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									     CONSERVATION
         AND
       SCOUTING




   University of Scouting
                February 2, 2008
Instructors –Bruce Handley and Jim Szpakowski
                         Goals
                  Goals for Leaders
• Develop an appreciation for the role of conservation in
  Scouting
• Convey the information you need to bring this part of
  Scouting into your unit
                   Goals for Boys
• Provide boys with an opportunity to learn the importance
  of conservation practices
• Provide meaningful conservation projects, assist in their
  completion, and award them for success.
        Course Overview
•   Definitions
•   History of Conservation in Scouting
•   Recognition for Conservation
•   Service Projects
•   Break
•   Conservation Olympics
•   Conservation Programs
•   Conservation and Nature Resources
                        Definitions
“Conservation is the foresighted utilization,
preservation, and/or renewal of forests, waters, lands
and minerals for the greatest good of the greatest
number for the longest time.”
-Gifford Pinchot (1905), Advisor to President Theodore Roosevelt


Ecology, from the Greek “oikos” (household) and
“logia” (study), is the study of the relationships of
organisms to their physical environment and to one
another.
History of Conservation in Scouting

    Answers the Burning Question:


How did conservation get tossed in with
      Scouting in the first place?
The Early Days
     • Ernest Thompson Seton

     • Lieutenant-General
       The Right Honorable
       Robert Stephenson Smyth
       Baden-Powell of Gilwell

     • Daniel Carter Beard
The Early Days

    • Part 1 of the 6-part “Scouting
      for Boys” was published on
      January 15, 1908.

    • Title page described the
      book as “A Handbook for
      Instruction in Good
      Citizenship”
          The Early Days
         An “A-hah!” Moment

There’s the connection: Good citizenship
implies the thoughtful use of our natural
resources and the preservation of the natural
environment. In a word:
             Conservation
               The Early Days
                        From The Woodcraft Laws of the
                          Woodcraft League (1902)

                        • The Third Ray of the Lamp of
                          Beauty
                          “Protect all harmless wild life for
                          the joy its beauty gives. Conserve
                          the woods and flowers, and
                          especially be ready to fight wild-
                          fire in forest or in town.”

Ernest Thompson Seton
                The Early Days
                      Article IX – Pledge from the Sons of
                      Daniel Boone (1905)
                      (4) In making camp-fires I will not
                      cut standing green timber, but use
                      dead or imperfect trees, and I will do
                      my best to preserve the forests. I
                      realize that, besides being of immense
                      value to my country, they are the
                      retreat of all forest-loving beasts and
                      birds.
Daniel Carter Beard
                   The Early Days
1911
• The first edition of The Boy Scout Handbook contains a single-page
   passage on Conservation, stating that we should be careful with these
   resources since they relate to the Gross National Product
1917
• The first William T. Hornaday gold medal, then called the Permanent
   Wild Life Protection Fund award, is presented.
1921
• Outstanding civic Good Turns are rendered in forest conservation and
   in connection with the floods at Pueblo, Colorado, and San Antonio,
   Texas.
1922
• The first BSA PWLPF award goes to Scoutmaster Harry Hall of
   Carbondale, PA.
                The Modern Era
Bruce Handley        1948-1959: The 5th edition of the
                     handbook is the first to contain a
                     “Conservation Pledge” which in
                     later printings was reworded to
                     become our present Outdoor Code:

                     “As an American, I will do my best
                     to be clean in my outdoor manners,
                     be careful with fire, be considerate
                     in the outdoors, and be
                     conservation-minded.”
The Modern Era
    • 1972 – BSA begins transition from
      heavy-impact to new low-impact
      outdoor ethic

    • 1980s – BSA and BLM do a pilot
      LNT educational program in the
      High Uinta’s of Utah

    • 1999 - BSA develops a patch
      recognition program for Scouts
      that complete a standard level of
      LNT education.
      History – The Conclusion
• The BSA Conservation Program Emphasis is
  designed to incorporate throughout the Scouting
  program and activities an awareness and
  understanding of conservation as wise and
  intelligent management of natural resources.
• The development of good citizens is one of
  Scoutings aims, and citizens need to practice
  sound environmental living and conservation of
  natural resources.
   Recognition for Conservation
Cub Scouts
• Achievements and Activity Pins
• Awards
Boy Scouts and Varsity Scouts
• 1st and 2nd class requirements
• Merit Badges
• Awards
Venturing
• Core and elective requirements
• Awards
     Recognition for Conservation

                     World Conservation Award
                     “think globally” and “act locally”
                     • Cub Scouts
                     • Boy Scouts
                     • Varsity Scouts
                     • Venturers
World Conservation
   Recognition for Conservation



       Cub Scout Outdoor Activity Award
Awarded to all Cubs for completion of several activities,
including 3-6 of 13 outdoor activities, one of which is #6:

“Complete a nature/conservation project in your area. This
project should involve improving, beautifying, or
supporting natural habitats. Discuss how this project
helped you to respect nature.”
Recognition for Conservation
           Conservation Good Turn

           •   Cub Scout Packs
           •   Boy Scout Troops
           •   Varsity Scout Teams
           •   Venturing Crews
Recognition for Conservation

         Leave No Trace
         •Boy Scouts
         •Varsity Scouts
         •Venturers

         Leave No Trace Awareness
         •Cub Scouts
Recognition for Conservation
        Paul Bunyan Woodsman
           Award – Boy Scouts
        3c. “Build a natural retaining wall or
             irrigation way to aid in a planned
             conservation effort.”


        50-Miler Award – Boy
           Scouts/Venturers
        3. “…complete a minimum of 10 hours
            each of group work on projects to
            improve the trail, springs, campsite,
            portage, or area.”
      Recognition for Conservation

                         The Hornaday Award
                         • Unit Award
                         • Boy Scouts
Bronze Silver     Gold   • Venturers
                         • Adults

     Gold Badge
      Recognition for Conservation
           Sam Houston Area Council
         Conservation Award for Adults




• A new award intended to stimulate interest in
  conservation among area Scouters.
• It will promote knowledge and service in various
  areas related to conservation of natural resources.
• Administered by the Conservation Committee
• Contact Tony Pagnotta, 713-466-2981 for an
  official progress record sheet.
     Recognition for Conservation

         Camp Strake Conservation Award

REQUIREMENTS:
• 1) 8 hours service on listed Saturdays only - 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
• 2) 30 people maximum, 8 people minimum - one group per
  weekend - 2 deep leadership required per unit.
• 3) Bring sack lunch, work gloves, rubber boots are useful.
• 4) Ranger will assign projects.
• 5) Receive a Patch upon completion.
• 6) Will meet requirements for Star and Life Projects.
• Call Strake for reservations toll free 1-877-272-2267 or
  936-756-1387, first call first served. Ranger will call to
  confirm your date. Cut off Saturday prior to work date.
Service Projects
• Project Planning
 Conservation Committee has the resources
  to support a wide range of projects.
 A backlog of projects exists
 www.ScoutingTexas.com shows the project
  areas on a map with links to project
  descriptions.

• Use of Hornaday theme areas
 www.ConservationBSA.com has a lot
  of resources to help with conservation
  projects in general and Hornaday
  projects in particular.
ELEMENTS OF PROJECT PLANNING

• Project identification and problem description
• Definition of possible actions & describing their
  impact on the problem.
• Selecting an achievable action
• Identifying tasks, resource needs and safety issues.
• Execution
• Reflection & education
   USE HORNADAY THEME AREAS

• INVASIVE SPECIES CONTROL
• ENERGY CONSERVATION
• SOIL & WATER CONSERVATION
• FISH & WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT
• FORESTRY & RANGE MANAGEMENT
• AIR & WATER POLLUTION CONTROL
• RESOURCE RECOVERY (RECYCLING)
• HAZARDOUS MATERIAL DISPOSAL & MANAGEMENT
         PROJECT IDENTIFICATION
            INVASIVE SPECIES
                     Organize and execute a project to
                     control:
                        • Chinese Tallowwood
                        • Japanese Climbing Fern
                        • Other Invasive animal or plant

                     Organize a community education
                     program concerning the cost of
                     local invasive species and encourage the
Chinese Tallowwood   community to help in its control.

(Sapium sebiferum)
PROJECT IDENTIFICATION
       ENERGY

         • Conduct a community
         education program on
         energy saving actions that
         can be implemented by the
         homeowner.

         • Plan and execute an energy
         saving project for your
         school, church or
         community structure.
       PROJECT IDENTIFICATION
     SOIL & WATER CONSERVATION
• Construct a three dimensional model of your local watershed
including a discussion of how citizens can help keep water clean.
Arrange to have it exhibited in a public place.
• Organize a storm drain labeling and community education
Program regarding non point source pollution.
• Stabilize an eroding stream bank with geotextiles, plants,
gabions and/or rip rap.
• Collecting discarded Christmas trees and using them to stabilize
Dunes on Galveston Island or along stream banks.
       PROJECT IDENTIFICATION
    FISH & WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT
• Construct a permanent exhibit on the effects of trash on
wildlife & staff the exhibit for at least 1 Trash Bash event.
• Construct and install Wood Duck or other bird houses determined
by wildlife manager.
• Construct or restore wildlife habitat to be used for education at a
school or park.
• Enhance habitat for an endangered species such at the Red
Cockaded Woodpecker or the Atwater Prairie Chicken.
• Use brush to develop cover for fish fry in a lake.
• Conduct a wildlife census.
• Establishing fenced test areas to evaluate deer browse pressure.
• Building wildlife observation decks with interpretive displays
     PROJECT IDENTIFICATION
   FOREST & RANGE MANAGEMENT
• Develop a guided nature trail that educates participants about
forest trees and forest management issues and practices.

• Reforest an area under the supervision of a forester or
range specialist. Give a presentation to youth or community
leaders illustrating the value of the program to flood control,
water quality and surface temperature.

• Assist in spreading desirable grasses and other herbaceous
plants in an area by collecting & distributing appropriate seeds.
Develop signs to educate the public of the project.

• Restore damaged meadows and/or hillsides
           PROJECT IDENTIFICATION
                RECYCLING
• Organize a Christmas Tree recycling Program (may be combined
With Soil & Water Conservation or Fish & Wildlife
Management).
Let’s Take a Break
Conservation Programs
PROJECT WILD CHARACTISTICS

 • Focuses on wildlife & habitat
 • Sponsored by Texas Parks & Wildlife
 • Emphasizes thinking
 • Over 200 Activities in three books
 • Applicable to Tigers through Venturers
 • Activities range from very active to desk top
 • Activities can be related to Scout advancement
 • Books free, but must attend a workshop
  PROJECT WILD & SCOUT PROGRAM


• May be used to enhance den, pack, troop and crew programs
• May be used in advancement
• May be used in planning projects
• Correlations to advancement requirements
• Correlations available from North Carolina Wildlife Resources
  Commission
         PROJECT WILD GUIDES

• PROJECT WILD – 123 Activities, best used for Tigers
 through 3RD year Scouts, 6 hr. workshop.

• PROJECT AQUATIC WILD – 48 Activities, Best used for
 Tigers through 3RD year Scouts, 6 hr. workshop.

• SCIENCE AND CIVICS - 34 Activities, Best used for
 high school age Scouts and Venturers, 2 hr+ workshop.
Conservation and Nature Resources

 There is an abundance of help out there.

     • State and National Agencies
      • Local and Private Groups
Look at all the possible projects!!
Starting with a view of Texas you can see all of    Select “Houston” from the Search & Find
    the possible conservation project areas.       option. Notice all the BSA Camps (purple)!




Zoom in on the Group near Sugar Land to see        Zoom in on a location to see the road names
        each location in that Group.                and more detail of water & other features.
Conservation and Nature Resources

State and National Agencies
• Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD)
• Texas Commission on Environmental Quality
  (TCEQ)
• Texas General Land Office (GLO)
• Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
• Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS)
• Texas and U.S Forest Service
• Texas Coastal Program – U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Conservation and Nature Resources
 Local and Private Groups
 •   SHAC Conservation Committee
 •   Jesse Jones Park
 •   Friends of Texas Wildlife
 •   Houston Museum of Science
 •   Gulf Coast Turtle and Tortoise society
 •   E. Texas Herpetological Society
 •   City of Houston Environmental Health Division
 •   Texas A&M County Extension Service
 •   Houston Arboretum and Nature Center
 •   Bayou Preservation Society
 •   Katy Prairie Conservancy
 •   Hermann Park Conservancy
   Conservation and Nature Resources
• AERIAL PHOTOS
• http://www.h-gac.com
   –   2002 & 2004 Aerial photos of Montgomery and Harris Counties
   –   Look for interactive mapper
   –   ARCIMS Website
   –   H-GAC Raster Datasets


• WETLANDS
• http://wetlandsfws.er.usgs.gov/
   – Maps of Wetlands in Houston area
• http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us
   – Go to Land & Water then wetlands
• www.crrel.usace.army.mil/rsgisc/wetshed/wetdatashed.htm
   – Contains listing of all wetlands plants in U.S. May be searched by county.
     Also may be used for evaluating wetlands
 Conservation and Nature Resources
• FORESTS
• http://www.fs.fed.us/greatestgood/
   – Video of History of Forest Service and conservation movement
     and current Forest Service policy.
   – 3-DVD set – “The Greatest Good”
   – Companion Book
• www.houstonregionalforest.org/Report/
   – 2005 report on the state of the forests in the Houston area
• http://www.americanforests.org/downloads/rea/AF_Housto
  n.pdf
   – “Urban Ecosystem Analysis for the Houston Gulf Coast Region”
     contains some interesting observations of the changes in the forest
     cover of the area.
 Conservation and Nature Resources

• WATER

• http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us
   – Videos titled “Texas the State of Water” and “Texas the State of
     Water Finding a Balance”
   – Go to publications then films
• http://www.tceq.state.tx.us
   – Go to publications then water
• http://www.bayoupreservation.org
   – Watershed maps
   – Floodplains
   – Topographic maps
                         Closing
            Seek Common Sense
         Approaches to Conservation
Goal: Make a difference for the better
Option 1: Quit your day job and lobby for the Green Party
Option 2: Drop a brick in your toilet tank
Method: Find out where you are in the spectrum between
  Option 1 and Option 2. Decide to raise the bar on future
  actions. Pass this new dedication and awareness on to the
  boys.
Closing

 “Conservation means the
    development of an
  ecological conscience.”

from “The Land Ethic” in A Sand
      County Almanac - Aldo
         Leopold (1949)

 Hornaday Gold Medal Recipient in
               1917

								
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