all the items on your cost sheet that we don’t bill for, such as airfare, etc. The Financial Aid
Office compares the exchange program costs to the on-campus costs. If your exchange
program cost is higher, the Financial Aid Office adds a lump sum to your budget to account for
the higher cost of studying abroad. The Financial Aid Office doesn’t adjust the budget line
items so that they match the categories of your particular exchange program; they just adjust
the total figure. It is the total budget figure that is used to determine your aid package. The
higher your budget, the more aid you may potentially be eligible for. Your aid package will
also be determined by your eligibility for additional loans, family contribution, etc. You aren’t
guaranteed that you will receive enough aid to totally cover all of your costs; in fact, most
students don’t.

                                                                                    Revised 4/10




                                             72
                                    FINANCIAL AID
Financial Aid Timeline
The following chart provides dates to consider if you will be applying for financial aid for next
academic year.

Mid-December                   Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) becomes
                               available for the next academic year. Copies can be picked up at
                               your Financial Aid Office. Start filling out the FAFSA as soon as
                               you get it, using estimated income if necessary. (You can also apply
                               online at www.fafsa.ed.gov.)
January 1 – February 1         Mail your FAFSA to the Federal Processor between January 1st and
                               February 1st for consideration as an on-time applicant.

April - May                    Your financial aid award is packaged. If you decide to stay in Spain
                               for the exchange program next year, it would be wise to contact
                               your Financial Aid Office at this time to ensure that your file is
                               complete and all forms have been signed. Please note that your
                               financial aid office cannot prepare your financial aid award package
                               to include additional expenses of studying overseas until the OUS
                               International Programs Office has supplied them with a final
                               budget. (Final determination of overseas budgets is dependent
                               upon cost projections from your program site.) For more
                               information, see the financial aid page for your university later in
                               this chapter.

Mid-May                        Award letters are sent out beginning in mid-May. The Financial Aid
                               Office will not print your loan promissory notes until you have
                               signed and returned your award letter.

Summer term                    If you have not finished the financial aid process as outlined above,
                               remain in contact with your Financial Aid Office and complete all
                               paperwork as needed.
Beginning of each term         Financial aid disbursement date

Mid-December                   Don’t forget to fill out the FAFSA for the following year!




                                                 73
Overview of Financial Aid Process
Even if you do not currently receive financial aid, it is a good idea to apply before you go overseas.
Some programs can cost significantly more than the regular OUS tuition. All students are eligible for
some form of aid, regardless of family income. If you are unsure about meeting the costs of your
program, financial aid may be your answer.

Participants in OUS study abroad programs are eligible to be considered for the same federal, state, and
institutional financial aid programs available to on-campus students at OUS universities. You will
receive the financial aid to which you are entitled when you have met all of the following conditions:

       Been admitted as a full-time student;
       Filed a FAFSA form;
       Provided all information requested by the Financial Aid Office;
       Received, signed, and returned your financial aid award letter to the Financial Aid Office;
       Signed and returned loan promissory notes or other required forms;
       Completed entrance loan counseling with the Financial Aid Office prior to receiving any
       loans;
       Notified the Financial Aid Office of your current address or the address of a contact person
       in the United States.

Applying early for financial aid is critical. On-time applicants will receive all aid for which they are
eligible. For consideration as an on-time applicant, send your completed, signed FAFSA to the Federal
Processor as soon after January 1st as possible and no later than February 1st. Getting your application
in on time also allows your Financial Aid Office adequate processing time to meet program payment
deadlines.

The FAFSA will ask for information from your tax returns. If you do not have your tax returns
completed, ESTIMATE your income! You can correct the information on the FAFSA later without
being considered a late applicant. However, once your application is considered late, you will no
longer be eligible for certain types of grant and loan aid.

When your financial aid award is being packaged, your Financial Aid Office will send either a request
for more information (if your FAFSA was incomplete, had inconsistent information, or used estimated
taxes) or an award letter offering you your financial aid for the following year. The budget on your
award letter may be higher than usual to reflect additional expense incurred by participation in an
overseas program. Your aid, when possible, may also be increased to cover the additional program
expenses including airfare to and from the site.

Keep in contact with your Financial Aid Office throughout the term before you go abroad to ensure
that:
    (1) your file is complete;
    (2) your aid has been packaged;
    (3) program costs have been calculated into your total budget;
    (4) all loan notes and release/authorization forms have been signed prior to the end of the
        term.

Your financial aid can be processed long distance, but this takes time and adds stress. It can also force
you to pay program costs out of your own pocket until your aid is processed.

Look realistically at your or your parent's ability to meet the expected family contribution, the
amount the federal government calculates that you can pay toward your education. If you don't
think you can pay this amount, look at other options before you go overseas. More and more
students are turning to alternative loans to help cover their educational expenses. Alternative loans
are offered through an outside institution directly to the student borrower to pay for the expected
                                                   74
family contribution. Please note that these loans generally carry higher interest rates and must not
exceed the amount of unmet need shown on your financial aid budget. Contact your Financial Aid
Office to get more information on these loans.

Your financial aid will be disbursed on the first day of classes at your home university even though
your program may start earlier. Make sure you bring enough money with you to cover initial expenses.

It is possible to have most of your financial aid credited directly to your OUS international program
billing account with the Oregon State University Business Affairs Office after the beginning of the
term.* In order to do this, you must sign release papers available in your financial aid or business
affairs office before you leave. Some Stafford Loans and other private loans, however, may not be
transferable in this manner. If this is the case, they must be mailed to you, or a designated individual, to
be endorsed and/or deposited in an account in your name. Contact your Financial Aid or Business
Office to determine what procedures they recommend you follow in order to receive these funds. If
you do receive a financial aid check when you are abroad and need to use the funds to make your
program payments, you can endorse it and make it payable to OUS International Programs (indicate
your program country) and then mail it to Oregon State University, Box 1086, Corvallis, OR 97339.

    * Note for PSU students: If you are a PSU student, you will be billed directly by PSU for your
    entire program cost. Your financial aid will be applied to your PSU account.

The aid that you have arranged to have released directly to the program will be applied to your account
at the beginning of the term in Oregon. (Do not be concerned if this credit does not appear on the first
bill you receive; sometimes the aid transfer takes a few weeks to be processed. Your aid should be
applied by the second bill of the term.) If your aid does not completely cover the program cost, you
must make payments for the difference by the due dates listed on the payment schedule. If your aid
will completely cover the cost of the program, you will not need to make any payments. If your aid is
more than the program cost, you will receive a refund.

BE SURE YOUR FINANCIAL AID ARRANGEMENTS ARE COMPLETE BEFORE YOU LEAVE
THIS COUNTRY. It can be very disconcerting to find out that you did not sign everything after you
are already several thousand miles away. It can also be expensive!

NOTE: Students on financial aid who do not maintain full-time status while on an overseas program
may face consequences related to aid for the year abroad or for the year following. Consult with the
Resident Director to be sure you are fulfilling full-time status requirements.

It is the student's responsibility to notify the financial aid office on their home campus, in writing, of
any and all changes in enrollment as they occur. Satisfactory academic rules and regulations do not
change just because a student is not on campus.




 Please be sure to read carefully the specific information regarding billing and financial aid
             procedures for your particular university, included in this chapter.




                                                    75
Financial Aid Information for Specific OUS Universities

                                   EOU FINANCIAL AID
Contact Person:           Carolyn Prescott, Financial Aid Counselor
                          Inlow Hall
                          Telephone: (541) 962-3550; E-mail: fao@eou.edu

As a participant in an OUS international program, you are eligible to be considered for all federal,
state, and institutional financial aid programs available to resident students of EOU except Federal
Work-Study. However, certain steps have to be taken to ensure your aid is processed and
disbursed smoothly while you are away from campus.

Before you leave the country, be sure to:

(1) Complete a FAFSA for the relevant academic year at http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/.
(2) Contact both the Financial Aid Office and Student Accounts at EOU. The Financial Aid
    office will need to be aware of your study abroad plans to discuss funding strategies with you.
    Our office requires notification from the Director of International Programs that your plans to
    study abroad have been approved. You will also want to make arrangements with the office of
    Student Accounts to ensure any excess financial aid for the term reaches you safely, either by a
    check through the mail or through Direct Deposit into your bank account.
    Office of Student Financial Aid Homepage: http://www.eou.edu/fao/
    Office of Student Accounts Homepage:            http://www.eou.edu/staccts/
(3) Be prepared to stay in contact with EOU through your official EOU e-mail account both prior to
    and during your entire time abroad.
While away, regularly check your official EOU email account and Webster: Offices such as
Student Accounts, Financial Aid, and others will routinely send selected official communications to
students via e-mail. Such e-mail will include your financial aid award information, as well as
notifications of any changes to your aid. These communications are for the purposes of conducting
official university business.

It is the student's responsibility to notify the financial aid office on their home campus, in writing, of
any and all changes in enrollment as they occur. Policies concerning satisfactory academic progress
apply to all students whether studying abroad or taking classes on campus and can be found here:
http://www.eou.edu/fao/sap.htm

NOTE: At the end of your first semester at a study abroad site, please ask the Resident Director to
send a letter to our office reporting the number of hours (with grades) you have completed.

NOTE: Students on financial aid who do not maintain full-time status while on a study abroad
program may face consequences related to aid in either the year they are abroad or the subsequent year.
 Consult with the Resident Director to be sure you are fulfilling full-time status requirements.

If you need to apply for financial aid for the year following your return: Complete a new FAFSA
as soon after January 1 as possible to be considered for aid in the upcoming school year. This is
best done through the FAFSA website.

For more information, please see EOU Billing Procedures and Frequently Asked Questions earlier
                                       in this chapter.

                                                                                            Revised 3/10

                                                   76
                                  OSU FINANCIAL AID
Contact:   Kristin Welsch
           Office of Financial Aid & Scholarships
           Kerr Administration Building, Room 218
           Phone: (541) 737-2241
           E-mail addresses: financial.aid@oregonstate.edu
                              Kristin.Welsch@oregonstate.edu

Most kinds of Federal and State financial aid can be used on OSU approved study abroad programs.
Many students have used aid successfully in conjunction with study abroad. However, to make
financial aid work for you, please read and follow carefully the instructions below:

      Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA
      application should be completed online (www.fafsa.ed.gov) by February 28 to meet priority-
      funding deadlines, or mailed by January 31 (but not before January 1). Make sure to list
      OSU on the FAFSA form by using the OSU school code: 003210. For more information,
      consult the OSU financial aid instructions at http://oregonstate.edu/admin/finaid/steps.html.

      Sign and submit all follow-up paperwork to the Office of Financial Aid and
      Scholarships. The Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships is not responsible for
      incomplete aid files, missing signatures, interest charges, missing or outdated addresses,
      satisfactory academic progress or registration holds that may cause a delay in the financial
      aid process.

      Accept your federal financial aid offer online
      www.oregonstate.edu/students/onlineservices. Your financial aid eligibility will initially be
      calculated according to the on-campus cost of attendance. You must accept your aid within
      30 days of your email notification. Delaying accepting aid may result in cancellation of
      certain aid types. If you have been awarded a scholarship that requires an acceptance letter be
      return, you must do so by the required deadline indicated on the letter.

      Sign Perkins and/or Ford Direct Student Loan Promissory Notes. If you are a first-time
      borrower, you will be required to complete an entrance counseling session before your loans
      can be disbursed. Entrance counseling is available on the web at www.dlservicer.ed.gov.
      You may also complete your Master Promissory Note (MPN) for student loans at
      http://dlenote.ed.gov. You will need your FAFSA pin number to complete both of these
      requirements. The Perkins Master Promissory Note can be signed online at
      https://www.ecsi.net/prom80/.

      The International Programs Office will submit a list of study abroad participants to the
      Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships the term prior to your departure. If your study
      abroad budget is more than the OSU on-campus budget, the Office of Financial Aid and
      Scholarships will automatically revise your aid budget based upon the study abroad program
      costs reported by the International Programs Office. You will receive an e-mail from the
      Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships notifying you of the budget revision. Most
      additional funding comes in the form of loans. You will need to request additions/revisions
      to your aid. Follow the instructions given to you in that e-mail.

      Complete a “Consent for Release of Confidential Information” form if you would like your
      parents (or other bill payers) to be allowed to discuss your account with the Office of
      Financial Aid and Scholarships. This form can be found online at
      http://oregonstate.edu/admin/finaid/forms.html.

       Notify the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships and the Office of International Programs
                                                 77
     of any enrollment changes. If you leave the program early, or fail to satisfactorily complete
     the program, you must notify the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships in writing.
     Failure to do so may require you to return aid funds received. You can change your address
     on your student online services at www.oregonstate.edu/students/onlineservices.

      Plan ahead for emergency funding. Do not expect emergency loan assistance through the
     Office of Business Affairs. If possible, identify sources for emergency funds before you
     leave in case an unexpected need arises once you are overseas.

     If your aid is less than the program cost, you must pay the difference by the due dates listed
     on the Payment Agreement to avoid interest charges. If your aid is greater than the program
     cost, you will receive a refund. You can sign up to have your refund directly deposited into
     your bank account through your student online services at
     www.oregonstate.edu/students/onlineservices under Personal Information. If you have not
     signed up for direct deposit, a refund check will be mailed to the current mailing address in
     the OSU billing system. Be sure to update your current mailing address. You can update
     your current mailing address via the web at www.oregonstate.edu/students/onlineservices.

     Pay any upfront costs. Federal regulations do not permit the disbursement of aid funds until
     the beginning of each scheduled term for the OSU campus. For some programs, the
     disbursement schedule of aid funds may not coincide with the study abroad program billing
     deadlines and start dates. You are encouraged to contact the program directly to determine
     any up-front cost for the study program or internship. You may need to seek outside funding
     to pay the costs of the program deposit, airline tickets, insurance, visas, etc. Certain
     expenses may not be covered by federal aid funds.

     Pay off any balance on your OSU account. Scheduled financial aid funds are applied to the
     student billing account. It is your responsibility to pay any remaining program costs owed to
     an outside agency or university that are not covered by financial aid. Any unpaid balance
     may result in your grades being held until payment is made in full. Unreported grades may
     result in a hold on your aid for subsequent terms until the problem is resolved.

NOTE: If you will need to apply for financial aid for the year when you return to the U.S., you
should apply for Federal aid on line by submitting your FAFSA on the web at www.fafsa.ed.gov by
February 28, 2010 to be considered for priority funding. If you submit your FAFSA after the
priority deadline, you can still be eligible for aid but may not be considered for all programs.

       For more information, please see OSU Billing Procedures and Frequently Asked Questions
                                          earlier in this chapter.

                                                                                       Revised 3/10




                                                78
                                   PSU FINANCIAL AID
    Contact Person:       Matthew Sagayaga
                          Room 183
                          Neuberger Hall
                          Telephone: (503) 725-3461
                          E-mail address: sagayagm@pdx.edu

    MAKE SURE YOUR FINANCIAL AID ARRANGEMENTS ARE IN ORDER BEFORE
    YOU LEAVE:

    1. Apply for financial aid the same as usual. Even if you have already been awarded when
       you decide to study abroad, it is relatively easy to revise aid to reflect a new budget. If you
       wish, you may wait until you’re accepted into a study abroad program to apply. However,
       because the aid process can take up to several months, it is best to get the process
       underway early. You can always cancel it later if things don’t work out.

    2. Get accepted to a study abroad program.

    3. Make sure the Financial Aid Office has been notified that you are accepted to study abroad.
       Students cannot be awarded aid for a study abroad program without first being accepted
       into it.

    4. When you receive notification of your Financial Aid Award, be sure to follow the
       instructions and respond right away. If you do not respond within 30 days, your award may
       be cancelled.

    5. Be sure you have made arrangements for delivery of any financial aid coming to you after
       your PSU charges have been paid. For most students, this will be through the HigherOne
       card. Confirm with the Business Office that the option you choose will be the right option
       while you are abroad. You can change your option if desired. The alternative to the
       HigherOne card is to sign up for Direct Deposit with the PSU Business Office.

AS A FINANCIAL AID RECIPIENT, YOU ARE SUBJECT TO THE SAME SATISFACTORY
PROGRESS REGULATIONS REQUIRED ON THE HOME CAMPUS.

REMEMBER: You must report to the Financial Aid Office any kind of resources you receive (such as
scholarships, stipends, etc.) other than those awarded through the Financial Aid Office. Receiving other
resources may result in an adjustment of your award.

NOTE:

If you are applying for financial aid for the year you are back in the U.S., please complete
your FAFSA for that year on-line at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Typically, FAFSA applications are to
be completed by January, in order to receive aid for the following academic year. If parental
information is included in your FAFSA application, the parent’s PIN must be entered when
submitting the FAFSA. Don’t forget to keep your PSU mailing address updated.

We strongly encourage you to meet with a financial aid counselor before you leave for your
study abroad experience.


                                                                                        Revised 4/10


                                                 79
                                 SOU FINANCIAL AID
Contact Person:      Debbie Beck
                     Enrollment Services Center
                     Phone: 541-552-6162; Fax: 541-552-6614
                     E-mail address: beck@sou.edu

Most kinds of Federal and State financial aid can be used on the foreign study programs. Many
students have used aid successfully in conjunction with study abroad. However, to make financial
aid work for you, you need to follow the guidelines below:

1. Apply early (by February 10 for the following school year) for financial aid at www.fafsa.gov
   so you can be considered for all sources of aid for which you might be eligible and have
   adequate processing time to meet program deadlines. Always search for scholarships by
   checking the Financial Aid website at www.sou.edu/enrollment/financial-aid/scholarships/ and
   researching on the internet. (If you are a student who receives WUE or a SOU tuition remission
   scholarship, be aware that they are not applicable to some exchange programs. Check with
   SOU International Programs at 541-552-6336 if you have questions.)

2. Study abroad financial aid recipients should respond promptly to any emailed requests for
   documents such as signed Verification Worksheets or Federal Tax copies. Once a student has
   accepted the aid offer online, Loan Entrance Counseling and Promissory Notes may need to be
   done, so track your aid status through the SOU Financial Aid website by clicking on “check the
   status of your aid”. No aid can be released to your student SISWEB billing account unless
   all required processing steps have been completed.

3. When the SOU International Programs Office notifies the study abroad financial aid
   coordinator, Debbie Beck, of your acceptance into a program, she will revise your budget and
   aid offer accordingly. Student and parent loans are generally the only funds that can be
   increased to accommodate the additional costs of these programs. Parents must have good
   credit in order to qualify for the Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loan.

4. Be aware that dependent students may have already reached their annual borrowing limit
   through the Federal Direct Loan Program and will need to borrow additional alternative
   loans through private lending agencies. A list of these lenders can be found at
   www.finaid.org/loans/privatestudentloans.phtml. A creditworthy co-signer may be required
   for these loans. Please allow extra time for processing. These loans must be in place before
   leaving the country.

5. Students who receive Veterans Benefits must meet with Diana Watson-Paul in the Enrollment
   Services Center to find out what is required to maintain those benefits while on the program.
   She can be reached at 541-552-6756 or by email at watsonpd@sou.edu.

6. If you are anticipating any checks to arrive while you are away that will need your signature
   (such as alternative loans or scholarship checks), you must meet with SuAnne Cleveland in the
   Enrollment Services Center before you leave to sign a Power of Attorney form. You can call
   her at 541-552-6730 or email her at clevelas@sou.edu. She is the contact who will be handling
   your aid funds while you are abroad.

                  For more information, see SOU Billing Procedures and
                    Frequently Asked Questions earlier in this chapter.


                                                                                     Revised 3/10

                                               80
                                   UO FINANCIAL AID
Contact Information:           • Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships
                                 Room 260 Oregon Hall - fawww@uoregon.edu
                                 (541) 346-3221 or (800) 760-6953

                               • Lois Yoshishige: (541) 346-1251 - loisy@uoregon.edu

                               • Marj Biehler: (541) 346-3207 - mbiehler@uoregon.edu

Most forms of financial aid may be used to pay for your study abroad program costs. Please note,
however, that most students need to supplement their standard financial aid package. For specific
information about awards and eligibility, you should consult with a financial aid counselor at the
Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships.

If you wish to use your UO financial aid to help pay for a study abroad program, here are the steps
you will need to follow:

    1. Apply for financial aid by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid
       (FAFSA) as soon as possible after January 1, and to ensure consideration for priority
       funding before February 1, using FAFSA on the web at http://www.fafsa.ed.gov.

    2. Your financial aid eligibility will be initially calculated according to the standard campus
       budget. Respond to all document requests to the Office of Student Financial Aid and
       Scholarships and accept your initial aid offer through your DuckWeb account as soon as
       possible. Information regarding this process can be found at
       http://financialaid.uoregon.edu/accepting_my_award_letter.

       After you have been accepted into your study abroad program and before your program
       begins, your budget and accepted aid will be revised. You will be notified of these changes.
        If you have any questions concerning additional aid availability please consult with a
       financial aid advisor. Loans (Stafford, PLUS and alternative) are generally the only type of
       aid that can be increased.

    3. Summer Applicants: Loans are generally the only type of aid available for summer study,
      and students must complete an additional summer financial aid application on line. Summer
      financial aid applications are usually available beginning April 1 and must be submitted
      to the Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships by May 1. For more information
      about summer aid and application completion, please visit
      http://financialaid.uoregon.edu/summer_aid.

    4. Once you've been accepted and billed, schedule an appointment with Lois Yoshishige in the
       Student Loans section of the Office of Business Affairs, which is located on the first floor of
       Oregon Hall. You will need to sign a Letter of Authorization so that your financial aid can
       be sent directly to OSU to be applied to your program bill. BRING IDENTIFICATION:
       Your ID must have your photograph and signature

       NOTE: If you are borrowing loans, you may need to sign a Promissory Note, which
       certifies your agreement to repay your loans. Further, you may need to complete Entrance
       Counseling, which certifies your understanding of your rights and responsibilities as a
       borrower. If you have questions, contact the Office of Student Financial Aid and




                                                 81
    Scholarships.

 5. Most types of financial aid can be transferred as described above. Some types of aid,
    however, cannot be transferred to a third party, including any check made out to you. All
    checks in this category must be sent directly to you or to a designated family member or
    friend. The Office of Business Affairs cannot deposit checks directly to a bank account.

 6. If your aid is less than the program cost, you must pay the balance by the due dates listed on
     the payment schedule. If you will receive a refund, you are strongly encouraged to sign up
     for Direct Deposit using your DuckWeb account so that your refund will be deposited in
     your checking or savings account. Instructions for Direct Deposit can be found at
     http://baowww.uoregon.edu/Student/directdeposit.htm.

 7. You must make sure that your UO general account is clear of any debts (library fines, health
    service fees, etc.) before you leave. Failure to clear your account may prevent you from
    being registered.

 8. Students planning to utilize financial aid should be aware that federal regulations prohibit
    the release of financial aid before the beginning of the term(s) at the University of Oregon.
    Participants will therefore, have to find alternative sources of funding to pay for airline
    tickets and other arrival expenses.

 9. Short Term Loan Fund: Short-term loans ranging from $300-2,000 may be available for
    students needing to pay up-front study abroad costs. These loans must be repaid with the
    recipient's financial aid within 30 to 180 days of the date of issue. For more information on
    how to obtain this loan, please contact Study Abroad Programs.

10. If you have any questions about the type or amount of your financial aid, contact your
    financial aid counselor. For questions concerning the transfer of funds, contact Lois
    Yoshishige or Marj Biehler.


 NOTE: If you will need to apply for financial aid for the year when you return to the U.S. you
 will want to consider using the on-line FAFSA at www.fafsa.ed.gov. You (and your parents)
 can obtain a PIN number to ‘sign’ the FAFSA. Information regarding PINs is available at the
 FAFSA website.

                                                                                     Revised 3/10


                    For more information, see UO Billing Procedures and
                     Frequently Asked Questions earlier in this chapter.




                                              82
                                       WOU FINANCIAL AID
Contact Person:          Ryan West, Associate Director of Financial Aid
                         Administration Bldg. Room 310
                         Phone: (503) 838-8475 or toll-free (877) 877-1593; E-mail: westr@wou.edu

1.   Apply for Financial Aid by completing a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at
     www.fafsa.gov. You will need a federal personal identification number (PIN) to complete the FAFSA
     online. You can request a PIN at www.pin.ed.gov.

2.   If you would like the Financial Aid Office to consider your study abroad expenses as an addition to your
     budget, you need to:

     _____ a. Apply for admission to the OUS International Program.
     _____ b. Make an appointment to see a financial aid counselor.
     _____ c. Submit all required documents including a signed award letter and loan promissory notes.
     _____ d. Complete a "Financial Aid Request for Study Abroad" form. This form allows you to request
              to have your additional study abroad expenses added to your budget.
     _____ e. Complete a "Release of Confidential Information Form for Study Abroad." This form
              designates your U.S. contact person(s) for financial aid documents.
     _____ f. Complete entrance loan counseling with the Financial Aid Office prior to receiving any loans.
               You can do this at the Financial Aid Office or online at www.dl.ed.gov.

3.   Make arrangements with the WOU Business Office (503) 838-8201 to transfer aid to your study abroad
     program. Please make these arrangements at least four weeks prior to departure. Aid will be disbursed
     at the beginning of WOU's regular terms or the beginning of your study abroad program--whichever date
     is later. You must sign a release: your financial aid cannot be released unless this is signed with the
     Business Office.

4.   Double check with the Financial Aid Office and Business Office prior to leaving to confirm that all
     records are in order.

5.   Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) will be monitored at the end of each term for every student
     receiving financial aid. As a financial aid recipient, you are expected to complete the credit hours
     required for the attendance level on your award letter. You must be in good satisfactory academic
     progress before you depart on your study abroad program or your financial aid will be placed on hold. If
     your financial aid is on hold, you will need to petition for reinstatement of your aid.

     The Financial Aid Office realizes that grades are delayed for the period that you are involved in the
     study abroad program and may not be posted at the time grade audit is done. If you receive a SAP
     petition and letter regarding failure to maintain satisfactory academic progress because your study
     abroad grades are not yet posted on the university's records, you need to complete the SAP petition and
     return it to the Financial Aid Office.

6.   If you leave the study abroad program prior to its official termination, you must notify the Financial Aid
     Office in writing indicating the date of last class attendance and reasons for withdrawal. You may be
     responsible for repaying all or part of your financial aid received.

If, while you are abroad, you need to apply for financial aid for the year following your international
program, you can complete a FAFSA online at www.fafsa.gov.

Please keep offices informed of your plans!!

            For more information, see WOU Billing Procedures and Frequently Asked Questions
                                        earlier in this chapter.

                                                                                                  Revised 3/10




                                                      83
                                  REFUND POLICY
Program Refund Policy
Notification of Withdrawal:

Notification of your withdrawal from the program must be directed, in writing, to your OUS
Program Director AND your home Campus Contact. No refunds will be considered without
written notification.

Apportionment of Charges:

Withdrawal or dismissal from an exchange program after the program has begun has significant
financial and academic consequences. It is important to note that your program costs are
apportioned and contained within each semester abroad, though costs are billed by trimester to
account for the dates financial aid is released and to reflect the academic calendar in Oregon. Your
Program Director can answer your questions about how this will affect the money owed to the
program as a result of your withdrawal or dismissal.

Program Fee Categories and Refunds:

    Deposits: The $200 deposit paid prior to the start of the program is non-refundable. Housing
    deposits made to agents or partner universities abroad are not refundable.

    Room and Board: You will be charged for room and board costs that have been disbursed on
    your behalf. This will include any reservation or penalty fees for early withdrawal. Room and
    board costs paid to the program, but not yet disbursed, will be refunded.

    Incidental Program Fees: You will be charged for incidental fees that have already been
    spent on your behalf for orientations, excursions, language preparation courses, insurance, etc.
    You will not be billed for incidental fees not spent on your behalf.

    Program Operations Fees: You will be charged for the program fee for each term you are
    registered in Oregon. Once the program has begun overseas, the program fee for that semester
    (and the previously attended semester, if applicable) is non-refundable. Program fee refunds
    do not follow on-campus tuition refund schedules. We recommend that you consult with your
    Campus Contact to see what consequences your withdrawal/dismissal may have in regard to
    registration and other fees at your home campus.

    Accident and Sickness Insurance Refund Policy: Due to pending changes in the broker of
    record for the OUS Study Abroad Insurance Plan, we were unable to provide specific details
    regarding the insurance refund policy at the time this handbook went to press. As soon as
    details are available, OUS International Programs will supplement this handbook with
    information about the insurance coverage and the insurance refund policy.

Refunds on unexpended program incidental fees are calculated from the date of the receipt
of notice of withdrawal in the OUS International Programs Office, except in unusual cases
where the formal withdrawal has been delayed through causes beyond the student’s control.
Fees collected by host universities abroad may not be claimed through the OUS International
Programs Office.



                                                 84
Withdrawal: A Word of Caution
Withdrawal from an international program may be expensive. You should give serious thought
to your motivation for participating in the program as well as the reason for withdrawing.

If you withdraw from the program, your financial aid may be withdrawn, or you may have to pay it
back. Furthermore, the amount of the refund is sometimes a matter of judgment, based on the
recommendations of the Resident Director of the program, the Director of OUS International
Programs, your physician, etc.

Refunds must be processed through the Business Affairs Office at Oregon State University, and
cannot be made immediately. Expect to wait from one to two months for payment after you
indicate your desire to withdraw.



             REMEMBER: To receive financial aid, students must maintain full-time
             status and are subject to the same satisfactory progress regulations required on
             the home campus.

             Any student leaving the program prior to its last official day must notify the
             financial aid office in writing indicating the date of last class attendance and
             reasons for withdrawal. If you are a financial aid recipient, withdrawal from
             the program may have a negative effect on both your current aid and your
             satisfactory academic progress, which in turn can impact future financial aid
             awards. Please consult with your home campus Financial Aid Office.




                                                85
Section Six

    Reentry
      or
   Returning
   Overseas




       86
87
                                HOMEWARD BOUND
Registration for the Term After Your Return Home

Eastern Oregon University
If you wish to take classes at EOU the term after your return, be sure to contact Janet Camp in International Programs
(541-962-3406; jcamp@eou.edu) and your faculty advisor to determine how best to register for them. You may wish to
register for these classes while you are still abroad.

                                                                                                             Revised 4/10

Oregon State University
If you wish to take classes at OSU the term after your return, you will need to register                                for
them. The OSU website will give you the priority registration schedule:                        Plan    Ahead
http://oregonstate.edu/registrar (click on “Priority Registration”). If you wish, you can                             wait
until you get back to the U.S. to register (there will be no late charges so long as you
register prior to the beginning of classes). However, registration is on a first-come,                                first-
serve basis for students registering according to the priority registration schedule, so, if                           you
wish to avoid being locked out of classes because they are full, you may want to take                                  care
of registration while you are still overseas.

In order to register on the web, go to the OSU website (http://oregonstate.edu); click on “Student Online Services,” then
“Online Services Quick Log in.”

You will need to know your OSU ID number, your 6-digit General Access Personal Identification Number (GAP) and your
Registration PIN. Registration PINs are provided by colleges at the time of advising. In the case of some colleges, PIN
numbers change every term. Check with your advisor, before you go abroad, to find out procedures for getting this number --
you may need to write to him/her from overseas.

For further instructions, consult the above website.
                                                                                                             Revised 4/10

Portland State University
PSU students can register via the web. The address is www.pdx.edu (select “classes & programs”; select “register” – you
should be able to see the course schedule and log in to register yourself on-line).

                                                                                                             Revised 3/10




                                                                 88
Southern Oregon University
SOU students abroad may pre-register for the quarter of their return in several ways, including over the web, and via e-
mail. To do any of these, you must wait until the SOU Class Schedule has been published. This usually happens about
the middle of the term prior to the term you'll wish to pre-register. The schedule is published on the SOU WEB PAGE. It
contains the list of courses offered and Course Registration Numbers, CRN, you will need. The urls are:

SOU WEBSITE:                        www.sou.edu
MySOU                               my.sou.edu
REGISTRATION TIMETABLE:             http://www.sou.edu/enrollment/academic-services/regis-timetable.html
CLASS SCHEDULE:                     www.sou.edu/cgi/schedule.cgi
SOU CATALOG:                        www.sou.edu/catalog

a) Via the web - you may register for classes by connecting to MySOU.

    1.   Click on the My SOU icon on any SOU webpage or via the internet at my.sou.edu
    2.   Login using your username and password.
    3.   If you don’t know your username or password, utilize the “Account Help Box” below login box.
    4.   Once logged on to MySOU, select the tab labeled “Student SISWeb.”
    5.   Make sure that you don’t have any holds, which are listed on lower left of “Academic Profile” on “Student
         SISWeb.”

   Adding a class

    1.   Under the “Registration Tools,” select “Add or Drop classes.”
    2.   Enter the term for which you would like to register (e.g. Fall 2011) and hit “submit.”
    3.   Scroll to the bottom of the page and enter a CRN in each box for all the courses you plan to take.
    4.   Click “submit changes.”
    5.   The next screen will show you which classes you successfully registered for and any courses in which there were
         error and why.

b) Via e-mail – please only use this if you really can’t register through my SOU. You may e-mail you pre-registration
  choices (and back-up choices) directly to the SOU Enrollment Services Center, c/o Brett Ainsworth,
  ainswortb@sou.edu. Remember to include your name, SOU ID (or SSN), and the CRN for each class.

Whichever way you pre-register, the Enrollment Services Center staff will input your course choices (or alternates if first
choices are full) on the correct pre-registration date for you, which will depend on your number of completed SOU
credits. If you email early, the information will be held until the correct date, then input.

Here are the key information numbers and addresses:

Enrollment Services Center, SOU                  Office of International Programs
Brett Ainsworth                                  intprogs@sou.edu
ainswortb@sou.edu                                541-552-6336
541-552-6600

                                                                                                             Revised 03/10




                                                             89
University of Oregon
During your time overseas, you will need to register for classes at the University of Oregon for the term after your program
ends. Initial registration times for 2010-11 are as follows (registration times for 2011-2012 should be similar).

                 Fall term 2010           May 17 - 27, 2010
                 Winter term 2011         November 15 - 24, 2010
                 Spring term 2011         February 21 - March 2, 2011
                 Summer term 2011         May 2 - 6, 2011

If you are unable to access Duck Web, it is important that you plan who will assist you with registration.

Here are some suggestions as to how you can register for the classes you want.

1).   If you are unable to register from overseas, you can ask your family or a friend to register for you. They will need to
      have your PAC number and the CRN numbers of the courses you select. We cannot give out your PAC number, even to
      you.

2). If your family or friend is unfamiliar with Duck Web, the UO Study Abroad Programs would be happy to handle your
     registration for you. Please be aware that Study Abroad Programs will not be able to register you for any class that
     requires pre-authorization or special approval by the department or instructor. Also, please list a minimum of four
     alternate courses in order of your preference.

3). If you decide to have Study Abroad Programs handle your registration, please send Marj Biehler (mbiehler@uoregon.edu)
      a list of courses with the CRNs. Don't forget to include the alternate courses. If she does not receive this information
      from you the day before you register, she cannot guarantee that she will be able to register you on time.

Finally, please make sure that you do not owe any money to the UO. If you have a past-due financial account, a registration
hold may block your registration. If there is a registration hold, Study Abroad Programs will not be able to remove this
hold and will not be able to register you.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding your registration, please do not hesitate to contact your study abroad program
coordinator or Marj Biehler.

                                                                                                                Revised 3/10




                                                             90
Western Oregon University
Web registration is available for all admitted WOU students. The online schedule of classes may be accessed by visiting
http://www.wou.edu/provost/registrar. Students use the same PIN to register as they use when on campus. Registration
times also are listed on the web page noted above.

Students who experience any difficulties registering (e.g., advising holds, etc.) should contact their advisor or the
appropriate office by email.

If students are taking prerequisites abroad that will count as the prerequisites for other study abroad courses for which
they are registering, they should contact the Office of Study Abroad and International Exchanges (studyabroad@wou.edu)
before registration to receive approval.

Students should maintain contact with the Study Abroad Office (studyabroad@wou.edu) while they are abroad and
provide that office with any updates on email addresses or course selections. In addition, students need to make sure that
the Study Abroad Office receives copies of all study abroad course syllabi as promptly as possible in order to facilitate the
WOU course equivalency process with the academic departments.
                                                                                                               Revised 3/10



Customs
Assuming you have somehow managed to squeeze your belongings into several odd sized carry-on bags, boxes, and
suitcases and have actually gotten them to the airport and onto the plane, you might have the distinct pleasure of un-
packing all that stuff in front of the customs officials when you get to the first airport on U.S. soil, unless you let them
know what is in each box and suitcase, and show them a few samples to prove it. The best way to do this is to list every
item in each box with the value (what you paid for it) listed beside each item, then a total dollar amount of all your
belongings. If it is neat, well organized, and legible, you probably won't be asked to unpack everything. It takes a little
time, but it's well worth the effort and it reminds you which suitcases need extra care.

For updated customs regulations, please read the U.S. Customs information "Know Before You Go" at
http://www.customs.gov/xp/cgov/travel.

Evaluating the Program
Toward the end of your program, you will be asked to complete a program evaluation. Please take the time to complete
this evaluation form carefully and thoughtfully. We rely on this information to make future changes and adjustments to
the program and to keep our information on the program up-to-date. If you have suggestions, recommendations, or
criticisms, please share them with us.

We, and each of the people on your home campus, would enjoy seeing you when you return from your overseas program.




                                                              91
At the End of Your Program
It may seem odd to bring this up now, but we want you to begin thinking about what happens when your program
overseas is completed. First, you will want to think about your experience in Spain as the starting point for your
international education. You will not stop learning when your program is completed. Indeed, many students have
returned to Spain after their graduation, or utilized the experience abroad as the springboard to new internship and career
opportunities and graduate schools.

Second, you may find that the readjustment to the U.S. is somewhat more difficult than your initial adjustment to Spain.
Re-entry shock catches many people off guard; knowing about it in advance won't prevent it, but at least you'll know what
to expect as you ride it out. (See section on re-entry shock below.) One way to help lessen the impact of re-entry shock is
to continue your international involvement through contributions in your classes, helping tutor students in Spanish (or
other international students in English), and helping as a peer advisor at your home campus.

On the matter of grades, you should be aware that it will take some time for classes and grades to be processed when you
return from Spain. Many procedures that the computer handles when you're on campus must be done manually when
you're in an international program.

Please read the chapter on re-entry in your “Maximizing Study Abroad” book given at orientation.

Re-entry Shock
After studying and living in another country, returning to the U.S. may seem like a walk in the park. After all, you're
fluent in the language and customs, right? Unfortunately, it's not always that easy. Many travelers forget about the
difficulties of returning to their home culture after an extended absence. The people you are close to will have changed,
which may be difficult for you to adjust to, and you will definitely have changed, which may come as a surprise to your
family and friends. The process of readjusting to life at home is often called reverse culture shock or re-entry shock. This
topic was described briefly at the end of the Intercultural Adjustment Cycle (Section Three), but it deserves a more
thorough explanation for the returning traveler.

In Survival Kit for Overseas Living, Robert L. Kohls describes the stages of re-entry into one's culture as being similar to
cultural adjustment. During the first stage, which he calls initial euphoria, you may be very pleased to be back in your
home country and others may be just as excited to have you back. You will notice interesting differences and parallels
between your home and host countries, and will want to share your observations and the events of your time abroad with
the people around you. You may notice, however, that while others may seem interested at first, they will soon expect
you to listen to their concerns and reassume the same relationship you had before you departed. You may also find that
you do not have an adequate support system to help you readjust to your home culture.

This combination of stressors soon leads to the next stage of re-entry shock: irritability and hostility. You may find
yourself irritated by others and by your own failure to fit right back into your pre-departure life. You will have had many
new experiences that others have not had, which can make finding common ground with friends and family difficult. You
will also have new knowledge and skills, but no immediate outlet for them (ways to use your new skills can be found with
a little effort). You will probably also find that politics and culture in the United States will have changed. Probably the
most distressing feeling for newly returned travelers is that they are now strangers who look like Americans. Basically,
your expectations for your return home will be, to some extent, disappointed. This combination of factors may lead you
to feel lonely, isolated, or depressed. Some people may experience this stage only briefly, while others experience an
extended period of alienation. Remembering that this is a natural reaction to rapid changes in your environment will help
keep what you are feeling in perspective.

This all sounds overwhelming, but don't despair, Kohls has several suggestions for easing yourself back into your home
culture. He suggests that you share your feelings about your experiences abroad with close friends and family. While
they may not be able to relate to all the new and exciting things you have done, they will be able to relate to how you felt
while doing them. When life in the U.S. feels strange to you, ask questions just as you did when you were abroad. In

                                                             92
some ways you are a foreigner even though you are at home; don't be afraid to explore your "new" environment. Touch
base with friends to find out from them what's changed while you've been gone. Look for groups to join which may
interest you. Most universities have international clubs. Join or organize a Spanish conversation group.

You may also find yourself getting upset in situations that wouldn't have bothered you before your international
experience. Kohls suggests a three-step process for dealing with this. First, describe what you see happening, if only to
yourself. Then interpret it -- what do you think objectively about the situation? Finally, evaluate the situation – how do
you feel about what has happened? Taking a moment to step back from situations which bother you may help you to
identify conflicts between customs of your host country, which you have spent a term internalizing, and American
customs, which now seem strange or even rude. Bear in mind that every culture is different and be patient with yourself
and others as you relearn your home culture.

Maintaining your International Connections
As mentioned above, one of the ways to readjust to your home country is by making use of the skills and experiences you have
gained while living in another country. All of the OUS universities have opportunities for you to make use of your language
and other new skills. For example, you might:

        become the language partner of an international or domestic student
        volunteer on- or off- campus
       help new international students adjust to life in the U.S.
        provide prospective study abroad students with information about the host
       country, or
        participate in international and multicultural events on campus and in the
       community

If you are interested in learning about the opportunities available to you on your campus, contact your Campus Contact for
more information.




                                                             93
                           RETURNING OVERSEAS


Returning Overseas
After you return to the U.S., you may be one of many students who finds that "once (or twice) is not enough" and that you
want to return overseas. Your campus contact or faculty advisor can make suggestions on grants, scholarships, internships or
possibly jobs overseas. If you plan to return overseas, you'll want to begin making arrangements quickly. Many scholarship
and grant applications are due in October and November.

IE3 Internship Program
    As an option for qualifying students, IE3 -- the Oregon International Internship Program -- offers internship placements in
    Spain. IE3 is administered by the Oregon University System and provides referrals for internships in a wide range of
    professions and locations. Internships are for academic credit. For more information, check http://ie3global.ous.edu.


Cultural Ambassador

The North American Language and Culture Assistants Program gives you an opportunity to visit Spain and become
acquainted with the Spanish education system, teachers and students, while sharing with them aspects of their own
language and culture. Visit the website for more information. Applications are due no later than March 30th but grants
will be given on a first-come first-serve basis. www.educacion.es/exterior/usa




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Section Seven

     Student
    Comments




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                 STUDENT COMMENTS AND TIPS
Student Tips

How to get into your apartment:

There will be a call box by the front of your door with numbers on one side and letters across the top. The
numbers represent the floor, and the letters are for the actual apartment you are in. Go across to the correct letter
on your address sheet, then down to the number in that column and when you push it a doorbell will ring on
their door or you can talk to them and they can let you in (depends on the system). Don’t be afraid to ask your
cab driver or someone else from the building for help.

Restaurants:

La Rana- burgers, chicken bocadillo (favorite!), hot dogs, excellent patatas bravas… get the platter!
Antonio’s- great Mexican… huge dinner, 12 euros per plate (7 courses)
Irish Pub- baked potatoes
El Meson de la Flota- Raphael is the greatest waiter EVER!!!
Café Alaska- desserts
Zamburpollo- late night snack place (burgers, pizza)
Srs. Patatas is the best (friendliest) restaurant/bar in Santander

Bars:

Retros
Malaspina
Don Vino– this is more of a club for dancing

International Student ID:

Pick up applications on your visit because they will actually save you money on buses, trains, hostels,
museums, etc. You pay the fee at the bank at the university, they sign it, then you run the paper back to the
Noches Jovenes place. Piece of cake and well worth it!

Language Partner:

USE THEM!!! They will not only help with your speaking skills, they can be really fun to go out with and
know many fun places to visit that you may not even have considered.

Host Families:

Remember that they are not your servants, but take advantage of the more relaxed setting to practice speaking.


Books:

You should get everyone in your group to bring a favorite book and then trade as you finish. You’ll want
something for all of the down time on buses and trains.

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Professors:

They are absolutely amazing! Don’t ever miss class though, and never be afraid to speak up. They are all really
encouraging and love to have a good time.

Sanitation:

Make sure to buy toilet paper and soap, it’s rare in public restrooms. Hand sanitizer is also helpful. Bring two
sticks of deodorant because it’s different there.

International Cell Phones:

Vodaphone seemed to provide the best service and have the nicest phones for what you pay. It is very easy to
buy more minutes at any tobacco place (brown sign with yellow writing). All you do is give them your phone
number, tell them how much you want to spend (5, 10, 20, 50euro) and it is applied to your phone right after
they punch it in. Other students suggest getting yoigo.

Laptops:

Bring your laptop. If you don't bring a laptop, there are computers with internet available at the paraninfo, but a
laptop's also handy for comforting English movies and uploading pictures. Using Skype on the computer is the
cheapest way to communicate, and also fairly convenient. Download it onto the computer at the Paraninfo at
skype.com and just follow the steps. There is an electronics store about 2 blocks from the Paraninfo where you
can buy headphones for 5euros.

Travel:

If you take the bus often, definitely buy a Bonobus (tobacco stores). Take advantage of the weekends to travel
or even look around Santander. If you want to travel and you don’t drink (therefore you won’t spend most of
your money on alcohol) bring $400 a trip and plan for spending $30 a week regularly in Santander.

Clothing to Bring:

Bring comfortable shoes and clothes, even sweats. Santander is on a big hill, so remember that when packing
shoes. Make sure you are prepared for all sorts of weather. Flip flops are fine to bring as well. Also bring some
nice clothes to go out in. Make it so that your clothes can be easily mixed and matched. There are no dryers so
your clothes will stretch out. If you come in the Fall, bring rain boots.

Random Items to Bring:
Take at least one comfort item from home/your bedroom, it can help with homesickness. Bring an aluminum
water bottle as Santander does not have drinking fountains. Makeup is expensive, so pack what you would like
to have. Bring protein/snack bars for those longer days. Bring Nyquil. Sunscreen. Batteries. Vitamins. Febreeze.

Safety:

Boys- walk girls home or make sure they get into a cab safe after a night out. And be careful in clubs. Women,
when walking by yourself be aware of your surroundings.

Random notes:

*Check the paper before you buy a notebook for class because most of them have squares instead of lines. But
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do bring pencils and pens.

*Try the sangria at different restaurants because it’s made differently everywhere.

* Gaseosa is a great beverage if you get tired of water

*Keep a journal and try your best to write in it every night. You’d be surprised how quickly you forget things…

*Don’t be shy to speak Spanish to each other. Go on walks and test each other by pointing out things and saying
what they are.

*Tip is included in the restaurant bill.

*Inform your bank that you’ll be away and hope your cards don’t get turned off.

*Walk everywhere to avoid gaining weight.

*Break away from the group sometimes. You will all have a chance to spend time together in class and on trips
so branch out when you can. You will be amazed at what you discover and who you meet.

*Take pictures of everything!

*If you are a vegetarian- you will be served meat. They aren’t familiar with vegetarian eating practices.

*Be courteous with your host parents. Even if their rules or requests seem strange, they are feeding and housing
you, so be nice!

* “Estoy caliente” means “I am horny”, not “I am hot”.

*Keep a journal and write in it every night no matter what. It’s great to keep track of things and very funny to
read when you get home.

*Surprisingly, walking is actually a good way to get around Santander. Despite being built on a hill, it is often
faster to walk from the university area downtown than to try and take the bus. The buses are worth it when it’s
raining, if you are headed to the beach area, or to go to the outlying areas.

*Finally, the taxi service in Santander is great. It is about 3€ to go pretty much anywhere within Santander, and
around 7€ to go to the airport. It makes a lot of sense to use the taxis at night, or when carrying luggage.



                          *** TAKE ADVANTAGE OF EVERY SINGLE DAY!!! ***




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Popular Travel Destinations
      Students will also have the opportunity to travel through the country before, after, and during course breaks. The
      following is a list of the most popular locations compiled by past students in the program.

      San Sebastián
      Galicia
      Un sitio retirado con un toro
      Sevilla
      La Mezquita de Córdoba
      La Alhambra de Granada
      Barcelona
      Madrid
      Valencia




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