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					  School of Nursing
Health and Safety Plan

        February 2001
             (Revised 2008)




        School of Nursing
     University of Washington
            Box 357260
     Seattle, WA 98195-7260
      Phone: (206) 543-8732
       Fax: (206) 543-3624


    Environmental Health and Safety
             Box 354400
         Phone: (206) 543-7262
          FAX: (206) 543-3351
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                        2




                                           Preamble



The School of Nursing’s Health and Safety Plan represents the
Nursing School’s long-standing commitment to a safe and healthy
working environment for all of our students, staff and faculty. This
living document will be updated periodically based on changes in
policies, regulations and/or safety standards. Please contact your
School of Nursing Group 4 Health and Safety Committee
Representative(s) or your department’s Safety Coordinator if you have
any questions regarding the SoN Health and Safety Plan policies or
procedures.
                                Dean Nancy F. Woods, Feb 22, 2001
               School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan

                                 Table of Contents


Preamble…………………………………………………………………………….………… 2

A. Introduction……………………………………………………………………………….7
   1. Scope…………………………………………………………………………..…....7
   2. Health and Safety Policy………………………………………………...…….......7
   3. Responsibility……………………………………………………………….…...….7
   4. Safety Coordinator…………………………………………………………...…….7,8

B. Fundamentals: 8 Keys………………………………………..…………………..….…. 8
   1. New Employee Health and Safety Orientation……………………………….….. 8
   2. Emergency Evacuation and Operations Plan (EEOP)…………………….….… 9
         2.1   Purpose…………………………………………………………………. 11
         2.2 Scope……………………….………………………..….…………….... 11
         2.3 Coordination with Departmental Health and Safety Plans……..…... 11
                    2.3.1. UW Emergency Operations Plan………………….……… 11
                    2.3.2 Other Departmental Emergency Operation Plans……… 11
         2.4 Coordination with Department Health and Safety Plan…………….. 11
         2.5 University Emergency Resources and Contacts…………………….. 12
                    2.5.1 UW Police Department……………………………………. 12
                    2.5.2 Environment Health and Safety…………………………….12
                    2.5.3 Facilities Services……………………………………………12
                    2.5.4 UW Emergency Operation Center…………………………12
                    2.5.5 Official Emergency Broadcast Station…………………….13
         2.6 Emergency Communication…………………………………………… 13
                    2.6.1 Telephone……………………………………………………13
         2.7 Expectations for Departments and Staff……………………….…….. 13
                    2.7.1 Employees, Faculty, and Staff Responsibilities………… 13
                    2.7.1 Special Positions…………………………………………… 14
                    2.7.3 Fire Safety Director Responsibility and Control………… 14
                    2.7.4 Fire Safety Director and Alternates Duties……………… 14, 15
                    2.7.5 Duties of the Evacuation Warden…………….……………15
                    2.7.6 Instructor’s Responsibility………………………………… 16, 17
         2.8 Emergency Procedures…………………………………….………..... 17
                    2.8.1 Fire Procedures for Occupants…………………….………17, 18
                    2.8.2 Bomb Threats ……………………………………………… 18, 19
                    2.8.3 Chemical Spills or Release ………………………………. 20, 21
                    2.8.4 Earthquakes …………………………………………………21, 22
         2.9 Employee Orientation…………………………………………… .….….22
         2.10 Fire Exit Drills………………………………………………………….… 22
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                         4



Appendix A:             EEOP/Responsible Individuals……………………………………….23, 24

Appendix B:             EEOP/Unusual Hazardous Locations and Key Laboratory………...25

Appendix C:             EEOP/Building Evacuation Plans…………………………………….. 26

Appendix G:             EEOP/Emergency Evacuation for Persons with Disabilities……..… 27-29

Appendix H:             EEOP/Procedures for Planning and Scheduling Fire Drills………... 30

Appendix I:             EEOP/Low Rise Building Procedures for Conducting, Critiquing…   31, 32
                        and Recording Fire Drills

Appendix K:             EEOP/Assembly Occupancies Procedures for Conducting,……….. 33 - 35
                        Critiquing, and Recording Fire Drills

Appendix L:             Fire Drill Report Form………………………………………………..…. 37

Appendix M:             About the UW Emergency Operations Plan (EOP)…………….…... 37

Appendix N:             Classrooms and Teaching Laboratories Emergency Procedures…. 38 - 43
                        For Faculty, Lecturers, and Teaching Assistants

Appendix O:             Earthquake Drill Evacuation Evaluation Form ……………………... 44

     3. Accidents……………………………………………………………………..……..                                       45
             3.1 Medical Emergencies…………………………………………….…...                              45
             3.2 Report Form to Supervisor……………………………………………                             45-47
             3.3 Investigation……………………………………………………….……                                  47

     4. First Aid and CPR Access………………………………………………………… 47, 48
              4.1 Department First Aid………………………………………………….. 48
              4.2 First Aid Kits………………………………………………………..….. 48

     5. Safety Problems: Reporting and Resolving…………………………………….. 48

     6. Safety Meetings: Supervisor Leadership……………………………………..…. 48

     7. Health and Safety Committee Participation……………………………..……….                      49
             7.1 Department Health and Safety Committee………………………….                      49
             7.2 Organizational Health and Safety Committee……………………...                  49
             7.3 University-wide Health and Safety Committee……………………...                 49

     8. Safety Bulletin Boards………………………………………………………..…….. 49

C. Accidents/illness Prevention: 6 Keys…………………………………………..…….. 50
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                    5




     1. Identification of Hazards……………………………………………………………..50, 51
                1.1 FCN…………..………………………………………………………… 52
                1.2 PCH………………………………………………………………….… 53
                       rd
                1.3 3 Floor….…………………………………………………………….. 54
                1.4 BNHS…………………………………………………………………... 55
                1.5 Research……………………………………………………………… 56
     2. Reduction of Hazards………………………………………………………………. 57
                1.1    FCN…………..……………………………………………………….. 57 -59
                1.2 PCH………………………………………………………………….… 59 - 62
                        rd
                1.3 3 Floor….……………………………………………………………. 63
                1.4 BNHS……………………………………………………………….… 64 -66
                1.5    Research…………………………………………………….……….. 67- 69
     3. Evaluation of Hazards………………………………………………..…………….. 69
                 3.1 Engineering Controls………………………………………………. 70
                 3.2 Administrative Controls……………………………………….…… 70
                 3.3 Personal Protective Equipment………………………..…………. 70
     4. Safety Inspections…………………………………………………………..…….. 70, 71
                 4.1 First Aid and CPR Training……………………………………….. 71
                 4.2 Safety Training: On-going………………………………………… 71
                 4.4 Medical Exams and Vaccinations……………………………...…. 71, 72
                 4.5 Ergonomics Fact Sheet……………………………………………. 72, 73
     5. Workplace Violence……………………………………………………………….. 74 - 76
                 5.1 Documentation and Follow-up………………………………………77
                 5.2 Record-keeping……………………………………………………… 77
                 5.3 Updates………………………………………………………………. 77

Appendix 1:          Organization Chart……………………………………………………….. 78

Appendix 2:          UW Statement of Policy and Responsibilities………………………….. 79

Appendix 3:          “Back Page” – SoN Dean’s Office………………………………………. 80

Appendix 4:          “Back Page” – BNHS………………………………………………….…. 81
.
Appendix 5:          “Back Page” – FCN…………………………………….………………… 82

Appendix 6:          “Back Page” – PCH…………………………………………..….....……. 83

Appendix 7:          “Back Page” – Research Office…………………………………………. 84

Appendix 8:          Departmental New Employee Safety Orientation……………………… 85 – 93

Appendix 9:          Reporting Work Related Incidents, Injuries or Illnesses……………… 94, 95
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                  6

Appendix 10:         First Aid Training and Certification Requirement……………………… 96 – 102

Appendix 11:         Doing Safety Inspections………………………………………………… 103 - 107

Appendix 12:         Workplace Inspection Form……………………………………………... 108 - 113

Appendix 13:         Office Safety Inspection Checklist………………………………………. 114 - 117

Appendix 14:         Laboratory Safety Survey Checklist…………………………………….. 118 - 127

Appendix 15:         Syllabi Additions…………………………………………………………….128
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                       7



                                            SCHOOL OF NURSING
                                           HEALTH & SAFETY PLAN



A. INTRODUCTION:


      1.    Scope:
            The policies and procedures described here apply to all operating units and address site-
            specific safety issues, if applicable. See the attached School of Nursing organization
            chart (Appendix 1).


      2.    Health and Safety Policy:
            This Accident Prevention Program, or Health and Safety Plan, shares the commitment
            of the University of Washington to provide a “safe and healthful environment for all
            individuals associated with the institution, including faculty, staff employees, hospital
            patients, and visitors” (University Handbook Vol. IV, Part VI, Chapter 4). It follows
            UW policy set in the Operations Manual (OPS D 10.3), and is consistent with
            requirements in the Washington State Industrial Safety and Health Act (WISHA) (WAC
            296-24-40 and 296-62) which is administered by the Department of Labor and
            Industries (L&I).


      3.    Responsibility:
            The School of Nursing Dean, Director, Chairs and Supervisors (see Appendix 2) are
            responsible for maintaining safe work practices in their respective units, including
            required health and safety training. We understand that it is University policy that this
            responsibility can neither be transferred nor delegated (University Handbook, Vol. IV,
            Part VI, Chapter 4, Section 1.A).

            Our School requires all employees to comply with health and safety regulations, with
            School of Nursing policies and procedures that apply to their own conduct on the job,
            and to report accidents, injuries, and unsafe conditions to their supervisor.


      4.    Safety Coordinator:
            We have chosen one individual to serve as a Safety Coordinator for each department
            (see “Back Pages” Appendices 3-7). This person has been given adequate authority to
            carry out the following responsibilities:
              Auditing compliance with this Health & Safety Plan
              Updating this Plan, at least annually
              Scheduling employee safety training
              Coordinating with Environmental Health & Safety
              Working with supervisors and employees to resolve safety complaints
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                     8




                 Keeping safety bulletin boards current
                 Maintaining safety records
                 Keeping the department head aware of current safety concerns.



B. FUNDAMENTALS: 8 KEYS

      1.    NEW EMPLOYEE HEALTH AND SAFETY ORIENTATION
            All our new employees, including those that are permanent, temporary, or part-time,
            must receive instruction for the following:
            a. Reporting procedures for fire, police, or medical emergencies;
            b. Evacuation procedures during an emergency;
            c. Location of fire alarm pull-stations and fire extinguishers; Employees using fire
                extinguishers must have previously received training;
            d. Procedures and forms for reporting all accidents and incidents to their supervisors;
            e. Procedures for reporting unsafe conditions or acts to their supervisors, and, when
                possible, taking action to correct unsafe conditions;
            f. Location of first-aid kits and identification of first-aid certified employees;
            g. Description of UW and departmental Hazard Communication Program;
            h. Identification and explanation of all warning signs and labels used in their work
                area;
            i. Use and care of any personal protective equipment they are required to use;
            j. Description of safety training they will be required to attend for their job.

            The following procedures describe how we provide the above instruction, how and
            where records are kept, and what person is responsible for providing training. Samples
            of checklists we use are included (or referenced) here.

            The Safety Coordinators in the School of Nursing are charged with new employee
            instruction and keeping records in their home department/unit. A Department New
            Employee Safety orientation checklist is attached to this plan. (Appendix 8).

            The School of Nursing new employee orientation is based on the generic new
            employee safety orientation checklist which can be found on the EH&S web-site
            www.ehs.washington.edu in the Developing Department Safety Plans section.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                   9



2. EMERGENCY EVACUATION AND OPERATIONS PLAN (EEOP)

    All University employing units must develop procedures for evacuation in an emergency and
    for response to fires, bomb threats, chemical spills, earthquakes, etc. The School of Nursing
    EEOP contains:

            a.     Building floor plans that show safety equipment and exit pathways;
            b.     Evacuation procedures;
            c.     Evacuation assembly point(s);
            d.     Methods for accounting for staff, students, visitors;
            e.     Areas of refuge for mobility-impaired occupants.


            The School of Nursing EEOP is covered by the T-Wing East Section
            which follows:

                                           T-Wing East Section
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                           10




                               Emergency Evacuation and Operations Plan (EEOP


                                             Prevention and Assessment
                                           Environmental Health and Safety
                                               Seattle, WA 98195-4400
                                                Phone: (206) 543-0465
                                                 Fax: (2060 543-3351

                                 T-Wing East Fire Safety Director, Lisa McDonald
                                   University of Washington School of Nursing
                                            Box 357260, Room T303A
                                              Seattle, WA 98195-7260
                                               Phone: (206) 221-2473
                                                Fax: (206) 543-3624
                                           lisamcd@u.washington.edu

                                               Alternate: Brendon Lee
                                               Box 357262, Room T303
                                               Seattle, WA 98195-7262
                                                Phone: (206) 221-4484
                                                 Fax: (206) 543-3624
                                               blee@u.washington.edu

                                   T-Wing East Alternate fire Safety Director
                                                 Kathleen Larson
                                University of Washington Health Sciences Library
                                      Box 357155, Health Sciences Library
                                              Seattle, WA 98195-7155
                                                 Phone: 543-3401
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                  11




Introduction: Environmental Health and Safety Emergency Evacuation and
Operation Plan (EEOP)

Environmental Health and Safety developed this model Emergency Evacuation and
Operation Plan (EEOP) to assist departments that occupy Low-Rise buildings in preparing for
building emergencies as expected and required by University policy, the Seattle Fire Code
and the Washington Administrative Code. This plan is intended for use by multiple
departments that occupy non high-rise facilities and may be completed as a departmental
evacuation plan. A companion document is also available from Environmental Health &
Safety for High-Rise buildings.

It is expected that departments will customize and complete this plan to meet their specific
needs, operations, and locations. Staff from Environmental Health & Safety are available to
assist, but review and dialog among your departments within a fire zone must be part of the
process.

The EEOP model plan was written to correlate with the larger University of Washington
Emergency Operation Plan developed in June of 1994 for campus operations during large
scale or campus-wide emergencies. Copies of the campus plan were distributed to
organizational and department units in a red three-ring binder titled UW Emergency Plan. It
should be at your departmental reference station. Part three of the UW Emergency Plan
contains a guide for departments to develop their own emergency plan. While the model
EEOP incorporates key points of the departmental guide, reviewing the campus plan and
guide may be helpful while completing the attached plan.

Considerable effort has gone into trying to make this plan concise, clear, easy to use, and easy
to implement. If we can be of further assistance, please call Stan Yantis at 543-0465.


                                                   Mark D. Murray, PE
                                                   Manager, Fire Safety Section


2. EMERGENCY EVACUATION AND OPERATIONS PLAN (EEOP)
   HEALTH SCIENCES T-WING EAST - LOW-RISE

 Purpose
            The purpose of this plan is to establish procedures and duties, to promote planning,
            and to establish training for the staff of Health Sciences T-Wing East, for fire and
            other emergency evacuations as required by Article 193 of the Seattle Fire Code, the
            Washington Administrative Code (WAC 296-24-567), and the UW Emergency
            Operations Plan (See Appendix L).
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                   12



   2.2      Scope
            This plan applies to all occupants in the T-Wing East -or- areas occupied by the
            School of Nursing and the Health Sciences Library.

   2.3. Coordination with Other Emergency Plans
        An evacuation and operation plan is a key component in department safety plans
        and University disaster planning and must be coordinated with these other
        emergency/safety plans.

           a.    UW Emergency Operations Plan

                 This plan outlines procedures and duties for obtaining information,
                 communicating with the UW Emergency Operation Center (See Section E.4),
                 responding to non fire building emergencies, and other contingencies that are
                 consistent with the University of Washington’s Emergency Operations Plan for
                 large scale or campus-wide emergencies.

           b.   Other Departmental Emergency Operations Plans

                 This departmental plan has been coordinated as necessary with other
                 departmental plans in the building, specifically that plan developed by
                 T-Wing West Fire Safety Director: Jim Calbreath, T-285 Health Sciences
                 Building, Box 357175, Phone: 206-616-3331, Fax: 543-0531,
                 jcal@u.washington.edu.

     2.4 Coordination With Departmental Health and Safety Plans
         This plan reflects the University’s emergency response procedures and programs and
         satisfies an element of the Departmental Health and Safety Plan required by the
         Department of Labor and Industries (WAC 296-24-567).

           This plan is cross-referenced with School of Nursing and Health Sciences Library
           health and safety plan and other plans as appropriate.



2.5 UNIVERSITY EMERGENCY RESOURCES AND CONTACTS

     2.5.1       UW Police Department

      The University of Washington Police Department (UWPD), at 1117 NE Boat Street in
      the Bryant Building, maintains an emergency Communications Center 24 hours a day, 7
      days a week. To report an emergency of any kind, including but not limited to fire,
      medical emergency, or hazardous material spills or release, dial 9-911 from any
      telephone with a campus prefix. If the phone is a private line, as in residence rooms, or
      a pay phone, the number is 911.
      School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                    13

                  2.5.2             Environmental Health and Safety

                   Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) is available to provide consultation and
                   support for hazardous material spills and releases, temporary controls, and other
                   general information to the Seattle Fire Department (SFD), UWPD, and UW
                   departments during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through
                   Friday. After normal business hours, EH&S may be reached through the UWPD

                          EH&S is not an emergency response unit. Report all emergencies
                          to the UWPD.

                   using the EH&S Duty Officer system.

                  2.5.3.      Facilities Services

                   Facilities Services’ Plant Operations division maintains a 24 hours a day, 7 days a
                   week response unit called the Facility Operations Maintenance Specialists, but
                   known as “FOMS”or “Unit 2”. The FOMS respond automatically to all fire
                   alarms, and other emergencies to provide support for the UWPD and SFD. This
                   support includes, but is not limited to, the operating/resetting of the fire alarm
                   system; operating the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems (HVAC);
                   and the shutdown of steam, water, electrical, and other utilities. FOMS support
                   may be requested through the UWPD.

                  2.5.4             UW Emergency Operation Center

                   For a major local or regional emergency, the UW President may request activation
                   of the University’s Emergency Operation Center (EOC). The location of the EOC
                   is Room 111 of the Bryant Building on 1117 N.E. Boat Street. EOC staff will
                   decide on the use of available resources and communicate with outside agencies
                   and authorities. Information on missing persons, building emergencies, first aid,
                   and other needs must be provided to the EOC through the UWPD by using campus
                   telephone systems (See F. Emergency Communications) or by runner if the
                   telephone systems fail. The secondary EOC location is Lander Hall, Room L-130.

                  2.5.5.      KIRO AM #710 - Official Emergency Broadcast Station

                   KIRO AM #710 is the official area broadcast station in case of major disaster or
                   University closing. Tune into this station for information.

2.6        EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS
           Include other monitored systems such as alarmed equipment and communication needs
           such as radios, cellular phones, runners and the like.

           5.1.        Telephone
      School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                         14

           The campus telephone system will be used to the extent possible. In case of system
           failure or a power failure, campus phones will not function. An alternative in some
           buildings is the emergency single-line phones, which could function in a power outage.
           T-Wing-East personnel will serve as messengers if phone communication is not an
           option.

           If your building is equipped with a backup phone service capable of operating without outside
           power, please identify the equipment, plug locations, and the location of instructions on its use.
           Included in this list should be the location of pay phones as they are part of the Emergency
           Phone System.

           The building fire alarm system is continuously monitored for alarm by a contracted
           service and, in a back up capacity, by the UW Police Department's Communication
           Center. All alarms result in an automatic response by Seattle Fire Department, UW
           Police, and Facility Services FOMS unit.

2.7        EXPECTATIONS FOR DEPARTMENTS AND STAFF

           2.7.1       Employees, Faculty, & Staff are Responsible for:
                       Being familiar with and following EEOP procedures when required.
                 .
            Participating in drills and training as required.
            Orienting and informing students and visitors of procedures to be followed in case of a
            building alarm or emergency. Students should have a brief orientation on the first day
            of class to assure that they are aware that evacuation is required, when the alarm system
            is activated, and that they know where the nearest exits are located. Visitors unfamiliar
            with building procedures should be informed and assisted as appropriate.

           2.7.2. Special Positions

                      The Fire Safety Director, Evacuation Wardens, and their alternates are employees
                      and occupants of the low-rise building and have either volunteered or been


               When the fire alarm sounds, begin immediate evacuation according to the plan.

                      appointed to serve in these positions. They receive special training and the
                      authority for their role in employee safety.

                      In low-rise buildings, the building coordinator is a good choice for the
                      assignment of fire safety director if the plan serves the entire building.
                      Alternately, the departmental administrator or safety chair may be a good
                      choice, particularly if the plan serves a single department.

           2.7.3.      Fire Safety Director Responsibility and Control
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                          15

            a.     The Fire Safety Director acts as the liaison with the responding emergency
                   service, EH&S and others if a building emergency occurs. In their absence,
                   the alternates are responsible for carrying out the requirements. If an
                   emergency happens when these members of the department are not available,
                   the most senior employee will have decision-making authority. A contact
                   person, appointed by the advisor of each research group, is responsible for
                   laboratories and work areas (See Appendixes A and B). Any possible problem
                   areas should be reported to responding emergency personnel.

            b.     For a community-wide event (Level III), the Fire Safety Director or an alternate will
                   establish contact with the UW Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The first
                   location for the EOC is Room 111 of the University of Washington Police
                   Department at 1117 N.E. Boat Street. The secondary location is in room L-135 at
                   Lander Hall. Contact will be established by normal phone system (9-911), single
                   line phones or runners.

            2.7.4.      Fire Safety Director and Alternates Duties

            a.     Prepare and maintain their building’s Emergency Evacuation and Operations Plan
                   (EEOP). EH&S can help with technical questions.

                   (1) A copy of the completed plan should be in all department reference stations.

            b.     Coordinate with building/department administrators responsible for employee,
                   student, and visitor health and safety.

            c.     Assign Evacuation Wardens (and alternates) for all areas of the building and ensure
                   that they know what their duties are in case of an evacuation. Evacuation Warden
                   orientation is required when there are changes of personnel. A current list of
                   Evacuation Wardens and alternates is to be maintained in the building's EEOP (See
                   Appendix A).

                   Formal assignment of Evacuation Wardens may not be necessary in all cases
                   depending upon the nature and occupancy of your building. If your building
                   is relatively non-public, evacuation assurance using Evacuation Wardens may
                   be unnecessary. The role could alternately be assigned to managers and
                   supervisors where appropriate.

            d.     Assure public event staff for events with an occupancy of 300 or greater are
                   assigned duties and receive required training as outlined in Appendix K.

            e.     Assure classroom instructors inform students about emergency procedures,
                   exit routes, and assembly points on the first day of class.

            f.     Schedule Evacuation Warden Training for assigned personnel. Contact the
                   EH&S Training Section.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                          16

            g.     Schedule, conduct, and record fire drills as required by the Seattle Fire Code
                   and WAC 296-24 (See Appendices H, I, J and K).

            h.     Review the emergency plan at least annually and confirm that it is current.

            i.     Assure emergency services, UWPD, FOMS, SFD, and EH&S are notified for
                   all building emergencies as appropriate.

            j.     During a fire alarm, report to the evacuation assembly point and act as a
                   liaison with responding emergency services and do the following:

                         Receive status reports from area evacuation wardens.
                         Provide information about the building layout, systems, processes, and special
                          hazards to Facility Services, SFD, UWPD, and other emergency personnel.
                         Help the Facility Services Personnel (FOMS), and the Seattle Fire Department
                          in the operation of the Fire Alarm Panel if required.
                         Coordinate with key building administrators on building occupation and
                          operation issues.

            Assign Evacuation Wardens or other assigned personnel, as needed, to be
            stationed by all other building entrances to prevent unsuspecting personnel
            from reentering the building. When an "ALL CLEAR" determination is made
            by the fire or police department, the Fire Safety Director notifies the
            Evacuation Wardens that the occupants may reenter the building.

                 Silencing of the alarm is not considered an all clear signal!

     2.7.5         Duties of the Evacuation Warden
            a. Be familiar with the "Emergency Evacuation and Operations Plan"
               (EEOP). It contains the function and activities of building staff during
               many emergencies, how these activities are to mesh with responding
               emergency personnel, information on the building and its emergency
               protection systems, emergency equipment testing procedures, and a list
               of all the evacuation wardens in your building. Your Fire Safety Director
               will have copies of the EEOP available for use.

            b. Distribute copies of the completed plan, or appropriate sections of it, to
               all people in your area of responsibility.

            c.     Know where persons with disabilities are located in your area and what
                   their alarm response will be (See Attachment G). Areas of Refuge or
                   individual rooms may be used by persons with mobility disabilities
                   during a fire alarm. The Areas of Refuge may be identified on your
                   evacuation plans found in Appendix C. If you have a staff member
                   with a mobility disability and cannot find an area of refuge on your floor
                   plan, contact EH&S Fire Safety at 5430465.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                               17

            d.     Coordinate with the other Evacuation Wardens on your floor to work
                   together and avoid duplication of tasks.

            e.     Walk over your primary and secondary evacuation routes at least once
                   to familiarize yourself with emergency exits and routes to the re-
                   assembly area.

            f.     Attend training sessions and meetings to review procedures and
                   duties, if necessary. EH&S and SFD offer Evacuation Warden training
                   sessions regularly.

            g.     Know where hazardous conditions or situations in your area may exist.
                   Know the location of flammable, radioactive and other hazardous
                   materials.

            h.     Know where the phones and pull stations are and know HOW to turn in
                   an alarm.

            i.     Know how the alarm system responds. For most low-rise buildings,
                   the alarm sounds throughout the building and all occupants, except
                   persons with physical disabilities, must evacuate.

     2.7.6.      Instructor’s Responsibility

            a.     Provide his or her class or audience with general information relating to
                   emergency procedures. This information should be shared during the
                   first week of class or at the start of a seminar. Please note the posted
                   information for Classroom Emergency Procedures (See Appendix N).

            b      Know how to report an emergency from the classroom being used.

            c.     Assure that persons with disabilities have the information they need.
                   The instructor should be familiar with the students plan and be able to
                   direct visitors with disabilities.

            d.     Take responsible charge of the classroom and follow emergency
                   procedures for all building alarms and emergencies.


2.8 EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

      2.8.1               Fire - Procedures for Occupants

      When an alarm sounds on your floor or area, begin immediate evacuation
      following your plan (See Appendix C, Building Evacuation Plan). Close doors
      behind you.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                            18

     If you discover a fire, activate the nearest pull station and call 9-911. Then
     you may attempt to put it out if it is small (no larger than a wastebasket) and you
     have called for HELP. If the fire is too large or you are uncomfortable or
     unfamiliar with the proper use of a fire extinguisher, simply close the door and
     evacuate.

     If the fire alarm does not work, call 9-911 and notify occupants verbally of
     the emergency and the need to evacuate. Evacuation Wardens or another
     responsible party needs to confirm that all occupants are notified.


              Remember that hazardous equipment and processes should
              be shut down unless doing so presents a greater hazard.
              Close doors before leaving.


     Evacuate via the nearest stairwell or grade level exit. Do not block/wedge
     exit doors in an open position. The doors must remain closed to keep smoke
     out and keep them safe for evacuation and fire personnel. Leaving doors open
     makes the stairwells dangerous and unusable.          Persons with physical
     disabilities have several options (See Appendix G).


                                       DO NOT USE THE ELEVATORS!


         When an alarm is sounded many of the elevators will be
         automatically recalled to a pre-determined floor and shut-off.




            a.     Go to your pre-determined Evacuation Assembly Point (EAP) as
                   outlined in Appendix C. You may have two or more EAP’s depending
                   on the size of the building.

            b.     At the EAP, account for personnel and report to the Evacuation
                   Wardens if any occupants are unaccounted for and may be trapped.
                   Evacuation Wardens will report to the Fire Safety Director.

            c.     If you are trapped by smoke, stay low, cover your mouth with wet
                   cloth, stay near a window, open it but do not break it, hang something
                   out the window to let fire personnel know you are there and put
                   something in cracks around the door, phone 9-911 if possible.

            d.     Special Instruction for Evacuation Wardens
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                 19

                        Begin at the farthest reach of your area and assure that the
                         occupants ahead of you have evacuated. Conduct a quick search
                         as you go to make sure hazardous equipment is shut off, doors are
                         closed and no one is left behind. If there is smoke in the hall, stay
                         low, cover your mouth with a damp cloth or handkerchief, visualize
                         where the exits are, stay close to and use the wall to guide you so
                         you do not become confused. If there is no smoke, you may have
                         trouble getting people to evacuate, be strong, positive and insist.
                         Students and visitors who may not be familiar with this plan must
                         be informed of the requirement to evacuate.

                        Direct occupants to the exits and tell them where to reassemble
                         (See Appendix C). If you have helpers, station them in front of the
                         elevator to make sure no one attempts to use it. Do not go to the
                         roof unless it is the only way out, there are too many obstructions
                         for a helicopter rescue. If the stair is full of smoke go to another
                         stair.

                        Do not allow the stairway doors and other exit doors to be
                         blocked/wedged open (See H.1.d). Leaving stairway doors blocked
                         or held open makes the stairwells dangerous and unusable.

                        Special attention needs to be given to any persons with disabilities,
                         in particular those who are visitors and unfamiliar with the building.
                         A process is necessary to ensure they are notified and accounted
                         for. See Appendix G for further details.


     2.8.2       Bomb Threats

                 University personnel receiving telephoned threats should attempt to get
                 the exact location where the bomb has been planted, or is going to be
                 planted. Also, attempt to get as much information as possible about the
                 caller, for example, male or female, accent, etc. Listen for any
                 background noise that may indicate the location of the caller. The
                 checklist below shows the information that can aid in locating a bomb.
                 Complete the checklist as soon as possible after receiving a threatening
                 call and report it immediately to the University Police Department at 9-
                 911 (TDD 543-3323). Bomb threats received through the mail or by
                 other means are also to be reported immediately to the University Police
                 Department.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                   20




     Exact time of call_________________________________________________
     Exact words of caller______________________________________________
     QUESTIONS TO ASK
     1. When is the bomb going to explode?_______________________________
     2. Where is the bomb?____________________________________________
     3. What does it look like?__________________________________________
     4. What kind of bomb is it?_________________________________________
     5. What will cause it to explode?_____________________________________
     6. Did you place the bomb?________________________________________
     7. Why?________________________________________________________
     8. Where are you calling from?______________________________________
     9. What is your address?__________________________________________
     10. What is your name?___________________________________________
     CALLER’S VOICE (circle) Male          Female
     Calm           Disguised           Nasal       Angry      Broken
     Stutter        Slow                Sincere     Lisp       Rapid
     Giggling       Deep                Crying      Squeaky    Excited
     Stressed       Accent              Loud        Slurred    Normal
     If voice is familiar, whom did it sound like? ___________________________
     Were there any background noises?__________________________________
     Person receiving call:______________________________________________
     Date:_______________Telephone number call received at:________________
           REPORT CALLS IMMEDIATELY TO: UWPD AT 9-911 or 543-9331
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                            21



     2.8.3       For Chemical Spills or Release

            a.     Spills that do not endanger workers in the immediate area may be cleaned
                   up by laboratory personnel who have been trained by their PI or lab
                   supervisor and are properly equipped to handle the situation. Chemical
                   spill guidelines should be established by the PI or lab supervisor and
                   should take into consideration the following:

                   (1)    The hazards of the chemical(s) involved.
                   (2)    The amount of the chemical(s) spilled.
                   (3)    The possible spill locations.
                   (4)    Availability of spill clean up materials or kits.*

                   *      (See Section III.B.7 of the Laboratory Safety Manual for help in
                          assembling a spill clean up kit.)

            b.     If the spill is large, if the chemical is not easily identified, or if the chemical
                   is extremely hazardous, then:

                   (1) Evacuate all personnel from the area.
                   (2) Report:
                           Main Campus UW Police          - Dial 9911
                           Harborview                     - Dial 3000
                           UW Medical Center              - Dial 9911
                   (3) When placing an emergency call:
                         Give your name.
                         Give your location (room and building).
                         Give the phone number you are using.
                         Describe the emergency/injuries.
                         If possible, remain in vicinity, away from danger, to assist emergency responders.

            c.     The UW Police will notify the Seattle Fire Department who will respond to
                   stabilize and contain the chemical spill, often leaving behind hazardous
                   waste and contaminated equipment. If the hazardous waste is not
                   properly cleaned up and packaged by the Seattle Fire Department, do not
                   reoccupy the area. Contact Environmental Health & Safety at 5430467
                   for assistance.

                   Please note that packaged waste must be handled according to policies
                   and guidelines established in the UW Hazardous Waste Management
                   Guide (Part II. of the Laboratory Safety Manual). Please Contact the
                   EH&S Chemical Waste Group at 6852848 for assistance.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                    22


     2.8.4        Earthquakes


                                           Drop, Cover, and Hold

            a.     If indoors, get under a sturdy table or desk, into a corner away from
                   windows, or into a structurally strong location such as a hall by a pillar.
                   Watch for falling objects such as light fixtures, bookcases, cabinets,
                   shelves, and other furniture that might slide or topple. Stay away from
                   windows. Do not run outside.

            b.     During or immediately following an earthquake do not run for exits since
                   they may be damaged and the building’s exterior brick, tile, and
                   decorations may be falling off.

            c.     Do not use the elevators either during or following an earthquake, and use
                   the telephone system only for urgent matters.

            d.     When the shaking stops
                   1. Check for injuries to personnel in your immediate area. Do not
                      attempt to move seriously injured persons unless they are in
                      immediate danger. If you are trained to do so, render first aid
                      assistance to those seriously hurt unless you feel that your own safety
                      would be jeopardized by your efforts. If you are trapped, injured, or
                      rendering aid, notify your floor safety warden of your situation.

                   2.     Check for fires or fire hazards spills of flammable or combustible
                          liquids, or leaks of flammable gases. If there is a fire or spill, activate
                          fire alarm.


                   3.     Shut off or unplug all gas and heating sources, if applicable, and only
                          if it is safe to do so.

            If the earthquake was severe enough to result in Drop, Cover, and
            Hold (D, C, & H) then exit the building and check-in.

                   4.     Exit the building and go to the assembly point [see your Emergency
                          Evacuation route and Assembly Point(s)] to report to your floor safety
                          warden on injuries, damages, and potentially hazardous conditions.
                          The Safety Warden will report to the Safety Director who will call or
                          send a runner to the Emergency Operations Center to notify them of
                          any needed assistance and emergencies that may exist. Also report
                          to and check in with your Safety Warden before you leave the area.
                          Once you have exited the T-Wing due to a potential asbestos release,
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                  23
                          do not reenter until your floor and/or area of the t-wing has been
                          declared “officially” reopened.


                   5.     If you are unable to exit the building, go to the top of the stairwell or
                          another place of refuge, as defined by the evacuation plan.


                   6.     Evacuation Wardens are responsible for walking through their
                          assigned areas, assisting in evacuations, and reporting to the
                          emergency assembly point. These activities must not significantly
                          delay departure from the building or put the Evacuation Warden in
                          danger.


                    7.    Personnel should know the location of first aid kits, fire alarms, and
                          extinguishers. The names of employees with current first aid skills
                          are available to all departmental personnel (Appendices 2-7 – “Back
                          Pages”). Faculty members, lecturers, and teaching assistants have
                          special responsibilities to their students during an emergency
                          evacuation (see Appendix 15).

                    8.    Nursing faculty and staff are strongly encouraged to supply their own
                          emergency evacuation kits that can be kept in close proximity to their
                          daily workspace.

                    9.    At a minimum, each department or academic unit should have first aid
                          supplies, water, flashlights, and other essential supplies in case of an
                          earthquake.



     2.9.       EMPLOYEE ORIENTATION
                New employees must be informed of the EEOP as part of their new
                employee safety orientation. This initial plan and all significant revisions to
                the plan should be routed to all personnel. The faculty and staff should be
                reminded of the plan as necessary and encouraged to discuss the plan with
                their research groups, students, and visitors. To assure the safety of all
                building occupants, the Fire Safety Director and Evacuation Wardens will
                work together to assure all departmental employees are aware of the plan,
                and that students and visitors are also oriented as indicated in G.5.l

   2.10         FIRE EXIT DRILLS
                Evacuation drills will be scheduled, conducted, and recorded by the Fire
                Safety Director. Procedures for planning, scheduling, conducting, critiquing,
                recording, and reporting fire drills are outlined in Appendices H, I, J and K.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                       24

                                                  Appendix A

                                           EEOP Responsible Individuals
Appendix
A. FIRE SAFETY DIRECTOR AND ALTERNATES

     1.     Fire Safety Director for T-Wing East

                   Don Berg
                   Faculty Support Services Coordinator
                   T-314B
                   (206) 221-2419
                   bergd@u.washington.edu

     2.     Alternates for the Fire Safety Director

            For each alternate include the following information:

                   Kathleen von der Hofen
                   Library Supervisor
                   Health Sciences Library)
                   (206) 685-2449
                   kvdh@u.washington.edu

B. EVACUATION WARDENS

T-Wing East Location                            Name                  Email Address
1st Floor Primary                               George Liu            gyliu@u.washington.edu
1st Floor Primary                               Vacant
1st Floor Alternate                             Cecil Mancebo         cmancebo@u.washington.edu
1st Floor Alternate                             Vacant
2nd Floor Primary                               Hilary Carkeek        hilary@u.washington.edu
2nd Floor Primary                               Vacant
2nd Floor Alternate                             Lori Tschirhart
 nd
2 Floor Alternate                               Vacant
3rd Floor Library Primary                       Vacant
 rd
3 Floor Library Alternate                       Vacant
3rd Floor SoN Primary                           Dagmar Schmidt        dagmar@u.washington.edu
3rd Floor SoN Primary                           Sharon Nilsen         snilsen@u.washington.edu
3rd Floor SoN Alternate                         Sally Bomar           sbomar@u.washington.edu
3rd Floor SoN Alternate                         Donna Nichols         dnichols@u.washington.edu
4th Floor SoN Primary                           Mark Squire           msquire@u.washington.edu
T-Wing East Location                            Name                  Email Address
4th Floor SoN Alternate                         Marie Annette Brown   mabrown@u.washington.edu
4th Floor SoN Alternate                         Cathy Lindenberg      clindenb@u.washington.edu
5th Floor SoN Primary                           Candace Brummet       candaceb@u.washington.edu
 th
5 Floor SoN Primary                             Laura Mason           sparkys@u.washington.edu
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                          25
5th Floor SoN Alternate                    Vacant
5th Floor SoN Alternate                    Vacant
5th Floor SoN Primary                      Brian Pankow       pankowb@u.washington.edu
5th Floor SoN Primary                      Daniel Olson       dolson@u.washington.edu
6th Floor SoN Primary                      Laurie Rossnagel   rnagel@u.washington.edu
6th Floor SoN Primary                      Cliff Solomon      csolomon@u.washington.edu
6th Floor SoN Alternate                    Beth Hacker        bhacker@u.washington.edu
6th Floor SoN Alternate                    Bob Perigo         bperigo@u.washington.edu
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                            26



                                           Appendix B

    EEOP Unusually Hazardous Locations and Key Laboratory Personnel
                              (Optional)

The following areas have been identified as unusually hazardous locations. The first
responsibility in case of an emergency is getting yourself to safety. If time permits, it is
recommended that all hazardous processes, gas and power in these areas be shut
down by the operator before evacuating the building.

List unusually hazardous locations, who the Principal Investigator and lab contacts are
for each location and how to contact them.

List Effective this Date: 13 February 2001

Labs T-629, 630, 632, 636, 638, 640 and 658 managed by Coralie Baker @ 543-0306
See the Lab Safety Manuals in T-640 for SOPs and documentation of the 2/13/2001
Safety inspection conducted by EH&S.

An annual report is distributed by EH&S. The most recent copy is in the Fire and
Safety Plan.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                   27



                                               Appendix C
                                      EEOP Building Evacuation Plans
Appendix
The evacuation plans should be used as a guide in developing evacuation procedures
for all building occupants. Evacuation routes should be available for review by
employees and posted at various locations. Contact EH&S Fire Safety Section, at 543-
0465, for building evacuation floor plans or assistance in identifying assembly points.

Fire exit drills are necessary to refine the evacuation procedure.

A.   EVACUATION PLANS

     The attached floor plans identify exits and exit routes for the building. Occupants
     should go to the nearest exit when the alarm sounds. If access to the nearest exit
     is obstructed, the alternate exit should be taken.

B. ASSEMBLY POINTS

     Establish inside and/or outside assembly points for your building. Indicate each
     floor’s designated assembly point(s) on or below the floor plan.

     1.     Inside Assembly Point

            a.     If occupants work on floors four or more levels above grade and,

            b.     If the building is designed for partial evacuation (ie. only fire floor and floor
                   above alarm), then

            c.     Occupants should have an inside assembly point four floors below their
                   floor of origin.

     2.     Outside Assembly Point

            The assembly point should be an open area away from the building and out of
            the way of responding emergency personnel. Occupants meet after
            evacuation so that they may be accounted for or lend assistance as needed.
            There may be more than one assembly point depending on the size of the
            building and the location of the exits.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                          28




                                   EEOPAppendix G
                    Emergency Evacuation for Persons With Disabilities
Appendix
General
This appendix provides a general guideline of evacuation procedures for persons with
disabilities, which would make exiting difficult, during fire and other building
emergencies. Faculty, staff, students and visitors with disabilities must develop their
own facilities’ evacuation plans and identify their primary and secondary evacuation
routes from each building they use.

   Be familiar with evacuation options.

   Seek evacuation assistants who are willing to assist in case of an emergency.

   Ask supervisors, instructors, Disabled Student Services, or Environmental
    Health & Safety about evacuation plans for buildings.

Most UW buildings have accessible exits at the ground level floor that can be used
during an emergency. In buildings like the Health Sciences Center or Padelford Hall,
people can move into the unaffected wings of the building rather than exiting. However,
in most UW buildings people will need to use stairways to reach building exits.
Elevators cannot be used because they have been shown to be unsafe to use in an
emergency and in some buildings they are automatically recalled to the ground floor.

Evacuation Options
Persons without disabilities must evacuate to the nearest exit. Persons with disabilities
have four basic evacuation options.

   Horizontal evacuation: using building exits to the outside ground level or going into
    unaffected wings of multi-building complexes.

   Stairway evacuation: using steps to reach ground level exits from the building.

   Stay in Place: unless danger is imminent, remaining in a room with an exterior
    window, a telephone, and a solid or fire-resistant door. With this approach, the
    person may keep in contact with emergency services by dialing 9-911 and reporting
    his or her location directly. Emergency services will immediately relay this location
    to onsite emergency personnel, who will determine the necessity for evacuation.
    Phone lines are expected to remain in service during most building emergencies. If
    the phone lines fail, the individual can signal from the window by waving a cloth or
    other visible object.

The Stay in Place approach may be more appropriate for sprinkler protected buildings
or buildings where an Area of Refuge is not nearby or available. It may also be more
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                          29
appropriate for an occupant who is alone when the alarm sounds. A solid or fire-
resistant door can be identified by a fire label on the jam and frame.

   Non-labeled 1 3/4 inch thick solid core wood doors hung on a metal frame also offer
    good fire resistance.

   Area of Refuge: with an evacuation assistant, going to an area of refuge away from
    obvious danger. The evacuation assistant will then go to the building evacuation
    assembly point and notify the on-site emergency personnel of the location of the
    person with a disability. Emergency personnel will determine if further evacuation is
    necessary.
    Usually, the safest areas of refuge are pressurized stair enclosures common to high-
    rise buildings, and open air exit balconies. Other possible areas of refuge include:
    fire-rated corridors or vestibules adjacent to exit stairs, and pressurized elevator
    lobbies. Many campus buildings feature fire rated corridor construction that may
    offer safe refuge. Taking a position in a rated corridor next to the stair is a good
    alternative to a small stair landing crowded with the other building occupants using
    the stairway. For assistance in identifying areas of refuge, call EH&S, Fire Safety at
    543-0465.

    For false or needless alarms or an isolated and contained fire, a person with a
    disability may not have to evacuate. The decision to evacuate will be made by the
    Seattle Fire Department (SFD). The SFD will tell the individual their decision or
    relay the information via the University of Washington Police Department (UWPD).

Disability Guidelines
Prior planning and practicing of emergency evacuation routes are important in assuring
a safe evacuation.

Mobility Impaired Wheelchair
Persons using wheelchairs should stay in place, or move to an area of refuge with their
assistant when the alarm sounds. The evacuation assistant should then proceed to the
evacuation assembly point outside the building and tell SFD or UWPD the location of
the person with a disability. If the person with a disability is alone, he/she should phone
emergency services at 9-911 with their present location and the area of refuge they are
headed to.

If the stair landing is chosen as the area of refuge, please note that many campus
buildings have relatively small stair landings, and wheelchair users are advised to wait
until the heavy traffic has passed before entering the stairway.

Stairway evacuation of wheelchair users should be conducted by trained professionals
(SFD). Only in situations of extreme danger should untrained people attempt to
evacuate wheelchair users. Moving a wheelchair down stairs is never safe.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                           30


Mobility Impaired Non Wheelchair
Persons with mobility impairments, who are able to walk independently, may be able to
negotiate stairs in an emergency with minor assistance. If danger is imminent, the
individual should wait until the heavy traffic has cleared before attempting the stairs. If
there is no immediate danger (detectable smoke, fire, or unusual odor), the person with
a disability may choose to stay in the building, using the other options, until the
emergency personnel arrive and determine if evacuation is necessary.

Hearing Impaired
Some buildings on campus are equipped with fire alarm strobe lights; however, many
are not. Persons with hearing impairments may not hear audio emergency alarms and
will need to be alerted of emergency situations. Emergency instructions can be given
by writing a short explicit note to evacuate.
Reasonable accommodations for persons with hearing impairments may be met by
modifying the building fire alarm system, particularly for occupants who spend most of
their day in one location. Persons needing such accommodation should contact
Disability Services Office (See reverse).

Visually Impaired
Most people with a visual impairment will be familiar with their immediate surroundings
and frequently traveled routes. Since the emergency evacuation route is likely different
from the commonly traveled route, persons who are visually impaired may need
assistance in evacuating. The assistant should offer their elbow to the individual with a
visual impairment and guide him or her through the evacuation route. During the
evacuation the assistant should communicate as necessary to assure safe evacuation.

Resources
The information provided in this appendix is also available in a brochure entitled,
Campus Health and Safety Emergency Evacuation for Persons With Disabilities. These
guidelines are designed to complement the University Emergency Plan Departmental
Planning Guide, and to provide general information and promote planning. If you have
any questions or would like copies of the brochure, call Environmental Health & Safety,
Fire Safety Section at 543-0465, or the Disabled Student Services Office at 543-8924
(V/TDD).

This brochure can be made available in alternate formats for persons with disabilities.
Please contact the Disability Services Office with any requests at least 10 days in
advance. 543-6450 (voice); 543-6452 (tty); 685-3885 (fax); access@u.washington.edu
(e-mail). Revision 5/96.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                              31



                                           Appendix H

               EEOP Procedures for Planning and Scheduling Fire Drills
Appendix H for Planning and Scheduling Fire H for Planning and Scheduling H for
A. PREPARATION

     1.     Meet with Fire Safety Director and Evacuation Wardens to:

            a.     Review procedures, duties, evacuation routes as outlined in the plan.
            b.     Determine who will participate in the drill.
            c.     Confirm participants are familiar with the plan.
            d.     Establish a date and time for drill that is convenient but assures
                   appropriate participation.

     2.     Notification and Technical Assistance

            a.     Call Physical Plant’s Signal Shop Supervisors at 685-2758 to arrange for a
                   technician to activate the alarm system and reset it after the drill.
            b.     Notify UWPD of the time and date of the drill.
            c.     For assistance in conducting and critiquing the drill, notify EH&S Fire
                   Safety at least one week in advance at 543-0465 (optional).

     3.     Publicize Drill Event to Building Occupants

            Approximately three days before the drill post notices in conspicuous locations
            informing all occupants of the time and date of the drill. Notification via e-mail
            and other means is also encouraged.

B. DAY BEFORE DRILL

     1.     Prepare any Special Props for the Drill (optional)

            a.     Cardboard flames or balloon for location of fire.
            b.     Cardboard smoke barriers to indicate blocked corridors and/or stairways.

     2.     Confirm Responsibility Roles with Players

            a.     Building staff (Fire Safety Director and Evacuation Wardens).
            b.     Plant Operations to activate the alarm system.
            c.     EH&S Fire Safety or other third party observer (optional).
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                       32

                                                Appendix I

                                  EEOP Low Rise Building Procedures
                                                     for
                       Conducting, Critiquing and Recording Fire Drills

A.   CONDUCTING THE FIRE DRILL

     1.     Participation

            The Washington Administrative Code 296-24-567 requires that all employees
            train a sufficient number of persons to assist in safe and orderly emergency
            evacuation of employees. To meet this requirement and satisfy public safety
            for all faculty, staff, students, and visitors, University low-rise buildings must
            conduct a fire drill that will include the participation of all the building
            occupants. It is recommended that the annual drill be conducted during
            Autumn Quarter to orient new faculty, staff and students.

     2.     Alarm Activation and Evacuation

            a.     Special props, if used, should be installed just prior to activating the alarm.

            b.     A building wide alarm will be initiated by Plant Operations personnel upon
                   request of the Fire Safety Director. An “all call” announcement indicating
                   that this is a drill will be made prior to activation of the speakers and
                   strobes as follows:

                          “A building wide fire drill will commence in the next few minutes. This
                          is only a drill but it requires full participation. If you are unfamiliar with
                          fire drill procedures, please ask your colleague or other building
                          occupant”.

            c.     Evacuation of all occupants should follow in accordance with established
                   procedures (See H and Appendix C).

            d.     Evacuation Wardens must report to their area of responsibility.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                           33




B. CRITIQUING THE DRILL

     The following should be verified by the Evacuation Wardens and Fire Safety
     Director:

                   X      Evacuation Wardens responded to assigned floor or area and performed assigned
                          duties.
                   X      Staff could hear clearly and respond to the alarm and any additional instructions.
                   X      Evacuation Wardens accounted for missing occupants, guided occupants to safety,
                          completed floor checks and reported to the Fire Safety Director.
                   X      Persons with disabilities were accounted for and helped.
                   X      No one attempted to use elevators for evacuation.
                   X      Occupants reported to nearest stair or exit and proceeded to an evacuation assembly
                          point where applicable.
                   X      Occupants who exited did not reenter prematurely.

C.   RECORDING THE DRILL

                   X      The Fire Safety Director will summarize critique comments and initiate appropriate
                          follow-up for items that need improvement.
                   X      The Fire Safety Director will complete and distribute the Fire Drill Report Form
                          (attached).
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                  34


                                         Appendix K
                        EEOP Assembly Occupancies Procedures for
                       Conducting, Critiquing and Recording Fire Drills
Occupancies Procedures for Conducting, Critiquing and Recording Fire Drill

A.   CONDUCTING THE FIRE DRILL

     1.     Participation

            Seattle Fire Code, Article 14, requires employees (event staff) of public
            assemblies with an occupancy of 300 or greater participate in fire drills or
            related activity at least every quarter (not to exceed 120 days). Patrons are
            not required to attend or participate. To meet this requirement assembly
            occupancies will:

            a.     Every quarter or prior to the event for athletic and other seasonal events,
                   the building Emergency Coordinator, or appointee, will meet with event
                   staff to conduct a drill or exercise to review employee procedures and
                   duties.


            b.     A drill, exercise, or orientation will be performed whenever there is a
                   change in staff, building/exit configuration, or other substantive change.

     2.     Set up and Alarm Activation

            a.     Special props, if used, should be installed just prior to performing the drill.

            b.     An assembly drill may be performed at the same time as a comprehensive
                   building fire drill, or independently. If conducted as part of a larger
                   building drill using the fire alarm system, Plant Operations personnel must
                   first bypass the fire alarm panel so the Fire Department doesn’t respond to
                   an activated alarm system. If the drill is performed independently,
                   activation of the alarm system may not be possible without disrupting the
                   balance of the building. In this case, the audible alarm may be simulated.

            c.     Staff, ushers, stagehands and other associated staff should report to their
                   area of responsibility. Requesting a small number of other persons to
                   simulate patrons may be helpful in making the drill more realistic.

     3.     Evacuation Procedures

            The following procedures should be simulated as practical for fire drills:

             a.     As the alarm sounds, or upon instruction, begin evacuation. Staff, ushers,
                    and stagehands should promptly assist patrons and players from the
                    facility in a safe and orderly fashion.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                                35


            b.     Keep people moving calmly, yet quickly. No one should be allowed to run.
                   Assist those individuals with special needs.

            c.     Use all exits. Prop exterior exit doors open to help facilitate evacuation.
                   Outdoor lighting will encourage and help speed the evacuation of patrons.
            d.     Keep patrons informed of the situation. Have a prepared evacuation
                   message to help convey appropriate evacuation instruction and take
                   pressure off staff.

            e.     Instruct people to move away from the building to a predetermined
                   evacuation assembly point.

            f.     Prevent people from re-entering the building. (Patrons may re-enter the
                   building only after the building has been declared safe by the Fire
                   Department). Silencing the alarm should not be considered an all-
                   clear signal.

            g.     Meet the fire department. The building emergency coordinator or event
                   designee should meet the arriving fire department to inform them of the
                   situation and assist them as needed.

            h.     Account for personnel as practical and identify a single location for
                   patrons who have become separated from their parties to reunite.

B. CRITIQUING THE DRILL

     The following should be considered in evaluating the drill:

                   X      Did staff know the layout of the building?
                   X      Did staff respond promptly as outlined above?
                   X      Were all exits used?
                   X      Is staff familiar with how to activate the fire alarm system?
                   X      Is staff familiar with the evacuation procedures specific to this facility?
                   X      Were all occupants accounted for?
                   X      Is staff familiar with how to notify emergency services?
                   X      Was a prepared evacuation statement read or available?
                   X      Was the alarm audible?




C. RECORDING THE DRILL
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                      36
The Emergency Coordinator will complete and distribute the Fire Drill Report Form
(attached), record performance using critique questions above and on the form, and
initiate appropriate follow-up for items, which need improvement.
 School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                                 37

                                                 Appendix L
                                                   EEOP
                                            University of Washington
                                            Fire Drill Report Form
                                 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY


Building Name                                                   Facilities Services Building No.

High-Rise       Residential     Assembly Day Care Low-Rise Other
Address

Fire Safety Director or Building Administrator/Coordinator
IMPORTANT

Verify that all procedures for preparing and conducting fire drills have been completed. Do not activate the alarm on
your own!
Fire Drill alarm activation must be done by Facilities Services.
Device Activated (location)                      Time Initiated                            Time Completed

Areas Alarmed

Floor Wardens/Staff reported to assigned              YES
areas and performed duties.                           NO        If NO, Which floors or areas did not:


Floor Wardens/Staff reported the following to the Fire Safety Director or Building Administrator/Coordinator:

1. Occupants/staff exited using the nearest exit                      YES        NO
2. Occupants/staff responded and reported to Assembly Point           YES        NO
3. Persons with disabilities are accounted for      NA                YES        NO
4. Visitors and students were properly directed     NA                YES        NO
5. Accounted for missing or trapped personnel                         YES        NO
6. The alarm was audible throughout the area                          YES        NO
7. No premature reentry                                               YES        NO


Comments on all NO marks. Include additional remarks about the drill.


SIGNATURES
___________________________________________________________________________________________

Drill                                                conducted                                                   by:
_____________________________________________________________________________
Fire Safety Director or Building Administrator/Coordinator or designated employee

Drill witnessed by: ____________________________________________________________

Seattle Fire Department Representative (optional)
Environmental Health and Safety (optional)
UoW 1213 Send copy to EH&S Fire Safety, Box 354400
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                          38



                                           Appendix M
                                             EEOP
                   About the UW Emergency Operations Plan (EOP)
Appendix M the UW Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) the UW Emergency UW
                Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) UW Emergency Operations Plan UW
                Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) the UW the UW Emergency
                Operations Plan (EOP) UW Emergency Operations Plan (EOP)
In June of 1994, the University of Washington published its comprehensive EOP for
campus operation during large scale or campus-wide emergencies. Copies of the
campus EOP were distributed to organizational and departmental units in a red, three
ring binder titled UW Emergency Plan and should be in their primary Reference Station.
The following is a summary of UW Emergency Operations Plan.

First, it is important to point out that this EOP does not cover specific departmental
operations, even for those departments assigned emergency response functions. All
departments must establish their own emergency operations plan that considers its
specific needs and how it will interface with the UW EOP. Part Three of the UW
Emergency Plan contains a guide for departments to develop their own plan.

The UW EOP has been developed to provide for a coordinated and integrated campus-
wide response to emergencies.

This plan is designed to function in coordination with other existing emergency
response plans, such as the plan for the UWMC and the City of Seattle.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                            39




                                           Appendix N

    EEOP Classrooms and Teaching Laboratories Emergency Procedures
                                   for
              Faculty, Lecturers, and Teaching Assistants


Instructor’s Responsibility

“Because of the personal nature of safety performance, everyone with supervisory
responsibility will be expected to directly participate in the supervision of programs to
assure that safe working conditions are maintained. Faculty and staff shall be directly
responsible for their own safety, for the safety of students and employees under their
supervision; and for the safety of their fellow employees. This responsibility can neither
be transferred nor delegated. Supervisors shall provide training for accident prevention
as necessary, for those working under their direction”.

Ref: "University Handbook", Vol. 4; Part VI; Chapter 4, University Safety Programs;
Section 1, Statement of Policy and Responsibilities (Executive Order No. 55 of the
President, last revision April 1994).

Consistent with this order, instructors must:

   Provide his or her class or audience with general information relating to emergency
    procedures. This information should be shared during the first week of class or at
    the start of a seminar. Please note the posted information for “Classroom
    Emergency Procedures”.
   Know how to report an emergency from the classroom being used.
   Assure that persons with disabilities have the information they need. The instructor
    should be familiar with the student’s plan and be able to direct visitors with
    disabilities.
   Take responsible charge of the classroom and follow emergency procedures for all
    building alarms and emergencies.

Supplemental Information

As an instructor, what do I need to know about Emergency Preparedness?

Every University department and unit should have a written Emergency Plan covering
specific procedures for their facility and employees. These plans will cover events such
as: fire, earthquake, power outage, bomb threat, hazardous material spills, severe
weather, etc. Instructors will find it helpful to review the plans for the buildings in which
they teach to see if the plans differ from the general information provided here.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                 40




The “Instructor” is an authoritative figure for the student, either consciously or
subconsciously, and can influence how the student responds in an emergency. Calm,
collected, and clear directions by the instructor will have a calming effect on the

students. In order for the instructor to exhibit this controlled personae he or she must
be prepared for emergencies.

   1.       EVACUATION ROUTES - The University is in the process of posting floor
            plans on building walls showing evacuation routes. Check your classroom(s)
            to see if the plans are posted. If you have trouble finding copies of the floor
            plan, call EH&S Fire Safety at 543-0465.

   2.       EMERGENCY ASSEMBLY POINTS - After the class leaves the alarmed
            building or area, it is important for them to go to a pre-determined area where
            the presence of persons can be documented. This “safe area” will be a
            designated Emergency Assembly Point where the class will not interfere with
            responding emergency services nor place themselves at risk of injury from the
            emergency. Evacuation routes in most University buildings lead the occupants
            out the building. However, in some high-rise buildings the evacuation routes
            may lead occupants horizontally into another wing or down a couple of floors
            below the source of the alarm. These high-rise buildings may have
            Emergency Assembly Points for both inside and outside the building.

            Look on the building evacuation route floor plans for the designated
                 Emergency Assembly Points.

            Accounting for all students can be very difficult, particularly with a large class.
            However, an attempt must be made. For example, it might be possible for the
            instructor to: wait until all the students have left the room/lab, use the class
            roster, use a head count, or have students see if the students seated next to
            them are at the assembly point. You must also account for persons with
            disabilities (See below).

     3.     EVACUATION FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES - If there is a person
            with a disability in the class, the instructor must be knowledgeable of their
            response and who may be assisting them. Four options are available to
            persons with disabilities:

                  Horizontal Evacuation to outside or another building, if available.
                  Stairway Evacuation.
                  Stay in Place unless danger is imminent.
                  Area of Refuge if available.

                   Elevators cannot be used during an emergency evacuation!
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                             41
See the Campus Health and Safety Emergency Evacuation for Persons With
Disabilities for additional information. Copies of the brochure (attached) are available
from EH&S Fire Safety at 543-0465.


   4.       REPORTING TO FIRE SAFETY DIRECTOR - After exiting and accounting for
            students, the building Fire Safety Director will notify emergency personnel of
            persons missing or trapped or persons with disabilities that are waiting
            assistance in areas of refuge. Note: a MHSC emergency staff member will be
            at FCC West to relay information to emergency crews on evacuation status.

   5.       FIRE ALARMS - Fire alarms will sound a slow WHOOP and include strobe
            lights for people with hearing disabilities. When the alarm sounds, everyone
            must exit the alarmed area according to the evacuation plan.

                  Everyone Must Evacuate Immediately!

                 Procedures that may be hazardous if left unattended should be shut down.
                 Verify that everyone leaves and that all the doors are closed. Closed doors
                  significantly reduce fire and smoke damage.

   6.       EARTHQUAKES - Most of the injuries that occur during earthquakes are
            caused by interior items falling on the building occupants, such as books,
            shelves, light fixtures, ceiling tiles and office equipment. Consequently, the
            first thing to do during an earthquake is to have everyone drop to the floor,
            cover their head, and hold that position. After the shaking stops and if there
            is building damage, tell the class to collect their possessions calmly and
            evacuate the building to the Emergency Assembly Point. Caution them to
            watch for brick and other exterior building materials that may have been
            knocked loose by the earthquake.

                   Procedures that may be hazardous if left unattended should be shut
                       down.

   7.       WHAT TO EXPECT IN A POWER OUTAGE - The University campus power
            system is served by the Campus Power Plant with back up from City Light and,
            over time, has proven to be fairly reliable, even during major windstorms.
            Many campus buildings are provided with emergency or standby power from
            the campus power plant’s emergency generators. This system is automatic
            and should be operational within 60 seconds. Consequently, if the power does
            go out during class, have the people stay in their seats for a little while and
            wait for the power to return. If the power does not return in a reasonable
            length of time (~ 5 minutes) then evacuate the classroom or laboratory.
            Evacuation should take advantage of available lighting unless the building is in
            alarm, then use the same evacuation procedures as during a fire. Caution
            students that there is no rush and they should take their time exiting the
            building. Emergency lighting may or may not be functioning in the room,
            hallway, or stairways.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                              42




   8.       HOW TO REPORT AN EMERGENCY - Check each classroom, lecture hall,
            or laboratory for the nearest working telephone, the nearest life safety (fire)
            alarm pull station, and the nearest fire extinguisher.

            a.     Fire                            Activate Fire Alarm Pull Station
                   and if possible -                   Call 9-911
            b.     Health/Police -                     Call 9-911
            c.     Hazardous Material Spill -          Call 9-911
            d.     Facility or Utility Failure -       Call 5-1411

            What Emergency Preparedness materials should I have with me at class?

                         Roster
                         Important telephone numbers (in addition to Emergency numbers)
                          Department Administrator/Manager:
                          Kimberly Sims                    (206) 616-3905
                          Classroom Services               (206) 543-6729
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                             43


                                  Classroom Emergency Procedures


         1.      When you hear the fire alarm...
                   Everyone should calmly collect their coats and books and exit the
                    classroom, lecture hall, or laboratory. Please turn off the gas supplies in
                    laboratories.
                   Leave the room/lab and go the nearest building exit. Know the location
                    of alternate exits.

         * The elevators cannot be used during a fire alarm!

                        Go to the Emergency Assembly Point (See the posted floor plan in the
                         exit corridors). Exception: Persons with disabilities may choose to
                         remain in place or report to an area of refuge. See the University
                         brochure, Campus Health and Safety, Emergency Evacuation for
                         Persons With Disabilities.

         2.      When there is a power outage...
                   Everyone should stay in their seat to see if the outage is temporary and
                    to let their eyes adjust to the lower light level.
                   If the outage appears to be long term, everyone should calmly collect
                    their materials and carefully exit the building.

         3.      If there is an earthquake...
                    Drop and Cover your head for protection from material that might fall
                       from the ceiling or walls.
                    After the shaking stops, calmly evacuate the building. Plans can be
                       found posted on walls.
                    Note: Additional information on emergency procedures, evacuation
                       routes, and floor plans can be found posted on walls.


BUILDING EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

FIRE ALARM
    Sounding Slow Whoop
    Evacuate Alarmed Area Immediately!              EXIT to designated Evacuation
      Assembly Point and wait for instructions – See posted floor plan or as directed
      by instructor
    Elevators cannot be used!
    If disabled and cannot use stairs, go to Area of Refuge or other safe location
      – See instructor for brochure or call EH&S at 543-0465

REPORTING FIRES
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                        44


   Activate nearest Fire Alarm Pull Station
AND
   CALL 9-911 if possible

HEALTH/POLICE EMERGENCIES
   Call 9-911 or if you are alone and cannot get to a telephone, use a Fire Alarm Pull
     Station

EARTHQUAKE
   Duck and Cover – Do not leave room until shaking stops

OTHER EMERGENCIES
Hazardous Spill or Release, Power Outage, or Other Events – Await instructions from
your instructor



  A guide for developing a departmental EEOP can be found at the EH&S web-site
  www.ehs.washington.edu. (Click on Developing Department Safety Plans) or by
  calling 543-0465. WISHA requires an employer to develop an emergency action
  plan that includes most of the points found in this guideline.

           All department staff must be trained in the EEOP. If an employee moves to a
           new location, the EEOP must be reviewed for the new work-site.




                                           Appendix O
    School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                                 45


                                   Earthquake Drill Evacuation Evaluation Form


 Circle your response to the questions below.0 = lowest rating, 10 = highest rating
   1.         Understanding of written earthquake evacuation policies and procedures in plan?
               0         1           2         3       4       5       6       7       8       9       10

               Comments_________________________________________________
               __________________________________________________________

   2.           Degree to which evacuation drill followed written policies and procedures?

                   0         1           2         3       4       5       6       7       8       9    10

               Comments_________________________________________________
               ___________________________________________________________

   3.           Adequacy of communication with the evacuation wardens?
                   0         1           2         3       4       5       6       7       8       9    10

               Comments:__________________________________________________
               ___________________________________________________________

   4.          Adequacy of communication with evacuating faculty and staff?

                   0         1           2         3       4       5       6       7       8       9    10

               Comments:_______________________________________________________
                          ______________________________________________________
   5.          Adequacy of evacuation assembly points for evacuating faculty and staff?

                   0         1           2         3       4       5       6       7       8       9    10


               Comments_________________________________________________
               ___________________________________________________________
               ___________________________________________________________

   6.          Clarity of evacuation assembly points for evacuating faculty and staff?
                   0         1           2         3       4       5       6       7       8       9    10


               Comments_________________________________________________
               ___________________________________________________________

   7.          Other                                                           comments:
               ____________________________________________________________________
               ____________________________________________________________________

B. Fundamentals: 8 Keys (cont’d)
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                              46



     3. Accidents:
        a. Medical Emergencies:
           All medical emergencies must be reported to the nearest Emergency Medical
           Services (EMS). Our department uses the following method to summon
           EMS help. (Non-campus facilities also need to indicate here how
           emergency services are summoned to their location.)
                 Call 9-911

           b. Report form to Supervisor:
              All accidents and near misses must be reported to the employee’s supervisor
              as soon as possible. Near misses are valuable opportunities to correct
              unsafe situations, which under slightly different circumstances, would result
              in serious injury. The form “Incident / Accident / Quality Improvement
              Report” (see Appendix 9) may be filled out by the employee, the supervisor,
              or both. How to get the appropriate version of blank form is explained on the
              EH&S web-site www.ehs.washington.edu (click on “Services” and then
              “Accident/Incident Reports”). Copies of completed forms are distributed to
              the departmental safety coordinator.

                                           Reporting Work Related Incidents,
                                                  Injuries or Illnesses

                Why Report ?

                 The Washington State Department of Labor and Industries requires
                 employers to record work related injuries and illnesses. The University of
                 Washington also finds that data and information contained in the records of
                 incidents, injuries, and illnesses are essential to maintain an efficient and
                 successful safety program. They supply the facts necessary to develop
                 programs and procedures that can control both the conditions and acts that
                 contribute to incidents.

                 Supervisors should make a detailed report about each incident, even if only a
                 minor injury or no injury is the result. Minor injuries occur in greater numbers
                 than serious injuries and records of these injuries can help to pinpoint
                 problem areas.

                 How Do I Report ?

                 Supervisors should complete the incident report as soon as possible after an
                 incident occurs. The relevant incident report form should be used and mailed
                 to the appropriate office. Details about the forms and where they should be
                 sent are summarized in the following table:
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                          47


                   Work Location           Form          Mail to       Call for Assistance




                 University                UoW 1428       Box 354400        543-7388

                 UWMC                      UH 0266        Box 356380        598-6303

                 HMC                       UH 0266        Box 359706        731-8744

                 Dental School             UoW 1119       Box 357131        543-3510

                 Bothell Campus            UoW 1428       Box 358525        352-5359

                 Tacoma Campus             UoW 1428       Box 358400        552-4400



            With input from the affected parties, supervisors should record on the form a
            description of the event, the causes contributing to the incident, and the
            recommended precautionary and protective measures to prevent reoccurrence.

            If the incident results in the death, probable death, or hospitalization of an
            employee or student, the Environmental Health and Safety Department (EH&S)
            must be notified immediately at 543-7262. After office hours, contact EH&S by
            calling the UW Police at 543-9331 and ask that the EH&S Duty Officer be paged.
            By law, EH&S must report such information to the Department of Labor and
            Industries within eight hours.

            Who Else Needs to Know ?

            Motor vehicle accidents occurring on campus must be reported to UW Police at
            543-9331.

            For possible exposures to blood borne pathogens, follow the department’s
            specific procedures, notify your supervisor and contact the area employee health
            nurse.


           HMC Kathy Maher/Sheri Ivey                731-3081
           UWMC/Campus Farrish Sharon                 598-4848
           Where Can I Get the Form ?

            UWMC and HMC supervisors can order form UH 0266 by completing the UWMC
            Requisition for Purchasing and Services Form (UHO 459).
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                              48



            Dental School supervisors can obtain form UoW 1119 from Clinical Affairs at
            543-3510.

            For all other University departments, supervisors may get form UoW1428 on this
            web page or by calling EH&S at 543-7388. Follow the instructions on the form
            regarding who should have a copy of the report.

            What If I Want to Make a Workers’ Compensation Claim?

            University employees and volunteer workers whose work related injury or illness
            requires medical treatment and/or time loss from work may be eligible for
            Washington State Workers’ Compensation coverage and benefits. The affected
            party may go to the physician of his/her choice. Be sure to tell the health care
            provider that the injury or illness is work related, so that a “Report of Industrial
            Injury or Occupational Disease” form can be completed to initiate a claim.

            The form contains a worker information section to be completed by the injured
            employee. A physician section is to be completed by the treating physician who
            is responsible for mailing the form to the University of Washington Risk
            Management Office. Risk Management completes the employer section of the
            form and mails it to the Department of Labor and Industries.

            In order to be eligible for consideration for Workers’ Compensation, injuries must
            be reported within one year. Diseases must be reported within two years after
            receiving written notice from a doctor that the condition exists and is work
            related.

            The UW Risk Management Office (543-0183) manages all UW Workers’
            Compensation claims.

           c. Investigation:
              All accidents and near accidents must be investigated by the supervisor who
              then summarizes the details and corrective measures in the above report.
              EH&S and the department’s organizational safety committee review the
              report. Assistance from EH&S is available by calling 543-7388.

     4. First Aid and CPR Access:
        Quick and effective first-aid for an injured University employee results from the
        availability of strategically located first-aid kits and first-aid/CPR certified
        individuals whenever department staff are working. Adequate employee access
        to these resources is addressed in this section.


           a. Department First Aid
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                               49


                 Consistent with the UW First Aid Response Plan (see Appendix 10 OPS
                 Manual D 10.5), certified first-aid and CPR assistance is available to
                 department employees by:

                 Calling 9-911 and requesting emergency first aid/CPR. For 6th floor
                 laboratories, Martha Lentz is first aid/CPR certified.


                 Related department training requirements are addressed later in section C.4
                 First Aid and CPR Training. Names and phone numbers of employees who
                 are first-aid/CPR certified are listed on the “Back Page” of this document


           b. First Aid Kits
              Locations and sizes of first-aid kits in our department are listed below. First-
              Aid Kits are inspected periodically so they can be restocked before running
              out of an item. Names and phone numbers of employees responsible for
              first-aid kits are listed on the “Back Pages” of this document. The Safety
              Coordinators.

     5. Safety Problems: Reporting and Resolving:
        Employees are encouraged to report safety concerns to their supervisor. If
        employees do not feel they can do this, or have done so and do not feel the
        problem has been resolved, they may discuss the situation directly with their
        safety coordinator or safety committee representative. Assistance from EH&S is
        available, if needed, to resolve a problem. Safety problems may be reported on
        the same form as accidents/incidents.

     6. Safety Meetings: Supervisor Leadership
        Supervisors can promote health and safety in formal safety meetings or in regular
        staff meetings, but either way, discussion of safety issues needs to be
        documented. Health & Safety issues are discussed at staff and/or faculty
        meetings for which minutes are kept and returned by the department/unit Safety
        Coordinator.

     7. Health & Safety Committee Participation:
        Health & Safety Committees at three organizational levels help determine unsafe
        conditions and procedures, suggest corrective measures, and obtain the
        participation of all UW personnel. Fifty percent (or more) of the representatives
        are elected by employees and fifty percent (or less) are appointed by
        management. Safety issues may originate at any level. Health & Safety
        Committees are required by Washington State regulation (WAC 296-24-045). A
        listing of committees and current members may be found at the EH&S web-site:
        www.ehs.washington.edu (click on Safety Committees).

           a. Department Health and Safety Committees
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                              50


                 Departmental Health & Safety Committees deal with “front line” issues.
                 Large departments may especially benefit from this centralized approach to
                 health and safety issues, even though safety committees at this level are
                 optional. In addition to providing a pathway for communication between
                 different sections, committees involve employees in the process of identifying
                 and resolving safety issues. Our School of Nursing

                        does not have a formal health and safety committee. Instead, health and
                         safety issues are discussed in staff meetings by Safety Coordinators
                         (see section B.6).

           b. Organizational Health and Safety Committees
              The University system is divided into eleven organizational groupings, each
              one represented by an Organizational Health and Safety Committee. This
              committee deals with issues the members may have in common but can
              handle more effectively together. Each elected member represents all
              organizational units of the group, including his/her own. Unresolved issues
              may be referred to this committee from departmental committees. Our
              School is represented on the Group # 4 HS Complex Health & Safety
              Committee.

                 Our current representatives are identified on the “Back Pages” of this
                 document.

           c. University-wide Health and Safety Committee
              In addition, to provide consistency and oversight, a University-wide Health
              and Safety Committee has been established. Its members come from the
              official organizational committees. Safety issues referred to this level are
              relevant to the entire University community. The member(s) who currently
              represent us from the Group # 4 Organizational Health & Safety Committee
              are listed on the “Back Page” of this document.

   8. Safety Bulletin Boards
      Our departmental safety bulletin boards are used for posting WISHA posters,
      safety notices, safety newsletters, safety committee minutes, training schedules,
      safety posters, accident statistics, and other safety education material. They are
      located in Room T-603 for BNHS; Room T-523 for PCH; T408 for FCN; and
      T310 for Dean’s office where all employees, students, and visitors can see them
      (WAC 296-24-055) and at all University reference stations.
C. ACCIDENT/ILLNESS PREVENTION: 6 KEYS:

     1. Identification of hazards:
        This is the foundation for our Accident Prevention Program. The boxes we have
        checked in the following chart, “Typical Work-site Hazards or Preventive
        Measures,” indicate health and safety concerns present in our own
        department/academic units.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                           51


               We consulted knowledgeable staff to identify possible hazards.
               We reviewed records of past injuries to understand their causes.
               We developed Laboratory Safety Manuals for our laboratories (including
                Chemical Hygiene Plans) if required.
               We visited all work areas, and examined processes from beginning to end in
                order to record possible hazardous situations.
               We developed inspection checklists (see section C.3 below).
               We applied recommendations from inspectors outside our department, such
                as EH&S.
               We consulted the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapters 296-24
                and 296-62 for General Safety and Health Standards and Occupational
                Health Standards established by the State Department of Labor and
                Industries (L&I), as well as the University of Washington Operations Manual,
                D 10.3.
               We performed Job Hazard Analyses (JHA). (See below)



A Job Hazard Analysis may be performed in the following way:

        Review job injury and illness reports (including “close calls”) to determine
         which jobs to analyze first.
        Involve employees in all phases of the analysis. Explain to workers that you
         are studying the job, itself, not checking up on them.
        Review work plans for an overview of job activities.
        First note deficiencies in general conditions, such as inadequate lighting,
         noise, or tripping hazards that may not be directly related to the job.
        Break the job down into steps in the order of occurrence.
        Examine each step to determine hazards that exist or might occur.
        Determine whether the job could be performed in another way or whether
         safety equipment or precautions are needed.
        If safer job steps can be used, write new procedures to describe specifically
         what the worker needs to know to perform them.
        Determine if any physical changes will eliminate or reduce the danger (e.g.
         redesigned equipment, different tools, machine guards, personal protective
         equipment or ventilation).
        If hazards are still present, try to reduce the necessity or frequency for
         performing the job.
        Review recommendations with all employees performing the job.
        Review and update the job hazard analysis periodically, especially if an
         accident occurs in that job.


Typical Worksite Hazards or Preventive Measures Chart Instructions
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                      52


         Any safety item in the chart, “Typical Worksite Hazards or Preventive
         Measures,” (on the next page) must be included in a safety plan if the hazard
         exists in your workplace. Place checkmarks in the left column to indicate
         the ones you need to evaluate and develop methods to reduce the hazard.
         Section C.2 Reduction of Hazards explains how to do this. Mitigation steps
         follow each department’s checklist.

         The most common hazards are at the top of the chart and the least common
         are at the bottom, but it’s a good idea to consider them all at first. The
         columns on the right indicate the degree to which hazards are likely to be
         present in a particular type of workplace (4 subjective levels), but more than
         one column may apply if the workplace functions in different ways.

         If you can’t decide whether a hazard is present or not, please contact EH&S
         for help.
     School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                           53


Check All          1.1 FCN Worksite Hazards                               Class-   Hosp. /
That Apply
                     or Preventive Measures                     Offices   rooms    Clinics   Labs   Shops
                              Applies: A=Almost Always, B=Commonly, C=May Apply, Blank=Rarely Applies
   X         Emergency Procedures: Fire, Other (EEOP)           A         A        A         A      A
   X         Earthquake Preparedness                            A         A        A         A      A
   X         Housekeeping Hazards                               A         A        A         A      A
   X         Slip/Trip Hazards                                  A         A        A         A      A
   X         Electrical Equipment & Wiring                      A         A        A         A      A
   X         Emergency Escapes (Egress) Maintained/Unlocked     A         A        A         A      A
   X         Obstruction-Free Aisles                            A         A        A         A      A
   X         Stacks of Stored Materials (Stable/Secure)         A         A        A         A      A
   X         Temperature Extremes: Heat/Cold Stress             A         A        A         A      A
   X         HazCom Right-To-Know (Written Program In Place)    A         A        A         A      A
   X         Air Contaminants, Dusts, "Inert" Gases, Vapors     A         A        A         A      A
   X         Asbestos (Present or Handled)                      A         A        A         A      A
   X         Lifting >20 lbs.                                   A         A        A         A      A
   X         Repetitive Motion, Ergonomics                      A         B        A         A      A
             Motor Vehicles                                     A         A        B         B      A
   X         Hand or Portable Power Tools                       B         B        A         A      A
             Ladders                                            B         B        A         A      A
   X         Knives or Cutting Blades                           B         C        A         A      A
             Compressed Gas or Equipment                                  A        A         A      A
   X         Hazardous Waste                                    C         A        A         A      A
             Haz-Mat Spills: Operations, Emergency Response               A        A         A      A
             Hazardous Materials Stored/Shipped/Transported     C         B        A         A      A
             Laboratory Chemicals                                         B        A         A      A
             Radioactive Materials Used or Stored                         A        A         A
             Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)                C         B        A         A      A
             Respirator Protection, Workplace Evaluations                 B        A         A      A
             Bloodborne Pathogens/Biohazards/Infectious Waste             B        A         A      B
             Welding, Cutting, Brazing                                    B        A         A      A
             Machinery (Machine Guards)                                   B        B         A      A
             Lock-Out/Tag-Out                                             C        A         B      A
             Confined Work Spaces / Oxygen-Deficiency                              A         C      C
             Steam or Autoclaves                                          C        A         A
             Lasers or UV Light                                           C        B         A      A
   X         Flammable Liquids (Handled or Stored)                        C        B         A      A
             Formaldehyde (Handled or Stored)                                      B         A      C
   X         Carcinogens                                                           B         A      A
             Lead or Benzene (Handled or Stored)                                   C         A      A
             Animals (Handled or Kept)                                    C                  A
             Loud Noise                                                                      A      A
             Vibration From Tools/Machinery                                                  A      A
             Heights > 4 Ft. (Possible Falls)                   C         C        C         A      A
             Cranes, Hoists, Derricks, Rigging                            C        C         A      A
             Powered Platforms (Personal Lifts)                           C        C         C      A
             Forklifts                                                                       C      A
             Scaffolds                                                    C        C         C      B
             Excavation, Trenching or Shoring Activities
             BBQs
             Food Handling                                                         C
             Diving
   X         Hot Water
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                            54


Check All         1.2 PCH Worksite Hazards                                Class-   Hosp. /
That Apply
                    or Preventive Measures                      Offices   rooms    Clinics   Labs    Shops
                           Applies: A=Almost Always, B=Commonly, C=May Apply, Blank=Rarely Applies
   X         Emergency Procedures: Fire, Other (EEOP)           A         A        A         A      A
   X         Earthquake Preparedness                            A         A        A         A      A
   X         Housekeeping Hazards                               A         A        A         A      A
   X         Slip/Trip Hazards                                  A         A        A         A      A
   X         Electrical Equipment & Wiring                      A         A        A         A      A
   X         Emergency Escapes (Egress) Maintained/Unlocked     A         A        A         A      A
   X         Obstruction-Free Aisles                            A         A        A         A      A
   X         Stacks of Stored Materials (Stable/Secure)         A         A        A         A      A
   X         Temperature Extremes: Heat/Cold Stress             A         A        A         A      A
   X         HazCom Right-To-Know (Written Program In Place)    A         A        A         A      A
   X         Air Contaminants, Dusts, "Inert" Gases, Vapors     A         A        A         A      A
   X         Asbestos (Present or Handled)                      A         A        A         A      A
   X         Lifting >20 lbs.                                   A         A        A         A      A
   X         Repetitive Motion, Ergonomics                      A         B        A         A      A
             Motor Vehicles                                     A         A        B         B      A
             Hand or Portable Power Tools                       B         B        A         A      A
             Ladders                                            B         B        A         A      A
             Knives or Cutting Blades                           B         C        A         A      A
             Compressed Gas or Equipment                                  A        A         A      A
             Hazardous Waste                                    C         A        A         A      A
             Haz-Mat Spills: Operations, Emergency Response               A        A         A      A
             Hazardous Materials Stored/Shipped/Transported     C         B        A         A      A
             Laboratory Chemicals                                         B        A         A      A
             Radioactive Materials Used or Stored                         A        A         A
             Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)                C         B        A         A      A
             Respirator Protection, Workplace Evaluations                 B        A         A      A
             Bloodborne Pathogens/Biohazards/Infectious Waste             B        A         A      B
             Welding, Cutting, Brazing                                    B        A         A      A
             Machinery (Machine Guards)                                   B        B         A      A
             Lock-Out/Tag-Out                                             C        A         B      A
             Confined Work Spaces / Oxygen-Deficiency                              A         C      C
             Steam or Autoclaves                                          C        A         A
             Lasers or UV Light                                           C        B         A      A
             Flammable Liquids (Handled or Stored)                        C        B         A      A
             Formaldehyde (Handled or Stored)                                      B         A      C
             Carcinogens                                                           B         A      A
             Lead or Benzene (Handled or Stored)                                   C         A      A
             Animals (Handled or Kept)                                    C                  A
             Loud Noise                                                                      A      A
             Vibration From Tools/Machinery                                                  A      A
             Heights > 4 Ft. (Possible Falls)                   C         C        C         A      A
             Cranes, Hoists, Derricks, Rigging                            C        C         A      A
             Powered Platforms (Personal Lifts)                           C        C         C      A
             Forklifts                                                                       C      A
             Scaffolds                                                    C        C         C      B
             Excavation, Trenching or Shoring Activities
             BBQs
             Food Handling                                                         C
             Diving
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                                   55


Check All That Apply
                                       1.3 3rd Floor                                    Class-   Hosp. /
                                  or Preventive Measures                      Offices   rooms    Clinics        Labs   Shops
                                           Applies: A=Almost Always, B=Commonly, C=May Apply, Blank=Rarely Applies
    X                  Emergency Procedures: Fire, Other (EEOP)              A          A        A          A          A
    X                  Earthquake Preparedness                               A          A        A          A          A
    X                  Housekeeping Hazards                                  A          A        A          A          A
    X                  Slip/Trip Hazards                                     A          A        A          A          A
    X                  Electrical Equipment & Wiring                         A          A        A          A          A
    X                  Emergency Escapes (Egress) Maintained/Unlocked        A          A        A          A          A
    X                  Obstruction-Free Aisles                               A          A        A          A          A
                       Stacks of Stored Materials (Stable/Secure)            A          A        A          A          A
                       Temperature Extremes: Heat/Cold Stress                A          A        A          A          A
                       HazCom Right-To-Know (Written Program In Place)       A          A        A          A          A
    X                  Air Contaminants, Dusts, "Inert" Gases, Vapors        A          A        A          A          A
    X                  Asbestos (Present or Handled)                         A          A        A          A          A
    X                  Lifting >20 lbs.                                      A          A        A          A          A
    X                  Repetitive Motion, Ergonomics                         A          B        A          A          A
                       Motor Vehicles                                        A          A        B          B          A
                       Hand or Portable Power Tools                          B          B        A          A          A
                       Ladders                                               B          B        A          A          A
    X                  Knives or Cutting Blades                              B          C        A          A          A
                       Compressed Gas or Equipment                                      A        A          A          A
    X                  Hazardous Waste                                       C          A        A          A          A
                       Haz-Mat Spills: Operations, Emergency Response                   A        A          A          A
                       Hazardous Materials Stored/Shipped/Transported        C          B        A          A          A
                       Laboratory Chemicals                                             B        A          A          A
                       Radioactive Materials Used or Stored                             A        A          A
                       Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)                   C          B        A          A          A
                       Respirator Protection, Workplace Evaluations                     B        A          A          A
                       Bloodborne Pathogens/Biohazards/Infectious Waste                 B        A          A          B
                       Welding, Cutting, Brazing                                        B        A          A          A
                       Machinery (Machine Guards)                                       B        B          A          A
                       Lock-Out/Tag-Out                                                 C        A          B          A
                       Confined Work Spaces / Oxygen-Deficiency                                  A          C          C
                       Steam or Autoclaves                                              C        A          A
                       Lasers or UV Light                                               C        B          A          A
                       Flammable Liquids (Handled or Stored)                            C        B          A          A
                       Formaldehyde (Handled or Stored)                                          B          A          C
    X                  Carcinogens                                                               B          A          A
                       Lead or Benzene (Handled or Stored)                                       C          A          A
                       Animals (Handled or Kept)                                        C                   A
    X                  Loud Noise                                                                           A          A
                       Vibration From Tools/Machinery                                                       A          A
    X                  Heights > 4 Ft. (Possible Falls)                      C          C        C          A          A
                       Cranes, Hoists, Derricks, Rigging                                C        C          A          A
                       Powered Platforms (Personal Lifts)                               C        C          C          A
                       Forklifts                                                                            C          A
                       Scaffolds                                                        C        C          C          B
                       Excavation, Trenching or Shoring Activities
                       BBQs
                       Food Handling                                                             C
                       Diving
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                            56


Check All        1.4 BNHS Worksite Hazards
That Apply
                                                                          Class-   Hosp. /
                    or Preventive Measures                      Offices   rooms    Clinics   Labs    Shops
                           Applies: A=Almost Always, B=Commonly, C=May Apply, Blank=Rarely Applies
   X         Emergency Procedures: Fire, Other (EEOP)           A         A        A         A      A
   X         Earthquake Preparedness                            A         A        A         A      A
   X         Housekeeping Hazards                               A         A        A         A      A
   X         Slip/Trip Hazards                                  A         A        A         A      A
   X         Electrical Equipment & Wiring                      A         A        A         A      A
   X         Emergency Escapes (Egress) Maintained/Unlocked     A         A        A         A      A
   X         Obstruction-Free Aisles                            A         A        A         A      A
   X         Stacks of Stored Materials (Stable/Secure)         A         A        A         A      A
             Temperature Extremes: Heat/Cold Stress             A         A        A         A      A
             HazCom Right-To-Know (Written Program In Place)    A         A        A         A      A
   X         Air Contaminants, Dusts, "Inert" Gases, Vapors     A         A        A         A      A
   X         Asbestos (Present or Handled)                      A         A        A         A      A
   X         Lifting >20 lbs.                                   A         A        A         A      A
   X         Repetitive Motion, Ergonomics                      A         B        A         A      A
             Motor Vehicles                                     A         A        B         B      A
             Hand or Portable Power Tools                       B         B        A         A      A
             Ladders                                            B         B        A         A      A
   X         Knives or Cutting Blades                           B         C        A         A      A
             Compressed Gas or Equipment                                  A        A         A      A
             Hazardous Waste                                    C         A        A         A      A
             Haz-Mat Spills: Operations, Emergency Response               A        A         A      A
             Hazardous Materials Stored/Shipped/Transported     C         B        A         A      A
             Laboratory Chemicals                                         B        A         A      A
             Radioactive Materials Used or Stored                         A        A         A
             Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)                C         B        A         A      A
             Respirator Protection, Workplace Evaluations                 B        A         A      A
             Bloodborne Pathogens/Biohazards/Infectious Waste             B        A         A      B
             Welding, Cutting, Brazing                                    B        A         A      A
             Machinery (Machine Guards)                                   B        B         A      A
             Lock-Out/Tag-Out                                             C        A         B      A
             Confined Work Spaces / Oxygen-Deficiency                              A         C      C
             Steam or Autoclaves                                          C        A         A
             Lasers or UV Light                                           C        B         A      A
             Flammable Liquids (Handled or Stored)                        C        B         A      A
             Formaldehyde (Handled or Stored)                                      B         A      C
             Carcinogens                                                           B         A      A
             Lead or Benzene (Handled or Stored)                                   C         A      A
             Animals (Handled or Kept)                                    C                  A
             Loud Noise                                                                      A      A
             Vibration From Tools/Machinery                                                  A      A
   X         Heights > 4 Ft. (Possible Falls)                   C         C        C         A      A
             Cranes, Hoists, Derricks, Rigging                            C        C         A      A
             Powered Platforms (Personal Lifts)                           C        C         C      A
             Forklifts                                                                       C      A
             Scaffolds                                                    C        C         C      B
             Excavation, Trenching or Shoring Activities
             BBQs
             Food Handling                                                         C
             Diving
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                             57


Check All       1.5 Research Worksite Hazards                              Class-   Hosp. /
That Apply
                    or Preventive Measures                       Offices   rooms    Clinics   Labs        Shops
                              Applies: A=Almost Always, B=Commonly, C=May Apply, Blank=Rarely Applies
   X         Emergency Procedures: Fire, Other (EEOP)           A          A        A         A           A
   X         Earthquake Preparedness                            A          A        A         A           A
   X         Housekeeping Hazards                               A          A        A         A           A
   X         Slip/Trip Hazards                                  A          A        A         A           A
   X         Electrical Equipment & Wiring                      A          A        A         A           A
   X         Emergency Escapes (Egress) Maintained/Unlocked     A          A        A         A           A
   X         Obstruction-Free Aisles                            A          A        A         A           A
   X         Stacks of Stored Materials (Stable/Secure)         A          A        A         A           A
             Temperature Extremes: Heat/Cold Stress             A          A        A         A           A
   X         HazCom Right-To-Know (Written Program In Place)    A          A        A         A           A
   X         Air Contaminants, Dusts, "Inert" Gases, Vapors     A          A        A         A           A
   X         Asbestos (Present or Handled)                      A          A        A         A           A
   X         Lifting >20 lbs.                                   A          A        A         A           A
   X         Repetitive Motion, Ergonomics                      A          B        A         A           A
             Motor Vehicles                                     A          A        B         B           A
             Hand or Portable Power Tools                       B          B        A         A           A
   X         Ladders                                            B          B        A         A           A
   X         Knives or Cutting Blades                           B          C        A         A           A
             Compressed Gas or Equipment                                   A        A         A           A
   X         Hazardous Waste                                    C          A        A         A           A
   X         Haz-Mat Spills: Operations, Emergency Response                A        A         A           A
   X         Hazardous Materials Stored/Shipped/Transported     C          B        A         A           A
             Laboratory Chemicals                                          B        A         A           A
             Radioactive Materials Used or Stored                          A        A         A
             Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)                C          B        A         A           A
             Respirator Protection, Workplace Evaluations                  B        A         A           A
             Bloodborne Pathogens/Biohazards/Infectious Waste              B        A         A           B
             Welding, Cutting, Brazing                                     B        A         A           A
             Machinery (Machine Guards)                                    B        B         A           A
             Lock-Out/Tag-Out                                              C        A         B           A
             Confined Work Spaces / Oxygen-Deficiency                               A         C           C
             Steam or Autoclaves                                           C        A         A
             Lasers or UV Light                                            C        B         A           A
   X         Flammable Liquids (Handled or Stored)                         C        B         A           A
             Formaldehyde (Handled or Stored)                                       B         A           C
   X         Carcinogens                                                            B         A           A
             Lead or Benzene (Handled or Stored)                                    C         A           A
             Animals (Handled or Kept)                                     C                  A
             Loud Noise                                                                       A           A
             Vibration From Tools/Machinery                                                   A           A
   X         Heights > 4 Ft. (Possible Falls)                   C          C        C         A           A
             Cranes, Hoists, Derricks, Rigging                             C        C         A           A
             Powered Platforms (Personal Lifts)                            C        C         C           A
             Forklifts                                                                        C           A
             Scaffolds                                                     C        C         C           B
             Excavation, Trenching or Shoring Activities
             BBQs
             Food Handling                                                          C
             Diving

             Note: See T640 Lab Manuals for Wet Lab
             Hazards
     School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                           58



2.      REDUCTION OF HAZARDS
        2.1 FCN Office Safety Inspection Remediation Checklist

      General departmental:                                  Mitigation:
      Need step stool/small ladder for access to high        Get departmental step stool
      shelves                                                Have problems detailed above fixed
      No computers/peripherals are secured to prevent        Secure computers \
      falling                                                Written Haz-Com Program
      during EQ                                              Record keeping for new employee training
      Surplus furniture in hall                              Clean air ducts and vents; adjust air flow rates?
      Need T-Wing east fire wardens                          Ergonomic training – all
      Uneven temperatures – south hall vs north hall         MSDS for all products
      Cardboard piled by recycle                             Schedule pick—up from surplus BEFORE moving
      Air quality                                            items into hall
                                                             New employee safety training – review for all
                                                             Staff CPR training
                                                             More frequent pickup of recycling bin in hall
                                                             Find acceptable and affordable way to secure
                                                             books
                                                             Appoint fire wardens




     Room                    Inspection Outcome             Correction                Updated
                                                            Needed
          401                Bolt Cabinet                   Bolt
          403                Reference Station books by
                             desk are unsecured
          403B               Heavey plant on high shelf     Move
                             Fan on top of cabinet          Move
          405
          405A               Books
                             Storage boxes                  Move
                             Organize computer cording      Tie Strips
     405B                    Books
                             Bolt cabinet
     405C                    Tie up cord                    Tie strips
         407                 Bolt file cabinet              Bolt
     407A                    Chair blocking exit            Move
         409                 Storage room area
                             Create path around equipment   Move
                             Secure rolling carts           Secure
            411              Rug is tripping hazard         Secure
            411A             Rug is tripping hazard         Secure
                             Books
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                          59

     413                Bolt cabinet in outer office     Bolt
     413A               Books
                        File cabinet drawer blocks       Move
                        passage
     413B               Books
     413C               Books
     413D               Books
     413E               File cabinet might block exit    Move
     415                Cabinet                          Bolt
     415A               Books
     415B               Books
                        Move chair by door               Move
   415C                 Books
   415D                 Books
   415E                 Books
   417                  Bolt cabinets                    Bolt
   417A                 Books
   417B                 Books
                        Fan on high shelf                Secure
                        Office heat
   417C                 Sticky door lock
   419                  Desk strip loose
                        Bolt bookcases                   Bolt
   423                  No key
   425
   425A                 Clear shelf over cot
   425B                 Ok
   425C                 Books
   425D                 Ok
   425E                 OK
   427                  No key
   402                  Books
                        Bolt cabinet                     Bolt
   402A                 Books
                        Bolt cabinet                     Bolt
   406
   406A                 Kitchen/Lunchroom

                        Hot water – better warning

                        Toaster
                        Microwave
                        Cleaning supplies –label: MSDS   Locate
                        Bolt cabinet                     Bolt
                        Bolt refrigerator                Bolt
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                          60

                        Knives                           Covers
                        Glass on open shelves by sink    Move
                        Secure rolling carts
                        Has fire extinguisher
   408                  Workroom
                        Shredder – finger guard
                        Paper cutter – blade guard
                        Copy machine and printer inks    Locate
   410                                                   Locate
   410A                 Books
   410B                 Books
   410A                 Books
   410C                 Bolt cabinet                     Bolt
   410D                 Ok
   410E                 Ok
   412A                 Ok
   412B                 Notebooks on high shelf
   412C                 Move file cabinet (door block)   Move
   416A                 Ok
   416B                 Bolt bookcase                    Bolt
                        File cabinet
                        Books
   416C                 Books
                        File cabinet too near door       Move
   416D                 Books
   416E                 Bolt bookcase
   418                  Books
                        Plant                            Secure
   418B                 File cab could block door
                        Glass on shelves
                        Secure vase
   418C                 Ok
   418D                 Books
   418E                 Books
   424                  Bolt bookcase
   428                  Bolt room divider                Bolt
                        Bolt book cases                  Bolt
                        Rolling table/chair block exit   Move
                        Can’t check inside offices
   432                  Bolt room divider                Bolt
   436                  Bolt tall cabinet                Bolt
   436A                 Bolt bookcases
   438                  Books
                        Bolt bookcases                   Bolt
   School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                   61




2.2. PCH OFFICE SAFETY REMEDIATION LIST


   Building: Health Sciences                              Inspector: Candace Brumett

   Room Number: T502-T529                                 Date Inspected: February, 2001

   Department/Unit Psychosocial & Comm                    Supervisor: Bobbie Berkowitz,
   Hlth                                                   Chair
   (Check if completed)
   Administrative                                                              Comments   Correction
                                                                                          Date
      1.      Is the departmental Health and Safety Plan in a location Yes                
               known and accessible to all employees?
       2.     Is there a Safety Corner/Bulletin Board established with         Yes       
               the following displayed (in terminology and language
               understood by the employees)?
               - WISHA Posters (available from EH&S, 543-7262)                 Yes
               - The Emergency Phone Number poster                             Yes
               - Other health and safety material/information                  Yes
       3.     Are training records maintained and available for review         Yes       
               by employees, EH&S, and outside agencies?
      4.      Are departmental safety inspection reports and                   Yes       
               corrections maintained and available for review by
               employees, EH&S, and outside agencies?
       5.     Are Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) and an                   Yes       
               inventory sheet of all office products used in the
               workplace on file and accessible to employees?
       6.     Does the departmental Emergency Operations Plan                  Yes       
               include a floor plan/map of the department, including
               emergency evacuation site, procedures, and routes?
               Are employees/students instructed in emergency
               procedures (i.e., location of exits, location and use of fire
               extinguishers)?
   General Safety Concerns
      1. Are the exits (doorways), exit aisles, or corridors free of           Yes       
           obstacles and combustible storage?
      2. Are the fire doors closed securely at all times?                      Yes       
      4. Have all loose rugs or mats been secured or removed?                  Yes       
      5. Have missing or loose ceiling tiles been repaired?                    Yes       
   .1        Electrical Cords and Outlets
     1.      Are extension cords, multiple outlet strips, or cube taps Yes               
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                              62


Administrative                                                         Comments   Correction
                                                                                  Date
      plugged directly into a wall outlet?
2.   Are extension cords at a minimum 14 gauge (heavy-duty)           Yes       
       and servicing only one appliance or fixture?
 3. Are cords in good condition without splices, deterioration,        Yes       
     taping, damage, or being sharply bent or pinched?
4.   Are employees instructed not to use extension cords in                     
       place of permanent wiring?
       - Are extension cords prevented from running through            Yes
       walls, ceilings, or doors?
5. Are extension cords grounded when servicing a grounded             Yes       
      appliance or fixture?
6. Are cord guards provided across an aisle or other                  Yes       
      passageway?
 7. Does the multiple outlet strip have a circuit breaker?            Yes       
8. Are multiple outlet strip cords 6' or under?                       Yes       
9. Is clear access (36" clearance) provided to electrical             Yes       
      panels?
10. Are electrical cover plates provided on all electrical            Yes       
      switches or outlets?
.2         Heaters and Fans

 1.   Do all heaters have a working tipover switch?          Yes                
 2.   Are combustibles kept 24" from all sides and tops of Yes                  
       heaters?
 3. Are fine finger guards provided on fans?                 Yes                
 4. Are all electric space heaters plugged directly into the None               
       wall?
 5. Are all fans below head level or secured?                Yes*               
Seismic Bracing and Earthquake Preparedness

 6.       Are furnishings more than four feet high braced? (This      Yes**     
            includes file cabinets, bookcases, desk hutches, etc.)
     7.    Are projection screens, maps, blackboards, etc., fastened   Yes       
            with a closed hook system or bolted to walls?
     8.    Is overhead storage of heavy items or plants prevented?     Yes       
     9.    Are hanging planters or other objects prohibited?           Yes       
Heaters and fans
 No heaters are allowed with the energy crunch; fans used in the summer will be
monitored.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                      63


Seismic Bracing and Earthquake Preparedness
 Lateral file cabinets over 4 feet high have internal weights to prevent tipping.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                64




2.3        3rd FLOOR REMEDIATION, MEDIATION PLAN 2001

The University of Washington School of Nursing Dean’s Office and the offices of the
School of Nursing Continuing Education Programs are standard University of
Washington office environments. Located in the vicinity of Health Sciences Building,
Room T310. Each is faced with typical office hazards (see Dean’s Office Hazard
Checklist).

Hazards/Preventative measure include:

       Housekeeping Hazards                        Slip/Trip Hazards
       Electrical Equipment & Wiring               Obstruction-Free Aisles
       Air Contaminants                            Knives or Cutting Blades
       “Inert” Gases                               Loud Noise
       Asbestos (Present or Handled)               Earthquake Preparedness
       Hazardous Waste                             Lifting >20 lbs
       Carcinogens                                 Heights >4 Ft. (Possible Falls)
       Repetitive Motion                           Dusts
       Ergonomics                                  Emergency Procedures: Fire,
                                                   Other (EEOP)
       Vapors                                      Emergency Escapes (Egress)
                                                   Maintained/Unlocked


     The School of Nursing Dean’s Office and the offices of the School of Nursing
Continuing Education Program plan to mitigate or remediate these potential hazards by
identifying them and providing education and training to staff. A bulletin board is in
place, offering safety tips and suggestions and provides Material Safety Data Sheets
(MSDS) for all products (toner cartridges, etc.) Safety training and a record keeping
system, tracking such training by new employees will be instituted. This training will
occur in coordination with the whole SoN Safety Plan. Refresher training will be offered
on an annual basis. All staff will have access to ergonomic training and work space
evaluation. Items (such as filing cabinets, book cases, and computer equipment) will be
secured. Air ducts and vents will be cleaned and airflow rates checked on a regular basis.
First Aid and CPR training will be offered and persons already qualified in these areas
will be identified. Fire Safety Wardens will be appointed and trained. The Fire Safety
Plan, when complete, will be placed in the Dean’s Office Reference Station.

      Donald G. Berg
   School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                              65




2.4 BNHS OFFICE SAFETY INSPECTION CHECKLIST


  Building: Health Sciences Building                Inspector: Bea Duffy

  Room Number: T600-T620                            Date Inspected: February, 2001

 Department/Unit: Biobehavioral Nursing & Health Supervisor: Margaret Heitkemper,
 Systems                                         Chair


(Check if completed)
                                                                   C   Comments   Correct Date
Administrative
 1. Is the departmental Health and Safety Plan in a                    Yes                    
     location known and accessible to all employees?

  2.    Is there a Safety Corner/Bulletin Board established Yes                     
         with the following displayed (in terminology and
         language understood by the employees)?

         - WISHA Posters (available from EH&S, 543-7262)               Yes

         - The Emergency Phone Number poster                           Yes

        - Other health and safety material/information                 Yes
  3.    Are training records maintained and available for              Yes          
        review by employees, EH&S, and outside agencies?
  4.    Are departmental safety inspection reports and                 Yes          
        corrections maintained and available for review by
        employees, EH&S, and outside agencies?
  6.    Does the departmental Emergency Operations Plan                             
        include a floor plan/map of the department, including
        emergency evacuation site, procedures, and routes?
        Are employees/students instructed in emergency
        procedures (i.e., location of exits, location and use of
        fire extinguishers)?




  1.    Are the exits (doorways), exit aisles, or corridors free       Yes          
        of obstacles and combustible storage?
   School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                           66




                                                                 C   Comments   Correct Date
   2.   Are the fire doors closed securely at all times?             Yes         

   3.   Are light fixtures working and are diffuses installed?       Yes         

   4.   Have all loose rugs or mats been secured or                  Yes         
        removed?

   5.   Have missing or loose ceiling tiles been repaired?           Yes         

Electrical Cords and Outlets

   1.   Are extension cords, multiple outlet strips, or cube         Yes         
        taps plugged directly into a wall outlet?

   2.   Are extension cords at a minimum 14 gauge (heavy-            Yes         
        duty) and servicing only one appliance or fixture?

   3.   Are cords in good condition without splices,                 Yes         
        deterioration, taping, damage, or being sharply bent
        or pinched?

   4.   Are employees instructed not to use extension cords          Yes         
        in place of permanent wiring?

         - Are extension cords prevented from running                Yes
         through walls, ceilings, or doors?

   5.   Are extension cords grounded when servicing a Yes                        
        grounded appliance or fixture?
   6.   Are cord guards provided across an aisle or other Yes                    
        passageway?

   7.   Does the multiple outlet strip have a circuit breaker?       Yes         

   8.   Are multiple outlet strip cords 6' or under?                 Yes         

   9. Is clear access (36" clearance) provided to electrical          Yes        
panels?
    School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                             67




                                                                C   Comments       Correct Date
   10. Are electrical cover plates provided on all electrical       Yes             
switches or outlets?

Heaters and Fans
  1. Do all heaters have a working tipover switch?                  Yes             

   2.    Are combustibles kept 24" from all sides and tops of       Yes             
         heaters?

   3.    Are fine finger guards provided on fans?                   Yes             

   4.    Are all electric space heaters plugged directly into the Yes               
         wall?

   5.    Are all fans below head level or secured?                  Yes             

Seismic Bracing and Earthquake Preparedness
   1. Are furnishings more than four feet high braced?              Yes             
       (This includes file cabinets, bookcases, desk
       hutches, etc.)

   2.    Is all shelving secured?                                   Yes             

   3.    Are projection screens, maps, blackboards, etc.,           Yes             
         fastened with a closed hook system or bolted to
         walls?

4.      Is overhead storage of heavy items or plants               Yes             
          prevented?




   2.5      NURSING RESEARCH OFFICE SAFETY INSPECTION CHECKLIST


               Building: Health Sciences Building       Inspector: Patra Leaming
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                           68




           Room Number: T643                          Date Inspected: February, 2001

           Department/Unit: Office of Nursing         Supervisor:
           Research


(Check if completed)
                                                                      Comments     Correction
                                                                                   Date
Administrative
  1. Is the departmental Health and Safety Plan in a location No                        
      known and accessible to all employees?
  2. Is there a Safety Corner/Bulletin Board established with Yes                       
      the following displayed (in terminology and language
      understood by the employees)
                                                                      
                                                                      
           - WISHA Posters (available from EH&S, 543-7262)            Yes

           - The Emergency Phone Number poster                        Yes


           - Other health and safety material/information             Yes

   3.     Are training records maintained and available for review No                  
          by employees, EH&S, and outside agencies?
   4.     Are departmental safety inspection reports and Yes                           
          corrections maintained and available for review by
          employees, EH&S, and outside agencies?
   5.     Are Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) and an           Yes                 
          inventory sheet of all office products used in the
          workplace on file and accessible to employees?

   6.     Does the departmental Emergency Operations Plan             No                
          include a floor plan/map of the department, including
          emergency evacuation site, procedures, and routes?
          Are employees/students instructed in emergency
          procedures (i.e., location of exits, location and use of
          fire extinguishers)?

General Safety Concerns
    1. Are the exits (doorways), exit aisles, or corridors free of Yes                 
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                          69




                                                                       Comments   Correction
                                                                                  Date
          obstacles and combustible storage?
        2. Are the fire doors closed securely at all times?            Yes            
        3. Are light fixtures working and are diffuses installed?      Yes            
        4. Have all loose rugs or mats been secured or removed?        Yes            
        5. Have missing or loose ceiling tiles been repaired?          Yes            
        Electrical Cords and Outlets

        1. Are extension cords, multiple outlet strips, or cube taps   Yes            
           plugged directly into a wall outlet?
        2. Are extension cords at a minimum 14 gauge (heavy-           Yes            
           duty) and servicing only one appliance or fixture?
        3. Are cords in good condition without splices,                Yes            
           deterioration, taping, damage, or being sharply bent or
           pinched?
        4. Are employees instructed not to use extension cords in      Yes            
           place of permanent wiring?
        - Are extension cords prevented from running through           Yes
           walls, ceilings, or doors?
        5. Are extension cords grounded when servicing a Yes                          
           grounded appliance or fixture?
        6. Are cord guards provided across an aisle or other Yes                      
           passageway?
        7. Does the multiple outlet strip have a circuit breaker? Yes                 
        8. Are multiple outlet strip cords 6' or under?                Yes            
        9. Is clear access (36" clearance) provided to electrical      Yes            
           panels?

        10. Are electrical cover plates provided on all electrical     Yes            
          switches or outlets?

Heaters and Fans
1. Do all heaters have a working tipover switch?                       N/A            

2. Are combustibles kept 24" from all sides and tops of                N/A            
        heaters?

3. Are fine finger guards provided on fans?                            Yes            
     School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                           70




                                                                          Comments      Correction
                                                                                        Date


     4. Are all electric space heaters plugged directly into the wall?    N/A               

     5. Are all fans below head level or secured?                         Yes               

     Seismic Bracing and Earthquake Preparedness
     1. Are furnishings more than four feet high braced? (This            Meaning? 
             includes file cabinets, bookcases, desk hutches, etc.)

     2. Is all shelving secured?                                          Meaning? 

     3. Are projection screens, maps, blackboards, etc., fastened         Yes               
             with a closed hook system or bolted to walls?

     4. Is overhead storage of heavy items or plants prevented?           No                

     5. Are hanging planters or other objects prohibited?                 No                


3.    Evaluation of hazards:
      Our department head and supervisors have complied with the requirement for
      a written plan in their areas of responsibility by identifying each of the above
      hazards, evaluating its potential risk, and controlling or eliminating it according
      to the measures described below. Some plans (e.g., Laboratory Safety
      Manuals, Emergency Evacuation and Operation Plans, Radiation Safety
      records) are located elsewhere and are referenced accordingly.

      When possible, we modified or designed our facilities and equipment to
      eliminate employee exposure to hazards. Where engineering controls are not
      possible, we have instituted work practice controls that effectively prevent
      employee exposure to the hazard. When these methods of control are not
      possible or not fully effective, we require the use of personal protective
      equipment (PPE), such as safety glasses, hearing protection, etc.

          a. Evaluation
                 Evaluation of potential risk (probability and magnitude of harm) has
                 been done for certain hazards. Because they are either (1) present
                 in an unknown or a variable amount (such as airborne
                 contaminants like asbestos or carbon monoxide), or (2) subject
                 to complicating factors (such as extreme risk or individual
                 medical sensitivity), monitoring has been done to determine the
                 safest procedures. EH&S has been consulted as needed. The
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                            71




                 mitigation plans follow the Hazard Checklist for each
                 department/unit.

           b. Engineering Controls
              Engineering controls have been employed, whenever possible, as
              the preferred way to eliminate the following specific hazards (facility
              or equipment design, e.g., fume hoods, guardrails, proper tool
              guards, walkway surfacing).

           c. Administrative Controls
              Administrative controls, the way a job is done, have been used to
              reduce some of the hazards in our department, and on-going training
              is an inherent part of our safety program (see section C.5).

                 (Administrative controls may include rotation of workers to
                 reduce exposure time, specialized training, or using less
                 hazardous procedures. The best procedures are usually those
                 recognized as safe by professionals working in the field, by
                 equipment manufacturers, by consensus in a specialized group,
                 or simply by tradition. They are often referred to as “standard
                 operating procedures,” (SOP’s), “operating instructions,” “safe
                 practices,” “prudent practices,” “Universal Precautions,” etc.,
                 and are often found in something like a manual.)


           d. Personal Protective Equipment
              Personal protective equipment (PPE) is used as a “last line of
              defense” for some hazards, particularly chemicals. Our hazard
              assessment and training documentation is located in each Lab’s
              Safety Manual. The following information is required (UW OPS
              D10.4):
               Hazard Assessed, (site, evaluator, date, supervisor verifying)
               PPE Selected
               Type and frequency of Training

     4. Safety Inspections
        To maintain our commitment to safe work practices, and to ensure that
        our department continues to meet regulatory standards, we conduct
        regular, thorough inspections of associated work areas and continually
        check for unsafe conditions and practices. We consider these
        inspections an additional opportunity to provide practical training in
        safety awareness as well as a systematic method for involving
        supervisors and others in the process of reducing workplace hazards.
        Our School’s policy on the frequency and methods for periodic safety
        inspections, and the location of inspection records are described in
        Appendices 11, 12, 13 and 14.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                            72




           Additional information about conducting inspections at your work-
           site and sample inspection check lists may be found at the EH&S
           web-site www.ehs.washington.edu in the Developing Department
           Safety Plans section.

           4.1      First Aid and CPR Training
                 (Use one of the following)

                In order to ensure our staff has adequate access to first aid in an
                 emergency (see section B.4), our department requires current
                 training for some employees in first aid and CPR certification.
                 According to the UW OPS Manual D 10.5, which lists jobs, activities,
                 and work-sites that require this, we have established the following
                 training requirements:
                 Names and phone numbers of employees who are first-aid/CPR
                 certified are listed on the “Back Page” of this document with the
                 exception of laboratory personnel.

                The UW Police Department provides adequate access to emergency
                 first aid for our employees (see section B.4). Consequently, we do
                 not require employee training in First Aid and CPR.


           4.2     Safety Training: On-Going
           To ensure an effective health and safety program, we continually re-
           educate employees on how to work safely with all applicable hazards.
           Supervisors are responsible for this training and for seeing that safe
           practices are followed. Training records, including completion dates, are
           kept to maintain program continuity and to satisfy legal requirements.
           Documentation is kept by Safety Coordinators


           Additional information regarding training requirements may be
           found on the EH&S web-site. Supervisors are encouraged to attend
           EH&S training for hazards faced by employees in their areas of
           responsibility. The class “HazCom Train-the-Trainer,” for example,
           would apply to most work places.

           4.3     Medical Exams and Vaccinations
           Certain work environments or specific work practices create health risks
           that require medical examinations or immunizations for employees. Our
           department has checked the UW OPS Manual D 10.3 or D 10.6, or
           called Occupational Health at 543-7388 and determined that this does
           not apply to us.


          4.4        Ergonomics Fact Sheet
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                   73




            On May 26, 2000, the Washington State Department of Labor and
            Industries (L&I) adopted an Ergonomics Rule (WAC 296-62-051). This
            Rule, based on the multidisciplinary science of ergonomics, has been a
            major initiative of L&I due to the high cost of disability claims associated
            with work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD). WMSD include
            tendinitis, carpal tunnel syndrome and low back disorders. High claims
            costs due to these injuries have also been experienced here at the
            University.

            L&I information indicates that modification of a job, work methods, or better
            design of tools and equipment used by a worker can achieve benefits which
            are significant and immediate. These benefits include decreased risk of
            injuries and illnesses related to the musculoskeletal system, enhanced
            safety and health performance; improved quality and productivity;
            reductions in errors; heightened worker morale; reduced workers’
            compensation and operating costs; and accommodation of diverse
            populations, including those with disabilities.

           Thus, the Ergonomics Rule is prevention based and focuses on training and
           interventions that can reduce employee exposure to certain risk factors
           specified in the Rule.

           What is the Impact of the Ergonomics Rule on the University?

           Like all Washington State employers, the University will be required to
           identify those jobs where an employee’s typical work includes certain
           physical risk factors. These jobs are referred to as “caution zone “ jobs

           The University will need to ensure that employees working in or supervising
           these jobs receive ergonomics awareness education. A determination must
           also be made as to whether employee exposure to risk in “caution zone
           jobs” is great enough to represent a WMSD hazard, based on the Rule’s
           definitions. If a hazard is found, based on the Rule’s criteria, action must be
           taken to reduce the exposure below hazardous levels or to the extent
           technologically and economically feasible.

           When does the Ergonomics Rule take Effect?

           At the University, the ergonomic requirements will be phased in over a
           three-year period beginning July 1, 2001. The University must fully
           implement the hazard identification (caution zone jobs) and employee
           education phase by July 1, 2003. Hazard reduction to the degree feasible
           must occur beginning July 1, 2004.

           Who will be Responsible for the University’s Ergonomics
           Requirements?

           As with all health and safety issues at the University, responsibility and
           accountability for assuring the employees’ workplace meets regulatory
     School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                  74




                requirements rests with the Deans, Directors, Chairs and Supervisors. As
                noted in the University Handbook, everyone with supervisory responsibility is
                expected to directly participate in assuring that safe working conditions are
                maintained. Supervisors provide training for those working under their
                direction, and each employee is required to comply with occupational health
                and safety regulations, including reporting unsafe conditions to his or her
                supervisor. Implementation of the Ergonomics Rule will follow this same
                system.

                Deans and other administrative personnel can look to administrative units
                for assistance in fulfilling their responsibility. For implementation of the
                Ergonomics Rule this will require a multi-disciplinary approach that crosses
                several organizational boundaries, including Environmental Health and
                Safety (EH&S), Risk Management, Human Resources, Disability Services
                and Capital Projects.

                The University Health and Safety Committees are also initiating ergonomics
                awareness at the organizational unit level. Since these groups report to
                Deans, they can also provide significant “local” assistance.

                What Ergonomics Assistance is Currently Available?

                The University is currently developing strategies and budget requests that
                will allow the campus to address the ergonomics requirements with a
                comprehensive approach beginning in the next biennium.

                  In the interim period, EH&S can provide guidance to individuals and
                 organizational units on how they can begin to address their ergonomics
                 issues. EH&S has traditionally provided and continues to provide
                 ergonomic awareness training, specific training focused on back protection,
                 and some limited technical assistance and consultation regarding
                 ergonomic issues. Please contact EH&S at 206-543-7388 or
                 www.ehs.washington.edu for further information.

                 If disability or reasonable accommodation assistance is needed, please
                 contact the Disability Services Office at 206 543-6450, 206 543-6452
                 (TTY), or dso@u.washington.edu.

                Questions regarding employee work-related injuries or illness claims should
                be referred to the Workers’ Compensation Program Manager in the Office of
                Risk Management at 206 616-7510 or workcomp@u.washington.edu

                 Additional ergonomics information is available at the L&I Ergonomics
                 website: www.lni.wa.gov/wisha/ergo.



5.        SON Policy and Procedure on Workplace Violence

          Preamble
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                75




     The School of Nursing abides by the University of Washington’s Workplace
     Violence Policy outlined in the following pages of this plan. As the following
     policy, certain behaviors are prohibited in the School of Nursing workplace.
     Individuals engaging in these prohibited behaviors will be reported to the
     appropriate authority and their actions could be the basis for their dismissal
     from the University. This violence prevention plan will be periodically
     undated                                                                     at:
     http://www.washington.edu/admin/hr/pol.proc/work.violence/wk.viol.policy.ht
     ml

     UW Workplace Violence Policy
     The University of Washington is committed to providing a safe, healthful
     workplace that is free from violence or threats of violence. For purposes of
     this policy, workplace violence is any violent or potentially violent behavior
     that arises from or occurs in the workplace that affects University faculty,
     staff and students.
     Individuals who engage in violent or prohibited behavior (see below) may be
     removed from the premises, and may be subject to dismissal or other
     disciplinary action, arrest and/or criminal prosecution. This policy applies to
     all work locations including offices, work sites, vehicles, and field locations.
     The University takes reports of threatening or violent workplace incidents
     seriously. Employees, supervisors and managers are expected to follow the
     University of Washington Workplace Violence Report/Response Procedure
     to report actual or alleged incidents of violence in the workplace.
     In addition to this policy, some units (such as medical centers) have
     particular legislative or regulatory requirements with which they must comply.

     Prohibited Behavior
     The University of Washington does not tolerate behavior, whether direct or
     through the use of university facilities, property or resources that:
         Is violent;

         Threatens violence;

         Harasses or intimidates others;

         Interferes with an individual's legal rights of movement or expression; or,

         Disrupts the workplace, the academic environment or the University's ability
     to provide service to the public.
     Violent or threatening behavior can include physical acts, oral or written
     statements, harassing telephone calls, gestures and expressions or
     behaviors such as stalking.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                            76




     UW Workplace Violence Report/Response Procedure
     Direct Threats of Harm to Persons or Property
     Direct threats of harm to persons or property require immediate response as
     follows:

    Main            UW              UW       UW        Harborview       All Other UW Locations
    Campus &        Medical         Tacoma   Bothell   Medical Center
    Health          Center
    Sciences
    Call 9-911                                         Call 5555        Follow Established Local
                                                       (Harborview      Procedure for Calling Law
                                                       Public Safety)   Enforcement


5.1 Reporting/Documentation Requirements
All members of the University community must cooperate to maintain a safe work
environment. Individuals should report to their supervisor any incidents of violent,
threatening, harassing, or intimidating behavior in the workplace, whether or not
those involved are University employees.
Employees who report incidents of workplace violence may request to do so
confidentially. Such requests will be honored to the degree legally allowable.
Employees who are concerned about confidentiality should discuss their
concerns with their unit's Human Resources Consultant.
Each unit is responsible for reporting incidents of violent or threatening behavior
involving all University employees and appointees as follows:
   1. Supervisors and managers who receive reports of violent or threatening
      behavior must notify the head of the unit (or designee); and
   2. Telephone the unit's Human Resources Consultant. If the Consultant is
      not immediately available the reporting supervisor or manager should
      request to speak with any other Human Resources Consultant, Supervisor
      or Director in the office. Do not leave a voice mail message.
         If a report must be made after normal business hours, use the procedure
         for reporting direct threats of harm.
The unit's Human Resources Consultant will involve the appropriate resources
and assist supervisors and managers in their response to allegations of violent or
threatening conduct. If allegations of violent behavior are made against faculty or
students, the Human Resources Consultant will notify the Provost's office or the
Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, respectively.
Supervisors must also report alleged violent workplace behavior on an
"Incident/Accident/Quality Improvement Report" form. For details on incident
reporting, including where to obtain and submit the proper form, see
Environmental Health and Safety's "Reporting Work Related Incidents, Injuries
or Illnesses" web page.
Domestic Violence
Domestic violence can be a form of workplace violence and in accordance with
the Governor's Executive Order 96-05 the UW has adopted separate policy and
procedures on domestic violence.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                    77




Critical Incident Stress Debriefing
"Critical Incident Stress Debriefing" is the process by which individuals who have
experienced or been exposed to a traumatic event can be professionally helped
to resolve the concerns or anxieties that such an experience often causes.

Follow the link for more information about University of Washington Critical
Incident Stress Debriefing services.



Reporting and Action

All members of the University community must cooperate to maintain a safe work
environment. Each unit is responsible for investigating reports of violent or threatening
behavior and taking appropriate action. Individuals should report to their supervisor any
incidents of violent, threatening, harassing, or intimidating behavior in the workplace,
whether or not those involved are University employees.

Supervisors and managers who receive reports of violent or threatening behavior must
notify the head of the unit and the unit's Human Resources Consultant. Human Resources
Consultants will assist supervisors and managers in their response to allegations of
violent or threatening conduct.

Violent behavior must be reported on an "Incident/Accident/Quality Improvement
Report" form. For details on incident reporting, including where to obtain and submit the
proper form, see Environmental Health and Safety's "Reporting Work Related Incidents,
Injuries or Illnesses" web page.

In addition, allegations of violent conduct on the part of students or student workers must
be reported to the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs and allegations of
violent conduct on the part of faculty must be reported to the Provost's Office.

For physical assault or direct threats of harm to people or property, call the 9-911
from campus phones. From non-campus phones call 911.


Critical Incident Stress Debriefing

 "Critical Incident Stress Debriefing" is the process by which individuals who have
experienced or been exposed to a traumatic event can be professionally helped to resolve
the concerns or anxieties that such an experience often causes. Follow the link for more
information about University of Washington Critical Incident Stress Debriefing services.



5.2 DOCUMENTATION AND FOLLOW-UP
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                           78




1. Record-Keeping
To meet State requirements, our department maintains records of safety
activities for varying lengths of time depending upon the type of record, and is
able to produce them when requested by EH&S or L&I. For this Plan, we have
listed below applicable records maintained by our department, and their
locations.


           SoN Dept                        Safety Coordinators    Room
           Dean’s Office                   Don Berg               T 314
           BNHS                            Bea Duffy              T601
           FCN                             Melinda McRae          T 432
           PCH                             Candace Brumett        T 503A
           Research Office                 Patra Leaming,         T 643
           Labs                            Bob Perigo             T 640


For a list of required records for general health and safety compliance
activities, see the EH&S web-site.

5.3 Updates:
For this Plan to be useful as a “living document,” it must reflect the department’s
current safety program and its current responsible parties. Periodic updates, at
least annually, are necessary to ensure this. The “Back Page” of this document
provides a convenient place to look for the most recent revision date, the names
of key safety personnel, and other information.
            School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                                           79                                                               Appendix 1
                                                                                            University of Washington School of Nursing
                                                                                                                                      Office of the President
                                                                                      Chancellor


                                                                                                                                    School of Nursing
                                                                                                                                    Nancy Woods, Dean                                   Office of the Dean
                                 UW Bothell Campus              UW Tacoma Campus                                                                                                           Asst to Dean
                                  Nursing Program                 Nursing Program                                                                                                           Craig Lewis
                                Anne Loustau, Director         Marjorie Dobratz, Director
                                                                                                                                                                                           Fac Affairs Coord
                                                                                                                                                                                             Don Berg

                                                                                                             Office of Academic Programs       Office of Research
                                   BSN Coordinating                     Coordinating                                 Susan Woods,               Pamela Mitchell,
                                   Committee                            Committees                                                                                                         Intl Visitor Coord
                                                                                                                     Associate Dean             Associate Dean
                                   A. Loustau, Chair                    BSN - J. Lowenberg,                                                                                                Carmen Matthews
                                                                        Chair
                                                                        MN - J. Primomo, Chair
                                                                                                                                                                                           Public Info Spec
                                                                                                                                                                                          Kathy Dannenhold
                                                                                                             Educational Outreach /CNE
                                                                                                                    Ruth Assistant
                                                                                                             Ruth Craven,Craven, Dean
                                                                                                                                                                                 Acting Dean’s
                                                                                     Tri-Council                   Assistant Dean                                                     Asst
                                                    Governing Council                    Dean                                                                                   Casey Washburn
                                                          Dean                     Associate Dean
                         Faculty Council
                                                     Associate Deans                Assistant Dean
                        Joie Whitney, Chair
                                                     Faculty Council              Campus Directors
                                                    Department Chairs                                        Office of Academic Programs                              Dean Office
                                                                                     Coordinating                       Julie Katz,                                      Sec
                                                                                   Committee Chairs                      Director                                       Vacant
                                   Coordinating                                  (UW Seattle, Bothell,
                                   Committees                                         Tacoma)
                                   BSN - S. Cunningham,                           Students                                                                                       Dept of
                                   Chair                                                                                                                                Biobehavioral Nursing and
                                   MS/MN - S. Flagler,Chair                                                        Office of Finance &          Info Systems
                                                                                                                                                                             Health Systems
                                   PhD - L. Lewis, Chair                                                                Planning                David Bowen,            Margaret Heitkemper, Chair
                                                                                                                      Frank Spargo,               Supervisor
                                                                                                                       Administrator
                                    Practice Committee
                                    Patricia Brandt, Chair                                                                                         Terri McVeigh
                                                                                                                                                     Specialist                   Dept of
                                                                                                                Office of Development                                        Family and Child
                                                                                                                Chong Porter, Director                                            Nursing
                                                                                                                Laurie Ramacci-Nogel,                                     Kristen Swanson, Chair
                                                                                                                     Asst Director                   Dean Kernan
                                  Research & Intramural                                                                                               Specialist
                                   Funding Committee
                                  Mary Lou de Leon Siantz,                                                         Center for Women’s                                            Dept of
                                           Chair                                                                    Health Research                                          Psychosocial &
                                                                                                                   Margaret Heitkemper,            Derrick Gochnour        Community Health
                                                                                                                         Director                      Specialist         Bobbie Berkowitz, Chair

                                        Appointment,
                                     Promotions & Tenure                                                           deTornyay Center on
                                                                                                                      Healthy Aging                                   Reporting Relationships
                                       Susan Blackburn,
                                            Chair                                                                   Linda Teri, Director
                                                                                                                                                                      Collaborative Relationships


                                                                                                                  Staff Advisory Council
                                                                                                                  Kendra Hayward, Chair

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON SCHOOL OF NURSING         1999-2000
                 June, 2000
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                       80



                                           Appendix 2



The UW “Statement of Policy and Responsibilities” for Safety, in the University
Handbook (Vol. Four, Part VI, Chapter 4, Section 1(A), says in the 3rd paragraph:

“Faculty and staff shall be directly responsible for their own safety, for the
safety of students and employees under their supervision; and for the
safety of their fellow employees. Their responsibility can neither be
transferred nor delegated.”

Dean of the School of Nursing: Nancy F. Woods

Chair, Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems: Margaret Heitkemper

Chair, Family, Child & Nursing: Kristen Swanson

Chair, Psychosocial & Community Health: Bobbie Berkowitz
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                  81



                                                 Appendix 3

                                                 “Back Page”

   1. Department: SoN Dean’s Office/Academic Services

   2. Last Updated (date/person): January, 2003; Julie Katz

   3. Safety and Health Coordinator (until January, 2004):

         Name:                       Don Berg          Lisa McDonald
         Phone:                      221-2410          221-2473
         E-mail:                     <bergd>           <lisamcd>
         Bldg./Room #:               HSB/T-314         HSB/T-318

   4. Departmental Safety and Health Committee members (if applicable):

   5. Representatives to Group #4

         Organizational Safety & Health Committee:
         Elected:                Don Berg/<bergd>/221-2410
         Appointed:              R. Perigo/<bperigo>/543-0306
         Union Representative: Name/e-mail/phone
         Dean:                   Nancy Woods/<nfwoods>/543-8732
         Administrator:          Kimberly Sims/<simsk>/616-3905

   6. Representative to University-Wide Safety & Health Committee:

                 Stephanie Steppe

   7. First-Aid/CPR Certified:

                 Marty Lentz T624, 616-5147, <lentz>

   8. Safety and Health Coordinator responsible for stocking First-Aid Kits
      (UW OPS Manual D10.5)

                 Don Berg/<bergd>/221-2410

   9. Environmental Health & Safety Phone Numbers:
        See EH&S Web site at www.ehs.washington.edu. Click on “Phones.”
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                    82




                                           Appendix 4

                                           “Back Page”

   1. Department: BNHS
   2. Last Updated (date/person): Bea Duffy
   3. Safety and Health Coordinator (from 10/00 to 9/01):

           Name: Laurie Rossnagel
           Phone: 543-3064
           Email: rnagel@u.washington.edu
           Bldg./Room # HSB, T-609C

   4. Departmental Safety and Health Committee members (if applicable):

         N/A

   5. Representatives to Group #4, Health & Safety Committee
       Organizational Safety & Health Committee:
       Elected: Randal Beaton/randyb@u./543-8551
       Appointed: R. Perigo/bperigo@u./543-0306
       Union Representative: Name/e-mail/phone
       Chair: Margaret Heitkemper/heit@u./543-1091

   6. Representative to University-Wide Safety & Health Committee:
      Name/e-mail/phone

   7. First-Aid/CPR Certified:
      Marty Lintz T624, 616-5147.

         Safety and Health Coordinator responsible for stocking First-Aid Kits
         (UW OPS Manual D10.5)

   8. EH&S Phone Numbers:
      See EH&S web-site at www.ehs.washington.edu. Click on “Phones”
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                 83




                                           Appendix 5

                                           “Back Page”

   1. Department: FCN
   2. Last Updated (date/person): 01/03/Mark Squire

   3. Safety and Health Coordinator (from 04/01 to Present):

         Name: Mark Squire
         Phone: 543-8220
         e-mail: msquire@u.washington.edu
         Bldg./Room # T-401

   4. Departmental Safety and Health Committee member (if applicable):

   5. Representatives to Group #4, Health & Safety Committee

         Organizational Safety & Health Committee
         Elected: Don Berg/<bergd>/221-2410
         Appointed: R. Perigo/bperigo@u./543-0306
         Union Representative:
         Chair: Kristen Swanson/kswanson@u.washington.edu/543-8228

   6. Representative to University-Wide Safety & Health Committee:
      Stephanie Steppe

   7. First-Aid/CPR Certified:
      Marty Lintz T624, 616-5147.

         Safety and Health Coordinator responsible for stock First-Aid Kits
         (UW OPS Manual D 10.5)

   8. EH&S Phone Numbers:
      See EH&S web-site at www.ehs.Washington.edu. Click on “Phones.”
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                  84




                                           Appendix 6

                                           “Back Page”


   1. Department: PCH
   2. Last Updated: 1/01

   3. Safety and Health Coordinator (from 10/00 to 9/01):
      Name: Candace Brumett
      Phone: 543-8550
      e-mail: candaceb@u.washington.edu
      Bldg./Room #: HSB/T-503A
   4. Departmental Safety and Health Committee members (if applicable):

   5. Representatives to Group #4

      Organization Safety & Health Committee:
      Elected: Don Berg/<bergd>/221-2410
      Appointed: R. Perigo/bperigo@u./543-0306
      Union Representative:
      Chair: Bobbie Berkowitz/bobbieb@u./543-3116
   6. Representative to University-Wide Safety & Health Committee:
      Stephanie Steppe
   7. First-Aid/CPR Certified:
      Randal Beaton/533-8551/07-01
   8. EH&S Phone Numbers:
      See EH&S web-site at www.ehs.washington.edu. Click on “Phones.”
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                        85




                                           Appendix 7

                                           “Back Page”

           1. Department: Research Office
           2. Last Updated (date/person): 1/01
           3. Safety and Health Coordinator (from 10/00 to 9/01):
         Name: Patra Leaming
         Phone: 221-2412
         e-mail: patra@u.washington.edu
         Bldg./Room #: HS/T-643
           4. Departmental Safety and Health Committee member (if
              applicable): N/A
           5. Representatives to Group #4

         Organizational Safety & Health Committee
         Elected: Don Berg/<bergd>/221-2410
         Appointed: R. Perigo/bperigo@u./543-0306
         Union Representative: Patra Leaming

            6. Chair: Stephanie Steppe

            7. First-Aid/CPR Certified: Marty Lintz T624, 616-5147.
               Safety and Health Coordinator responsible for stock First-Aid
               Kits (UW OPS Manual D 10.5)

          8. EH&S Phone Numbers:
         See EH&S web-site at www.ehs.Washington.edu. Click on “Phones.”

         Research Labs:

         Managed by Coralie Baker.             Find “Back Page” information in the
         T640 lab safety manuals.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                                 86



                                                          Appendix 8

          Departmental New Employee Safety Orientation


Employee Name: _____________________________________________________________

Job Title: __________________________________                            SSN:________________________



   Topics 1-4 are contained in the departmental Emergency Operations Plan.
   Reviewing this plan during the orientation will more than meet the
   requirements of these first few topics.




1. Reporting Emergencies
      Tell and show the new employee(s) the police, medical, and fire
      emergency reporting number(s) for their work area.


                          General Campus                           Police - Medical - Fire       9-911

                          UW Medical Center                        Police - Medical              9-911

                          Harborview Medical Center                Police - Medical - Fire       3000


                 The emergency number should be posted on all telephones.


                 Your dept., div., unit, worksite, etc.
                 Name

                 Location                                      Emergency Service(s)          Phone #




2. Emergency Evacuation
      Walk new employees through the appropriate emergency evacuation
      route for their work area. Also point out the secondary emergency
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                               87


          evacuation route to be used if the primary route is blocked. Show them
          where to assemble after evacuation. Discuss special evacuation needs
          and plans with disabled employees. (Campus building evacuation floor
          plans are available from EH&S, call 3-0465.)


3. Local Fire Alarm Signaling System
       Show new employees where fire alarm pull stations are and instruct
       them in their use. Let them know that activating the pull station sounds
       an alarm in the building to alert other occupants to evacuate. Describe
       what the alarm in your building sounds like (a bell, chimes, a slow
       whoop).

               Tell your new employees that they must leave the building
                immediately upon hearing the alarm, closing doors behind them.

               When employees discover a fire they should first, pull the nearest
                fire alarm pull station and then exit the alarmed area. If possible,
                employees should follow up with a telephone call from a safe
                location to provide more details.

               On Campus: The activation of a fire alarm pull station also sends a
                signal to the UW Police and Seattle Fire Department showing the
                location of the emergency.


4. Portable Fire Extinguishers
       Show the employee(s) where portable fire extinguishers are located. Tell
       them to use a portable fire extinguisher only if:

               they have been trained to use them,

               the fire alarm has been sounded first,

               the fire is small (waste basket size), and

               they have a clear evacuation route.



5. Department Reporting Procedures
      Tell your new employee(s) to immediately report accidents, incidents,
      near misses, motor vehicle accidents and any unsafe conditions or acts
      to:
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                 88


           Name:                                                    Phone:

           Location:                                                Room:


                 Usually their supervisor


          a.     Reporting Accidents and Incidents
                 Explain that after they immediately report on-the-job accidents, they
                 have to fill out a University accident incident report form.


                                      Work Location                 Form

                                      University                    UoW 1428

                                      UW Medical Center             UH0266

                                      Harborview Medical Center     UH0266

                                      Dental School                 UoW 1119

                     Your report form
                     name

                     Report form #

                     Request form from


                 Explain the form and tell them where the forms are located. All
                 accidents or near accidents (incidents) must be reported on this
                 form even if no personal injury was sustained.

                 Reporting all accidents and incidents helps the University and the
                 employing department initiate effective safety programs and
                 accident prevention measures.

          b.     Reporting Motor Vehicle Accidents
                 All automobile accidents in University-owned vehicles must also be
                 reported to the University Police Department (9-911) immediately,
                 whether or not there appears to be personal injury or property
                 damage.

          c.     Reporting Unsafe Conditions and Acts
                 Along with immediately reporting unsafe conditions and acts to their
                 supervisors or the person noted above, employees may report
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                    89


                 safety problems to Environmental Health and Safety.

                 Explain that employees should take responsibility for correcting
                 unsafe conditions when feasible, e.g., wiping up small, nontoxic
                 spills and removing tripping hazards.



6. Workers’ Compensation and Industrial Insurance
      Tell employees that work-related injuries or illnesses resulting in medical
      expenses or time loss are covered by Washington State’s Workers’
      Compensation. To establish a Workers’ Compensation claim,
      employees must fill out a State Department of Labor and Industries (L&I)
      Report of Industrial Injury or Occupational Disease at their medical
      provider’s office when they receive medical care for a work-related injury
      or illness. Explain, also, that prompt reporting of accidents to you, the
      supervisor, will make the claims process easier and may allow you to
      find them modified work during their recovery.



7. First Aid
        Tell new employees where first aid kits are located. If your department is
        required to have first aid certified employees on staff, (UW OPS D 10.5)
        tell new employees who they are and how to contact them. Explain what
        actions employees should take if they or others are injured. If safety
        showers or eye wash stations are located in your department, show new
        employees where they are and instruct them in their use.



8. Hazard         Communication            (Chemical   Safety)   (Worker   Right-to-Know,
HazCom)

          a.     General (all employees)

                      Tell new employees where hazardous materials are used or
                       stored in their work area.

                      Explain the labeling system for these materials.

                      Show employees where material safety data sheets (MSDSs)
                       are located or explain how they can obtain an MSDS.

                      If new employees will be working with hazardous materials, tell
                       them they will receive training in the safe handling of these
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                          90


                       materials or conduct the training at this time, if appropriate.



                                Hazard Communication training is conducted               by
                                supervisors or a designated departmental trainer.

                      Inform new employees that hazardous materials emergencies,
                       such as spills or releases too big for them to clean up, are to be
                       reported to:


                                             Who                                          Phone


             Small Spills

             Large Spills or releases


                 Report large spills or releases to (General Campus 9-911)
                                                    (UW Medical Center 9-911)
                                                    (Harborview Medical Center 3000)
                                                    (Department protocol for off
                                                    campus locations)
                  Explain the hazardous materials waste disposal procedures that
                    apply in your area.

          b.     Specific Worksites

                 Office Staff
                      For staff whose only chemical exposures are in an office environment,

                             Provide a copy of the brochure "Hazard Communication
                              Information and Training for Office Staff.

                             Discuss hazard information and protection measures for
                              products they will work with.

                             Explain an MSDS and tell employees where they are
                              located or how to obtain them.

                 Laboratory Staff
                     Laboratory staff may be sent to the EH&S course "Chemical
                     Safety in the Laboratory" for an introduction to chemical safety
                     regulations and procedures. The laboratory supervisor or
                     principal investigator must provide additional training, specific
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                              91


                        to the chemicals in the laboratory. See the UW Laboratory
                        Safety Manual (5/00 rev.), Section 7 Safety Training.

                 Non-Laboratory Hazardous Chemicals
                     Employees who work with chemicals in non-laboratory
                     environments must receive detailed hazard communication
                     training from their supervisor or designated departmental
                     HazCom trainer. (Employees who fall into this category include
                     maintenance, custodial/housekeeping, food service and
                     printing and copy/duplicating employees.)



9. Worksite Warning Signs and Labels
        Explain to all new employees the meaning of warning signs, tags, and
        labels used in their work area.
10. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

          Check the personal protective equipment needed for this job.

                             Gloves                            Hard Hats

                             Safety Glasses, Goggles,          Hearing Protectors
                             Face Shields

                             Personal Protective Clothing      Fall Protection

                             Orange Safety Vest                Safety Shoes

                             Respirator


          Explain precisely the use, care, cleaning, and storage of any personal
          protective equipment the new employee will be required to use on the
          job. Stress the need for strict adherence to department, division, unit,
          and/or lab policy on the use of PPE.



11. Employee Safety and Health Training
       Use the following list to indicate the safety and health training classes
       the new employee will be required to take for their job. Recommended
       classes could also be marked but priority must be given to arranging the
       required health and safety training classes.

               Please register new employees in EH&S courses as soon
                as you are aware of their start date since many required
                courses fill early.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                           92




                        Environmental Health and Safety courses are general and
                        must often be supplemented with specific training by the
                        department or supervisor.
 School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                                 93




Employee Safety and Health Training Check List
   Mark training/courses the employee needs to take. Retain documents verifying that the training
   requirements have been met.
   Course                                    Provided by   Course                               Provided by
ALL NEW DEPARTMENT EMPLOYEES
   General Orientation                       T&D           Departmental/Supervisor        New   Department
                                                           Employee Orientation
   Campus      New            Employee       T&D           Hazard Communication (Worker         Department
   Orientation                                             Right to Know)
   New       Employee           Benefits     Benefits
   Orientation                               Office
AS REQUIRED BY JOB
   Asbestos Awareness                        EH&S          Laboratory Fire Safety               EH&S
   Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure              EH&S          Laboratory Safety System (LSS)       EH&S
   Control
   Chemical        Safety      in      the   EH&S          Lead Awareness                       EH&S
   Laboratory
   Chemical Spills Clean-up                  EH&S          Lifting Training - Back Protection   EH&S
                                                           Program
   Chemical Waste Disposal                   EH&S          Lockout     Safety   -     (Energy   EH&S
                                                           Control)
   Confined Space Entry                      EH&S          Motorized/Powered        Personnel   Mfg/Supplier
                                                           Lifts
   Compressed Gas Safety                     EH&S          Office Ergonomics                    EH&S
   CPR                                       EH&S          Powder Activated Tools               Mfg/Supplier
   Fire Extinguisher Training                EH&S          Radiation Safety Training            EH&S
   First Aid / CPR                           EH&S          Respiratory Protection and Mask      EH&S
                                                           Fitting
   Forklift     Operator            Safety   EH&S          Scaffolds                            Mfg/Supplier
   Certification
   Hearing                  (Protection)     EH&S          Shipping   and     Transporting      EH&S
   Conservation                                            Hazardous Materials
                                                           Traffic Control and Flagging         Outside
                                                                                                agent
OTHER DEPARTMENTAL REQUIRED / RECOMMENDED COURSES
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                               94


   12.      Safety and Health Committee(s) and/or Safety Meetings

            Tell new employees about the Organizational and University-wide
            Health and Safety Committees and about the departmental health and
            safety committee and safety meetings, if applicable. Tell them who their
            safety committee representatives are and how to contact them.



13. Safety Bulletin Board

          Point out the departmental safety bulletin board and tell them what items
          can be found on the board.
          The bulletin board must display the following posters:-
           UW HazCom Poster
           State Labor and Industries Posters
                    "Job Safety and Health Protection"
                     "Notice to Employees"
                     "Your Rights as a Worker"
           Other safety notices, newsletters, safety and health committee
             minutes, etc. should be posted here also.

14. Departmental/Worksite Safety Practices and Rules

          Conduct an on-the-job review of the practices necessary to perform the
          initial job assignments in a safe manner. Employees should understand
          that supervisors will provide job safety instruction and inspection on a
          continuing basis. Review safety rules for your department (e.g., non-
          smoking areas, working alone, safe use of chemicals, biohazards,
          radioactive materials, etc).



15. Tour Department/Facility Reviewing Worksite Hazards

          Encourage your employees to ask questions and to develop a sense of
          safety consciousness.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                95




                                           Appendix 9
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                96




                                           Appendix 9
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                  97




                                           Appendix 10


Administrative Policy Statements                          January 2001     12.4

                        First-Aid Requirements

(Approved by the President by Authority of Executive Order No. 1)

1.     Policy

      In compliance with the Revised Codes of Washington, Chapter 49.17, the
      Washington Industrial Safety and Health act (WISHA) under WAC 296-24-
      061, First-Aid Requirements, and WAC 296-155, First-Aid Training and
      Certification for Construction, the University must ensure quick and effective
      first aid for all University employees in case injury or acute illness occurs on
      the job.


2.      Scope

        In general, this policy applies to all locations including the Seattle, Bothell
        and Tacoma campuses, all other University owned property, University
        leased space, and temporary field locations and field trips that are under
        the control of University operations and staff.


3.      UW Compliance Responsibility

        It is University policy, as required by the University Handbook, Volume
        Four, Part IV, Chapter 4, Page 59, University Safety Program, that each
        dean, director, department chair, and supervisor is responsible for the
        health and safety performance in their respective units. This responsibility
        can neither be transferred nor delegated.

            a. Employing Unit

              Employing units are responsible for compliance with the first aid
              requirements including assuring that first aid certified employees are
              available and making sure first aid supplies appropriate to the work
              area are maintained and accessible to all employees. Each
              organizational unit shall determine the best method for compliance
              with first aid requirements from the options and guidelines below
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                 98




              documenting their first aid compliance plan in the appropriate unit
              health and safety plan.

            b. Responsibility of Purchasing and Stores

              UW Purchasing and Stores consults with EH&S to assure the
              appropriate first aid supplies are stocked at University Stores.

            c. Responsibility of Environmental Health and Safety (EHS)

              EH&S interprets the first aid requirements for the University and serves
              as a liaison with the Department of Labor and Industries relating to,
              among other things, first aid requirements. In addition, EH&S assures
              compliance with the first aid regulations through program oversight and
              provision of services to assist in compliance.

            d. University of Washington Police Department (UWPD)

              University Police are first aid certified and provide first aid response
              on the Seattle campus.


4.           Compliance Procedures

              a. General First Aid Response Plan

              The University has adopted this First Aid Response Plan to
              accommodate the wide variety of work types, locations, and
              environments shared by the University’s approximately 25,000
              employees. Employing units can consult this Plan to determine if they
              are required to have first aid certified employees and how many, and
              to determine what first aid supplies they should stock and how to
              obtain them.

              The majority of University employees work in typical administrative
              office environments with large numbers also working in laboratories,
              medical/clinical settings, skilled trades and shops, grounds
              maintenance, custodial services, and food services. While the plan
              addresses the differing needs of these work environments for first aid
              response, it also takes into consideration the common elements
              shared by University work areas. The following applies to all University
              work areas:
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                               99




              1.      University work locations are served by municipal or county
              enhanced 911 Emergency Medical Services. Where there might be
              exceptions, such as field trips or remote research field stations, the
              first aid response plan requires more rigorous first aid coverage.

              2. University policy requires that emergency access phone numbers
              be posted on all telephones.

              3. First aid trained employees are identified in the employing unit
              Health and Safety Plan, which supervisors must review with new
              employees. Units are required to identify at least two first aid certified
              employees including contact information, phone number and location,
              on or near first aid kits. In some locations first aid certified employees
              may be shared between units in order to provide adequate coverage
              during absences.

     b. Training Compliance

              Employing units may choose from the following options for the
              compliance method that bests suits their work environment. Units are
              required to document how first aid requirements will be met in the unit
              health and safety plan.

              1. Supervisor First-Aid Training

              Compliance may be achieved for any type of work environment, units if
              each supervisor (or their designee) is trained and certified in first aid.
              It is strongly recommended that an alternative person also be trained
              and certified in first aid to assure coverage during absences.

              2. Office Environments (Academic, Administrative or Service Unit
              Offices, etc.)

              Office work environments can comply with the first aid training
              requirement by having at least one first aid certified employee per floor
              or each building or wing where they have offices or in another defined
              work area. For example, a large suite of offices may have one first aid
              trained employee for the suite and rely on a first aid trained employee
              in another area or on another floor to serve as a back up first aid
              responder.

              As an option, at the Seattle campus, office work environments may
              choose to rely on the UW Police for first aid response instead of
              maintaining first aid trained employees in their own unit. In office
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                   100




              areas where this option is used, all employees must be informed that
              the UW Police are primary first aid responders and be trained in how
              to summon assistance.

              3. Laboratories (Research, Clinical, Teaching, etc.)

              Work environments that are primarily laboratory facilities are required
              to have at least one first aid certified employee present at all times
              where employees are working. This can be achieved by having at
              least two first aid certified individuals or per floor per building or wing or
              other defined work area, such as a center or institute or suite of
              laboratories, etc. Another method to achieve compliance is to have
              building floor wardens also be first aid certified.

              4 Medical/Clinical Environments

              At the UW Medical Center and Harborview Medical Center, first aid
              and emergency medical response are available to employees from
              resident medical staff through the hospital paging system. In areas
              where health care staff are not available or do not respond to
              employee injuries or illness, first aid certified staff must be available.
              One first aid certified employee on each floor or a building, wing or
              other defined work area is adequate coverage if provisions are made
              for back up from first aid trained employees in adjacent areas.

              5. Shops and Trades/Warehouse Operations

              In order to assure that first aid certified employees are available at all
              times employees are present, each shop and warehouse location must
              have at least one first aid certified employee on each shift in each work
              area. This will likely require having two trained in order to assure the
              minimum are present during absences and vacancies.

              6. Dispersed Work Crews

              Dispersed work crews in campus areas must have a first aid certified
              employee present at the work site.

              Employees who work alone (e.g., Custodial Services, parking kiosks)
              must know how to summon a first aid certified employee and
              supervisors’/leads must know the location of all staff working alone
              and check on them periodically.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                            101




              7. Remote Locations (Research Field Stations, Field Trips)

              When University employees are stationed in remote locations such as
              research field stations or on field trips that are not served by a local
              jurisdiction emergency medical service, there must be at least two
              employees on-site at all times who have advanced first aid training.
              Arrangements for advanced first aid training can be made through
              EH&S at 543-7201.

              In addition, when University employees are assigned to work at remote
              field locations or field trips, the employing unit must have a written
              emergency plan for each field station or field trip. The emergency plan
              must include emergency phone numbers, communications capabilities,
              provisions for transportation of injured or ill, and location of nearest
              medical facilities.

              8. Other – If an employing unit has a work environment(s) not
              addressed in this plan, or has a complex mix of work environments or
              locations, EH&S will assist in the development of a unit specific first
              aid response plan that will be documented in the unit’s Health and
              Safety Plan.

              c. How to Obtain First-Aid Training

              EHS schedules first aid classes at least once each month. The first
              aid training schedules are distributed widely on campus and published
              on the EH&S web site.

              First aid training must be repeated every two years to maintain a valid
              first aid certificate.

              The first aid training is limited to employees who are attending to meet
              the first aid requirements for their unit (verification required)

              d. Documentation of First-Aid Training

              Each employee who completes the EH&S sponsored first aid course
              will receive a first aid card which serves as documentation. Each unit
              Health and Safety Plan identified first aid certified employees. In
              addition, Environmental Health and Safety maintains training records
              for all EH&S sponsored courses and can arrange for replacement of
              lost first aid cards.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                               102




              e. First-Aid Supplies

              1. First aid supplies must be readily available to all employees, stored
              in clean, clearly marked, portable containers. Environmental Health
              and Safety and University Stores have developed a list of first aid
              supplies and kits suitable for University work places.

              2. Post name, location and phone number of first aid certified
              employees on first aid kit or where first aid supplies are stored.

              3. Post a sign near the location of first aid kits and supplies.

              4. Indicate exact locations of first aid supplies in unit Health and
              Safety Plan.

              5. Identify the individuals responsible for maintaining first aid supplies,
              including stocking and checking expiration dates, in unit Health and
              Safety Plan.

              f. Good Samaritan Act

              Employees who obtain first aid training to comply with this regulation
              are not required to provide first aid nor is rendering first aid considered
              to be a job assignment. Employees who may render first aid to
              another employee in the work place do so voluntarily and are therefore
              covered by the Good Samaritan Statute (RCW 4.24.300) which states
              in part: Any person who in good faith and not for compensation
              renders emergency care at the scene of an emergency or who
              participates in transporting, not for compensation, there from an
              injured person or persons for emergency medical treatment shall not
              be liable for civil damages resulting from any act or omission in the
              rendering of such emergency care or in transporting such persons,
              other than acts of omissions constituting negligence or willful or
              wanton misconduct.

              g. Bloodborne Pathogens

              University employees designated to be first aid trained are not required
              to render first aid treatment but to so voluntarily on a case-by-case
              basis. Since employees are not required to provide first aid as a job
              assignment, they are not required to have annual bloodborne
              pathogens training nor are they required to be provided a HepB
              immunization.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                103




              The first aid training scheduled by EHS includes instruction in universal
              precautions for protection against bloodborne pathogens while
              administering first aid.

              In the event that a University employee is exposed to human blood or
              body fluids during the administration of first aid or any other activity in
              the work place, the employee should contact the UW Campus Health
              Service at 548-4848 for post exposure follow-up.



5.             For Additional Information

              Questions regarding First Aid should be directed to EHS at 543-7388
              or e-mail ehsdept@u.washington.edu. Specific web pages have been
              developed (www.ehs.washington.edu/training/) to assist operational
              units in meeting training responsibilities for First Aid.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                   104




                                           APPENDIX 11

University of Washington
Environmental Health and Safety
November 29, 2000


Doing Safety Inspections
“To determine whether work areas meet the General Safety and Health Standards and
Occupational Health Standards (Chapters 296-24 and 296-62 WAC) established by the
L&I (Washington State Department of Labor and Industries), departments should
conduct regular, thorough inspections to evaluate work conditions and work practices.
These inspections should be held at regular intervals to insure continuing compliance
with standards; contact EH&S, 543-7388, for assistance.” (UW Operations Manual D
10.3)

Even if safety inspections were not strongly recommended, they are an excellent way for
the department to reference the commitment to safe work practices, provide practical
training in safety awareness and minimize hazards at the worksite. These inspections
provide a systematic method for involving supervisors, employees, safety coordinators,
and/or safety committees in the process of eliminating workplace hazards.

Types of Safety Inspections
There are several ways to perform safety inspections of a workplace, task or job. The
most popular ways include using checklists, general knowledge, and risk mapping. To be
effective, safety inspections must be individualized or tailored to meet the needs of a
specific worksite, task or job.

         Safety Checklist Inspections
         A checklist is very good for the regular inspection of specific items. However,
         they may not be as useful in identifying previously unrecognized hazards.

         Many different checklists are available from a variety of sources. Unfortunately,
         since these ready-made checklists are generic, they rarely meet the needs of a
         specific workplace, task or job. However, you may find them useful to inspect a
         part of your area. For instance, the owner’s manual for a table saw may have a
         checklist that works perfectly for inspecting the saw in a department shop. Taking
         parts of several ready-made checklists and putting them together may be an easy
         method of beginning the development of your customized checklist.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                   105




         There are three sample checklists one for offices, one for general work areas, and
         one for laboratories available for downloading on the EH&S web site
         www.ehs.washington.edu in Developing Department Health and Safety Plans
         section. These are only examples. They will need to be modified to fit your
         specific work areas, tasks or jobs.

         General Knowledge Safety Inspections
         Another way of conducting inspections is to use the information you have in your
         head and just walk around looking at what is going on. You do not use a pre-made
         checklist for this type of inspection. This method keeps you from getting stuck
         looking at the same things every time. However, the effectiveness of this
         inspection method is dependent on the individual’s level of knowledge about
         workplace related safety practices. It is important to document the results of the
         inspection and any action taken in resolving or addressing safety hazards.

         Risk Mapping Safety Inspections
         The third inspection method is called risk mapping. It is a good method to use at a
         safety meeting where everyone there is familiar with the workplace or process.
         This technique uses a map/drawing of the workplace (like a floor plan) or a list of
         steps in a process. People in the group then tell the leader the hazards they
         recognize and where they are located in the workplace or process. The leader uses
         different colors or symbols to identify different types of hazards on the map or list
         of steps. This type of inspection is valuable for involving all employees in
         identifying and resolving safety hazards. There is an example of Risk Mapping at
         the end of this document.


What should you include in your inspections?
When you do your inspections make sure you are looking at your entire operation’s safety
program. Remember to evaluate:
    processes
    tools and equipment (some will require a different inspection before each use)
    chemicals
    worksite environment
    employee training
    personal protective equipment
    emergency plans


How often should you do inspections?
Giving a recommendation on the frequency of inspections is difficult. The frequency is
very dependent on how often things change and on the hazard level at the worksite.
Perhaps the best method is to begin with frequent inspections until there have been
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                   106




several inspections where no new hazards are found and then reduce the frequency.
However, if you are always finding items that need work, you can decrease the frequency.

Safety inspections should be conducted at least every six months.


Who should do the inspections?
It has to be someone who is familiar with the workplace, task or job. The best way is to
have a supervisor and an employee from the area inspect together.


What should you do with your inspection findings?
You have to follow up on your findings. It does little good to do inspections if nothing
gets corrected. Someone should be assigned to develop a correction for each problem that
was found. Attaching a deadline for the correction of each problem is helpful. Don’t let
corrections get drawn out.

Review your inspection reports for trends. Is the problem showing up again and again?
There may be something that encourages this problem to exist. That also needs to be
addressed.


Resources
The following are some resources that are commonly used in developing effective safety
inspection procedures:
     Suggestions from supervisors and employees
     Reviewing the types of accident/incidents that have occurred in the past and in
        departments at UW peer institutions
     Reviewing applicable State and Federal Safety Standards and UW Operations
        Policies and Procedures
     Suggestions from EH&S
     EH&S will conduct a departmental review, a walk-through, and customize the
        generic checklists upon request (call 543-0467). This friendly service is designed
        and meant to help departments in recognizing risks and evaluating the workplace.
        A team of EH&S professionals will visit some or all sites as agreed upon.


Remember, the inspection is not your goal. A safe working environment is!
This is just one tool used to get you there.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                107




Sample Risk Mapping

First develop a symbol/color key for the hazards. Collecting hazards into groups like the
ones below simplify the mapping process. Next review the worksite map or the process
steps and mark the hazards.

Risk Mapping Groups

Physical Hazards Examples (Color) (Symbols: triangle, square, diamond, etc.):
       noise
       heat

         ventilation
         light
         machines
         vibration

Ergonomics Examples (Color) (Symbol):
      positions
      loads
      effort
      fatigue
      repetition

Chemicals Examples (Color) (Symbol):
      dusts
      liquids
      gases
      mists
      vapors

Stress Examples (Color) (Symbol):
        shift work
        over-supervision
        responsibility
        lack of control

Other Examples (Color) (Symbol):
       germs
       radiation
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                               108




Giving a recommendation on the frequency of inspections is difficult. The frequency is
very dependent on how often things change and on the hazard level at the worksite.
Perhaps the best method is to begin with frequent inspections until there have been
several inspections where no new hazards are found and then reduce the frequency.
However, if you are always finding items that need work, you can decrease the frequency.

Safety inspections should be conducted at least every six months.


Who should do the inspections?
It has to be someone who is familiar with the workplace, task or job. The best way is to
have a supervisor and an employee from the area inspect together.


What should you do with your inspection findings?
You have to follow up on your findings. It does little good to do inspections if nothing
gets corrected. Someone should be assigned to develop a correction for each problem that
was found. Attaching a deadline for the correction of each problem is helpful. Don’t let
corrections get drawn out.

Review your inspection reports for trends. Is the problem showing up again and again?
There may be something that encourages this problem to exist. That also needs to be
addressed.


Resources
The following are some resources that are commonly used in developing effective safety
inspection procedures:
     Suggestions from supervisors and employees
     Reviewing the types of accident/incidents that have occurred in the past and in
        departments at UW peer institutions
     Reviewing applicable State and Federal Safety Standards and UW Operations
        Policies and Procedures
     Suggestions from EH&S
     EH&S will conduct a departmental review, a walk-through, and customize the
        generic checklists upon request (call 543-0467). This friendly service is designed
        and meant to help departments in recognizing risks and evaluating the workplace.
        A team of EH&S professionals will visit some or all sites as agreed upon.
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                               109




Remember, the inspection is not your goal. A safe working environment is!
This is just one tool used to get you there.
        School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                110




                                                   APPENDIX 12


              Workplace Inspection Form                               Inspection Date:

              Building:                                               Inspector:

              Room Number:                                            Supervisor:

              Department/Unit:                                        Phone:


             Y=Satisfactory
Y   N   N    N=Needs Improvement                           Comments                Corrective Action
        A    NA=Not Applicable                                                     Completion Date


             General

             1. Workplace clean and orderly

             2. Exits cleared of obstructions and
             accessible

             3. Stored materials secured and limited
                in height to prevent collapse

             4. Suitable Warning signs and tags
             utilized

             5. A hazard assessment has been
                completed and the appropriate
                personal protective equipment has
                been identified for each specific job

             Training

             1. Safety training and inspections held
                for new employees on a regular
                basis
        School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                  111




             Y=Satisfactory
Y   N   N    N=Needs Improvement                          Comments   Corrective Action
        A    NA=Not Applicable                                       Completion Date
             2. First Aid (and CPR) trained
                individuals available for medical
                emergencies

             3. Personnel familiar with the hazards
                of chemicals and trade products
                and have read the applicable
                Material Safety Data Sheets
                (MSDSs)

             4. All personnel familiar with
                           documented emergency
                           evacuation plan

             5. Fire extinguisher familiarization
                provided

             6. Personnel are trained in the proper
                selection, use and maintenance of
                personal protective equipment.

             Safe Lifting

             1. Workers trained on and using safe
                 lifting techniques
                a. Size up / test load
                b. Avoid heavy loads - split into
                      small loads or ask for help
                c. Bend knees to take pressure off
                      of back when lifting
                d. Consciously firm up abdominals
                      when lifting
                e. Never twist while lifting or holding
                      a load

             Fire

             1. Emergency exit signs identifiable
                and readily visible
        School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                112




             Y=Satisfactory
Y   N   N    N=Needs Improvement                        Comments   Corrective Action
        A    NA=Not Applicable                                     Completion Date

             2. Fire alarm pull stations and portable
                fire extinguishers visible and
                unobstructed

             3. Stairway doors are not kept open
                (unless equipped with a self-closing
                device

             4. 18 inch vertical clearance
                maintained from all sprinkler heads

             Earthquake

             1. Bookcases, filing cabinets, shelves,
                racks, cages, storage cabinets, and
                similar items over four feet tall are
                all secure

             2. Shelves have lips or other seismic
                restraints

             3. Portable machines or equipment
                secured against movement (unless
                actually being moved) by chains,
                lockable castors, straps, or other
                means where appropriate

             4. Top-heavy equipment of apparatus
                bolted down or secured to withstand
                accelerations typically expected in
                an earthquake

             5. Large and heavy objects stored on
                lower shelves or storage areas

             6. Valuable equipment sensitive to
                shock damage, such as
                instruments, computers, and
                glassware are stored in latched
        School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                  113




             Y=Satisfactory
Y   N   N    N=Needs Improvement                          Comments   Corrective Action
        A    NA=Not Applicable                                       Completion Date
                 cabinets or otherwise secured to
                 prevent falling.

             7. Storage areas uncluttered -
                providing clear evacuation routes in
                the event of an emergency

             8. Cabinets and lockers containing
                hazardous materials equipped with
                positive latching or sliding doors.

             Equipment

             1. Electrical Equipment
                a. Clean and working properly
                b. Properly grounded
                c. Proper clearances kept from
                   combustibles (paper, cardboard,
                   or combustible liquids)
                d. Adequately ventilated
                e. Approved extension cords,
                   extension cords with breakers,
                   and multiple connectors used
                   properly (e.g., not as fixed wiring)
                f. Frayed or damaged electric cords
                   replaced

             2. Machinery
                a. Clean and working properly
                b. Proper clearances kept from
                   combustibles
                c. Adequately ventilated
                d. Emergency stop mechanisms
                   identified and in working order
                e. Mechanical safeguards in place
                   and in working order

             Personal Protective Equipment

             1. Employees provided with and trained
        School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                         114




             Y=Satisfactory
Y   N   N    N=Needs Improvement                      Comments              Corrective Action
        A    NA=Not Applicable                                              Completion Date
                 in the proper use and selection of
                 respiratory protection

             2. Employees provided with and using
                hearing protection for noise
                hazardous equipment (noise level
                above 85 dBA)

             3. Employees provided with and using
                safety goggles/face shields when
                needed

             4. Employees provided with and using
                protective clothing (e.g., gloves,
                coats, aprons, coveralls)

             5. Steel-toed safety shoes worn when
                required

             Hazardous Materials

             1. Do you have any hazardous materials in your work area?

             2. If you have hazardous materials, are the MSDSs available?

             3. If you have hazardous materials, have they been inventoried within the last year?

             4. When transferring chemical materials from the original container to a secondary
                container are the secondary containers labeled with the proper name and
                hazard warnings, including target organs affected by an exposure?

             5. Please list any hazardous materials (by name and quantity) missing from any
                chemical inventories for this work area.
        School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                           115




             Y=Satisfactory
Y   N   N    N=Needs Improvement                   Comments   Corrective Action
        A    NA=Not Applicable                                Completion Date
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                              116




                                           APPENDIX 13

                            OFFICE SAFETY INSPECTION CHECKLIST

           Building:                                     Inspector:

           Room Number:                                  Date Inspected:

           Department/Unit                               Supervisor:


(Check if completed)
                                                                           Comments    Correction
                                                                                       Date
Administrative
 1. Is the departmental Health and Safety Plan in a location                         
      known and accessible to all employees?

 2. Is there a Safety Corner/Bulletin Board established with                         
           the following displayed (in terminology and language
           understood by the employees)?

           - WISHA Posters (available from EH&S, 543-7262)

           - The Emergency Phone Number poster

           - Other health and safety material/information

 3. Are training records maintained and available for review                         
           by employees, EH&S, and outside agencies?

 4. Are departmental safety inspection reports and                                   
           corrections maintained and available for review by
           employees, EH&S, and outside agencies?

 5. Are Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) and an                                   
           inventory sheet of all office products used in the
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                         117




                                                                      Comments    Correction
                                                                                  Date
           workplace on file and accessible to employees?

 6. Does the departmental Emergency Operations Plan                             
           include a floor plan/map of the department, including
           emergency evacuation site, procedures, and routes?
           Are employees/students instructed in emergency
           procedures (i.e., location of exits, location and use of
           fire extinguishers)?

General Safety Concerns
 1. Are the exits (doorways), exit aisles, or corridors free of                 
       obstacles and combustible storage?

 2. Are the fire doors closed securely at all times?                            

 3. Are light fixtures working and are diffuses installed?                      

 4. Have all loose rugs or mats been secured or removed?                        

 5. Have missing or loose ceiling tiles been repaired?                          

Electrical Cords and Outlets

 1. Are extension cords, multiple outlet strips, or cube taps                   
           plugged directly into a wall outlet?

 2. Are extension cords at a minimum 14 gauge (heavy-                           
           duty) and servicing only one appliance or fixture?

 3. Are cords in good condition without splices,                                
           deterioration, taping, damage, or being sharply bent or
           pinched?

 4. Are employees instructed not to use extension cords in                      
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                     118




                                                                  Comments    Correction
                                                                              Date
           place of permanent wiring?

           - Are extension cords prevented from running through
           walls, ceilings, or doors?

 5. Are extension cords grounded when servicing a                           
           grounded appliance or fixture?

 6. Are cord guards provided across an aisle or other                       
           passageway?

 7. Does the multiple outlet strip have a circuit breaker?                  

 8. Are multiple outlet strip cords 6' or under?                            

 9. Is clear access (36" clearance) provided to electrical                  
           panels?

 10. Are electrical cover plates provided on all electrical                 
           switches or outlets?

Heaters and Fans

 1. Do all heaters have a working tipover switch?                           

 2. Are combustibles kept 24" from all sides and tops of                    
           heaters?

 3. Are fine finger guards provided on fans?                                

 4. Are all electric space heaters plugged directly into the                
           wall?
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                       119




                                                                    Comments    Correction
                                                                                Date
 5. Are all fans below head level or secured?                                 

Seismic Bracing and Earthquake Preparedness

 1. Are furnishings more than four feet high braced? (This                    
           includes file cabinets, bookcases, desk hutches, etc.)

 2. Is all shelving secured?                                                  

 3. Are projection screens, maps, blackboards, etc.,                          
           fastened with a closed hook system or bolted to walls?

 4. Is overhead storage of heavy items or plants                              
           prevented?

 5. Are hanging planters or other objects prohibited?                         
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                120




                                           APPENDIX 14


2     University of Washington Environmental Health and Safety
2.1 Laboratory Safety Survey Checklist
Principal Investigator:                                                         Date:
Lab Contact:
Room Number:                                 Lab Name/Function:
Building:                                    Department:
Please check “YES,” “NO,” or “NOT APPLICABLE” for each item. Comments may be
written next to the question or at the end of the survey. Questions answered “NO”
require follow-up. Additional sheets may be attached if there is insufficient room in the
Comments and Corrective Action Items.
Y      N N                                   Laboratory Safety Survey
         A
                    A. Written Laboratory Safety Policies/Procedures/Programs
                    1. Have you obtained a UW Laboratory Safety Manual (which includes
                       Chemical Hygiene Plan information to be modified) and is it accessible
                       to every worker whenever work is being done in the laboratory?
                         a. Has laboratory-specific information been added?
                         b. Have Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) addressing all
                            hazardous processes/chemicals been written and added to (or
                            referenced in) the Laboratory Safety Manual?
                         c. Are the SOPs up-to-date with current safety information?
                    2. Does your laboratory or department have written procedures for:
                         a. Describing any revised procedures necessary due to laboratory
                            work outside usual work hours (such as first aid/emergency
                            response, etc.)?
                         b. Waste minimization/management?
                         c. Chemical spills?
                              i. Biohazard spills, if applicable?
                              ii. Radioactive material spills, if applicable?
                         d. Emergencies such as unplanned loss of power, gas, or water; fire;
                            severe weather; earthquake; etc.?
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                              121




                         e. Planned shut-down of gas, water, or electricity?
                    3. Are records kept of safety inspection results and corrective actions?
                    4. Are safety procedures/issues discussed at staff, department, or other
                       committee meetings and the discussions are documented?
                    B. Employee and Visitor Training
                    1. Do laboratory personnel working with hazardous materials receive
                       training in the following subjects:
                         a. Chemical safety, addressing all hazardous chemicals, and including
                            the proper selection, use, and maintenance of personal protective
                            equipment?
                         b. Chemical waste disposal?
                         c. Biohazard waste disposal, as applicable?
                         d. Radioactive waste disposal, as applicable?
                         e. Laboratory fire safety?
                         f. Fire extinguisher training?
                         g. Location and use of safety/deluge showers?
                         h. Location and use of eye washes?
                         i. Chemical spill clean up?
                         j. Bloodborne pathogen exposure control?
                         k. Shipping/transporting hazardous materials?
                         l. Safe work practices when using biological safety cabinets?
                         m. Safe work practices when using fume hoods?
                    2. Does your research supervisor or department keep records of what
                       training was provided, detailing the instructor's name, date, who
                       attended, and scope of training?
                    3. Have employees been instructed in the following:
                         a. What phone number to call for emergency assistance?
                         b. Where the fire alarm is located?
                         c. Where the nearest fire extinguisher is located?
                         d. How to evacuate upon hearing an alarm or other warning?
                    4. Are employees aware that they should call the Seattle Fire Department
                       (SFD) (or responding emergency service at sites outside Seattle) to
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                 122




                         clean up or contain accidental releases involving any quantity of
                         unknown hazardous substances or any quantity of hazardous
                         substances that represents a threat to health or safety?
                    5. Are faculty, staff, and students aware of the meaning of all laboratory
                       warning labels and signs used in the lab?
                    6. Are records kept of new employee and visitor safety orientations?
                    7. Are records kept of employee safety training (required and cont. ed.)?
                    C. General Emergency Preparedness
                    1. Are the following posted:
                         a. Emergency phone numbers?
                         b. Emergency instructions addressing fire, medical and chemical
                            emergencies, and biohazard and radiation emergencies as
                            needed?
                    2. Do employees know:
                         a. The location of the nearest fire alarm pull box?
                         b. The number of exits (doors) in the room? _______
                         c. The number of escape “kick-out” panels in room? _______
                         d. That fire codes prohibit the use of any door wedges?
                         e. The location of the fire extinguisher(s) in this room?
                         f. The posted location of the Washington State Labor & Industries
                            posters entitled "Job Safety & Health Protection," "Your Rights as a
                            Worker," and “Notice to Employers?” (Available from EH&S)
                         g. Location(s) of complete/up-to-date first-aid kit(s)/supply(ies)?
                         h. The location of a chemical spill kit?
                    3. Have employees been provided information about the importance of
                       personal emergency preparedness?
                    4. If the lab has an emergency preparedness kit or supplies, have it/they
                       been checked in the last 6 months?
                    5. Is a First Aid and CPR – certified responder available on all shifts that
                       employees are working?
                         a. Do all workers know who these people are, or how to contact the
                            responding agency?
                         b. Are instructions for contacting the responding agency posted, or are
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                  123




                              these responders listed by name on a sign or in a document (such
                              as department Safety and Health Plan or Lab. Safety Manual)?


                    D. Laboratory Conditions
                    1. Does this lab use proper housekeeping practices which include:
                         a. Removal of residues on floor/bench tops?
                         b. Uncluttered benchtops and hoods?
                         c. Clear pathways to eyewashes and safety showers?
                         d. Clear pathways to exits, both inside and outside the laboratory?
                         e. Is there easy access to electrical panels?
                    2. Electrical Equipment
                         a. Is equipment plugged into permanent wiring outlets (not extension
                            cords)?
                         b. Are multi plug fused power strips used if permanent wiring outlets
                            are not available?
                         c. If electrical equipment or power strip has frayed/damaged cords or
                            damaged plugs, has it been removed from service until repaired?
                    3. General Lab Equipment
                         a. Are belts, pulleys, and other exposed moving equipment parts
                            guarded?
                         b. For reduced pressure processes, is there a filter or trap between the
                            experimental setup and the evacuating equipment?
                         c. If a research pressurized vessel or a similar high-pressure system is
                            in use, has it been pressure tested? (Do not include compressed
                            gas cylinders or lab bench gases.)
                         d. If a pressurized vessel or system is in use and if the vessel or
                            system should have an over pressure device, does it have one?
                         e. Are explosion shields available if they are needed?
                         f. Is equipment serviced to ensure that it functions safely?
                         g. Are equipment service and inspection records kept?
                    4. Safety Equipment
                         a. Is a first-aid kit available which is appropriate for the size of the lab
                            and located in an easily accessible spot?
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                  124




                         b. Is the lab first-aid kit fully stocked with non-expired materials?
                         c. If corrosive, irritating or substances toxic by eye contact are being
                            used, can an eye wash be reached within 10 seconds
                            (approximately 50 feet)?
                         d. If corrosive, irritating or substances toxic by skin contact are being
                            used, can a safety shower be reached within 10 seconds
                            (approximately 50 feet)?
                         e. If a fume hood is available, does it have a valid EH&S certification
                            sticker that marks the sash height for 100 feet per minute airflow?
                         f. If a fume hood is available, are the electrical receptacles (sockets)
                            outside the hood?
                    5. If the room has ceiling sprinklers, is the lab maintaining an 18 inch
                       clearance below the sprinklers?
                    6. Is the general room ventilation adequate (temperature and odors
                       controlled, etc.)?
                    E. Hazardous Material Safety
                         (Materials considered potentially hazardous include cleaners, solvents,
                         laboratory chemicals, grease, disinfectants, dental products, etc.)
                    1. Is a current inventory of hazardous materials available?
                         a. If yes, does it include chemical amounts, container type, pressure
                            and temperature?
                         b. If yes, is it on the campus Laboratory Safety System (LSS)?
                    2. Do all lab personnel have access to Material Safety Data Sheets
                       (MSDSs) during all hours of operation?
                         a. If the method is to download MSDSs from the Laboratory Safety
                            System (LSS) (a chemical database on the UW network), can all
                            employees prove they know how to get an MSDS?
                         b. If the method is to maintain a file of hard copy MSDSs, can all
                            employees prove they know where the file is located?
                         c. Are MSDSs available for all hazardous chemicals used in the
                            laboratory?
                    3. Are all containers labeled, showing chemical contents and appropriate
                       hazard warning labels?
                    4. Are incompatible hazardous materials isolated from each other (i.e.,
                       stored according to chemical class)?
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                    5. If hazardous materials are stored in this laboratory, are they stored in:
                         a. A mechanically ventilated storage area?
                         b. Chemically-resistant containers?
                         c. Designated areas such as placarded cabinets, shelves, etc.?
                    6. Are chemical storage shelves:
                         a. Protected with a lip or barrier?
                         b. Designed and installed to carry the current load?
                    7. If present, are refrigerators containing hazardous materials placarded
                       to identify contents and restrictions (e.g., “NO FOOD”)?
                    8. If a refrigerator is used to store flammable materials, is it explosion-
                       proof and labeled as explosion proof?
                    9. If ten (10) gallons or more of flammable liquids are in a room:
                         a. Are the flammable liquids stored in a storage cabinet designed for
                            storing flammables?
                         b. Are flammable liquids storage areas located away from open flames
                            or sparks, and labeled (e.g., with signs reading “Flammable”)?
                    10. Are ethers and peroxide-forming compounds (e.g., aldehydes, ethers,
                        benzylic hydrogen compounds, allylic compounds, vinyl compounds)
                        dated when received by the department and when opened in the lab?
                    11. Are the dated containers of ethers and peroxide-forming compounds
                        checked to ensure they do not exceed allowable storage times?
                    12. Are all staff familiar with storage, handling, and testing of peroxide-
                        forming chemicals prior to performing procedures that can increase
                        potential for peroxide development (e.g., distillations)?
                    13. Are piping (tubing), valves, and fittings compatible with the hazardous
                        materials for which they are used and checked periodically for
                        integrity?
                    14. If compressed gas cylinders are located in the lab:
                         a. Are the cylinders secured with chains/straps at two levels when
                            used in a permanent location, or secured on an approved cart?
                         b. Are the cylinders capped when not in use?
                         c. Are the cylinders stored away from heat sources?
                    15. Are staff aware that state safety regulations protect worker’s exposure
                        for many specific hazardous materials (such as, but not limited to:
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                126




                         benzene, formaldehyde, lead, vinyl chloride, and chemicals considered
                         particularly hazardous; i.e. carcinogens, highly acute, and reproductive
                         toxicants)?
                    16. Are there designated and labeled areas for handling particularly
                        hazardous substances? (These particularly hazardous substances
                        include but are not limited to: select carcinogens, reproductive
                        toxicants, select agents, and materials with high acute toxicity.)
                    17. Are the designated and labeled areas (# 16 above) supplied with local
                        exhaust, such as a fume hood?
                    18. Is an external container like a Rubbermaid tub always used when
                        carrying particularly hazardous materials and multiple containers, and
                        whenever possible when carrying less hazardous materials?
                    19. Are all hazardous procedures, and processes using hazardous
                        materials conducted in a fume hood?
                    20. Are unnecessary materials removed from the hood so that procedures
                        can be performed at least 6 inches inside the face of the hood?
                    21. Has the laboratory replaced their reagents, procedures or equipment
                        with less hazardous materials (such as replacing mercury-containing
                        thermometers) when possible?
                    22. Are chemical spill cleanup supplies (e.g., absorbents like spill pads,
                        or diatomaceous earth, and neutralizers like citric acid) readily available
                        in the lab at all times and selected based on materials likely to spill
                        (e.g., if mercury is used, is a mercury spill kit available)?
                    F. Biological Safety
                    1. If laboratory operations involve potential biohazard exposures, is a
                       copy of the UW Biohazard Safety Manual available (1997 edition)?
                    2. If the Bloodborne Pathogen Standard applies, have all of the staff:
                         a. Received the required training?
                         b. Received the Hepatitis B immunization or signed a declination?
                    3. Has the Principal Investigator filed a "Research Project Hazard
                       Assessment Form" for all research ongoing in the laboratory?
                    4. If the laboratory's activities involve recombinant DNA, does it have a
                       current project registration with the UW Recombinant DNA Committee?
                    5. Is a biosafety cabinet used for procedures where the manipulation of
                       potentially infectious material could create aerosols or splashes?
                    6. Are sharps placed in sharps containers at point of generation and
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                                                127




                         autoclaved prior to disposal?
                    7. Are biohazardous liquid wastes decontaminated by autoclaving,
                       bleaching, or other methods before disposal via the sewer?
                    8. Are biohazardous solid wastes autoclaved before disposal?


                    G. Radiation Safety
                    1. Are radiation safety inspections periodically performed?


                    H. Hazardous Chemical Wastes
                         Anyone generating wastes (such as labs, shops, stores, etc.) bears the
                         responsibility for handling the waste according to all Federal, State,
                         County, and University regulations. Waste reduction and minimization
                         are important in reducing hazards and/or quantities of wastes.)
                    1. Do people responsible for purchasing chemicals review reference
                       materials (such as MSDSs available in LSS) to evaluate materials
                       before purchase to select the least toxic materials possible and to
                       identify possible waste streams?
                    2. Are reactions run on the smallest scale possible to reduce chemical
                       waste?
                    3. Are process waste streams segregated (i.e, not mixing different
                       chemicals), which makes disposal cheaper and easier?
                    4. Are employees familiar with the procedure for requesting chemical or
                       radioactive waste pickup by EH&S?
                    5. Are glass and sharp plastic waste segregated and disposed of
                       separately from general trash?
                    6. Is glass waste properly packaged and labeled?
                    7. Are empty containers originally containing acutely-hazardous chemicals
                       triple rinsed prior to being discarded?
                    8. A limited number of chemicals can be disposed of in the sink (call 685-
                       3759 if you have questions). If any chemicals are disposed of in the
                       sink:
                         a. Is the required sewer discharge log maintained?
                         b. If a discharge log is kept, is the following sign posted?
                              “IN CASE OF A SPILL TO THE SEWER
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                              CONTACT EH&S AT 685-3759 OR 616-0585”
                    9. Are hazardous chemicals neutralized/filtered/destroyed when possible
                       in order to reduce hazardous wastes quantity or hazard?
                         a. Are procedures included as part of the protocol’s SOP?
                         b. Is a Treatment Log maintained to document quantities treated and
                            filtration or destruction methods used for disposal?


                    I. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
                    1. Have potential exposure hazards been assessed?
                    2. If PPE (e.g., gloves, goggles, face shields, lab coats, safety glasses
                       with side-shields, etc.) is required, have the requirements been noted in
                       SOPs, health and safety plans, or other guidance used by all laboratory
                       workers?
                    3. Is required PPE available and in good condition?
                    4. Are all laboratory personnel:
                         a. Instructed as to general departmental rules for PPE (such as rules
                            to remove and store lab coats in the laboratory before leaving) and
                            any process specific requirements for additional PPE?
                         b. Informed as to where these rules are posted or filed?
                         c. Trained in the correct procedures for selecting the appropriate PPE,
                            inspecting for damaged PPE prior to wear, correctly donning and
                            adjusting for proper fit (if required), doffing without spreading
                            contamination, and maintaining and disposing of the PPE?
                    5. When selecting the type of protective gloves(s) required, does the staff
                       use all glove selection resources available (e.g., MSDSs, Laboratory
                       Safety Manual Appendix G, vendor catalogs and laboratory staff
                       experience that the glove provides adequate dexterity)?
                    6. If respirators (half face, full face, SCBA, Air Line) are being used:
                         a. Has EH&S been contacted to assess the exposure?
                         b. Have users received medical evaluation, training and fit testing in
                            accordance with the EH&S Respiratory Protection Program?
                         c. Are respirators properly inspected, cleaned, serviced and stored?
                         d. If cartridges are used, are they the correct ones for each hazard
                            exposure?
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                    J. Occupational Health
                    1. Do all personnel know that following an incident or accident they must
                       complete the appropriate UW Incident / Accident / Quality Improvement
                       Report form?
                    2. Do staff know that there is an occupational health nurse available for
                       consultation at 685-1026? (Note: In case of a medical emergency,
                       staff should go to the nearest emergency room for care.)


Comments:




Corrective Action Items:




Laboratory Survey Conducted By: (Print)
PI or Supervisor Signature:                                                 Date:
School of Nursing Health and Safety Plan                             130




                                           APPENDIX 15


In the aftermath of February 28, 2001’s earthquake, it has become
evident that we need to better prepare our students for what to do in
case of emergency when they are in class. For their safety and
yours, please

***ADD THE FOLLOWING 2 STATEMENTS
TO YOUR COURSE SYLLABI***,
every course, every quarter.

These statements have been approved by the Safety Committee. I
realize that they neither answer all of the questions nor address all of
the possible scenarios – but they are a good start.

IN CASE OF AN EARTHQUAKE: DROP, COVER, and HOLD.
Once the shaking stops, take your valuables and leave the building.
Do not plan to return for the rest of the day. Do not return to the
building until you have received an all-clear from somebody “official”,
the Web, or e-mail. Call 547-INFO or check the UW home page for
updates on UW and building status. If the building is closed for
longer than one day and an alternate location has been found for this
class, it will be communicated by the instructor via e-mail to all
students.

IN CASE OF A FIRE ALARM: Take your valuables and leave the
building. Plan to return to class once the alarm has stopped. Do not
return to the building until you have received an all-clear from
somebody “official”, the Web, or e-mail. Call 547-INFO or check the
UW home page for updates on UW and building status. If the
building is closed for longer than one day and an alternate location
has been found for this class, it will be communicated by the
instructor via e-mail to all students.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
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