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									                             FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
           ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS & ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

   State and federal education laws require assessments of Limited English Proficient
   (LEP) students—also known as English Language Learners (ELLs)—be conducted
   annually to determine students’ English language proficiency level. This information
   helps schools identify and plan appropriate language support for their ELL students as
   well as determine placement on Assessing Comprehension & Communication in
   English for English Language Learners (ACCESS for ELLs)®, the ELP assessment used
   in Wisconsin.

   Districts are accountable for their ELL students’ progress and attainment of English
   Language Proficiency (ELP). For more information about ELL accountability, visit:
   http://dpi.wi.gov/oea/ellamao.html. ELL students also participate in Wisconsin Student
   Assessment System (WSAS) testing which includes the Wisconsin Knowledge and
   Concepts Examination (WKCE) and the Wisconsin Alternate Assessment for Students
   with Disabilities (WAA-SwD); see the WSAS FAQ at http://dpi.wi.gov/oea/faq.html. For
   additional information about the development of the ELP assessment by World-Class
   Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) consortium, visit:
   http://wida.us/FAQs/generalindex.aspx.

   Topics addressed in this FAQ:

Identifying English Language Learners         Training for Test Administration
(ELLs)




Screening Students for Initial Placement      Testing Students’ English Language
                                                     Proficiency: ACCESS for ELLs®




Student Mobility During Testing               Reporting & Coding ELL Data




Exiting ELLs: Former Limited English          Accountability for ELLs & Annual Measurable
Proficient (FLEP) Students                    Achievement Objectives (AMAOs)
                    FAQ: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS & ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY


IDENTIFYING ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS (ELLS)

Q. What are the steps for identifying students as ELLs?
A. The identification and placement of limited English proficient (LEP) students in
   programs for English language learners (ELLs) is based on the following required
   steps:

Step 1. Home Language Survey: The Home Language Survey (HLS) is a district-
        developed tool that should include the following minimum information:
              • place of birth,
              • first language acquired,
              • language other than English spoken in the home,
              • number of years of education outside the U.S., and the
              • number of years of education in the U.S.

          If there are indications that the student has been sufficiently exposed to a
          language other than English, then the student must be assessed for English
          language proficiency (ELP) level.

Step 2. Preliminary Evaluation: Students who have recently arrived in the U.S. or in a
        particular school district who are potential ELLs must be evaluated to identify if
        they need ELL services, and to assist in program placement if the preliminary
                                                                TM
        ELP Level is 1-5. The WIDA-ACCESS Placement Test , or ―screener‖ is
        Wisconsin’s recommended initial placement assessment. For more information
                       TM
        on the W-APT , visit the WIDA website: http://wida.us/assessment/w-
        apt/index.aspx.

Step 3. Assessment of English language proficiency: Per Titles I, Part A and III, Part
        A of the ESEA-No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, all ELP assessments must
        include four language domains: listening/understanding, speaking, reading, and
        writing.

  For more information please visit the following document: Identification of Students as
  English Language Learners (Entry) (ESEA Information Update Bulletin 7.01).


Q. How are English Language Proficiency (ELP) levels defined?
A. There are seven language levels defined in WI administrative code. Limited English
   proficiency is defined in ELP Levels 1-5; Level 6 is assigned to students who are fully
   English proficient and no longer require ELL services (exiting or ―Formerly ELL‖);
   Level 7 refers to students who were never classified as ELL (ELP 1-5). Further
   description of these levels is available: http://dpi.wi.gov/ell/pdf/elp-levels.pdf

  The WIDA performance definitions for the levels of English language proficiency
  Performance Definitions for the Levels of English Language Proficiency and the
  Wisconsin ELP level definitions at http://dpi.wi.gov/ell/pdf/elp-levels.pdf should serve

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                     FAQ: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS & ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

     as a guide. The ESEA bulletin 7.01, Identification of Students as English Language
     Learners (Entry) http://dpi.wi.gov/esea/pdf/bul_0701.pdf may also be of interest.

Q. What about students who are new to the district?

A. Districts should enter the estimated ELP level into their Individual Student
   Enrollment System (ISES) Count Date records for new ELL students so labels can
   be generated for their ACCESS testing. Students entering the district after the label
   file is generated should have their demographic data bubbled onto their test booklet.
   The Wisconsin Student Locator Number (WSN), name, and birth date must
   accurately match the record entered into the WSLS system.



Q. For the ISES data element, how do I determine if an ELL student is “served” or
  not?

A. The student is considered ―ELL served‖ if an English Language Learner (English
   Language Proficiency code 1-5) is served in an English language instruction
   educational programs designed for English language learners or served by an
   English language instruction program funded by Title III.

ELL Served       Code      Description/Comments

No               N         The student is NOT served in English language instruction educational programs designed for English
                           language learners.

Served - No T3   S         The student is served in English language instruction educational programs designed for English language
                           learners, no Title III funding

T3 Served        T         The student is served in English language instruction educational programs designed for English language
                           learners, some Title III funding

Data Not         X         Valid only for Parentally Placed Private students.
Required

For more information, see: http://dpi.wi.gov/lbstat/dataellserved.html.



Q. What should I do if an English speaking student was inappropriately coded as ELL?

A. Each year there are a few students who participate in ACCESS for ELLs® testing in
   error. This composite score may be removed so the district can upload the correct
   ELP code. This can only be done during the period that ISES is open (see dates:
   http://dpi.wi.gov/lbstat/isesdates.html) for the school year’s Year-End collection and
   the following fall ISES Count Date collection. The district can always upload or
   manually enter the correct ELP code when there is no composite (overall) score in
   ISES.

     Schools and districts that discover inaccurate English Language Proficiency (ELP)
     codes used to identify English Language Learners (ELLs) should complete the
     request form: District Request & Certification of Change (removal of ACCESS
     Composite Score from ISES) located on the DPI Office of Educational Accountability-

  Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction                        3                        Office of Educational Accountability
                   FAQ: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS & ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

 ELL website at http://dpi.wi.gov/oea/ells.html. This (rare) correction is only a request
 to inactivate the composite score so the district can enter the corrected ELP code for
 the student.
 It is very important that data is checked for accuracy. ELL students are included in
 accountability measures for Title I (AYP) and Title III (AMAO) and accurate data
 ensures the most accurate results.




Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction       4                Office of Educational Accountability
                    FAQ: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS & ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY



                            TRAINING FOR TEST ADMINISTRATION


Q. Who can proctor the ACCESS for ELLs® Assessment?

A. ACCESS for ELLs® proctors are trained staff (including administrators, teachers, and
   paraprofessionals) who are employed by the school or district. They may also include
   student-teachers who normally have responsibility for supervising students.

   Parent volunteers should not be allowed to proctor examinations.
   Prior to assisting in administering the ACCESS for ELLs® , schools and districts should
   ensure that proctors have received training and are certified test proctors. To be a
   certified proctor the on-line quizzes must be completed on the following website:
   www.wida.us or the former D2L site.



Q. If I have already been trained to administer the ACCESS for ELLs® on the
  former Desire2Learn (D2L) site, do I have to be re-trained on the new WIDA
  site?

A. If you are administering the assessment for grades 1-12, you do not have to be re-
   trained. However, we do recommend that you review the training (especially the
   speaking portion) yearly.

  If you are administering the assessment for Kindergarten students then you will be
  required to be re-trained because it is a new assessment for 2008-09. Training is
  available on both the WIDA website http://wida.us and through a DVD presentation.



Q. Do all test administrators need to take the online quizzes?

A. Yes. Regardless of which training the test administrator participated in, they must
   take the corresponding quizzes that pertain to the sections for the test that they will
   be administering.


Q. Does DPI offer any online trainings?

A. Yes. The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction has produced three separate
   Mediasite presentations. The presentations are: ACCESS for ELLs® test
   administration training, Kindergarten ACCESS for ELLs® test administration training,
   and The English language proficiency standards. These presentations are available
   on the following site: http://dpi.wi.gov/oea/ells.html.


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                    FAQ: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS & ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY




                      SCREENING STUDENTS FOR INITIAL PLACEMENT

Q. What is the WIDA ACCESS Placement Test (W-APT)™ and what is its purpose?
A. The W-APT™ is a screening assessment tool that may be used as an initial measure
   of student’s English language proficiency to determine if a newly enrolled student is in
   need of English language instructional services and, if so, at what level.

  The W-APT™ has three main purposes:
     1. To evaluate students, at the time of enrollment, identified by the Home
        Language Survey who may be candidates for ESL and/or bilingual services;
     2. To estimate the academic English language proficiency level of students new
        to a school or to the U.S. school system in order to determine appropriate
        levels and amounts of instructional services; and
     3. To accurately assign students identified as ELLs to one of the three
        overlapping tiers for the more extensive ACCESS for ELLs® assessment given
        in December – February each year.


Q. Who is required to take an English language proficiency screener?
A. The English language proficiency screener is used as a preliminary evaluation for
   students that you suspect may be ELL. The W-APT™ is the DPI’s recommended
   method of evaluation because it is aligned with the ELP standards and ACCESS for
   ELLs® assessment. However, it is a local decision which screener is used for
   placement of ELL students.


Q. When should the screener be administered?
                       TITLE III − PARENTAL NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS
                                          Section 3302

                                              Required Elements

   1. The school(s) have informed the parent(s) of a limited English proficient (LEP) student that their
   child has been identified for participation in a language instruction educational program within 30
   days after the beginning of the school year (or, for students who arrive after the beginning of the
   school year, within two weeks of the child’s placement in a language instruction program).
   2. The notification identifies why the child was identified as LEP and why the child needs to be
   place in a language instructional educational program that will assist the child to develop and
   attain English proficiency and meet state standards
   3. The notification is distributed to parent(s) of participating LEP children, in an understandable
   and uniform format and, to the extent practicable, in a language the parents understand.
   4. Parents are informed about the child’s level of English proficiency, how such level was
   assessed, and the child’s academic level.


For more information, see http://dpi.wi.gov/ell/doc/parenttl3.doc.

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                    FAQ: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS & ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY




Q. Where is the W-APT™ available for download?
A. The W-APT™ screener is available at the WIDA website at
   http://wida.us/assessment/w-apt/index.aspx. The W-APT™ is a secured site and
   usernames and passwords are required. If you need a copy of your username and
   password please contact your district assessment coordinator or Brian Johnson a
   DPI, (608) 267-1290.


Q. What is the difference between the format of the Kindergarten W-APT™ and
  the new WIDA MODEL™ for Kindergarten?

A. The Kindergarten W-APT™ is available for free as a downloadable document at
   http://wida.us/. This is an adaptive test, with components that can be administered to
   children in pre-K, Kindergarten, or first grade, depending on each child’s individual
   circumstances. Pre-K children would take only the Listening and Speaking
   components, which are combined in one test. A child entering in the second half of
   the Kindergarten year may take all four components: Listening/Speaking, Reading,
   and Writing; or only the oral portions (Listening/Speaking). A child entering first grade
   will take all four components of the Kindergarten W-APT™. Whereas the oral portion
   will result in a score that lies along the WIDA ELP scale, the Reading and Writing
   portions are diagnostic tests, not proficiency tests. Results on the Reading and
   Writing portions of the Kindergarten W-APT™ will provide specific diagnostic
   information such as, ―Can read/write simple phrases.‖

  The new WIDA MODEL™ is available for purchase to screen Kindergarten students
  aligned with the WIDA standards and linked with the new Kindergarten ACCESS for
  ELLs®. The new interactive screener, model, will be available to districts in a kit that
  will include hands-on activities. The MODEL™ screener will assess students in the
  four language domains of: listening, speaking, reading and writing and students will
  be able to score a 1-6 ELP level.


Q. How should the Kindergarten W-APT™ proficiency descriptions (low, middle,
  high, etc.) convert to a numeric value representing a student’s ELP score?

A. There is some ambiguity in the old version of the W-APT™, especially for
   Kindergarten students, because it only tests social language and listening/speaking.
   WIDA has recommended that Wisconsin use: Low: 1-2, Med: 3-4, High: 5,
   Exceptional: 6. It will include teacher judgment if a specific number is put in the score.
   The number or level (for the W-APT™) is just a place holder and information until the
   final ACCESS numbers are received and put in ISES as a final number.

  Also, review the definitions of each ELP level (see PI 13.08 Classification of LEP
  pupils located online http://legis.state.wi.us/rsb/code/pi/pi013.pdf), consider the
  functional level used in the classroom for their instructions using multiple measures,
  including teacher input and the W-APT™ screener.

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                    FAQ: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS & ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY



 TESTING STUDENTS’ ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY: ACCESS for ELLs®
Q. What is ACCESS for ELLs®?
A. ACCESS for ELLs® is a large-scale test used to assess English language proficiency.
   It does not assess content area knowledge such as math or social studies. Four
   language domains are assessed: Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing.
   ACCESS scores assign an ELP level indicating the student’s limited English
   proficiency:

           Level 1         Level 2            Level 3        Level 4    Level 5       Level 6

           Entering      Beginning       Developing         Expanding   Bridging    Reaching



Q. How does one determine tier placement on the ACCESS for ELLs® test?
A. A brief screening exam known as the WIDA ACCESS Placement Test (W-APT)™
   should be used to designate ELL status and to assist teachers in assigning new
   students their appropriate tier for ordering test materials. The W-APT™ can be used
   at any time throughout the year as students enter a new school or district. Returning
   students may be assigned to a tier according to their ACCESS scores from the
   previous year.

   ACCESS for ELLs® TIER A is most appropriate for English language learners who:
      · have arrived in the U.S. or entered school in the U.S. within this academic school year
       without previous instruction in English, OR
      · currently receive literacy instruction ONLY in their native language, OR
      · test at the lowest level of language.

   ACCESS for ELLs® TIER B is most appropriate for English language learners who:
      · have social language proficiency and some, but not extensive, academic language
       proficiency in English, OR
      · have acquired some literacy in English, though have not yet reached grade level
       literacy.

   ACCESS for ELLs® TIER C is most appropriate for English language learners who:
      · are approaching grade level in literacy and academic language proficiency in the core
       content areas, OR
      · will likely meet the state’s exit criteria for support services by the end of the academic
       year.

Q. How can we avoid placing students in the wrong tier?

A. This situation can be avoided by using multiple measures, including teacher input
   and the W-APT™ screener, when determining tier placement and by following the
   Criteria for Tier Placement for ACCESS for ELLs®, located at:
   http://wida.us/assessment/ACCESS/tier_criteria.aspx. It is conceivable that a
   student may still be placed in the wrong tier. If discovered prior to test
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                    FAQ: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS & ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

   administration, the most appropriate booklet should be used (MetriTech provides
   extra booklets to all districts).

   The most common mistake is underestimating a student's capabilities and placing
   him or her in tier A rather than B or C. When this happens, the student can "top out"
   on the test, by getting most or all items correct, making it difficult to determine the
   student's true English language proficiency level. When in doubt, because a student
   seems to be on the border of tier A and B or tier B and C, place the student in the
   higher tier.

Q. What is the new Kindergarten ACCESS for ELLs®? How does it differ from the
  previous Kindergarten ACCESS for ELLs®?

A. The revised Kindergarten ACCESS for ELLs® is a standards-based, criterion
   referenced assessment used to meet federal accountability requirements.

  Since much of Kindergarten learning takes place through hands-on activities, the new
  Kindergarten language proficiency test incorporates the use of picture cards that
  allow for a variety of new test item types including matching, identifying, and
  describing activities. The interactive nature of the tests encourages all students to
  accurately demonstrate their level of English language proficiency.

  Research supports that PreK-Kindergarten English language learners are
  developmentally distinct from ELL students in Grades 1 and 2. For this reason, the
  2007 Edition of the WIDA English Language Proficiency (ELP) Standards includes a
  separate PreK-K grade level cluster for the first time. This mirrors TESOL’s ELP
  Standards (2006). The new assessments are aligned to the model performance
  indicators of the new PreK-K grade level cluster.

  Features of the revised Kindergarten assessment:
   • Include high-interest, age-appropriate stories
   • Centered around engaging, child-friendly graphics
   • Thematically integrated throughout the language domains:
      listening, speaking, reading, writing
   • Improved item types involving the use of manipulatives
   • Result in a composite proficiency level score (1.0-6.0) on the WIDA scale


Q. What is the administration time of the ACCESS for ELLs®?
       LISTENING:       approximately 25 minutes (group administered)
       SPEAKING:        up to approximately 15 minutes (individually administered)
       READING:         approximately 35 minutes (group administered)
       WRITING:         approximately 60 minutes (group administered)

   It is not a timed test; these times are approximate and vary slightly by grade level
   cluster, tier, and levels of English language proficiency. A tier A first grader, for
   example, may finish the writing section of the test within 20 minutes whereas an

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   eleventh grade student taking the tier C test might need 60 minutes to complete the
   writing section.

Q. There are students who have done very well on various sections of the test
  and yet have to repeat them because of a weakness in one area. In future years,
  is it possible to only test areas where they scored below the cut-off?

A. Per Title III requirements, "States MUST ANNUALLY assess the English language
   proficiency of all LEP students in the five domains of speaking, listening, reading,
   writing and comprehension, for grades K-12. Title I also requires annual assessment
   of English language proficiency in four of these domains: listening, speaking, reading,
   and writing." In order to score a student's test and show annual growth, the student
   must be tested in ALL domains annually. The composite score is based on all four
   domains from the current year.

Q. What accommodations can be made for ELL students with special needs?
A. The types of acceptable accommodations suggested for ELLs with Individual
   Educational Plans (IEPs) taking this English language proficiency test are published
   in the Administration Manual (available at: http://wida.us on the log-in section) and
   are also available on the Accommodations for ACCESS for ELLs® web page.

Q. Do we need to give the ELP assessment—ACCESS for ELLs®—to our High
  School exchange program students?

A. Foreign exchange students come to a US school to be educated in English. They
   generally do not participate in the state English Language Proficiency examination
   because they are considered English proficient when they come to a Wisconsin school.
   However, if a district believes this to be inaccurate and they will end up serving a foreign
   exchange student in their ELL program, then the school will have to assess the
   student’s ELP level. Any student who is not an ELL is considered at ELP level 7. The
   department considers international/foreign exchange students here as "visitors" for a
   language immersion experience. Districts are not required to assess exchange
   students for ELP, however, may receive support as needed, and if they meet the Title III
   "immigrant" criteria, they are to be counted for that purpose.


Q. Is there an opt-out /parental refusal for ACCESS for ELLs® testing?

A. No, there is no parent opt-out for the ELP test (ACCESS for ELLs®). It is required for
   all ELL students to be tested if the district receives Title III funding for that student.
   ACCESS for ELLs® is not an achievement test, it is used to make decisions about
   students’ educational needs.


Q. What do I do with a test label that has incorrect student information?




 Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction      10                Office of Educational Accountability
                    FAQ: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS & ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

A. Shred the label and bubble-in the correct information on the outside back cover of the
   student test booklet.

Q. Who is the printing, distributing, scoring and reporting contractor for ACCESS
  for ELLs®?

A. All materials will come from MetriTech, Inc. of Champaign, IL, and should be
   returned as directed in the packaging/shipping information. For assistance from
   MetriTech, please call 1-800-747-4868 and ask for WIDA support.

Q. Is the ACCESS for ELLs® available for use in private schools?

A. ACCESS for ELLs® is available for private schools in Wisconsin. Private school
   students are counted for Title III grant allocations. The schools must agree to abide
   by confidentiality policies and security. Private schools may order booklets directly
   from MetriTech.

Q. Is there a cut score document that shows the minimum and maximum
  composite ranges for each grade and tier level?
A. This information is available in the ACCESS Interpretive Guide at:
   http://wida.us/assessment/ACCESS/index.aspx
   When you get to the page, scroll down to the link that says "ACCESS for ELLs®
   Interpretive Guide for Score Reports 2008". A PDF file should download onto your
   computer when you click on the link.

Q. Who can I contact with ACCESS problems and questions?

                    Department of Public
                                                            WIDA                    MetriTech
                         Instruction
                                                        (866) 276-7735            (800) 747-4868
                        Brian Johnson                    www.wida.us            www.metritech.com
                       (608) 267-1290
                   brian.johnson@dpi.wi.gov

                   Creating an account
                   (WIDA Training site, W-APT™)
                                                          Forgotten                  Label
Before             Data field questions
                                                          password (WIDA             information
                   Forgotten password
the test                                                  Training Site)             Ordering
                   (W-APT™)
window                                                    Professional               test
                   Professional development
                                                          development                materials
                   Who must take the ACCESS for
                   ELLs® assessment

                                                          How to use the             How to
During                                                    WIDA Training site         order
                   Delivery of test materials
the test                                                  Questions                  additional
                   What to do if a student moves
window                                                    about test                 test
                                                          constructs                 booklets



 Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction        11              Office of Educational Accountability
                    FAQ: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS & ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY


After the
                   Interpreting test results             Interpreting                Incorrect
test               Professional development              test results                data
window


                             STUDENT MOBILITY DURING TESTING

Q. What do we do if an ELL student moves to a different school within our district
  during the ACCESS for ELLs® testing window?

A. If a student moves from one school to another within your district, the student test
   booklet should be sent to their new school if portions of the test still remain to be
   tested. The second school completes the test and sends it to MetriTech. If the test
   has already been completed at the first school, it should be sent to MetriTech from
   the first school.

Q. What do we do if an ELL student moves out of our district to another district
  during the ACCESS for ELLs® testing window?

A. If the student is moving out and has not yet started the test, do not forward the
   booklet. If they have started the test then forward the booklet.

Q. What do we do if we receive a new ELL student into our district during the
  ACCESS for ELLs® testing window?

A. If student records do not indicate that any portions of the ACCESS for ELLs® test
   have been taken, you should contact the ACCESS for ELLs® coordinator in the
   district from where the student moved (visit http://www.dpi.wi.gov/schldist.html or
   http://dpi.wi.gov/oea/contact.html ). Consider asking the student if he or she has
   taken any of the tests. When in doubt, give the student the entire test so that you
   have ELP levels for state and federal reporting. If the student is either from a non-
   WIDA state (visit http://wida.us/states/index.aspx) or did not complete the ACCESS in
   their previous district, complete all of the ACCESS and return it to MetriTech.

Q. Do we still have to test new ELL students if they arrive at the end of the
  ACCESS for ELLs® testing window?

A. If a student arrives prior to the last week of the window, and is either from out of state
   or did not complete the ACCESS in their previous district, do what you can to get the
   test completed. If time does not allow for this, or it is within days of the end of the
   window, use the W-APT™ to determine an English proficiency level for the student as
   you would for a student arriving after the window closes.

Q. What do we do with students who move?

A. If a student moves from one school to another within your state, the student test
   booklet should be sent to their new school if portions of the test still remain to be
   tested. The student’s new school will complete the test and send it to MetriTech. If
   the test has already been completed at the first school, it should be sent to MetriTech
 Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction      12                Office of Educational Accountability
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  from the first school. If the student is moving into another WIDA state (visit
  http://wida.us/states/index.aspx) then the same procedures should be followed.

  Districts are only charged for test booklets that are scored. If a student is tested twice
  (or part of the assessment in two booklets) they will receive two scores and the
  district will be charged twice. This should be watched very carefully and should not
  occur.



                               REPORTING & CODING ELL DATA

Q. Are districts allowed to submit data corrections electronically?

A. Yes, beginning in 2008, all districts have a two-week window to view the ACCESS for
   ELLs® data electronically and make corrections before the ACCESS for ELLs®
   reports are printed.

Q. Is it possible to create a mechanism for obtaining newly enrolled students’
  ACCESS scores from other WIDA states?

A. If a student comes to Wisconsin from another WIDA state, the Wisconsin district may
   contact the previous district to find out the student’s ELP level. In this case, the
   district does not need to conduct a screener (W-APT™). The ACCESS for ELLs®
   assessment is currently being used in 19 states. If you would like find out which
   states are WIDA members: http://wida.us/states/index.aspx.

Q. How can we verify that the ACCESS results were completely uploaded into
  ISES? What information is uploaded by DPI?

    District Provides: Districts will be required to submit an English Proficiency Code
   for students who do not have a record with accurate demographic information or a
   Composite ELP score provided from the ACCESS for ELLs® results. Please see the
   following link for the ISES file specifications: http://dpi.wi.gov/lbstat/isesspec.html.
   The timeline for creation of pre-ID labels for WSAS and ACCESS can be found at
   http://www.dpi.wi.gov/lbstat/isesdates.html. The web site will be updated with any
   additional changes.

   Districts do not upload ACCESS for ELLs® data to ISES. This composite score is
   uploaded for ELL students with valid WSN, name, and birth dates by DPI. Their ELL
   level or ELP code is calculated based on the composite score (see above URL).
   Districts should submit a correct ELP codes for all students in their ISES data
   submissions. The district- submitted ELP code will be used for students without valid
   ACCESS for ELLs® composite scores and for students who should be reclassified
   as a composite score of 6.

   DPI Provides: DPI receives a file from MetriTech with the results of the ACCESS for
   ELLs® test. DPI uploads the Composite English Proficiency Level score from the
   ACCESS data into the ISES database. If a Composite English Proficiency Level
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                    FAQ: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS & ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

   score is available, the English Proficiency Code will be calculated (rounded-down to
   the nearest whole number). See the following website for information on how the
   English Proficiency Level will be calculated:
   http://dpi.wi.gov/lbstat/isescalc.html#eng_prof_code.

Q. What should a district do when ACCESS did not create an ELP code in ISES?

A. Districts should check their ISES Year-End and Count Date collections to verify that
   ELL students’ ACCESS for ELLs® composite scores are calculated at each student’s
   most current ELP code. For ELL students with no composite score on ACCESS or
   with hand-coded information that doesn’t match their WSN/ISES records, an English
   Proficiency Code should be submitted as soon as the student has been classified as
   an ELL student.

  Students who are to be reclassified to ELP 6 (or Former LEP) and who did not take
  the most recent ELP exam should have their correct ELP code uploaded to ISES. If
  a student was not available during the testing window, the W-APT™ score can be
  used as a placeholder until the following year’s ELP exam administration of ACCESS
  for ELLs® (the screener can only be used once per student). Please see the
  following link for the ISES file specifications: http://dpi.wi.gov/lbstat/isesspec.html

Q. How can we correct incomplete or incorrect English Language Proficiency
  codes?

A. Schools and districts that discover inaccurate ELP codes used to identify ELLs
   should upload corrected ELP codes during the ISES Year-End and ISES Count-Date
   submission windows.

Q. How should one report a preschooler’s English Language Proficiency level in
  ISES collections?

A. Neither NCLB nor state law requires assessment or services for ELLs at grade
  levels earlier than Kindergarten. If students at earlier grades are assessed, then their
  English Language Proficiency codes should reflect the results of the assessment
  used. Students who are not assessed cannot be counted as ELL/ELP (codes 1-5).
  DPI recommends using a mix of qualitative data, including language samples
  gathered in different environments and during varying activities and routines,
  observations in different environments and during varying activities and routines,
  extensive language history gathered from parents and other caregivers, and
  quantitative data in order to come up with an accurate picture of a student’s language
  development. The WIDA ELP Performance Definitions can also be used as a guide
  (http://wida.us/standards/RG_Performance%20Definitions.pdf).

Q. A few ELL students in my district also have an IEP and were not able to take all
  four domains of the ACCESS because of their disability. These students were
  not assigned a composite score. What ELP code should I give them in ISES?

A. When a student is unable to complete a portion of the ELP test due to his or her
   disabilities, the available subscale proficiency levels should be used along with other

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                    FAQ: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS & ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

  evidence collected by the teacher, including parent input, to determine the student’s
  ELL proficiency level and ELP code. That ELP code will have to be supplied to the
  student’s ISES record. The ACCESS composite score is only provided when all four
  domains are completed. Only students with a composite score have an ELP code
  generated in ISES.

Q. How are pre-ID labels generated?

A. The demographic information from ISES is used to make the pre-ID labels. The test
   contractor (MetriTech) creates the labels using this information.

Q. What if the label has incorrect information?

A. Destroy the label and bubble-in the correct information on the outside back cover of
   the student test booklet.

Q. How do private school students in our district get test labels from the
contractor?

A. Districts may send a separate data file to MetriTech for their private school students
   and then they will receive labels. If districts do not send a separate file, then all of
   the information will need to be bubbled on the test booklet. It is important that the
   correct DPI private school codes are used.



          EXITING ELLs: FORMER Limited English Proficient (FLEP) Students

Q. What is the definition of a former ELL?

A. Former ELL or Limited English Proficient (FLEP) students meet the definition for ELP
   6. The criteria for exiting a student from ELL services is available at:
   (http://dpi.wi.gov/esea/pdf/bul_0702.pdf). FLEP Level 6 students must be monitored
   for the first two years they are exited from ELL services - see bulletin 8.01
   (http://dpi.wi.gov/esea/pdf/bul_0801.pdf ).

Q. Is there any way to exit an ELL student who is able to function as fully English
  proficient doing academic work that is at grade level in a regular classroom
  without accommodations, but who has not yet scored a 6.0 on the ELP
  examination, ACCESS for ELLs®?

A. See Bulletin No. 07.02 entitled Criteria for Reclassification of English Language
   Learner Students as Fully English Proficient (Exiting) at
   http://dpi.wi.gov/esea/pdf/bul_0702.pdf for guidance on how to reclassify ELLs who
   are Fully English Proficient.




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                    FAQ: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS & ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY




 ACCOUNTABILITY FOR ELLs & ANNUAL MEASURABLE ACHIEVEMENT OBJECTIVES (AMAO)

Q. What are AMAOs?

A. The re-authorization of the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act, known
   as No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) inaugurated major changes in the
   expectations placed on state and local education agencies regarding assessment of
   and accountability for Limited English Proficient (LEP) students – also known as
   English Language Learners (ELL). Specifically, NCLB Title III requires states to:

       establish English language proficiency (ELP) standards aligned to state
       academic content standards, yet suitable for ELL students learning English as a
       second language;
       annually assess the English language proficiency of each ELL student using a
       valid and reliable assessment of English-language proficiency aligned to ELP
       standards;
       define annual measurable achievement objectives (AMAOs) to measure and
       report on progress toward and attainment of English proficiency and academic
       achievement standards; and
       hold local education agencies (LEAs) accountable for meeting increasing Annual
       Measurable Achievement Objective (AMAO) targets for English language
       proficiency (ELP) over time (NCLB 2002, Public Law 107-110, 115 Statute 1425).

Q. What are the AMAO targets?

Three specific AMAO target areas have been established under Title III:

AMAO 1: Progressing in English language acquisition
        annual increases in the number or percentage of students making progress
        in learning English
AMAO 2: Exiting or reaching English language proficiency
        annual increases in the number or percentage of students attaining English
        language proficiency by the end of each school year
AMAO 3: ELL-Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)
        AYP for the ELL subgroup (under Title I) in meeting grade-level academic
        achievement standards in English Language Arts (Reading) and
        Mathematics

Districts and consortia of districts must meet the Title III AMAOs annually since the
baseline year.

       Amended Cohort and AMAO definitions in Wisconsin
       Title III Accountability Law
       Title III Accountability Timeline (begins with 2006-07 determinations)
       Sample AMAO Parent Notification Letters, in English, Spanish, Hmong.

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