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									                           Casas Global Outreach


                      Short-Term Training

            Trip Members Manual
                           Revised November 2010
                 (Scroll down beyond links to reach topic manually)


Orientation I: Going and Sending                                            p. 2-8
     Purpose, Guidelines, Passports, Lines Of Authority, Pr@yer, Senders
Orientation II: Sensitive Countries                                         p. 9-20
     Open countries, Security, World Wide Caution, Liability Release
     Orientation Section Questions
Finance                                                                     p. 21-28
     Why, Who, How, Sample Letters, Finance Section Questions
M1n1stry Skills I: Storytelling and Photo Story Book                        p. 29-32
     Tools to provide story opportunities
M1n1stry Skills II: Storytelling to Other Religions                         p. 33-39
     Cultural knowledge sharing J3sus‘ story; Names Of G0d
     M1nistry Skills Section Questions
Cross-Cultural Training and Pr@yer Walking                                  p. 40-46
     Worldview, Cultural Stress, Critical M1ss1on Issues, Pr@yer Walking
Photo Tips                                                                  p. 47-49
     Cross-Cultural Section Questions
Health and Safety                                                           p. 50-59
     Security Awareness, Health Cautions, Health Tips
     Emergency Planning, Packing
     Communications Agreement                                              p. 60-68
     Post trip Experience, Giving the Report                               p. 70-76
     Health and Safety Section Questions


Appendices:                                                                 p. 77
    1.    Trip Agreement
    2.    Five Basic Stages of Culture Stress
    3.    Team roles
    4.    Liability Release Agreement – IMB
    5.    Insurance description
    6.    Casas M1ssi0n Trips contribution form sample




                                                                                      TM   1
                                      Orientation I

Why Should I Go On A Global Team?
Some may ask, ―Why should I go on a Global Team? Shouldn‘t I reach those without Chr1st in
my own country before going to other countries?‖ The least-reached in our homeland must not be
neglected. We have the privilege of living a life of witness to the world right around us and sharing
with them the story of G0d‘s love in our own lives.

Throughout Scripture, however, G0d‘s people having always gone beyond their own worlds and
enter into the worlds of people groups who do not know Him:

       Jesus led his group of ordinary disciples on cross-cultural short-term trips to grow them
        spiritually. They went to Tyre, Sidon, Perea, the Decapolis and twice each to Samaria
        and Gergasa/Gadara.
       Paul brought everyday Chr1st-followers with him on his journeys to develop them (Acts
        16:1-5, Acts 20:4).
       Ancient house chvrches* sent their members on short-term trips to help their long-term
        m1ssi0naries, like Paul (Philippians 3:25-30, Romans 16:1-24, Acts 18:27).
Casas B!ble Fellowships grow through sending their members on short term trips. The Home
Teams grow in faith as they entrust their members to G0d and bond as a community as they send
them out. The Away Teams gain confidence in sharing their faith and are stretched spiritually by
participating in the work of dedicated Chr1st-followers living in humble and challenging
circumstances.

We often wonder whether we have something to contribute, or whether we will know what to say
if we try to speak to seekers. Jesus reminds us that:

        But the Counselor, the Holy Spirit . . . will teach you all things and will remind you of
        everything I have said to you. (John 14: 26, NIV)

G0d called you to this m1ssi0n* since before you were born and He will empower you with His
words of truth. The Lord is glorified through your living worship as you bring the name of Jesus to
those who have not heard or understood.
* Note that certain words are intentionally misspelled to add online security for this document.

What Can Short-Term Trips Do?
At Casas we very carefully send our short-term trip workers (you) to help our Casas-supported
long-term workers (m1ssi0naries) succeed in very critical ways. You become part of their
strategic plan. Short-term teams become even more important when they return several times to
an area.

Two verses help us define the roles of short-term trip members.

        John 4:36-37 ―Already he who reaps is receiving wages, and is gathering fruit for eternal
        life; that he who sows and he who reaps may rejoice together. For in this case the saying
        is true, ‗One sows, and another reaps‘.‖

        1 Corinthians 3:4-7 ―What then is Apollos? And what is Paul? Servants through whom
        you believed, even as the Lord gave opportunity to each one. I planted, Apollos watered,
        but G0d was causing the growth. So then neither the one who plants nor the one who
        waters is anything but G0d who causes the growth.‖


                                                                                                    TM   2
There are three stages of the harvest listed in these verses. All three stages are equally
important. These stages are sowing, planting, watering, and reaping.

What would these stages look like?

       Planting – Jesus said ―the seed is the word,‖ so planting is sharing the story of Jesus
        with strategic people or distributing literature or media. (Also called ―sowing.‖)

       Watering is helping healthy plants grow. So this is reinforcing the message of those who
        originally heard - by sharing the story of Jesus from your point of view and sharing your
        own faith story.

       Harvesting is collecting the harvest of what has been planted and watered, and G0d has
        caused it to increase. This may be the privilege of seeing people come to faith. (Also
        called ―reaping.‖)

As a short-term worker, you may be asked to participate in projects that are in each of these
categories. Some of the categories will fit you better than others. Almost everyone wants to reap,
but few get this privilege. Remember, what ever stage of the process you contribute to is vital.
Every person works together to bring one into the Kingdom.

Casas Global Outreach M1n1stry
The Global Outreach team exists for ventures like this. It is a Casas adult support m1n1stry
chartered to help B!ble Fellowships send Casas people outside their normal spheres of influence
(culture, language, or nation) to make disciples of Jesus, to mentor new followers of Chr1st, to
start new chvrches, and to partner with existing chvrches to make new followers of Chr1st.


What is the Purpose of Casas Short-Term M1n1stry?
To help your B!ble Fellowship do what you are doing now: understand relational local/global
outreach and initiate trips that send your members to do field work with a Casas-supported
m1ssi0nary who can receive teams. Some go while others pr@y, give financially, encourage, and
support both the short-term members from their class and the long-term m1ssi0naries they serve,
and then to use the skills they learn globally in ministries locally.


General Guidelines
Each project is individually designed based on the field strategy of your long-term worker. Your
Trip Leader will train you as to what you should expect to do on the field. However, the key word
on any m1ssi0n trip is flexibility. Strategies change. New and exciting opportunities are often
presented by the Lord on the spur of the moment (or the evil one sets up a road block). Just
because you are prepared to do English conversation with college students doesn‘t mean you
won‘t end up sharing your story with schoolteachers!
           The exact dates for the projects are determined by the host Global Worker and your
            Trip Leader.
           Most teams are gone from 10-14 days, although this may vary.
           Your Trip Leader will make all of your travel arrangements for you.
           Team sizes vary according to the type of project.
           Teams are scheduled on a first come basis.
           Applicants must complete all requirements to qualify as a trip member (See Trip
            Agreement in Appendix)



                                                                                              TM    3
         Trip members must be 18 years of age to participate without a parent. Anyone under
          18 may participate with at least one parent, the proper paper work, and the
          agreement of the Trip Leader.

Required Training and Highly Recommended Training
  The following training is required for all Global Trip Members:
         Read Trip Members Manual and submit answers to all section questions
         Attend Orientation and Finance Global Outreach training
         Attend all team meetings designated by your Trip Leader to prepare for trip
          destination
       Attend the Recap Global Outreach training
  Highly Recommended training for all Global Trip Members:
      The Pathways to Global Understanding course or Principles of Global Outreach series

Requirements to serve as a Casas Global Trip Member/Goer
  Pre-Trip
         Listen to the Holy Spirit as He calls you to join a team.
         Fill out an Application with References or an Update.
         Secure ―home team‖ senders/supporters to provide practical support,
          encouragement, listening, communication, pr@yer support.
         Raise funds for the Short-Term trip.
         Prepare through personal devotions and B!ble study
         Attend all trainings or make-ups.
         Voluntarily place yourself under the authority of the Trip Leader.
         Remain supportive to the Trip Leader‘s authority until the group returns to Tucson.
         Recognize that even if you are leading a specific task you will still follow the direction
          of the Trip Leader.
        Pr@y without ceasing for team unity, for the field team and people group, for the
         Father‘s plans to be followed
  On-Trip
         Participate in daily devotionals and debriefings.
         Participate in the field workers‘ schedule.
         Take safety precautions.
         Set aside self while on the field, keeping in mind the trip is not about just you.
         Always put first the people group you‘re serving.
         Always present a positive witness in public.
        Pr@y without ceasing for team unity, for the field team and people group, for the
         Father‘s plans to be followed
  Post-Trip
         Attend the final debriefing (see Appendix) and team reunion gathering.
         Report to the Senders how G0d used their support to carry out the project.
         Participate in the team‘s trip presentation to ABFs.
         Pr@y for your team as they re-enter their routines, for the field team‘s continued
          work, for the indigenous people you came in contact with to know the Father, for the
          Father‘s kingdom to multiply



                                                                                               TM   4
Applications
Every person who goes on a short term trip will fill out one Casas Global Outreach application:
       Application for ABF Members - This is the normal application for all Casas-led trips.
       Application update - Use this renewal form if you submitted a full application within the last
       2 years.
       Application for Key Leaders and Pastors - Use this form if you are a ABF Director, ABF
       Teacher, Elder, Pastor, Pastor's Spouse
       Reference Form - Use this form if you are submitting a reference for someone else.
The full application and references will be resubmitted every fourth year. The completed forms
will be returned to Casas Global Outreach. Global Outreach application, reference and renewal
forms may be found at www.gocasas.com.
Beginning with all Short-Term Trips (STT) for 2010, every applicant needs to agree to a
Background Check, which supports our Casas Child Protection policies. When on the field during
a STT, trip members may be asked to work with children even though this was not preplanned.
Therefore, we require the background checks on all STT applicants.
A Medical History is required of each applicant. Some medical conditions may prevent an
applicant from participating in a STT due to a trip‘s location, e.g. too remote of an area, difficult
terrain, and/or strenuous activities.

Acceptance Letters
Ten to fourteen days after an application or renewal has been submitted, a letter will be emailed
to the applicant. This letter will either accept or decline the applicant as a Trip Member for that
year. The applicant is accepted or declined for that specific trip for that specific year. Applicants
who may be declined for a trip may reapply for a future trip.

Insurance
On Casas-led trips, Casas Global Outreach will pay for your supplemental travel insurance. This
insurance covers you while you are traveling outside of the country and is supplemental to your
personal insurance policy. It includes evacuation insurance in case you need a hospital with a
greater level of care than is available locally. It also provides air services if you need to be
evacuated for political reasons. See Appendix for coverage information.

Money for the Trip
The cost listed for your trip covers your plain ticket, in-country travel, hotel, three meals per day
and water. You will need to pay for snacks. You will probably want to bring some additional
money for local goods. Your team will have time set aside for cultural sites and shopping. This is
an important part of the re-entry strategy.

            How much money do I bring? The amount you bring is certainly up to you but most
             trip members usually bring approximately $150-$250.

            May I bring my ATM Card? You will need to discuss with your Trip Leader the
             advisability of bringing an ATM card. In many countries they are the fastest, easiest
             way to get cash in the local currency. The card will also give the most up-to-date
             exchange rate directly between banks. Unfortunately, not all countries have the
             infrastructure to support ATMs. Ask your country representative at a Team
             Preparation Training.

            How about Travelers Checks? Please Do Not Bring Traveler‘s Checks. Traveler‘s
             Checks are difficult and time consuming to cash. All of your routine expenses are
             covered, so you will not need to travel with large sums of money.




                                                                                                   TM   5
            How do I bring my money? Bring bills that are in good condition. Do not bring bills
             that are torn, worn or marked on. They are often not accepted. New $20s are the
             easiest to exchange.

Passports and Visas
A United States Passport is required for all US citizens serving on short-term trips outside of the
country. Beginning June 2009, a passport will become mandatory to return to the U.S. after travel
to Mexico or Canada. To travel out of the country with a US Passport, the Passport must be valid
for more than six months from your planned reentry date into the United States.

Begin the Passport process right away. Passports normally take three to six weeks to receive.
There is a fee for expedited Passports.

Passport photos can be taken at local businesses like Costco or Walgreens. Passport
applications are received at selected local post offices (http://iafdb.travel.state.gov) or by mail (if
the passport is a renewal). Call for an appointment if you are going to the post offices.

The two most common passport locations for Casas people are the

    (1) Oro Valley Station (at La Cañada and Tangerine), which will also take your passport
        pictures for a fee, but you have to call first for an appointment to (520) 229-0320 and

    (2) The International Affairs Passport Facility near the U of A at 1128 E. Mabel St.

See www.GoCasas.com - click on ―go global‖ for Trip Links to Passport forms.

After passports are obtained then visas can be requested. A visa normally takes an additional
three weeks or so unless expedited for a higher fee. When applying for a visa, you will be visiting
the country as a ―Tourist.‖

Vaccinations
Most of the locations for Casas Global Team trips will require inoculations. There are several
places you can receive these:

       your local doctor
       Concentra Medical Center 3402 E Broadway, Tucson, AZ (520) 881-0050
       Pima County Health 175 W Irvington Rd, Tucson, AZ

Pima County Health and Concentra Medical Center will have the latest updates on government
required inoculations and are the places most likely to carry the serums in stock. Pima County
Health is most likely to be the least expensive. Inoculations often cost upwards of $100.

Lines of Authority
The short-term m1ssi0nary works under three sets of moral and legal authority.

    The authority of Jesus Chr1st
    The authority of governments
             Host government - If the law of the host culture says women can not drive, then
                women can not drive. If the law of the host country says men and women do not
                eat at the same table, then they eat at separate tables. Remember: There is no
                innocent until proven guilty, one phone call or right to a lawyer. Follow the laws
                and customs of the country.




                                                                                                   TM     6
              Our government - Someone once asked, ―Can I smoke marijuana in Amsterdam?
                 It‘s legal there? The answer? No. If an action is illegal for you in the United
                 States, it is illegal for you in another country.
         The authority of our leaders
              Host M1ssi0nary - The final authority on the field is the host M1ssi0nary.
              Trip Leader - The final authority on the team is the Trip Leader.
                  As a Trip Member, never go around the Trip Leader to get your own answer from
                  the host M1ssi0nary. Example: You have asked the Trip Leader what m1n1stry
                  the team will be doing the next day. You don‘t like the answer or think it is wrong.
                  You say, ―I don‘t think that‘s right. I‘m going to ask the M1ssi0nary.‖ Don‘t – that
                  just sets you up as ―Junior Trip Leader‖ and can potentially set up a split on the
                  team. Now who is the team to come to for information, you or the Trip Leader?

Prepare Through Pr@yer
The B!ble gives us many truths, but your main focus during a m1ssi0n trip is on G0d and His
ongoing promises.

Seek pr@yer covering from your supporters – family, friends, B!ble Fellowship members – to
begin pr@ying for you as you prepare to go on the trip, as you are on the trip, and as you return
to Tucson and re-enter your regular routine. Provide them regular updates so they can pr@y
specifically for your needs, sending emails and reporting weekly to your ABF: praises and
petitions.

As a team, pr@y with your leader and fellow trip members for the needs of all the goers, of the
leader, and of the field workers, including the people group you will be going to serve on the field.
These needs include distractions, deceptions, fears, finances, etc. – small to big; minor to
intense. The Evil one may attempt to defeat you; don‘t give him a foothold.

Pr@y that you will stand surrounded in promises such as:

         G0d is our refuge and strength, an ever-present help in trouble. Therefore we will not
         fear, though the earth give way and the mountains fall into the heart of the sea, though its
         waters roar and foam and the mountains quake with their surging. (Psalm 46:1-3)

         When I am afraid, I will trust in you. In G0d, whose word I praise, in G0d I trust; I will not
         be afraid. (Psalm 56:3-4a)

         I will sing of the LORD’S great love forever; with my mouth I will make your faithfulness
         known through all generations. (Psalm 89: 1)

    back to top




                                                                                                   TM     7
                                                                                  Name of Goer:

                                                            Senders
ABF: On Sunday mornings: (1) pr@ys for goers, (2) comm1ssi0ns goers, (3) celebrates with goers (by hearing their presentation),
and then (4) celebrates with chvrch at the next Street Fair.
ABF Members: carry out the support below:

Practical supporters                                                   Communicators
       Pre-Trip – Senders:                                                    Pre-Trip – Senders:
        Commit now to caring for pets, plants, mail, bills, etc.              As needed, help goers write, type, copy, fold,
                                                                                stuff, seal, and mail their support letters.
        Commit now to do airport drop-off and pick-up
                                                                               Commit now to provide communication during trip
        Help gather any items or gifts needed on the trip
                                                                                (forward email; phone or web cam in class).
       On-Trip – Senders:
                                                                              On-Trip – Senders:
        Carry out all the goers‘ ―back home‖ tasks
                                                                               Carry out communication responsibilities agreed
       Post-Trip - Senders:                                                     to, i.e., email forwarding, phone/ webcam in class
        Meet at airport.                                                     Post-Trip– Senders:
        Report on assigned tasks completed during trip.                       Assist goers as needed to write their presentation
                                                                                stories (instructions at GoCasas.com).
Encouragers: Senders:                                                          Assist as needed to prepare Presentation slides.
                                                                               Assist goers in celebrating at Street
       Pre-Trip
                                                                                Fair.
        Speak words of blessing to free goers of
         self-doubt and worry (―I read about the destination - I
         believe G0d will use you,‖ ―G0d can provide.‖                 Pr@yer partners (10):
        Enter their world by attending appropriate training               Pre-Trip
         meetings with goers.
                                                                               For health, encouragement, personal issues,
        Write several notes goers can open on trip                             financial support, logistical concerns, and training.
        Plan a send-off event (e.g., dinner)                                  For G0d to provide all needed senders.
       On-Trip
                                                                               For on-field Global Workers as they prepare.
        Email, ―Keep up the good work‘‖ ―We lifted you up                    On-Trip
         today‖                                                                For spiritual warfare and Kingdom effectiveness
       Post-Trip - Role is now complete.                                       For goers to be healthy, safe, bold, humble in
                                                                                serving, and follow leadership.
Listeners: Senders:                                                            For senders/families to be safe, bold, and serving.
       Pre-Trip                                                                Unity within and humility among trip leadership.
                                                                              Effective debriefing and follow-up for the goers.
        Commit to meet with goers after trip to ask intelligent
                                                                           Post-Trip
         questions about their experience (get questions from
         GO) and listen carefully                                              Get current pr@yer needs from goers and
       On-Trip -                                                                listeners.
                                                                               To give goers ways to integrate growth from this
        Begin pr@ying through the list questions
                                                                                experience into their daily lives in Tucson
       Post-Trip
                                                                               For on-field follow-up of hearers, workers, next
        Make an appointment with the goer - allow 2-3 hours in                 team
         an emotionally safe, interruption-free environment.
        Sit down to listen, really listen, to Goer‘s answers.         Financial supporters
        If follow-up is needed, refer goers to the appropriate
         people (GO Pastor, Pastoral Care, etc.)                           Pre-Trip
                                                                               Give per goers‘ instructions (on time, who to
                                                                                make/give checks to)
                                                                               Encourage others to give
                                                                              On-Trip – Technically finished – consider pr@yer
                                                                                support
                                                                              Post-Trip – Role is now complete.




                                                                                                                                    TM   8
                 Orientation II – Sensitive Countries

What are Open Countries?
―Open‖ countries are locations where m1ssi0naries are working openly. They call themselves
―m1ssi0naries.‖ They are welcomed by the government and the local people. They have visas and
work permits that clearly state they are in the country on a religious platform (for a religious
purpose).

    We call Open Countries Level I Countries. This indicates the level of threat to the worker and
       the indigenous believer. Level I means there is no threat to the m1ssi0nary or the indigenous
       believer from the government or other majority groups if it becomes known they are
       believers. This is most common in countries with a majority population of Chr1stian
       background, such as Brazil, Mexico, South Africa.

    We call Semi–Open Countries Level II Countries. Level II means there is some degree of
       threat to either workers or indigenous believers. Often the long-term workers are in the
       country on a platform other than ―m1ssi0nary‖ or there is some persecution for indigenous
       believers. This is common in countries in which Chr1stians are not the majority.

    We call Sensitive Countries Level III Countries. Level III means there is a known threat to
       long-term workers and indigenous believers. The long-term workers are in the country on a
       platform other than ―m1ssi0nary‖. If it is determined that they are in the country for the
       purpose of evangelizing or to bring people to a saving faith in Jesus, they are ejected from
       the country. If an indigenous believer is discovered, they are persecuted by the majority
       people, often can‘t get a job or get imprisoned. This is common in countries in which
       Chr1stians are only a very tiny minority.
In all countries, whether they are labeled level I, II or III, we may be limited with some information we
may share. For example, some countries limit what a volunteer may do in the country. In Zambia,
volunteers may not come to the country to do work which may be done by a Zambian national; in the
eyes of the Zambian government, to do construction work there would be taking the job of a national.
Therefore, we may be asked not to divulge that information, and instead state our reason for the trip
simply as Tourist, even if we might be doing some handy-man tasks while there.
You may not be going on a Short-Term Trip to a sensitive country, but you must consider the cultural
differences of your destination regardless of the security level. As you read through the guidelines for
going into a Level III country, we would like for all Goers to have an understanding of how volunteers
on a Level III trip must prepare. Please pr@y for our Global Workers in these areas and for our
teams going to assist them.




                                                                                                     TM   9
“Sensitive” Country – Level III Security
Casas identifies certain countries and regions to be ―sensitive‖ based on religious background and
Persecution Index (http://www.joshuaproject.net and http://sb.od.org). Because Casas has several
projects in High Security Areas, we want to give you some guidelines to help you understand the
confidential nature of these trips. It is important that you read this information thoroughly and follow it
carefully.
                        THIS INFORMATION IS FOR YOUR EYES ONLY AND
                 SHOULD NOT BE LEFT WHERE SOMEONE ELSE MAY READ IT


1. Why the need for security?
       Long-Term M1n1stry Impact
        Making our efforts public could destroy our opportunity to go into this country in the future.
        This in turn would make it impossible for us to disciple those who have become Chr1stians
        through our m1n1stry.
       Indigenous Chr1stian Security
        Indigenous Chr1stians could face serious consequences if their involvement in Chr1stian
        activities became known. These consequences take the form of surveillance, questioning and
        detainment by the Security Police and often can result in the loss of homes and jobs.


2. What you can’t say
       The name of the destination city, destination country, and organization is confidential.
       The only instance you can disclose the country is to five or fewer trustworthy nuclear family
        members who live in your household (see below).
       Objects, photos, videos, or garments that have the name of the sensitive country or city are
        also forms of communication and will be shown or worn only inside the nuclear
        family/household.
       Some Global Workers in some sensitive countries may have more lax standards than Casas.
        Other Global Workers may give three messages to three audiences.
       In these cases, Casas still requires our team members to live up to the Casas standards so
        that if there is a security threat, Casas members will never be the cause. What is not
        dangerous one day may be dangerous the next.


3. What you can say
    You may think not telling others all about what you or your friends will be doing is difficult.
    Actually, you can say a lot - just not a few key details of where it takes place.

    Besides your nuclear family living in your household, there are three main groups of people you
    would talk to: Chr1st-followers here, secular authorities here and on the trip, and non-Chr1st-
    followers on the trip.

    Some people have tried to create a different message to tell to each group. But that makes the
    trip member feel untruthful and inauthentic, and it creates a security risk because the non-Chr1st-
    followers often find out the messages being told to the other groups. This puts in jeopardy the
    work of the full-time workers and the jobs and safety of the national Chr1st-followers .

    So Casas‘ standard is to develop one message for all three groups. Organizations call this three
    dimensional communication.



                                                                                                      TM   10
  You can tell anyone:
     A. Type of project - General characteristics of project, including:
          Project name-Volunteer Project (or any other name you are using)
          Financial Information-project cost, tax deductible status
          Learning about the culture first-hand, traveling and seeing
           what G0d is doing in this region
     B. Your objectives
          Share life with people of another culture (who may have misimpressions of people from
           our country)
          Expanded world vision
          Experience the culture
          Language acquisition- over time
     C. Questions:
          Be prepared for people to ask you specific questions. Realize that some people will be
           disappointed when you cannot give a lot of information. Tell them what you can and
           that you do not know all of the specifics. Emphasize that our security policies are for
           the benefit of the long-term workers and the safety of the nationals with whom you will
           be working.
          When talking to people remember there may come a time when you will have to say, ―I
           just can‘t tell you anything more,‖ again emphasizing the reasons for security.
          It‘s common for people to want to know specifically where you are going. Your answer
           should be, ―We will be traveling as tourists to a ‗limited access country‘ in Central As1a,
           the Middle East, Central As1a, etc.‖ Once again you might want to add, ―I just can‘t tell
           you anything more,‖ emphasize security and then CHANGE THE SUBJECT.


4. To Five or Fewer Trustworthy Members of Your Household
         Who are they?
         Not all nuclear family members can keep confidences. These should be five or fewer
         trustworthy nuclear family members living in your household. They need to be committed
         to pr@ying daily for you, your m1n1stry, the people, and the success of the project as a
         whole. They need to be highly-committed Chr1stians who have similar goals to yours.
         Because you will be giving them specific information about where you will be going, they
         must be trustworthy and willing to follow any directions you give them.

         What can I tell them?
         You can tell these 1-5 people the name of your country and that you will be going as a
         tourist. Before you tell them, each nuclear family/household member will commit to you to
         keep this information confidential and not disclose it to anyone else. They MUST
         understand they are not at liberty to share with anyone else the specific information you
         have given them. However, you will not be able to tell them specifically what cities
         you will be visiting (except your spouse or if you are a minor, your parents).

         Encourage them to do some reading about the country by lending them one of the books
         that you have read. Let them know what your goals are, how you would like to see G0d
         work in your life and in the lives of those you touch, and the challenges you see that will
         cause your faith to grow.




                                                                                               TM   11
5. To No One
        Never tell anyone or put in written form information that could identify specific places or
        people. If this information were to fall into the wrong hands, the lives of those individuals
        would certainly be negatively affected. This includes people living in-country that you
        might know, hear about, or meet; other project participants; and certainly the names of
        any nationals of which you might be aware. This also includes people in airports or
        airplanes. Give people an English name for your friends so you can refer to them in
        conversations. Never use their real names, especially when showing pictures.

6. Caution
        Under No Circumstances should you give an interview to anyone in the media. They
        tend to be curious and insensitive, and what they write or say can easily be picked up by
        anyone in the world through international news services.




                                                                                                TM   12
                                      Worldwide Caution
                        http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/pa/pa_1161.html
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Office of the Spokesman



                          This information is current as of Thu Nov 11, 2010.

August 12, 2010

The Department of State has issued this Worldwide Caution to update information on the continuing
threat of terrorist actions and violence against U.S. citizens and interests throughout the world. U.S.
citizens are reminded to maintain a high level of vigilance and to take appropriate steps to increase
their security awareness. This replaces the Worldwide Caution dated February 12, 2010, to provide
updated information on security threats and terrorist activities worldwide.

The Department of State remains concerned about the continued threat of terrorist attacks,
demonstrations, and other violent actions against U.S. citizens and interests overseas. U.S. citizens
are reminded that demonstrations and rioting can occur with little or no warning. Current information
suggests that al-Qaida and affiliated organizations continue to plan terrorist attacks against U.S.
interests in multiple regions, including Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. These attacks may
employ a wide variety of tactics including suicide operations, assassinations, kidnappings, hijackings,
and bombings.

Extremists may elect to use conventional or non-conventional weapons, and target both official and
private interests. Examples of such targets include high-profile sporting events, residential areas,
business offices, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, schools, public areas, and locales
where U.S. citizens gather in large numbers, including during holidays.

U.S. citizens are reminded of the potential for terrorists to attack public transportation systems and
other tourist infrastructure. Extremists have targeted and attacked subway and rail systems, as well
as aviation and maritime services. In the past several years, attacks have occurred in cities such as
London, Madrid, Glasgow, and Moscow.

Credible information indicates terrorist groups seek to continue attacks against U.S. interests in the
Middle East and North Africa. For example, Iraq remains dangerous and unpredictable. Attacks
against military and civilian targets throughout Iraq continue. Methods of attack have included
roadside improvised explosive devices, mortars, and shootings; kidnappings still occur as well.
Security threat levels remain high in Yemen due to terrorist activities there. The U.S. Embassy has
had to close several times in response to ongoing threats by Al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula
(AQAP). U.S. citizens have been the targets of numerous terrorist attacks in Lebanon in the past and
the threat of anti-Western terrorist activity continues to exist there. In Algeria, terrorist attacks occur



                                                                                                    TM   13
regularly, particularly in the Kabylie region of the country. In the past, terrorists have targeted oil
processing facilities in both Saudi Arabia and Yemen.

A number of al-Qaida operatives and other extremists are believed to be operating in and around
Africa. Since the July 11, 2010, terrorist bombings in Kampala, Uganda, for which the Somalia-
based, U.S.-designated Foreign Terrorist Organization al-Shabaab has claimed responsibility, there
have been increased threats against public areas across East Africa. The terrorist bombing in two
public venues in Kampala, which resulted in 74 deaths, highlights the vulnerabilities of large public
gatherings in East Africa and around the world. Additionally, the terrorist group, al-Qaida in the
Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) has declared its intention to attack Western targets throughout the Sahel,
which includes Mali, Mauritania, and Niger, and has claimed responsibility for kidnappings, attempted
kidnappings, and the murder of several Westerners.

U.S. citizens considering travel by sea near the Horn of Africa or in the southern Red Sea should
exercise extreme caution, as there has been a notable increase in armed attacks, robberies and
kidnappings for ransom at sea by pirates. Merchant vessels continue to be hijacked in Somali
territorial waters, while others have been hijacked as far as 1,000 nautical miles off the coast of
Somalia, Yemen, and Kenya in international waters.

The U.S. government maritime authorities advise mariners to avoid the port of Mogadishu, and to
remain at least 200 nautical miles off the coast of Somalia. In addition, when transiting around the
Horn of Africa or in the Red Sea, it is strongly recommended that vessels travel in convoys, and
maintain good communications at all times. U.S. citizens traveling on commercial passenger vessels
should consult with the shipping or cruise ship company regarding precautions that will be taken to
avoid hijacking incidents. Commercial vessels should review the Department of Transportation
Maritime Administration's suggested piracy countermeasures for vessels transiting the Gulf of Aden.

The U.S. government continues to receive information that terrorist groups in South and Central Asia
may be planning attacks in the region, possibly against U.S. government facilities, U.S. citizens, or
U.S. interests. The presence of al-Qaida, Taliban elements, Lashkar-e-Taiba, indigenous sectarian
groups, and other terror organizations, many of which are on the U.S. government's list of foreign
terror organizations, poses a potential danger to U.S. citizens in the region. Terrorists and their
sympathizers have demonstrated their willingness and capability to attack targets where Americans
or Westerners are known to congregate or visit. Their actions may include, but are not limited to,
vehicle-born explosives, improvised explosive devices, assassinations, carjacking, rocket attacks,
assaults, or kidnappings.

Some examples include Pakistan where a number of extremist groups continue to target U.S. citizens
and other Western interests and Pakistani officials. Suicide bombing attacks continue to occur
throughout the country on a regular basis, often targeting government authorities such as police
checkpoints and military installations, as well as public areas such as mosques, and shopping areas.
In Afghanistan, remnants of the former Taliban regime and the al-Qaida terrorist network, as well as
other groups hostile to International Security Assistance Force (ISAF)/NATO military operations,
remain active. There is an ongoing threat to kidnap and assassinate U.S. citizens and Non-
Governmental Organization (NGO) workers throughout the country. In India there is a continuing
threat of terrorism as attacks have randomly targeted public places frequented by Westerners,
including luxury and other hotels, trains, train stations, markets, cinemas, mosques, and restaurants
in large urban areas.



                                                                                                      TM   14
Supporters of terrorist groups such as the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, al-Qaida, the Islamic
Jihad Union, and the Eastern Turkistan Islamic Movement are active in the Central Asian region.
Members of these groups have expressed anti-U.S. sentiments and have attacked U.S. government
interests in the past. Previous terrorist attacks conducted in Central Asia have involved improvised
explosive devices, suicide bombings, assassinations, and kidnappings.


Before You Go

U.S. citizens living or traveling abroad are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or
Consulate through the State Department's travel registration website so that they can obtain updated
information on travel and security. U.S. citizens without Internet access may register directly with the
nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. By registering, U.S. citizens make it easier for the Embassy or
Consulate to contact them in case of emergency.

U.S. citizens are strongly encouraged to maintain a high level of vigilance, be aware of local events,
and take the appropriate steps to bolster their personal security. For additional information, please
refer to "A Safe Trip Abroad."

U.S. government facilities worldwide remain at a heightened state of alert. These facilities may
temporarily close or periodically suspend public services to assess their security posture. In those
instances, U.S. embassies and consulates will make every effort to provide emergency services to
U.S. citizens. U.S. citizens abroad are urged to monitor the local news and maintain contact with the
nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

As the Department of State continues to develop information on any potential security threats to U.S.
citizens overseas, it shares credible threat information through its Consular Information Program
documents, such as Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts as well as Country Information. In addition to
information on the Internet, travelers may obtain up-to-date information on security conditions by
calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or, outside the United States and
Canada on a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 am to 8:00
pm Monday through Friday, Eastern Time (except U.S. federal holidays).


             You may also link to Travel Advisories by going to www.gocasas.com;
                                    click on ―Learning & Links‖




                                                                                                  TM   15
http://travel.state.gov

Country Specific Information –
Reminder

                                  U.S. Department of State
                                  Bureau of Consular Affairs
                                   Washington, DC 20520

The Department of State provides information to assist travelers in better understanding foreign
countries they may visit and the known risks that they should consider. Travelers are encouraged to
inform themselves about their country of destination prior to commencement of travel. It is the
traveler‘s responsibility to obtain a U.S. passport from the Department of State and appropriate visas
from the embassy or consulate of the country of destination. Canceling a scheduled trip abroad may
cost money. When making reservations, travelers should discuss cancellation policies with their travel
agent, travel insurer or airline. The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their
medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas
and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation; Medicare does not
cover medical expenses abroad.




Check these links for current   Country Specific Information:
List of country links: http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1765.html#k

       Central As1a (Az3rb@ijan): http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_978.html
       Central As1a (Kyr_gyz_st@n/ Kyr_gyz R3public:
        http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_945.html?css=print
       Peru: http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_998.html
       Thailand: http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1040.html
       Southwest As1a (Tvrk3y: http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1046.html
       Zambia (Africa): http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1062.html




                                                                                                 TM   16
              Liability Release Agreement - Casas
       The undersigned wishes to participate in a short-term m1ssi0n trip (herein the ―Activity‖)
with Casas Adobes Baptist Chvrch: sponsored by Casas Adobes Baptist Chvrch, an Arizona
non-profit religious corporation (herein ―Casas‖) who is providing assistance in arranging this trip.

        Casas and the undersigned agree that the Activity poses risks including the following
specific risks: sickness, crime, political instability, governmental opposition to m1ssi0ns‘ activities,
as well as similar and dissimilar risks (herein the ―Risks‖).

         For and in consideration of Casas assisting the participant in the Activity, and other good
and valuable consideration the receipt and sufficiency of which is hereby acknowledged, the
undersigned for himself/herself and his/her personal representatives, assigns, heirs, distributes,
guardians and next of kin (herein the ―Releasors‖), hereby irrevocably and unconditionally
releases, waives, discharges and covenants not to sue Casas and its affiliate, subsidiaries,
divisions, members, directors, officers, employees and agents (herein the ―Releasees‖), for and
from all claims of any nature nor or hereafter existing whether known or unknown, including but
not limited to, all liability to the Releasors, on account of injury to the undersigned or death to the
undersigned or injury to the property of the undersigned, whether caused by the negligence of
Releasees or otherwise, while the undersigned is participating in the Activity.

        The undersigned is fully aware of the Risks and other hazards inherent in the Activity, and
voluntarily assumes the Risks and all other risks of loss, damage, or injury that may be sustained
by the undersigned while participating in the Activity.

         The undersigned further agrees that he/she bears the sole responsibility for any and all
medical expenses which he/she incurs while participating in the Activity, whether for injury or
illness, and whether required as a result of the undersigned‘s participation in the Activity, or not.
The undersigned acknowledges Releasees are under no obligation to provide medical insurance
for the undersigned.

           The undersigned warrants that he or she has fully read and understands this Liability
Release Agreement as well as the State Department World Wide Caution
(http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/pa/pa_1161.html) and the Consular Information Sheets
(http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1765.html#k) pertaining to the destination country and
all other countries visited while on the Activity and voluntarily signs the same, and that no oral
representations, statements or inducements apart from the foregoing written agreement have
been made to the undersigned.



                                READ BEFORE SIGNING



(Date)           (Please Print Name of Participant)           (Signature of Participant)



(Date)           (Please Print Name of Witness)              (Signature of Witness)
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                                                                                                   TM   17
(blank page)




               TM   18
                                 Orientation Section Questions

After reading this section, answer the questions below and email or hand your answers to your trip
leader before the next team meeting.

1.   I have read the entire Orientation section of the Trip Member manual:
                                                                               (Sign or type your full name)

2. How does it make you feel to consider that G0d called you to this trip ―before you were born?‖

3. What does the listed cost for your trip cover?

4. When applying for a visa, what do you list as your reason for visiting the country?

5. Is your passport valid through six months after the short-term trip return date? If not, submit your
   passport application or renewal application to the passport agency before the next team meeting.

6. Task: If your passport is valid, submit two photo-quality copies of it to your Trip Leader by the
   Global Outreach Orientation & Finance training date. Or, you may email a digital copy to
   casasglobaloutreach@gmail.com by the Friday before the Orientation & Finance training date.

7. Task: At the Orientation & Finance training, also submit two extra passport photos for your visa to
     your Trip Leader to hold for the trip.

8. What are the lines of authority on the field?

9. Besides financial supporters, who are you thinking of asking to be your supporters in each of
   these other areas – and how do you think they will respond?

        Pr@yer partners:
        Practical supporters:
        Encouragers:
        Listeners:
        Communicators:

10. How does it make you feel to consider having a team of people supporting you in the five areas of
    the Senders list? Besides finances, which area will mean the most to you for support?

11. In the discussion of security, how does it make you feel to consider the weight of responsibility
    you have to m1ssi0naries and to indigenous believers?

12. Carefully read over the Liability Release Agreement and prepare to sign it at the end of the final
    GO training session.




                                      - Questions Continued on next page -




                                                                                                     TM   19
13. Write the names of those trustworthy nuclear family members in your household. What phrase
    will you use to describe your destination to those in each of the three groups below:

             Group                                  What do you tell

 Five or fewer trustworthy
 nuclear family members living
 in your household:



 Everyone else:



 No one:



   back to top

Casas Global Outreach



                                            Notes




                                                                                           TM    20
                                             Finance
Why Do We Raise Support and Send Support Letters?
G0d has provided several kinds of m1ssi0ns participants. Some people are called to go on the team,
some to pr@y, some to mobilize the team to the field and back and some are gifted by G0d to give.

Casas does relational Global Outreach, which includes honoring Senders and the authentic
relationship they have with Goers. Casas longs for her people to become knit into the heart of an ABF
community. The community gets to know and love its members in an authentic way over time. When
those members become Goers, the ABF community naturally and joyfully participates in the trip.

Goers will raise the most funds in a way that honors Senders when Goers follow relational lines and
directly contact people with whom they have an established relationship. These are the people to
whom Goers should give their letters – people who know and therefore trust the Goer, so the person
may pr@y and possibly financially support the Goer.

When we send support letters, we are asking those gifted to pr@y to join our pr@yer base and those
gifted to give to add funds to the team‘s total. When people give, Paul tells his donors the results:
when people give to global outreach, it is credited to their account in heaven.

        You sent me aid again and again when I was in need. Not that I am looking for a gift, but I am
        looking for what may be credited to your account. I have received … the gifts you sent. They
        are a fragrant offering, an acceptable sacrifice, pleasing to G0d. (Philippians 4:16b-18)

Jesus said, ―Where your treasure is, there your heart will be also‖ (Matthew 6:21). When people
invest their treasure in your global outreach effort, their heart is there with you also. They go with you
in their hearts. They are moved to pr@y more diligently and eagerly wait for your report.

People want to give to people they trust and causes that are worthy. They know you and trust you.
Your cause is worthy: you go to build relationships and demonstrate G0d‘s great love to a people
who do not know Him.

Recruiting Pr@yer Partners
Recruiting a strong pr@yer base is fundamental to glorifying the name of the Lord through your trip.
Consider enlisting spiritually mature friends, youth leaders, worship leaders, leaders from other
congregations or spiritual leaders from other parts of your family. As you invite people to give
financially to your trip, those donors literally become invested in your trip and may become your most
faithful pr@yer partners.

Besides your support letter, you might send a second note inviting people to become senders –
practical supporters, encouragers, listeners, communicators, and pr@yer supporters. Give them a
copy of the Senders sheet so they know how to pr@y and carry out these other sending roles. Keep
your pr@yer partners updated of your training and fundraising progress so they can intercede for
G0d‘s provision and preparation for your trip.

Each pr@yer partner needs to understand the vital importance of they play in providing a solid
pr@yer covering. Be sure to give each pr@yer partner your itinerary with daily suggested pr@yer
topics. If you are going to sensitive areas, be sure to follow the security guidelines for the country with
regard to what information can be shared and with whom.

Each trip member will need to intentionally recruit 10 pr@yer partners to pr@y for them while they are
on the field. The partners will need to be on the communication list and the list of people invited to the
report when the team returns.


                                                                                                    TM   21
Who Gets a Support Letter?
Trip members are expected to work diligently to raise their individual funds. This generally means you
need to send your individual letter to a minimum of 25 people and preferably more than 40 people
outside your B!ble Fellowship and those the other trip members have in common.

Your support letter list should include everyone you would invite to a graduation or a wedding. You
might also include people in civic groups, Little League groups and, of course, your chvrch family and
friends. You might want to include people, from whom you have consistently bought candy for the
school band, 4H wrapping paper, etc:

           Family
           Relatives - near and far
           Friends - Chr1stmas card and graduation lists
           Neighbors
           Chvrch contacts
           Use your imagination!

What Should I Contribute?
Casas encourages trip members to save monthly toward their own trip. It is healthy for trip members
to contribute from their own funds and it communicates to donors that you are taking personal
ownership and investment in your trip. It is good stewardship to set aside each pay period for the
upcoming trip. During the months before the trip, the B!ble Fellowship can also make contributions for
the team (all B!ble Fellowship members going on the trip) into a special account at Casas set up for
the trip.

There are three fundraising deadlines: a non-refundable $300 trip deposit deadline, the airfare
deadline, and the final funds deadline.

Raising Funds for the Team
Each trip Goer is responsible to raise the full amount of the individual trip cost. The Trip Leader‘s trip
costs are not included in the funding raised for a team; the Trip Leader‘s costs are paid by a Global
Outreach designated account.
As you invite people to give, you should keep in mind that you are raising funds for the team. If a
Goer raises more than needed amount for the trip, the excess will be applied to help the team reach
its goals.
A donation received from a B!ble Fellowship (BF) individual, giving the donation to more than one
person from the donor‘s BF, may be divided equally among those BF members going on the STM trip
(Goers).
    1. The Trip Leader records the donation portion on each Goer‘s financial track sheet
    2. Each Goer may then write a thank you note to that donor
    3. This BF donation will be considered as an individual contribution
If for any reason, a trip member is unable to go on the trip, any money that came directly from another
chvrch will be refunded. Money from individual contributors can not be refunded as per IRS rules.
Funds they have raised will continue on with the team.
If the team raises more than the total team trip cost needed, the excess, up to $2,000, will go to a
project designated by the long-term Global Worker in STM country. If there is excess beyond $2,000,
the remainder will go to support long-term and short-term m1ssi0naries around the world.
Each trip member must raise the airfare funds by the airfare deadline. If G0d does not provide these
funds, Casas believes that He is guiding the person to become a sender for this trip.


                                                                                                    TM   22
Principles of Support Raising
1. As we are faithful, G0d gives the increase! G0d supplies all our needs as we trust in Him, as we
   are faithful and obedient. Where He calls us to go He enables us to go.
2. As you contact people, recognize that G0d is doing a work in their lives; you are part of that
   work. He is nurturing and growing their understanding of His heart, just as He is doing for you.
   Allow them to catch a vision with you, to join you in expecting G0d to do great things in this world
   through your team. Enlist them to pr@y, give time or money, or give whatever resources G0d
   lays on their heart to give. Allow them to share your burden!
3. Personal contact (relational) works best! Be prepared to share why you‘re going, what you will
   be doing; open your heart, and let G0d do the work in their heart. Keep in touch on a personal
   level; never let it be said that we cultivate relationships for the sole purpose of raising money!
   G0d is doing something bigger here.
4. Send out personalized letters and include the Contributor Coupon. (See Sample Letters and
   Coupon in this Finance section.) Use a good personal photo; send a follow-up note in due time;
   use phone calls (appropriately) as reminders.
5. Find a person who will promote your cause by sharing information about your trip with others in
   small group socials, through their family, and at chvrch.
6. A team letter or a B!ble Fellowship (BF) letter may be given to potential supporters whose names
   are shared by more than one person on the same short-term trip. After sharing about your trip in
   your own BF, the team or BF letters may be mailed to persons or may be left in the BF classroom
   for the funding specifics.
7. Global Outreach Goers should promote their trip in their own B!ble Fellowship but may NOT
   promote in any other Casas B!ble Fellowship. To build a true relationship of knowing and being
   known and loving and being loved, a person needs to be in a B!ble Fellowship over months or
   years. Then that B!ble Fellowship will naturally and joyfully send the person out.
    When a Goer tries to promote their trip in BFs other than their own, the principle of authentic
    relationship is violated. The motivation and transaction really become only financial. Also, there
    are so many Goers that BFs would feel overwhelmed and used for financial purposes. Finally, the
    Global Outreach Team is responsible for maintaining the delicate long-term relationship with BFs
    over years and decades. It is not fair to put that responsibility on Goers who do not have that
    breadth of accountability but are focused on their immediate need of fund raising.

Thank You Notes
To everyone who gives support to you, financial or other, you need to write a short, immediate
handwritten thank you. This makes people feel part of your trip and feel appreciated. It also gives the
enterprise of global outreach a reputation of caring and giving; not just asking.

Sample Ineffective Letter
Dear friends and family,
I‘m so excited! I‘m going on a trip to Krakozia. We are going to see the Great Wall, the Sphinx, and
the Shroud of Turin. On the way back I will spend a week on the beach in Fiji. I need $3,000 to go on
this trip. I hope you can help me and my friends go.
We are going to work with m1ssi0naries some and maybe hand out B!bles or something. I‘m pretty
sure they need some help. If not, we‘ll find something to do.
I will need so many things before I leave like new shoes, new clothes, and one of those bucket hats to
keep the sun off. Please send the money right away. I only have $23.64 raised so far.
G0d bless you,
Noël Snow


                                                                                                 TM   23
Sample Effective Letter #1 – personal letter:
               (To be adapted appropriately for sending to people outside of your B!ble Fellowship)

November 22, 2010

3123 E. Speedway Boulevard #431
Tucson, AZ 85719

Dear _____________:

Let me share some exciting news with you. Casas is sending out five teams on short-term outreach trips in 2011.
I will be a Goer with a team to the countries of C3ntral As1a this summer.

We have been invited to meet with students and teachers to tell them about life in our country and to learn about
life in theirs. The education sharing program is well organized. We will be explaining how our lives are impacted
by our personal principles, as well as have opportunity to share our life stories.

Our team will be leaving _________ and returning _______. The total cost will be $_____. The deposit of $___ is
due by ______, airfare funds of $______ are due by _______, and remaining funds of $_____ are due ______.

Since it is our desire that every part of this trip glorify G0d and further His Kingdom, we are seeking to create a
pr@yer network to support us throughout this endeavor. Casas would like for each member of our team to have
ten committed pr@yer partners. A pr@yer partner would pr@y for our pre trip preparation, to empower us to be
effective witnesses, to meet our financial support, to align our logistics, and to prepare the hearts of the people
we encounter in our destination city. On the trip, pr@yer partners may ask coverage for our health, safety,
boldness, humbleness, subm1ss1on to leadership, and effective communication. As we return, pr@yer is
needed for our health and integration back into our routines and for the field workers‘ efforts following up our
contacts.

Second, I will be contributing some of my own money toward the trip, but I can‘t do this alone. We are asking you
to consider a gift, which will enable us to be special ambassadors of our Lord to C3ntral As1a at this critical time
in their history. Your gift will help my team, but it will also be a personal way you can reach out and touch a future
generation of Jesus followers.

Each Goer on a short-term trip team will be sending out letters like this. Casas wants you to know that you may
receive multiple letters from more than one person or more than one team. You can consider these letters as
invitations to become a Sender – joining a Goer who you know. You are free to respond without feeling pressure
to those invitations as G0d leads you in one or more of these ways:
     1. Become a pr@yer partner for the Goers who have written to you.
     2. Pr@yerfully consider which Goers, if any, G0d would lead you to support financially
     3. With multiple invitations, you may choose to designate your financial gift to specific Goers or give a
          lump sum for the team to divide as needed
     4. Any gift may be given anonymously by returning the gift coupon with your directions to Casas Global
          Outreach.

Please give your pr@yerful consideration to joining our efforts as either a pr@yer or a financial supporter, or
both. Thank you for your help.

Sincerely,
Petunia Carrera




Contributor Coupon
Letters that fit on just a single side of one sheet of paper are much more inviting to the reader. Along
with your support letter you must include the Contributor Coupon below. Be sure to insert your
personal information regarding the trip, and then print coupon on a separate sheet of paper to include
with your letter. Goers often include a self-addressed, stamped envelope with the letter. This
technique allows the supporter to keep your letter as a reminder of your trip details and send the
coupon with a check.

                                                                                                              TM   24
TM   25
Contributor Coupon: Mail or give me the check with this gift coupon. I will record it in my
records and forward it to the chvrch. Please complete the information below.

           Yes, I want to help Petunia Carrera’s (Goer’s or Team’s name here) team reach Area
           (e.g.C3ntralAs1a) with this special m1n1stry.
           I will pr@y for your team; the time of day I most likely will be pr@ying will be:

                     Contributor information required with all contributions:
               Note: Contributions to this project are tax deductible when made out to:
                       ―Casas‖ or ―Casas Adobes Baptist Chvrch‖ or ―CABC‖.

       On the check memo line, please write this information: “purpose-project #”.
Name                                             Phone (          )                        Check#                 Amt
Address
City                                        ST                     Zip
        NOTE: For all donations under $250, only your check will serve as your receipt. This is in accordance with IRS stipulations.
                                For donations $250 and above, a receipt will be sent to you from the chvrch.
This contribution is made with the understanding that Casas Chvrch has complete control and administration over the use of the donated
funds. All contributions are received on behalf of the short-term team. If a trip member is unable to go on the trip, donations cannot be
refunded but will be applied to the team goal. Funds raised beyond individual needs are also used to reach the team goal. Funds raised
beyond the team goal are used to support long-term and short-term Chr1stian workers and their projects around the world.




                                                                                                                                 TM   26
Sample Effective Letter #2 – team letter:                      (To be adapted appropriately for giving to
those Casas people who would be found in common on other trip members’ contact lists, e.g. B!ble Fellowships.)

May 22, 2008

Dear Casas Members (or, Kingdom Workers B!ble Fellowship Class, or, specific names of Goers in the ABF):

We would like to share some exciting news with you. Casas is sending out five teams on short-term outreach
trips in 2011. We have several trip members who will be going with a team to the countries of C3ntralAs1a this
summer. Our team members are: Mikey, Billie, Johnny, Jeannie, Jenny, and Kelsey.

We have been invited by educators to meet with students and teachers to tell them about life in our country and
to learn about life in theirs. The education sharing program is well organized. We will be explaining how our lives
are impacted by our personal principles as well as having opportunity to share our life stories.

Our team will be leaving _________ and returning _______. The total cost will be $_____. The deposit of $___ is
due by ______, airfare funds of $______ are due by _______, and remaining funds of $_____ are due ______.

Since it is our desire that every part of this trip glorify G0d and further His Kingdom, we are seeking to create a
pr@yer network to support us throughout this endeavor. Casas would like for each member of our team to have
ten committed pr@yer partners. A pr@yer partner would pr@y for our pre trip preparation, to empower us to be
effective witnesses, to meet our financial support, to align our logistics, and to prepare the hearts of the people
we encounter in our destination city. On the trip, pr@yer partners may ask coverage for our health, safety, bold-
ness, humility, subm1ss1on to leadership, and effective communication. As we return, pr@yer is needed for our
health and integration back into our Tucson routines, and for the field workers efforts following up our contacts.

Second, we will each be contributing some of our own money toward the trip, but we can‘t do this alone. We are
asking you to consider a gift, which will enable us to be special ambassadors of our Lord to Central As1a at this
critical time in their history. Your financial gift will help our team, but it will also be a personal way you can touch
a future generation of Jesus followers.

Each Goer on a short-term trip team will be sending out letters like this. Casas wants you to know that you may
receive multiple letters from more than one person or more than one team. You can consider these letters as
invitations to become a Sender – joining a Goer who you know. You are free to respond without feeling pressure
to those invitations as G0d leads you in one or more of these ways:
     5. Become a pr@yer partner for the Goers who have written to you.
     6. Pr@yerfully consider which Goers, if any, G0d would lead you to support financially
     7. With multiple invitations, you may choose to designate your financial gift to specific Goers or give a
          lump sum for the team to divide as needed
     8. Any gift may be given anonymously by returning the gift coupon with your directions to Casas Global
          Outreach.

Please give your pr@yerful consideration to joining our efforts as either a pr@yer partner or a financial supporter,
or both. Thank you for your help.

Sincerely,
Mortimer Schnerd
Central As1a Trip Leader




Contributor Coupon
Letters that fit on just a single side of one sheet of paper are much more inviting to the reader. Along
with your support letter you must include the Contributor Coupon below. Be sure to insert your
personal information regarding the trip, and then print coupon on a separate sheet of paper to include
with your letter. Goers often include a self-addressed, stamped envelope with the letter. This
technique allows the supporter to keep your letter as a reminder of your trip details and send the
coupon with a check.




                                                                                                                 TM   27
Contributor Coupon: Mail or give me the check with this gift coupon. I will record it in my
records and forward it to the chvrch. Please complete the information below.

           Yes, I want to help Petunia Carrera’s team (Goer’s or Team’s name here) reach Area
           (e.g.C3ntralAs1a) with this special m1n1stry.
           I will pr@y for your team; the time of day I most likely will be pr@ying will be:

                     Contributor information required with all contributions:
               Note: Contributions to this project are tax deductible when made out to:
                       ―Casas‖ or ―Casas Adobes Baptist Chvrch‖ or ―CABC‖.



       On the check memo line, please write this information: “purpose-project #”.
Name                                             Phone (          )                        Check#                 Amt
Address
City                                        ST                     Zip
        NOTE: For all donations under $250, only your check will serve as your receipt. This is in accordance with IRS stipulations.
                                For donations $250 and above, a receipt will be sent to you from the chvrch.
This contribution is made with the understanding that Casas Chvrch has complete control and administration over the use of the donated
funds. All contributions are received on behalf of the short-term team. If a trip member is unable to go on the trip, donations cannot be
refunded but will be applied to the team goal. Funds raised beyond individual needs are also used to reach the team goal. Funds raised
beyond the team goal are used to support long-term and short-term Chr1stian workers and their projects around the world.




                                                                                                                                 TM   28
Finance Section Questions


After reading this section, answer the questions below and email or hand your answers to your trip
leader before the next team meeting.


    1.   I have read the entire Finance section of the Trip Member manual:
                                                                             (sign or type your full name)

    2. How do you feel about sending out personal support letters? Why do you think many
       Americans feel awkward sending out support letters?

    3. How do you feel about the principle for support letters described in the manual?

    4. How do you feel about contributing from your own funds toward your trip?

    5. When you raise money with letters or fundraisers, who are you raising the money for?

    6. According to your Trip Summary sheet, by what date should you submit a sample copy of
       your fund raising letter to your Trip Leader?

    7. According to your Trip Summary sheet, by what date should you submit to your Trip Leader
       the list of names (not addresses) of the people you will send the fund raising letter to.

    back to top




                                                                                                   TM   29
                        M1n1stry Skills I: Storytelling
                                                Imagine
                                     (To be done in your team meeting)




Imagine you were to see a 100-year old photograph of a white man and a group of African tribal people.
With a partner, brainstorm and fill in this chart.


1.   Assign the following actions to either the white man or to the African people, based on which you
     would most typically expect to see in the photograph:


     sitting (while another is standing)                      teaching
     standing (while others are sitting)                      learning
     speaking                                                 asking questions
     listening                                                judging
                                                              telling stories




           White man                                 Group of African tribal people




2.   How do you feel about the actions you have assigned to each?

3.   If you could change one thing about what is happening in the typical photograph you have seen, what would
     you change?

4.   Discuss: Of the actions above,

     a.   Which do you imagine Jesus doing the most?

     b.   Which seem very hard to imagine Jesus doing?

     c.   Which is your favorite to imagine Jesus doing?




                                                                                                    TM   30
                                                                                                Casas Global Outreach


                                              Storytelling
                Luke 10:16 The one who listens to you, listens to me . . . - The Message
In most cultures beyond the US borders, sharing stories with each other is natural event. To help Casas
Goers feel at ease with this relational approach, Global Outreach has each Goer prepare a personal story to
exchange naturally with others.

Ultimately we each have many stories we may convey with people we meet. An effective story teller is a
good listener and selects their words thoughtfully. To share effectively is the goal, whether it is with people in
another country or with our Tucson friends and families. When Goers return from their Short-term Trip, they
will need to apply these same guidelines when sharing about their trip to their friends and family.

Their story - listening is a vital to your own story:
1. Questions to draw out their story
    What does your name mean?                                 Can you tell me the story of how you got
    What do you do?                                              into this university / got this job?
    Tell me about your family.                                What has been your greatest success; your
                                                                 greatest struggle?
    How does your family feel about you being in
       this university / having this job?                     Is your family from here?


2. Our response to their story
        Listening - Listening opens the door for the person to see Jesus in us.


        Reflecting – “Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep.”
                Listen for the joy, pain, fear, excitement. Then join them in their feeling.
                 o   ―I am excited for you that you got accepted into this university/got to have this
                     experience. You must be really (happy, proud).‖
                 o   ―That must have caused you a lot of hurt. I am sorry you had to experience that.‖
                Ask if they have pictures of their family.


My story - select your words thoughtfully:
        Tell about your pain, failure, or struggle
                First write your story - keep it short and incomplete enough that it prompts questions.
                Be ready to tell about a time when you experienced pain, failure, or struggle - and how G0d
                 met you there and ministered to you. For example:
                 Pain - emotional pain such as the loss of a loved one, grief, depression, betrayal, rejection
                 Struggle - a difficult circumstance of physical or financial distress on you or a loved one
                 Failure - an experience that brought shame, condemnation, embarrassment, or guilt such as
                 loss of a job or a broken relationship
        Tell what G0d did
                Show how G0d comforted you, how you saw his heart, how that affected you. Said another
                 way, ―What aspect of G0d‘s heart or character did you experience or learn?‖ Maybe there is
                 an aspect of G0d‘s heart that you see in one of the names of G0d or description of His
                 character.
                Tell how He made an impact, perhaps through:
                 o   His word - when he communicates reassurance, comfort, wisdom.
                 o   His people - as they forgive and accept you (not reject or withhold love to punish you)
                 o   Himself (directly)
                                                                                                               TM   31
                                                                                                Casas Global Outreach

     Rehearse your story
              The story should be far enough in the past that your emotions are not on the surface as you
               share. It is ok to pause, but you should be able to quickly go on.
              Edit your story; the goal should be to share your story in 1-2 minutes, in order to hold the
               listener‘s interest.
              Practice your story with others so you are comfortable sharing; if your listeners ask questions
               for more information, you have peaked their interest with your thoughtful word choices which
               have left out some details.
     Sharing your story with a person of another faith
              It is our responsibility as a Goer to learn as much as possible about the culture of our Short-
               Term Trip.
              We need to be aware of and avoid terminology that would hinder building relationships.
              For example, in sharing with a Muslim, we should consider:
               o   Many believe it blasphemous to imply that G0d is a personal friend or buddy.
               o   Instead, say, ―G0d is great, so He did this for me,‖ or ―G0d is the creator, he created me
                   this way.‖
               o   Instead of calling yourself, family, or friends, ―Chr1stian,‖ say you/they ―fear G0d, believe
                   in one G0d, and follow Jesus‖


Photo Story Book – a tool to launch story opportunities:
  Objective
     Create a useful tool for conversation, to break the ice when meeting people in other cultures. Since
        people in third world countries often stereotype Americans as rich, immoral, and war-mongering,
        here is a chance to show them your heart.
     Collect significant photos which portray memorable times from your life:
         Family and friends G0d has put in your life
         Particular scenes from your environment
         A time(s) in your life when G0d helped you through a hurtful event/situation

  Photos
  Select photos or postcards considering G0d connections:
     1. Parent/family member – e.g. deceased but will be with them again in heaven, granddaughter G0d
        blessed you with, etc.
                                                                            nd
     2. Celebrations – e.g. birthday, Chr1stmas, wedding: connect to 2           birth, birth of Jesus, bride of
        Chr1st, etc.
     3. Vocation – your talents - e.g. classroom teaching shot, product of vocation, an office or workroom
        shot, etc, BUT, all without signage and obvious displays of wealth
     4. Environment – G0d‘s wonders - e.g. unique vegetation or land forms, natural phenomena
        particular to the area (e/g/ lightning/storms in AZ), or a cityscape, etc, all without specific signage
        and obvious displays of wealth
     5. Things that make you happy, or sad, or frustrated (cruelty, poverty, prejudice, disease)
     6. Heroes and people you admire – Martin Luther King, Mother Theresa. (it is important not to
        include politicians or people of questionable morality). Jesus can be included here; be careful
        how you portray him (Strict Muslim cultures often omit his face out of reverence).




                                                                                                             TM    32
                                                                                        Casas Global Outreach

   Cautions!
       1. No obvious chvrch structure shots or direct shots of your own home.
       2. Choose photos with people:
           Wearing modest clothing –
             Too much skin is offensive in many cultures
             Showing the bottoms of feet, e.g. when crossing your legs, is especially offensive to Muslims
               Wearing minimal jewelry or showing minimal possessions –
                Close-up shots of people are best to minimize wealthy surroundings
                No jewelry is better for sharing multi-culturally
   Extras
   Include a map of your state, a map of the USA with state boundaries showing, and a map of the country
   of destination.


ASSIGNMENT: select 4-6 photos, following the guidelines, to share at the next session:




                                                                                                     TM   33
                                                                                               Casas Global Outreach


        M1n1stry Skills II: Storytelling to Other Religions

Jesus’ story – the primary goal of building relationships:
Some scatter the seed . . . some water . . . and some harvest. It has been said that in some Muslim cultures,
it takes 50 cups of coffee with spiritual conversations to lead a Muslim to Jesus. To share Chr1st with non-
believers requires our ability to understand our audience, i.e. we should know the people group we are trying
to reach. This example shows important cultural facts to reach out spiritually with Muslims.
I.   One approach to telling Jesus’ story (most helpful with people who have some faith background)
        Intro: Has anyone ever shown you from the B!ble how you can know you have a relationship with
        G0d/have eternal life?
        May I?
        1. We fall short of G0d‘s standard. G0d up here, murderers are down here. Where are you? That
           gap = the problem Romans 3:23 All have sinned
            Most people tend to do one of two things with that shortfall:
            A. The Moral Self-Improvement Plan. Ladder Problem: can‘t reach moral perfection in 100
               lifetimes or climb ladder to moon. Eph.2:8,9 Not by works
            B. The Grace Plan. Outrageous. Jesus pays for your shortfall. Offers forgiveness as a gift. I
               take your cancerous blood. 1 Peter 3:18 Jesus died for us sinners to bring us to G0d.
               Question: Which plan have you been using?
        2. For the Grace Plan just put your trust in Jesus. Stop trusting the Moral Self-Improvement Plan‘s
           ladder. Step into the elevator. Can‘t swim ocean; put trust in boat. Acts 16:31 Believe in [trust in]
           Jesus & you will be saved
           Questions:
           (1) Does this make sense to you? (2) Would you like to express your faith in Chr1st now?
           Pr@yer: I decide once for all to put my trust in Jesus to give me a relationship with you/give you
            eternal life. Thank you that You give me a relationship with you/give me eternal life.
           Question: If you were to die today and G0d would ask, ―Why should I have a relationship with
            you/let you into heaven,‖ what would you say? (Should be: ―Jesus paid for my shortfall with
            G0d.‖)
           Conclusion: You can be sure you have a relationship with G0d/have eternal life. Citizen because
            of birth certificate, not because of goose bumps. John 6:47 he who believes has eternal life.
II. Telling Jesus’ story to a Muslim
     Principles
           Don‘t imply that G0d is a personal friend or buddy
           Instead, tell ―G0d is great, so He did this for us,‖ or ―G0d is the creator, he created us this way.‖
           Instead of asking them to become a ―Chr1stian,‖ invite them to ―follow Jesus‖
     One approach – adapting the above approach
           When using the above model, you may refer to yourself: I was a good person who feared G0d,
            and I was always trying to earn points, good works, like going to chvrch every week and saying
            pr@yers. But then I found out that it wasn‘t possible to be good enough.
           Question: What are some things Muslims think are good works that they have to do?
           Then I found out about grace. I realized that there was nothing I could do to be good enough
            because G0d gave us Jesus, and he offered a blood sacrifice.
           Muslim example: Like the holiday of Corban and the story of Abraham and his son (not
            ―Abraham and Isaac‖).
           Question: (1) Does this make sense to you? (2) Would you like to become a follower of Jesus?
           Pr@yer: I thank you for sending Jesus to offer a blood sacrifice. I decide once for all to become a
            follower of Jesus. Thank you that You give me eternal life.
                                                                                                             TM   34
                                                                                          Casas Global Outreach

III. Perspective
   It is not the norm for the same person to plant, water, and harvest. We can have a role in the process and
         we have to trust him with the part we can‘t do.
   An alternative way to ―measure success:‖ How many stories did I get to hear? How many people did I get
       to share my story with?
   Tips for sharing your story
          Avoid words like: ―always‖, ―never‖, ―all‖, and ―every,‖ such as ―I always read my B!ble.‖ (You
           never miss?) ―I never again had a problem with _____.‖
          Do not use jargon words such as ―saved‖/‖salvation‖, ―G0dly,‖ ―convicted‖, ―sinner‖, ―pr@yer of
           repentance‖, ―verse‖, etc.
          Use simple English:
           o   Short sentences
           o   Avoid analogies
           o   Don‘t tell jokes (humor usually does not translate)
           o   Be careful with metaphors - if you say ―Jesus is ―with me‖ every day,‖ they may expect Jesus
               to ―show up.‖ Check with your Trip Leader to see if this needs to concern you.




                                                                                                       TM   35
                                                                                                       Casas Global Outreach


                                                   Names of G0d -
                                        a tool to launch story opportunities
    1. G0d (Elohim)—Sovereign, Power, Creator
    2. Lord (Adonai)—Master, Ruler, Owner
    3. G0d Almighty (El-Shaddai) Powerful and willing to supply
    4. Jehovah or LORD (the Self-existing Lord)
    5. The Lord our Shepherd (Jehovah-Rohi)
    6. The Lord our Provider (Jehovah-Jireh)
    7. The Lord our Peace (Jehovah-Shalom)
    8. The Lord our Healer (Jehovah-Rophe)
    9. The Lord our righteousness (Jehovah-Tsidkenu)
    10. The Lord who is there (Jehovah-Shammah)
    11. The Lord our Banner (Jehovah-Nissi)
    12. The Lord who Sanctifies (Jehovah-M'Kaddesh)



Elohim
The first name we find of G0d in the B!ble is Elohim.            His focus was on the truth that G0d owns and rules over
(Genesis 1:1). It is used over 2700 times in the B!ble. The      all that exists.
prefix "El" signifies "one who is great, mighty, dreadful." It
is also a plural word that suggests the fact that G0d is a
Holy Trinity--Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Some say that        Yahweh
the word is related to the Hebrew word meaning "to
                                                                 But the most frequently used name for G0d is not Elohim,
swear" and implies the covenant nature of G0d. So the
                                                                 El Shaddai, or Adonai.
word Elohim might have meant to the Hebrews, "The great
mighty three-in-one G0d who establishes and keeps
                                                                 The most frequently used name for G0d is YAHWEH or
covenant forever."
                                                                 Jehovah.

                                                                 It occurs more than 6800 times in the B!ble.
El Shaddai
El Shaddai (remember the song?) is another name for              The greatest Jewish commentator on the O.T. of the
G0d. It is used 48 times in Scripture. It is always translated   Middle Ages, Moses Maimonides, said this about the
"The Almighty." The first time this name is used is in           name Jehovah (and it is a true statement), "All the names
Genesis 17:1 And when Abram was ninety years old and             for G0d that occur in the Scriptures are derived from His
nine, the LORD appeared to Abram, and said unto him, I           works, except one, and that is Jehovah. And this is called
am the Almighty G0d; walk before me, and be thou                 the plain name because it teaches plainly and
perfect.                                                         unequivocally of the substance of G0d."

This was when G0d changed Abram's name to Abraham                The Word literally means "I Am." It comes from the verb
and promised that he would be the father of many nations.        which means "to be" or "to exist."

                                                                 In Ex. 3:14, when Moses asked G0d what His name was
Adonai                                                           so he could tell the Israelites who had sent him, we read,
   rd                                                            "And G0d said unto Moses, I AM THAT I AM [Yahweh, or
A 3 name that G0d uses for Himself is Adonai. It occurs
                                                                 Jehovah]: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the
about 300 times in the O.T. This name suggests Lordship
                                                                 children of Israel, I AM hath sent me unto you."
and ownership. When G0d calls Himself by this name,
Adonai, He is saying, "I am the One who owns and rules
                                                                 Jehovah - The Eternal One, The Ever-Living One, The
over everything that exists."
                                                                 Self-Existent One
This is the name that Isaiah used in Chapter 6:1 when he
                                                                 He lives from Eternity past to Eternity future. And
wrote "In the year that king Uzziah died I saw also the
                                                                 everything else that lives gets its life from Him.
Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up, and his train
filled the temple."

                                                                                                                    TM   36
                                                                                                       Casas Global Outreach

The Compound Names
Now, the rest of the names I want us to consider are used      So the next time you are physically, or emotionally, or
in conjunction with this name Jehovah. They are                otherwise sick, Why not call out to Jehovah Rophe? And
compound names. You many wish to make a chain of               begin to praise Him because He is G0d, your Healer.
these verses in your B!ble with His name and it's meaning
written in the margin.
                                                               Jehovah-Nissi
We'll consider them in Biblical order, except for one, that    Then there is Jehovah Nissi. This is found in Exodus
I'll save for last.                                            17:15. It literally means "G0d, my Banner or G0d my
                                                               Standard of Victory" In Exodus 17:15 Moses named an
                                                               Altar he built after this name of G0d. ("And Moses built an
Jehovah-Jireh                                                  altar, and called the name of it Jehovahnissi")
The first one, Jehovah Jireh is found in Genesis 22:14. It
literally means "The Lord Provides." When G0d                  Here is the background. The Amalekites had refused to
commanded Abraham to sacrifice Isaac his son on Mount          allow the Israelites to pass through their land, so they had
Moriah, Abraham immediately set out to obey. Abraham           to fight. Moses sent Joshua into the valley to fight the
understood his covenant relationship with El Shaddai. He       battle, while Moses stood on the mountain to hold high the
asks no questions. He simply proceeds to obey.                 rod of G0d. The rod was their "standard." In those days,
                                                               and even now, a standard was used during a battle to give
When Isaac asked "where is the sacrifice?" Abraham             a sense of identity and a gathering point. It could be a
softly answered, "G0d will provide." His heart must have       flag, or a banner, or it could be only a high pole. But all the
been breaking. And even though he totally trusted G0d, he      soldiers could see it. It represented victory.
must have felt some confusion and bewilderment.
                                                               So the next time that you are in heated spiritual warfare,
Then, just as he raised the knife, the angel intervened.       remember that G0d is Jehovah Nissi. He is The Eternal
Abraham is shown a ram caught in a nearby thicket. And         G0d, your banner of Victory. We can praise Him with
he cries out, "We will call the name of this place Jehovah     words like, "Thank you Jehovah Nissi, that You always
Jireh!"                                                        give the victory through our Lord Jesus Chr1st."

Can you catch a little bit of the incredible emotion of that
moment?                                                        Jehovah-M'Kaddesh
                                                               Next, in Lev 20:8 we find the compound name, Jehovah
My G0d provides for me! And we must remember that we           M'Kaddesh.
will never have a need that the Eternal G0d does not know
about. And He has called Himself, Jehovah Jireh, The           ―And ye shall keep my statutes, and do them: I am the
Eternal G0d our Provider!                                      LORD which sanctify you"

So when you have a need, why not call out to Him by His        Literally, "I am the Lord Who makes you Holy." Or "Who
name, "Jehovah Jireh!" G0d, my Provider, I have a need!"       sets you apart for My Use."
We used to sing a little song that said, "Jehovah Jireh, my
Provider, His grace is sufficient for me. My G0d shall         The second part of this name, "M'kaddesh" was used to
supply all my needs according to His riches in Glory. He       refer to the various parts of the temple which were
gives His angels charge over me, Jehovah Jireh cares for       sanctified, or set apart, for the worship of G0d.
me."
                                                               Now in N.T. times, where is the temple of G0d?

Jehovah-Rophe                                                  WE are G0d's temples. And He is to us Jehovah-
The Second compound name we come upon is Jehovah               McKaddesh. He himself makes us holy--separates us
Rophe. It is in Exodus 15:26. It means "The Lord who           apart for His use. He sanctifies us.
Heals" In Ex 15:26 G0d said, "If thou wilt diligently
hearken to the voice of the LORD thy G0d, and wilt do that     So, the next time you feel unworthy to be used by G0d or
which is right in his sight, and wilt give ear to his          unfit for service, remember it is not you who makes
commandments, and keep all his statutes, I will put none       yourself worthy or fit to serve, it is Jehovah-M'kaddesh!
of these diseases upon thee, which I have brought upon         G0d, our Holiness!
the Egyptians: for I am the LORD that healeth thee.

The word Rophe means to heal, restore, or cure. G0d            Jehovah-Shalom
doesn't just heal, G0d IS healing. He is constantly healing    The next name is found in Judges 6:24.
us, and really, all His creation.
                                                               Here is the context. Israel was being oppressed by the
Sometimes He heals dramatically and immediately.               Midianites. An Angel was sent from G0d to Gideon to
Sometimes He heals more slowly using doctors or                remind him that the Lord was with him and that G0d was
medicine. But the healing process is a wonderful gift from     going to use Gideon to deliver Israel. At first, Gideon did
our G0d, Jehovah Rophe.

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not recognize the angel for who he was. And at first he         In 2 Cor 5:21 we read "For he hath made him to be sin for
argued with him.                                                us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the
                                                                righteousness of G0d in him."
When he finally did realize that he had been in the
presence of an angel of G0d, he was terrified. He thought       Now this is so important. Satan wins many victories when
he might die. You and I would undoubtedly react the same        we do not realize that our G0d is Jehovah Tsidkenu.
way.
                                                                When you have failed, when you have stumbled, when
But G0d spoke peace to him in verse 23. And in verse 24         you have sinned against G0d, Satan will try to tell you that
Gideon built an altar to the Lord and named it after this       you are so unworthy and so weak and so guilty that you
name of G0d, "Jehovah Shalom." "G0d is Peace!"                  are inadequate and insufficient to do anything worthwhile
                                                                in G0d's service.
22 And when Gideon perceived that he was an angel of
     the LORD, Gideon said, Alas, O Lord G0D! for               We must learn to repent and confess our sin to G0d, and
     because I have seen an angel of the LORD face to           then to gladly accept that He is Jehovah Tsidkenu, G0d
     face.                                                      our Righteousness. He has declared us to be righteous. It
23 And the LORD said unto him, Peace be unto thee; fear         is His gift. And we can go on boldly--not in our own
     not: thou shalt not die.                                   righteousness, but in HIS.
24 Then Gideon built an altar there unto the LORD, and
called it Jehovahshalom:
                                                                Jehovah-Shammah
The Nation was at war with the Midianites--but Gideon
                                                                Next go to Ezek 48:35. It is the last verse in the book of
learned that not only does G0d give peace, But G0d IS our
                                                                Ezekiel.
peace.
                                                                The last part of the vision of Ezekiel was of a new city,
And the next time you are in a time of stress, turmoil, fear,
                                                                with a new temple. It was to be glorious. And the last
anxiety, tension, or worry, try praising Jehovah Shalom,
                                                                words of this verse tell us the name of the city. In Hebrew
G0d your Peace.
                                                                it is named a compound name of G0d--Jehovah-
                                                                Shammah. He is "The Eternal G0d who is There."
Now if you are making a chain as we go, I'm skipping over
one in Psalms now. I'll come back to it in a minute. So if
                                                                Now where is G0d today? He is HERE! He is the G0d who
you want to keep the chain in Biblical order, you may want
                                                                is with us.
to wait to write the rest in your B!ble until later.
                                                                The fire that left the temple in Ezekiel's day returned on
                                                                the day of Pentecost and rested on the heads of men and
Jehovah-Tsidkenu                                                women who had just become temples of G0d Almighty.
So let's go to Jeremiah 23.
                                                                And now, G0d is here. He has promised never to leave us.
The background here is tragic. Josiah had instituted            So the next time you feel all alone, remember who He is
reforms and revival had come, but wickedness was still          and praise Him as Jehovah-Shammah--The Eternal G0d
deeply entrenched. And spiritual leaders had lied to the        who is here.
people and scattered the flocks of G0d. But in verses 5
and 6 G0d promises a better day is coming. This is a
prophecy of the coming Messiah.                                 Jehovah-Rohi
                                                                                                                                rd
                                                                Now let's go back to the one I skipped. It's in the 23
5 Behold, the days come, saith the LORD, that I will raise
                                                                Psalm. And you'll understand why I saved it for last.
     unto David a righteous Branch, and a King shall reign
     and prosper, and shall execute judgment and justice               rd
                                                                The 23 Psalm is an amazing Psalm. It is the favorite of
     in the earth.
                                                                many many people. And it begins with the words, "The
6 In his days Judah shall be saved, and Israel shall dwell
                                                                Lord is my Shepherd." In the Hebrew it is "Jehovah-Rohi."
safely: and this is his name whereby he shall be called,
                                                                The Eternal G0d is my shepherd.
THE LORD OUR RIGHTEOUSNESS.
                                                                He is our guide. He leads us. He feeds us. He comforts
                                                                us. No other name of G0d carries the tenderness and
In the Hebrew, The Lord Our Righteousness is Jehovah-
                                                                intimacy of Jehovah-Rohi.
Tsidkenu.
                                                                When we need to be reminded that the Lord is taking care
G0d is totally righteous. He demands righteousness in us.                                   rd
                                                                of us, we can come to the 23 Psalm and praise Him as
And He tells us in this verse that what He requires of us,
                                                                Jehovah-Rohi.
He becomes to us.
                                                                But look closely at this brief Psalm. Let's read it together.
In 1 Cor 1:30, we are told that Chr1st Jesus has become
to us righteousness. And in Him we are declared to be
                                                                The LORD is my shepherd [He is Jehovah-Rohi--our
righteous.
                                                                    shepherd]; I shall not want.


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[What name does that remind you of? Jehovah-Jireh--our               M'Kaddesh--our Holiness; our sanctification]; my cup
    provider!]                                                       runneth over.
2 He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth         6     Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the
    me beside the still waters [Jehovah-Shalom-our                   days of my life: and I will dwell in the house of the
    peace!].                                                         LORD for ever.
3 He restoreth my soul [Jehovah-Rophe--our Healer!]: he
    leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his             What a wonderful, amazing G0d we serve! He has given
    name's sake [Jehovah-Tsidkenu--our righteousness!].          us all these names, to remind us of His character--of Who
4 Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of         He is.
    death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me [Jehovah-
    Shammah--He is There!]; thy rod and thy staff they           So I'd like to encourage and challenge you to learn these
    comfort me.                                                  names of G0d. And use them when you are alone with
5 Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of            Him as an expression of praise to Him. You will find that
    mine enemies [Jehovah-Nissi--our Standard of                 using these awesome names of G0d will draw you into
    Victory]: thou anointest my head with oil [Jehovah           closer and more intimate fellowship with our wonderful, all-
                                                                 loving, all-wise, all-powerful heavenly Father.




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                       M1n1stry Skills Section Questions


After reading this section, answer the questions below and email or hand your answers to your
trip leader before the next team meeting.



1.   I have read the M1n1stry Skills section of the Trip Member manual:
                                                                          (sign or type your full name)

2. Write out your story of a moment when G0d met you in your pain, struggle, or failure, and
   how he comforted you and strengthened you. Tell of an aspect of G0d‘s character from the
   names of G0d that ministered to you. Bring your story to the next training session.

3. Bring your Photo Story Book with at least 4-6 photos to the next training meeting.

4. Share your Photo Story Book with another team member at the next meeting. Ask for their
   feedback – what did they like the best and what suggestions do they have to consider?

5. What‘s in your name? Find out the meaning of your names; write what they tell about you?
   Share the meaning of your name with another team member at the next meeting.




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                          Cross-Cultural Training

Rational
New sights, new smells, new sounds are all around. Everyone on the team is working hard
and enjoying the trip so far, but wait. The people around who live in the country are staring
and frowning. What‘s their problem? Oh, they must be jealous of our great clothes. They
must be wishing they were American!

Most likely, if you‘re thinking others are wishing they were Americans, you haven‘t been
through a Cross – Cultural training. Let‘s discover how the world really works.

Worldview
Our worldview is the picture frame around the painting of everything we see as real. On the
top rail of the frame are our beliefs. On each side are our values. On the bottom are many of
our behaviors. Painted inside is a scene of our every day lives. To us it is familiar, pleasing,
possibly exciting or restful.

But if we move into another culture without sufficient training, the picture we see of their lives
through our picture frame appears, at best, distorted, like Dali‘s melting clocks, or at worst,
ugly like an abstract painting splashed with colors we don‘t understand.

How is our worldview formed? From the day we are born until today, we have the world
divided into ―Us‖ and ―Them‖. We have all learned in some way that:

       We, people from the . . .: South, Midwest, Northeast, West Coast, etc.
       Or people who . . . : finished High School, finished College, were in the military, work
        with their hands, finished grad school, have white collar jobs, work in school districts,
        watch NASCAR, played sports, etc.
       Are . . . : better than, faster than, smarter than, cooler than, less gullible than, living
        life better than, etc.
       All the others.

Many events affect how we look at the world. Death of a parent in childhood, divorce, moving
frequently, staying in one city all of your life, having many siblings, being the middle child,
being an only child, being first born, being last born, being in a wealthy family, being in a
family with little money; all of these affect the way the painting inside the frame is tinted.

Not all behaviors are caused by worldview. Some behaviors are the same the world over.
Sleeping for example or eating or taking care of children can be found in all cultures around
the world.

Look at the actions below. See if you agree that the activity is part of a person‘s culture or if it
is a universal behavior.

        1. Needing to eat.                                        Universal

        2. Avoiding odd numbers.                                  Cultural

        3. Men and boys eating first.                             Cultural



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        4. Taking care of the sick.                               Universal

        5. Being punctual.                                        Cultural

        6. Men and women not touching in public.                  Cultural

Cultural and personal behaviors are chosen either by individuals or by the group. Universal
behaviors are actions every human does to one extent or another.

When we leave the United States of America, we leave our culture. There is an old saying
that sums up the attitude we should have when we enter a new culture,
                            ―When in Rome, do as the Romans.‖
We need to adopt the worldview, the picture frame, of the culture we step into.

If the new cultural frame tells us, ―Men and women do not hold hands walking down the
street,‖ even if our cultural frame tells us it is a natural part of life, we must reframe our vision
of walking down the street – at least while we are in this new culture.

Why is this important? Why not just take the USA culture to the other nations? Don‘t they all
want to be like us any way?

Coming into another culture as a learner will help you begin to understand the fallacy of that
thinking. Every culture was developed by G0d. Within every culture is planted seeds of G0d‘s
grace and love. To discover how G0d has worked in each nation for His glory is humbling and
eye opening.

If you choose to drop the trappings of your worldview behind, you can start to see through
different eyes. And when you see through different eyes, you get a new view of Jesus.


How to Embarrass Everyone around You
Our Americans culture is loud. Tone everything down: arm movements, voices, laughter,
walking - everything. In other nations women are taught to ―walk like the Queen‖ with hands
and feet kept closely to the body. Men are taught not to be ―hot hearted‖.

Keeping your voice at a lower volume is clear evidence that you are self-controlled. Keeping
your laughter at a low volume in an airport or walking over to a friend instead of yelling to
them across a hotel lobby shows the world that Americans can indeed be trusted. They can
control themselves. In restaurants, remember to keep your voice pitched low. Most people
have small homes so interrupting someone else‘s conversation in ―the world‘s living room‖ is
not acceptable.

A smile, respect for others and a quietly pitched voice will convince a few that followers of
Jesus might be different.

Don‘t embarrass the host m1ssi0nary by saying, ―I can‘t eat that. It doesn‘t look good.‖ If you
have an allergy to food such as shellfish, let your Trip Leader know before you leave. They
can find out for you how to say the equivalent of, ‖I‘m sorry I can‘t eat that I‘m allergic,‖ in the
heart language of the people. The people will readily accept this – as long as everyone on the
team isn‘t saying this for every dish they are offered!

Keep your cultural comments to yourself, both in verbal and body language. The people
around you from that culture who speak English don‘t think they‘re funny. The long-term
m1ssi0nary you are working with has been building something for years; your respect for
their culture will reinforce their work.



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Living and Working Cross – Culturally
The book, Scaling The Wall: Overcoming Obstacles to M1ssi0ns Involvement, asks the
question, ―What might limit me from doing my part in seeing the nations worship You, O
G0d?‖ Here are some of the answers people gave:

        Fear of unsanitary conditions, weird food, AIDS, strange places, being
           uncomfortable, associating with distasteful people, dirty water, no air
           conditioning, not knowing the language
        Disapproval from your family

When a person is a minor and family disapproves, it is always best to show honor to father
and mother by staying home. Continue to prove yourself trust worthy. Begin saving money for
a trip when you are no longer a minor. In a respectful way, share your heart for the people
you want to minister to. Perhaps by the time you are older, your family will understand
enough to be less of a stumbling block.

Families may experience fear that their loved one is going on a trip. This is not unusual and
should be respected as so. Pr@yer together and for each other is healing. Learning
together about the culture will help to resolve the unknown. The Senders for a team may
rally together to support the team‘s families as they go.

Fear, on the other hand, is part of culture shock. Most people have experienced some degree
of culture shock. This happens when we go to camp or spend the night in another child‘s
home as children. It happens when we leave home to go to college or get married. It also
happens when we move from one region of the country to another.

Culture Stress
There are five basic stages of culture shock. The International M1ssi0n Board‘s Volunteer
Cross – Cultural Training lists them as The Honeymoon on the Mountain, Loneliness in the
Valley, Climbing Out of the Valley, The Slow Climb, and Integration Partway Up the
Mountain. The stage most experienced on short-term trips is the Honeymoon. (See the
appendix for the other stage descriptions.)

The Honeymoon on the Mountain – This stage begins even before the team gets on the
plane. It is when the individual feels an emotional high. When they step into the country,
every thing seems quaint, charming or picturesque. It‘s a time for taking photos.

It‘s also a time when people feel safer than if they are in the US. They will sometimes let
down their guard. They think there is less crime in this country and as a result, women might
get purses stolen or someone might be more likely to be pick-pocketed.

Triggers of Culture Stress
Not understanding a language and not being understood can cause feelings of frustration
and are often the strongest triggers of culture shock. To help you overcome this trigger, learn
key words and phrases in the new language before you go. Be ready to laugh at your
mistakes. A smile will help in situations where you don‘t know the language. Let the love of
Jesus shine through you.

Space issues can also trigger culture shock. People born in the US usually prefer about
three feet between themselves and others. Elsewhere, this is not the same. Some cultures
feel about one foot is comfortable. In one culture, it is impolite to allow anyone to ever be
alone or for a person to remove themselves from the group except for the most personal of
reasons.



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In US culture, most people expect to sleep one person to a bed or two if they are married.
Other cultures sometimes have four or five on a common palette.

These space issues can wear on a short-termer. How can you handle them? Once again,
pr@yer and a sense of humor are the best place to start. Try to view the world through the
host‘s picture frame. What value are they exhibiting by not allowing you to be alone? Are they
trying to be hospitable? Form a hypothesis and test it for accuracy.

Time. It has been said, ―The clock is the G0d of the Americans.‖ Is this true for you? Then
most likely, the slow pace of a relationship oriented society will trigger culture shock for you.
Here are some suggestions for dealing with the frustration of not just ―getting on with the job.‖
Take a deep breath and blow it out. Take off your watch and put it away. Is it daylight? Then
we will eventually start the project. When will we stop? When it gets dark? The project is not
the important part of the m1ssi0n. The relationship is. Remember, you can‘t work beside
someone you don‘t know.

Comfort. The philosopher Francis Shaffer said, ―The American dream is to have great
comfort and great peace.‖ On a short – term trip you rarely have either. The electricity is
different or absent. There is no microwave. Your hotel has no air conditioning. And the food!
It‘s either day after day of carrots and chicken or you are offered guinea pig lying on its back
with its little feet curled up. But what is comfort? Could it be sitting with friends at a table
trying new food? When we finally decide to try the guinea pig, we need to be aware of one
thing – what our faces look like. Keep a pleasant look on your face. You may like the food or
dislike it. Remember what they teach children in m1ssi0n training school. Never spit it out,
chew and swallow.

Cleanliness. I went to a country in Asia on a short – term trip. The country was lovely, the
people welcoming. All was well, until we went to eat our first meal. When I sat down at the
table in the small cafe we went to eat, I had to swallow hard. Obviously, we had been taken
to what was considered a nice place, because the table had a tablecloth. But the cloth was
covered in spills and stains. The silverware was placed directly on top of the dirty spills. My
stomach turned over, but the Lord helped me to put a smile on my face, pick up my spoon
and fork and eat – without first wiping them on my sleeve.

Critical M1ssi0n Issues
The International M1ssi0n Board identifies several critical m1ssi0n issues in Volunteer Cross
– Cultural Training(IMB:VCCT) .

Using Money Without Causing Harm Many times you will see situations where you are
tempted to give money to believers and non – believers on the m1ssi0n field. We as North
Americans often feel money will fix all problems. Don‘t give in to this impulse. It is not helpful.
You might want to begin supporting a pastor on the field. Don‘t do it! At least not until you
have talked to the m1ssi0nary on the field.

Let‘s talk about why. If there is an individual who needs money and you give the individual
cash, who do they connect with the help? Right, you, the North American. But if we refer
these people to the local chvrch, they can receive more than a hand out. They can receive
the support and love of the believers around them. So what about giving money to pastors?
Sometimes, singling out one person can cause dissention among the other pastors in the
area. But even if there is no dissention, money can make the local chvrch and the local
pastor dependent on your chvrch and US dollars. It has been proven that chvrches that are
not dependent on the US grow faster, become more stable and are more creative.




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Ministering in Context When we enter a country, we live inside of that country‘s cultural rules
as soon as we step off the plane. If men speak only to men and women to women, then in
public, we will do the same. If people greet each other by bowing, then we will bow in
greeting. If we are asked to cover tattoos, we will. If we are asked to lead a worship service,
we need to find out what the host country worship style is and use that style unless we have
been specifically asked to bring our worship style to the meeting. If we are going to teach, the
same holds true. We use their style of teaching unless we have been asked to demonstrate
our way of doing things.

Constructive Attitudes
       I am not in the US. I do not have any rights as a US citizen.
       I am a humble servant for the King. I willingly give up my right to be the leader to my
             Trip Leader and the m1ssi0nary.
       If I have been to the country before, I will resist playing ―tour guide‖ and pointing out
             all of the things to take note of to the others on the team.
       I will speak respectfully to nationals, about nationals, about their country and their
             culture.
       I will not make jokes at the national‘s expense. Body language and tone of voice
             translate. More people than you know speak English.
       I will cheerfully adjust, change, or drop my planned program to meet the local needs
             and fit into the local context (IMB: VCCT).

Critical Situations
As you read each of these real situations, try to predict what actually happened next:

Situation A
A group of short-term trip members were going to a country they had never been to before.
Without asking the m1ssi0nary, they decided to do a sports camp on their short – term trip.
The team arrived in the country with many pounds of bats, balls, footballs, volleyball nets,
and miscellaneous other equipment. When they came through the airport they received a
harsh surprise. They had to pay customs duty on the equipment. It was a heavy and
unexpected tax, but they paid it and continued on.
When they arrived at the meeting location, the m1ssi0nary watched with dismay as the trip
members unloaded the sports equipment. The m1ssi0nary explained he had just completed a
two week sports camp for the neighborhood. Everyone was exhausted. What he needed this
team to do was what he had asked in his emails. He needed them to pr@yer walk a new area
and develop a spiritual map.
The leaders of the team got together and decided….

Situation B
The group was quietly handing out Jesus film DVDs in many languages. It was getting dark in
the Refugee Center. There were no light bulbs in the hallway as the country that hosted the
refugees did not want them to get too comfortable.
It was important that only the m1ssi0nary speak in this hallway. He spoke the language of the
host country. It was not wise to speak English here as most of the refugees were from Arabic
speaking countries and male. The small group of women following the male m1ssi0nary
understood the threat. All but one. When a door opened behind them and a woman said in
heavily accented English, ―Who are you? What are you doing?‖ This trip member answered
in a loud voice, ―Why we‘re from America and we‘re going to tell you about Jesus.‖
At the other end of the hall, the m1ssi0nary and several Arabic men froze…




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Situation C
Two American women were on m1ssi0n in Spain. They had been with the women of a small
chvrch all day as the ladies, their husbands and children participated in an outdoor Baptism
and picnic lunch. It lasted for hours.
Now the time had come for the men to have a men‘s meeting and the women to have a
women‘s meeting.
As the women of the chvrch pulled their chairs into a circle, they insisted Ennis and Carolyn
join the Circle. The meeting began with pr@yer, but it wasn‘t long until ti was obvious to the
two Americans that the group was split over who should set up and clean up the
refreshments at chvrch each week. The Older ladies were tired of doing it every weed, but
the Younger ladies were not doing it right. This argument went on for nearly an hour.
Suddenly, the leader of the group turned to Ennis and Carolyn and said, ―What do YOU think
we should do?‖
Ennis and Carolyn asked for a moment to confer. Ennis felt they should tell them exactly what
to do. Carolyn felt they should not voice an opinion and let the ladies work it out on their
own…

Situation D
The team had people from 16 through middle age. Every day they rode in a van through a
poor village where houses were up on stilts. Under the houses young children with only a
shirt on played in the dirt. The team members felt so sorry for these small children. No
clothes, no shoes, no toys, they felt they had to do something.
On one of their last days in country they went into a close by town and bought shorts, shoes
and toys. They were surprised at how few shorts there were in small sizes.
The next day, they asked their van driver to stop in the village. Confused, he did as they
asked. Then, also as they asked, he gathered the families that lived beside the rode.
The team asked him to translate for them as they presented the shorts, shoes and toys. The
driver blushed, looked down.
 ―Wait,‖ he said. ―I can not let you loose face in this way. Young children here do not wear
shorts or shoes. They are not toilet trained yet. They will not wear these things until they are
ready. And they will not know how to play with these toys. The toys are too old for them. It is
better to give them to the children at school.‖
Quickly the team decided to….


Pr@yerwalking
How to prepare to pr@yerwalk
        prepare your heart, confess your sins, leave your pressures with G0d,
             ask him to show you needs, meet and greet your co-walkers by name before
              starting,
             forgive anyone you may be holding something against, go in pairs or triplets
             divide the territory, return at the right time

How to pr@y when pr@yerwalking
        Keep your eyes open: see what you‘re looking at. (For sale signs, land values,
          poverty, anger. . .)




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                 Imagine what G0d wants to see happen in that neighborhood, in that home, and
                  ask Him for it.
                 Don‘t strain for a sudden revelation out of the sky.
                 Pause and listen for G0d‘s whispered cues once in a while.
                 Pr@y out loud, but you don‘t need passionate feelings to float your pr@yers.
                 Keep each pr@yer short so others can pr@y with you. Squeeze a few topics
                  together.
                 It's OK to pause to discuss and read/quote scripture.
                 If the experience is overwhelming just pr@y for those G0d directs you to.
                 Don‘t dig for high drama if it‘s not there, but expect G0d to act.
                 Share with what G0d has said to you with others.

     Sample pr@yerwalking pr@yer:
              Father, in the name of Jesus, I pr@y for this person and their family / the family in the
              red house / the families in this apartment building, etc. You are rightfully sovereign
              over this place and these people. You tell us that You have loved them before the
              foundation of the world. You say You want all people to be saved and to come to the
              knowledge of the truth.

              You tell us that Jesus died for their sins once for all. You warn that the G0d of this
              age has blinded the minds of unbelievers so that they cannot see the light of the
              Gospel. But You assure us that the one who is in us is greater than the one who is in
              the world.

              I ask You to prepare the hearts of people in this place who will be receptive to Jesus.
              I pr@y that the Holy Spirit will do His work of convincing these people to believe in
              Jesus. I ask that that Your word will do its work and not return void. I ask Jesus to
              do His work of drawing these people to Himself.

              In the name of Jesus and by His authority I pr@y, Amen.
back to top




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Photo Tips

Why Do Photos Matter?
The pictures you take on a trip can help report to those who supported you directly and to all
of Casas who supported you indirectly by setting up your trip and helping your Trip Leader.
They recapture some of the feeling you had while you were on your short-term experience.

What Makes A Great Short-Term Photo?
There are interesting objects and buildings to take pictures of. But the heart or the reason you
went had to do with G0d and His love for people. He sent you to be an instrument of his love
to those people. So the best pictures of those of you (and your team) interacting with those
you went to serve.

Be cautious in taking pictures of nationals. It is best to get perm1ss1on before taking a photo
than to possibly break a cultural norm. For example, Muslims may believe photos are
engraved images and therefore not allowed.

What Makes a Great Photo?
           Interaction - Take the picture of people interacting with each other, not staring at
            the camera.
           Fill the frame - move closer. Fill the frame from edge to edge. Then take a few
            steps forward and try again. When in doubt, move another step closer.
           Get on the same level as your subject.
           Watch out for and avoid objects in front of faces.




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                                       Casas Global Outreach




Examples of Close-in, Interactive Photos




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                                                                                    Casas Global Outreach




                   Cross-Cultural Skills Section Questions


After reading this section, answer the questions below and email or hand your answers to your
trip leader before the next team meeting.



    1.   I have read the entire Cross-Cultural Skills section of the Trip Member manual:
                                                    (Sign or type your full name)
    2. What is the best way to come into another culture and what should we not bring?

    3. Why is this so important for a successful trip?

    4. In reviewing your own behaviors, which might you need to tone down to save
       embarrassment when in your short-term trip culture?

    5. In the cleanliness section, the woman‘s culture shock was triggered by a dirty table cloth;
       how did you feel about how she got through her culture shock episode?

    6. Which trigger(s) of culture shock might set off your culture shock experience?

    7. What do you predict for the actual outcome of each of the four Critical Situations?

    8. Go pr@yerwalking with another member of your team in your neighborhood or around a
       school, college, university or workplace. Try pr@yer casting as you walk or drive/ride.
       Where, when, and with who did you go pr@yer walking?

    9. Do you plan on taking photos on this trip? In light of the photo tips, would you consider
       being your team‘s primary photographer?



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                                                                            Casas Global Outreach




                                Health & Safety
                                        Scenarios
The following scenarios, which potentially could happen on a short-term trip, take place in a
limited access country - proselytizing is not allowed, and the local people are not much in
favor of the American war efforts in Iraq. Read each scenario and consider an outcome for
each one; be prepared to share your solutions with your team.

1. Left behind!
The short-term team arrived in the destination city a day and a half ago and has met with the
field workers for some cultural and city highlights, although the orientation has not yet been
completed. The Trip Leader was given a local cell phone with field worker numbers already
entered. Today, your team, along with one field workers, is riding the local bus to meet the
rest of the field workers. Because the bus is so crowded, the team can not all sit together, so
some are seated or standing near the front while the rest are almost to the back of the bus.

When the field worker, who was close to the center of the bus, gave the signal to exit the bus,
those at the front of the bus got off, but the Trip Leader with members near the back did
stayed on the bus. Soon the members left on the bus realized that the rest of the team was
no longer with them!

What should the left behind members do to rejoin the other volunteers? What if the cell
phone was not working? What should the field worker and the other volunteers do to get the
team back together?



2. The Encounter!
The short-term team travels on a very crowded bus and now must walk about a mile to the
English class. While pr@yer walking on the walk, the leader realizes that one of the
members is dressed improperly for this outing with jewelry and choice of clothing. As they
turn a corner, the team notices that they are the only tourists in the area and observe a
woman with a young boy and five men approaching.

These local people begin saying something to you in their own language, and from the tone,
it doesn‘t sound too friendly. Then the young boy holds up a piece of cardboard in front of
the team member with the excessive jewelry, and the woman begins grabbing at the
member‘s bag, pockets, and jewelry. The men continue to speak nearly face to face at the
team, separating them from the inappropriately dressed member being accosted by the
woman and boy.

What should the team do in this thief set-up situation? Could this scenario have been
avoided? How or how not?




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                                                                             Casas Global Outreach



3. The Accident!
The short-term team has been working at the English Language center, and now your team
and several local students are walking to a nearby restaurant to have tea and conversation.
The local students encourage the team to cross the street quickly, weaving between a few
cars and bicycles. A couple of people on your team hesitate, then with the bustle of
pedestrians and traffic and trying to listen to what the rest of the group is saying from the
opposite side of the street, they dart off the curb and try to cross the street. Suddenly a small
car hits one of the two team members.

Fortunately, the team member is not seriously injured, but does have a large gash on the leg.
The other member immediately breaks down crying. A policeman nearby comes over to the
group now gathered.

What is the protocol that should be followed in this event? What precautions should be taken
considering the medical, political, and m1n1stry aspects of this situation? What advanced
preparations would help with handling these considerations?




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                                                                                              Casas Global Outreach




Security Awareness
Considering the current state of the world, the concern of Casas Chvrch, and the well being
of international short-term trip members, the following security policies* have been designed
to promote safety on the m1ssi0n field. Being committed to a proactive security plan can
reduce the chances of serious incident.

         Each potential short-term trip member shall complete safety training provided by
          Casas Global Outreach.
         Each potential short-term trip member shall be apprised of contingency planning.
         Casas expects compliance with these policies by all short-term trip members.
* Security policies are based on material used by World Vision International field personnel as well as the book,
  Survival of the Fittest by Dr. Chr1stine Aroney-Sine.

Be an unlikely target!
1. When traveling, be wise
         Make 4 quality copies of your passport: (1) for Short-Term Trips M1n1stry Assistant,
          (2) for your Trip Leader, (3) for your carry-on, and (4) to leave at home.
         Do not lock luggage; use twist ties or zip ties. Carry a lock for use in the hotel room.
         Carry as few valuables as possible.
         Write only your name, email address, and cell phone number on luggage tags.
         When in your destination country, carry your passport in your money belt, or as
          directed by the long term worker. Leave a photocopy of passport in a secure location,
          such as locked in your carry-on.


2. Try not to look like a tourist– be clean, neat, conservative
         Be sensitive to the cultural norms.
         Ask the field workers about local customs and clothing.
         Avoid wearing/carrying all but the simplest jewelry, cameras, bags, etc.
         Dress conservatively (tailored, modest, basic colors). Keep valuables out of sight.
         Behave conservatively, e.g. speak in low voice, reduce animation, restrict
          indulgences, etc.
         Use a money belt for the bulk of your money. If carrying a purse, keep it close to your
          body. Keep an eye on backpacks in crowded areas. Do not carry valuables in jacket
          pockets or trouser pockets. Leave valuables in a secure place at the hotel.
         Carry only small amounts of money in your wallet or purse, and wear a cheap watch
          so you can hand it over if mugged.
         Advise your bank of this trip so they are aware of your potential charges; ATMs are
          often the best option for obtaining money while in another country. A fee is charged
          for exchanging cash in foreign countries.
         T.I.N.A. – This Is Not Acceptable. Use this acronym with your team members to
          remind each other of inappropriate words or behaviors and to be alert of your
          surroundings.




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                                                                             Casas Global Outreach



3. Be alert and assured – you are not alone
      Walk with confidence, yet be discreet and unassuming.
      Always walk with a companion. Preferably walk in a group of three to five. Women
       should always have with a male escort nearby.
      Get directions to your destination before you leave your hotel. Carry a map and
       names of locations written in the local language and in English.
      Ask the field workers about areas to avoid. Avoid walking where people can hide.
      Do not accept sweets or food from strangers when not accompanied by your long
       term worker. You might wake up hours later and find all your belongings gone.
      Be aware of jostling and being surrounded in a crowd. Pickpockets often work in
       pairs or small groups.
      Avoid groups of people loitering on the streets. Be alert to the possible confrontation.
      Remain calm in potentially hostile situations.
      If a driver pulls alongside you to ask for directions, do not approach the vehicle.
      Call attention to yourself if you are in danger: scream, shout, run, etc.


4. Confidence within hotels
      Ask for a room between the second and seventh floors. Most fire equipment can
       reach these floors.
      Check the evacuation routes and establish a contingency plan with your Trip Leader.
      Secure doors with locks and chains.
      Check to make sure the telephone is working.
      Keep room curtains closed after dark.
      Watch to see that you are not being followed to your room.
      Positively identify visitors before opening the door (use peephole or telephone).
      Secure your valuables inside your room by locking them inside a suitcase, checking
       them in the hotel safe, or carrying them in your money belt or backpack.


5. Local transportation cautions
      Always travel with at least one other person.
      Have the addresses of your hotel and your destination(s) written out in the local
       language and in English to carry with you.
      Notify others of your destination, travel time, and travel mode; carry an international
       cell phone if possible and the phone numbers of the field workers.
      Taxis: Take only licensed taxis; ask the hotel or field workers for advice with
       appropriate taxis. Discuss the fare before you get in.
      Traffic and vehicle related fatalities are high internationally.
      ALWAYS wear seat belts.
      Never open car windows more than four inches.


                                                                                         TM   - 54 -
                                                                                Casas Global Outreach




6. Public Transportation tips
         Have a contingency plan for if people get separated when exiting transportation.
          I.e. if part of the group exits too soon, how will you plan to reunite the entire group?
         Ask the field workers for advice on public transportation.
         Travel in pairs when possible; the group may have to split up on the vehicle.
         Have the addresses of your hotel and your destination(s) written out in the local
          language and in English to carry with you; carry an international or local cell phone if
          possible and the phone numbers of the field workers.
         During off-peak hours especially, wait in lighted areas with your group.
         Do not ride deserted trains or buses.
         If you must ride a deserted bus, sit close to the driver.
         If you must ride a deserted train, choose a middle car and sit close to a window.
          (Conductors ride on middle cars.)
         After getting off, check to see that you are not being followed.


7. Robbery and Armed Assault Situations -
         Remain calm and composed.
         Seek the Father‘s covering and peace.
         Speak quietly and distinctly. Do not be aggressive.
         Move slowly with precise gestures.
         Lift up the offenders to know the Father.
         Never risk your life for material possessions.
         Keep your hands clearly visible.
         If in a group, do not talk among yourselves more than necessary.
         Within reason, do what you are told.


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                                                                                   Casas Global Outreach




Health Cautions
1. Inoculations - get all recommended inoculations in the recommended time frame.
      Start Early! Do not wait until the last month; some inoculations require a series.
      Check with a travel doctor, e.g. Concentra, or with Pima County Health Clinic
       International Division.
      Immunizations (such as, Hepatitis A & B, Typhoid, Polio, etc.) needed for your trip to
       (Country)                                                                                ,
       may be found at: http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/destinationList.aspx :
          USA immunizations up-to-date (such as, measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine,
           diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus (DPT) vaccine, etc)?
          Inoculation to schedule:
          Inoculation to schedule:
          Inoculation to schedule:
      Deadline to have immunizations up-to-date – minimum one month prior to trip:


2. Water Hazards
      Wash hands frequently using soap and warm water or waterless anti-bacterial
       solution, especially after touching young children or any surface that might be
       contaminated with fecal mater.
      In developing or third world countries, drink bottled, boiled/treated drinks only.
      Check the seals on bottled water to see that they are not already opened. Some
       cultures readily refill water bottles to use or sell.
      Never swim in or wade in fresh water streams, ponds or lakes in tropical areas as the
       water may contain a variety of diseases that are difficult to cure.
      Avoid stepping in puddles if possible; a puddle may not be water, e.g. per their potty
       training norm, toddlers in areas of China often urinate in walk areas.
3. Food Hazards
      In countries where water is a concern, avoid eating uncooked fruits and vegetables in
       restaurants (including lettuce). Eat only peeled fruits.
      Avoid eating from roadside stalls. (Unless the M1ssi0nary recommends it.)
      Avoid eating seafood.
      If you purchase fruit or vegetables to take to your room, wash them with soap and
       rinse with safe water.
4. Blood Hazards
      When working in medical or dental clinics, take extreme care if handling blood or
       medical or bodily waste. Use standard medical procedure for disposal.
      If you must be hospitalized in a high-risk area, go to a m1ssi0n hospital with western
       trained doctors or a university affiliated teaching hospital in a major city where there
       is most likely a safe blood supply. You may need to go to another city via the
       insurance coverage obtained through Casas Global Outreach.
      It is not advisable to get an injection in many regions of Africa. The needles are often
       cleaned and reused. If you think you might have to have an injection, bring your own
       needles from the US (include a prescription from your doctor for the needles).




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                                                                             Casas Global Outreach




Health Tips – Illness impacts the team, not just an individual - prevent sickness:
1. Washing your hands
       Use soap and water when available
       Use antiseptic wipes or waterless solution
2. Drinks
    Bottled water - be sure the cap has not been previously opened
    Chlorinated
    Filtered
    Soda
    Prepackaged such as Capri Sun
3. Foods
       Fruits and Vegetables should be pealed or cooked – ―served piping hot.‖
       Do not eat salsa that has been sitting out on restaurant tables for hours. They are
        filled with salmonella (according to research).
       Avoid raw sea food.
       Only eat from the roadside stands the M1ssi0nary recommends.
4. Medicines to bring:
       Routine medications should have original labels on if possible.
       Prescription medications should have all pertinent information and dosage written
        clearly on the label– ask your pharmacist for smaller bottles for traveling if possible
       Ask your family doctor if they recommend a broad band antibiotic for fighting off mild
        infections, e.g. Cipro for fighting food poisoning
       Medical History – be sure your application information is current by verifying it two
        weeks prior to the trip:
         The Trip Leader has two copies of your Medical History, placed inside separate
             envelopes.
         Review your sheets, initial any changes you make, date and initial the bottom of
             the sheet, and close the envelopes.
         One envelope will be carried on the trip at all times by the Trip Leader, and the
             other will be carried by the First Aid Manager.
         These envelopes will be opened by the Trip Leader or First Aid Manager only in
             an emergency situation for an attending physician; envelopes will be returned to
             you after the trip.
       If you are taking medications which may have severe side effects from taking or
        missing a dose, or which may be of vital information in an emergency situation, it is
        your responsibility to inform the Trip Leader of that fact when submitting the list.
         It is not necessary to verbalize the specifics of the medication, just to inform the
             Trip Leader of taking that type of drug.
         Finally, should the team be divided into smaller groups, it is also important that
             you are sure you are placed in a group with either the Trip Leader or the First aid
             manager, so they will have your medication list.
5. Medications to consider taking along:
     Imodium Advanced, Pepto Bismol, etc; over the counter laxative
     Motion sickness meds – Bonine, etc.
     Tylenol, Ibuprophen, etc
   Throat lozenges
   Cipro (check with your personal doctor)




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                                                                                               Casas Global Outreach




6. If you get sick:
        Be wise; inform your Trip Leader.
        A First Aid kit is taken on each trip; however, it is only first aid.
        The Trip Leader may contact the field worker to recommend a doctor. It‘s cheaper than you think,
         and they often do house calls.
        Go to a pharmacy recommended by the field worker; they often can help.
        Eat healthy.
        Drink water or juice.
        Don‘t be a burden. Rest! Recover!
        Your team will be pr@ying for you!



What To Do In Case Of Emergency:
1.   Protocol
     a. First Response – S.T.A.N.D. & Pr@y! (from the International M1ssi0n board Southern Baptist Convention:
         Impact Your World Trip Leader Training)
            S – Stabilize and secure situation. Remain calm; pr@y.
            T – Trip Leader takes leadership role for the situation. If the Trip Leader is unable to lead in
             this crisis, then the Pastor or First Aid Manager should do so.
            A – Assess the situation and acquire the necessary medical or police assistance.
            N – Notify: The Trip Leader will make the initial contact to the Field Worker, AIG, and the
             Short-term M1n1stry Assistant, as the situation requires.
            D – Document the details. The First Aid Manager or the Trip Leader should record the details
             (event, person involved, date, time and response taken).
            And Pr@y: The team should pr@y - the first line of help in any crisis.
     b. Travel Supplement Insurance
            Insurance obtained by Casas Global Outreach through Adams & Associates International.
            Each team member should have a copy of the insurance card on the trip.
            Carry this card in your money belts at all times.

2.   Emergencies
     a. Passport missing?
            Access your passport copy you brought in your luggage; the Trip Leader should also have a
             copy.
            Contact the nearest American Embassy and report immediately.
            Follow their instructions.
     b. Medical emergency?
            Access your insurance card issued for the trip.
            Seek medical attention. If in a developing country follow the directions of the long-term
             worker or, if unable to contact, go to a hospital connected with a university or with long-term
             workers. Look for western style services, if possible.
            The Trip Leader or the First Aid Manager will contact Insurance services listed on the
             insurance card, using the Trip Leader‘s international cell phone.
            Follow their step-by-step instructions.



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                                                                                         Casas Global Outreach



     c.   National emergency?
             Stay together. If you are not together, locate each trip member and gather as quickly as
              possible per the contingency plan.
             Follow the directions of the long-term worker, the Trip Leader and First Aid Manager.
     d. The Trip Leader and/or the First Aid Manager will contact the Short-Term M1n1stry
        Assistant, so your family can be contacted by your Casas network on your behalf.

3.   Contingency Plans
     Contingency plans will be discussed on-site with your Trip Leader. They consist of deciding on such
     things as:
             What to do in case the group gets separated
             Where to meet in case of a hotel evacuation
             Who is carrying the international phone is for emergencies and who has the local field phone
             When necessary phone calls will be made for home contact




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                                                                                          Casas Global Outreach




Packing Protocol
Remember that the way you dress doesn‘t just make a statement about what you think about yourself; it
also makes a statement about your views of the country you will be entering and most importantly, about
your view of G0d. The American dress code is considerably more immodest and often more casual than
most other cultures. You don‘t want to offend people before you even open your mouth.
You want to portray tasteful, clean and neat even in a country where staying clean is difficult. They stay
clean, we should too. Whether you are on the plane or the ground in another culture, you want to
communicate a conservative taste and outlook through what you wear.

Pack Light
       Pack only what you can carry. You will be responsible for dealing with your own luggage over
        curbs, up and down steps, and on and off crowded subways/buses.
       Consider taking only a carry-on for short trips; buddy system for blow dryers, etc.
       Consider sharing a check-in suitcase and taking your carry-on if necessary; some overseas
        flights allow less weight per bag than US flights.
       Save room for m1n1stry materials and gifts for the Field Workers; carry-on luggage should be
        used for more valuable items.
       See www.onebag.com.
Remember: It’s OK to wear the same thing twice in the same week!
       Modest, basic colors, rather than high fashion
       Comfortable, but not sloppy
       Low-maintenance washable fabrics, not dry-clean only
Things for the Carry On
       Tickets, passport, AIG card
       Reading material
       Extra pair of glasses, especially if you wear contacts
       Medications, motion sickness medication
       Change of clothing, sweater/jacket, socks
       Snacks for the plane
       Optional: neck pillow, eye cover, earplugs
Often Forgotten Items
       Wash cloth if needed (these are often not available overseas)
       Post cards or enlarged pictures from our state, and maps of the USA, our state and the
        destination country are helpful conversation tools
       Pictures of your family, but not pictures of your house – your Photo Story Book
       Gift(s) for the long-term worker(s) and guides
What to Leave Behind
       Jewelry and other expensive items
       Hair-Dryer/Curling Iron (Unless you have BOTH an adaptor AND a transformer) – sharing these
        items within hotel rooms lightens your luggage




                                                                                                       TM    60
                                                                                                Casas Global Outreach



                                                Casas Global Outreach

        Communication Principles for Casas Short-Term Trips
                                                 Updated 9/10/09



Casas Global Outreach is asking that Goers on Casas short-term trips (STT) willingly give up one to two
weeks of outside distractions and influences to focus solely on the team service for which G0d has prepared
them. It is very difficult to do this when remaining tied to distractions back in the U.S.

Our Global Worker hosts know when they are not being given 100% of a team‘s attention, so please be
considerate of those you are going to serve alongside.
       The Global Worker may provide you with use of a personal computer after the day‘s tasks are
        finished. Depending on the size of your team, there may only be time for one person to communicate
        on behalf of the team.
       If internet or cell phone reception is available in your country of service, such as at an internet café or
        some other source outside of the field worker‘s personal/work set up, please limit your usage to
        personal free time or after all team activities have been concluded for that day.
       Remember, the person you are communicating with back home does not have the full context of what
        you are experiencing on the trip, which causes information to be easily misunderstood at times.
       Please keep any communications short, containing positive information on how G0d is working while
        you are there.
As you read through these communication principles, please consider that Global Outreach is asking you to
follow these security guidelines for all Casas‘ short-term trips. Even if the Global Worker you are serving
appears to use less security, Casas Goers will maintain these security guidelines so that our Goers will be
less likely to jeopardize the short-term trip. Upon returning from the service trip, Goers will continue a level of
security matching the security level of the country, to protect and promote the Global Worker‘s strategy.




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                                                                                               Casas Global Outreach




                                        Cell Phone Principles
Casas Global Outreach recommends that you consider leaving your personal cell phone at home during the
outreach trip, for two reasons: so that you will not be distracted and you will not need to worry about losing it
on the trip.

Risks in using cell phones on a short-term trip:
       The pursuit of cultural awareness and team interdependence is hampered by frequent cell phone use
        (contact with home).
       Conversations may be overheard by a third party who may get the wrong impression from or be
        opposed to what they hear, e.g. a bystander, government regulators, etc.
       The person at home may not understand the exact context of what you are speaking about, even
        though you tried to provide it, e.g. pr8yer requests, events, etc.

Guidelines to follow if you choose to take your cell phone on the trip:
    1. Any communication between people at home and team participants needs to happen when there is
       no outreach or team activity; i.e., when you have free time
    2. Any minors on a trip should be under the supervision of their parent to follow these same guidelines
    3. When in a sensitive country, phone conversations, whether on a cell phone or a local phone, should
       be carefully stated with caution.
    4. Conversations should occur in private surroundings, e.g. your hotel room. Phone booths are not
       always private. Remember, you can‘t always tell who knows at least some English.
    5. Conversation topics should contain positive information regarding how G0d is fulfilling the trip‘s
       purpose.
    6. Be careful asking for pr8yer requests – these have caused undue alarm in the people at home
       because loved ones at home do not have the full context.
    7. The same guidelines should be followed as for any conversations which may be overheard by a
       national who may not share your faith.
    8. Text messaging would be an easy way to communicate home privately during your free time. For
       sensitive countries, texting should be done in ―code‖ (see email guidelines).

Our team leaders always have cell phones for team communication. This phone may also be used to call the
B1ble Fell0wship for a pre-arranged phone call. These same guidelines for cell phone usage on a trip should
be followed when these cell phones are used.




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                                                                                            Casas Global Outreach




                     E-mail and Written Communication Principles

Written communications by emailing, texting, and Twittering are quite popular in our society. Casas Global
Outreach recommends using email as the preferred mode of written communication with your family, friends
and international friends for two reasons: you can more easily control what is said and who may see
messages and you can easily set up a separate e-mail account for the trip.

Risks in using email:
       The person at home may not understand the exact context of what you are speaking about, even
        though you tried to provide it, e.g. pr8yer requests, events, etc.
       Internet communications may be monitored by international government regulators.
       Incorrect language could put the global workers or indigenous people in jeopardy.
Emailing may be the simplest, safest, most effective way to maintain a printed communication link with people
who are not Chr1st-followers in the country you go to. Because people are used to freely forwarding or
sharing information with others, short-term Goers need to be the ones who exercise restraint and caution.
Casas recommends these guidelines for e-mail usage concerning short-term trip.

Guidelines for emailing and sending any printed mail (texting, Twittering, hardcopy):
    1. Before their trips many Goers set up new email accounts, such as from Gmail which is free and
       secure, specifically to manage mail with new international friends.
    2. Any communication between people at home and team participants needs to happen when there is
       no outreach or team activity; i.e., when you have free time
    3. Any minors on a trip should be under the supervision of their parent to follow these same guidelines
    4. When in a sensitive country, printed conversations whether email, text, or hardcopy, should be
       carefully stated with caution.
    5. Communications should occur in private surroundings, e.g. global worker‘s home or your hotel room.
       However, in sensitive countries, hotel rooms may not be secure.
    6. Conversation topics should contain positive information, i.e. statements regarding how G0d is fulfilling
       the trip‘s purpose.
    7. Words
            a. Do not use the words m1ss10n or m1ss10nary!
            b. Describe your trip as a short-term trip but not "m1ssi0n" trip
            c.   Name the region but not the country, e.g. CentralAs1a
            d. When appropriate give first names of global workers but not last names
            e. Do not name indigenous Chr1st-followers in the host country
            f.   Do not name the agency or organization
    8. Other alternative language to use in communications:
            Jesvs= CEO, boss, greatest/best friend, etc.
            G0d= Father/your Father, Boss, etc.
            Ch1ist1an= follower, brother/sister, family, like-minded, etc.
            Chvrch= Club, our group, Glenn‘s office, etc.
            Bib1e, g0spel= books, the book, the manual, etc.


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        Pr8y= lift up, request, make mention, yarp, etc.
        b8ptize(ism)= dunk, swim, swim party, etc.
        Ev8nge1sm, the0l0gy= sharing, sharing good words, introducing them to my Father, etc.
        M1ss10nary= Worker, global worker, etc.
        Mvslim= misspell this word
9. When you return from your trip, your motivation to maintain emailing new international friend may
   decrease. Because of this many people don‘t offer their emails but only respond to requests for email.
10. To manage your new friends‘ expectations, you may want to tell people as you give them your email
    address, ―I‘m not able to keep up with all my emails, so it may take me awhile to respond.‖




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                                 Social Networking Principles

A second option for communicating with new international friends is to use social networking sites like
Facebook, MySpace, or Twitter. If you choose this option you will need to take several more steps of security.
Casas does not recommend social networking as the safest choice for communications with international
friends.
Recently we have become more aware of the risks social networking sites present to global workers, their
organizations, and indigenous Chr1st-followers.

Heighted security risks of social networking:
       Information posted becomes public information. While most of the information is not important, some
        of it is vital to personal and organizational security.
       The long-term well-being of nationals and Kingdom work can be compromised through unwise
        exposure.
       Parties who may not share your faith can potentially see photos, names, or links to global workers,
        their organizations, and indigenous Chr1st-followers.
       Web pages that contain your information and association with chvrches are often accessed by
        Embassies and Consulates as well as groups that seek to stop the spread of other faiths in their
        countries.
       Your ―friends‖ may inadvertently leave messages with trip information that may put the outreach at
        risk.
       New Chr1st-followers may get the wrong impression or be discouraged by seeing photos of American
        Chr1st-followers already on your site with dress or social behaviors that would be considered
        inappropriate in their culture.

Specific risks for Facebook:
       Facebook defaults to almost complete accessibility.
       Friends may be viewed by non-―friends.‖
       Networks can be easily navigated in and out of by non-network members.
       Locations, addresses and other personal information may be viewed by non friends
       Associations and connections can be made by those who wish to harm global workers, indigenous
        staff, or the work – in practical terms, visas can be denied, and extremists can trace you, global
        workers, indigenous staff, indigenous Chr1st-followers, friends, family, team, events attended, etc.
Choosing to communicate through a social network requires careful planning. Consider your trip, what
countries you may be traveling to and the people you interact with to make this decision. Also consider that
some Global Workers may not be able to be your ―friend.‖
If you choose to use social networking to communicate with people from your trip, to manage the risks of
communication with non-Chr1st-follwer or Global Worker friends, Casas needs you to commit to the following:

Guidelines
    1. You will set up a separate account (on Facebook for example) for communicating with your new
       international friends (followers or non-followers, but excluding global workers and indigenous staff)
    2. If you will use Facebook, you will not include your present Facebook contacts in this new Facebook
       account



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                                                                                            Casas Global Outreach



    3. If you will use Facebook, you will not include present Facebook ―friends‖ into this new account
    4. You will not include links to outside sites
    5. You will not include global workers or indigenous staff in this new account
    6. If you want to communicate with global workers or indigenous staff you will set up an additional
       account (on Facebook, for example) for them
    7. You will use the same principles on this account that are used for email and written communications
       and for talking about short-term trips, i.e. not discussing the trip as a "m1ssi0n" trip, not mentioning
       the name of the country, not mentioning or linking to Chr1st1an workers or indigenous believers in the
       host country, etc. (see Cell Phone and Email and Written Communications Principles above).
    8. You will change your information and security settings to the following:
        a. Use a different log-in with perhaps just a first and middle name
        b. Limit potentially offensive or confusing bio-data, associations or pictures
        c.   Change privacy settings:
             1) Profile: In all sections you should ensure that ―only my friends‖ can see your information,
                pictures, and videos, email address, etc. Otherwise the friends of sensitive country friends
                (whom you have not approved) can still access your account.
             2) Search: Uncheck ―view your friend list.‖
             3) Poke, Message, and Friend Request: review information you want to be public.
             4) Limited Profile: review information you want to be public.

Caution: You may prefer to use the simpler, safer method of email to communicate with your new
international friends. If so, and if you have a personal Facebook account you already use, your new friends
may ask you, ―Do you use Facebook? Can I be your Facebook friend?‖
A relationally appropriate answer could be, ―Can I communicate with you by email?‖ and if they press you,
―I‘m not using that a lot right now. I would love to communicate with you by email.‖




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              Blogging, Web Site, Flickr, youtube, Twitter Principles

A third option for communicating with family, friends or new international friends is to use a blog, Flickr,
youtube, Twitter, or other dedicated web site. Recently we have become more aware of the risks these media
present to global workers, their organizations, and indigenous Chr1st-followers. Information posted becomes
public information. While most of the information is not important, some of it is vital to personal and
organizational security.
Casas does not recommend these media as the safest choice for communications with Senders or
international friends during the short-term trip. However, if you choose this option to communicate with
Senders, you will need to take several more steps of security.
If you use Twitter to text message a specific group of Senders and your messages are not posted online,
please refer to the email and texting guidelines.

Heighted security risks
       The long-term well-being of nationals and Kingdom work can be compromised through unwise
        exposure.
       Parties who may not share your faith can potentially see photos, names, or links to global workers,
        their organizations, and indigenous Christ-followers.
       Blogs and web pages that contain your information and association with chvrches are often accessed
        by Embassies and Consulates as well as groups that seek to stop the spread of other faiths in their
        countries.
Choosing to communicate through these media requires careful planning. Consider your trip, what countries
you may be traveling to and people you interact with to make this decision. Also consider that some Global
Workers may not be able to go to your site.
To manage the risks, if you want to use these media to communicate with Senders about your trip, talk with
your Trip Leader immediately. If your Trip Leader approves, there will only be one blog, one web site, one
Twitter account, etc. for the whole team, and it will be managed by a person the Trip Leader designates. If
you are that person, notify the Trip Leader that you commit to the following:

Guidelines
    1. You will notify your Trip Leader that you will maintain Casas guidelines for these media
    2. You will set up a separate account (on Blogger for example) - and not use an existing account for the
       short-term trip
    3. You will not include links to outside sites
    4. Do not upload short-term trip photos throughout the trip process
    5. After a trip, be very careful in placing any short-term trip photos online anywhere (see Email and
       Written Communications Principles above)
    6. You will use the same principles on this account that are used for email and written communications
       and for talking about short-term trips, i.e. not discussing the trip as a "m1ssi0n" trip, not mentioning
       the name of the country, not mentioning or linking to Chr1st1an workers or indigenous believers in the
       host country, not using sensitive language (see Cell Phone and Email and Written Communications
       Principles above).




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                    Deciding Which Communication Method To Use

Choosing to communicate through any of these methods requires careful planning. You need to consider
your trip, the countries you may be traveling to and the people you will interact with before, during, and after
your short-term trip.
Even though you may not be planning on communicating with any international friends at this time, it is best to
have a plan in case the opportunity arises on your short-term trip. Casas needs you to identify which
method(s) you will use throughout this trip process.
Please consider your options below, read over these principles, clarify any questions you may have through
your trip leader, and send you response to your trip leader by the Saturday following the presentation of these
Communication Principles for Casas Short-Term Trips. The presentation will be at the GO Recap Training.
Your Trip Leader will email you this page to reply with your decisions below, or, you may copy this page
and attach to or paste in an email to your Trip Leader. Please keep this document with your Trip Member
Manual.
Name:
Short-term trip destination & dates of trip:
Trip Leader:
Check only the ones that apply for you:

    Cell: I am not taking my cell phone on my short-term trip.

    Cell: I will take my cell phone on my short-term trip to possibly call or text home in my free time; the cell
    number is:

    Email: If I decide to communicate on my short-term trip and to contact my international friends, I will use
    email; my new, separate email address is:

    Network: I have set up a new social network account to communicate with international friends; my new,
    separate network address is:

    Twitter: I will use Twitter to send texts only; I have set up a new, separate Twitter account, and I have
    changed my settings so nothing is posted online. My new Twitter address is:

    I am not planning to use email, social networks, or Twitter, to communicate with any international friends
    which I may make on this trip.

    Blogs, etc: My Trip Leader has asked me to manage a blog or web site or Twitter account or Flickr
    account or youtube account for my short-term team; this new, separate address is:

    Blogs, etc: If I have not been designated to manage any of the sites mentioned in the previous item, I will
    not use these media
Casas Global Outreach Trip Leaders, Team Communication Manager, and/or staff will visit your site(s)
chosen above to verify that the guidelines are met. I understand that I will follow the Communication
Principles for Casas Short-Term Trips.

Name or Signature & Date:
(Electronic submission indicates your agreement in lieu of a signature on paper)
EMAIL YOUR RESPONSE to your Trip Leader by the Saturday following the Recap training over this section.



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               Casas Global Outreach



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                            TM   70
                                                                                              Casas Global Outreach




Preparing for your Post-Trip Experience


Final Trip Debriefing
                (1) Debriefing helps you grow from their short-term experience by reflecting on the group
                    experience communally while it is still vividly in front of you.
                (2) Debriefing helps you and the chvrch measure the effectiveness of the trip by hearing how
                    people grew and how we aided the Global Worker‘s work.
                (3) Debriefing identifies stories of what G0d did that need to be shared with the chvrch.
    Ask yourself:
             (a) What was the most eye opening part of the trip for you?
                (b) When did you sense G0d stretching you the most?
                (c) How have you come to understand m1ssi0nary work in a new light as a result of this
                    trip?
                (d) Would you be willing to come and live here for a year or two? Why or why not?
                (e) Are there people in your B!ble Fellowship class that you think should be part of a trip like
                    this? Do they have skills that could aid the m1ssi0nary‘s strategy? Would the trip be a
                    good spiritual growth experience for them?


Preparing for re-entry
        A. It is common to feel an emotional letdown after a trip because you‘ve been preparing for it for a
           so long, it is so intense, it ends so suddenly, and people back home don't seem to understand.
        B. It is common for team members is to feel frustrated with people back home – at first they may
           seem ―shallow‖ and ―unG0dly.‖
        C. Learn to transform that frustration into something positive:
                -     Look at the people back home like you looked at the people on the field - they are needy;
                      we need to cross into their culture to let them be touched by G0d
                -     The touch of G0d the people at home need to feel is G0d's heart of love for the least-
                      reached around the world
                -     G0d doesn‘t touch them through our frustration, but he does when we enter into their
                      world (a "less-global" world), like we enter another culture
                -     In their culture, people at home are often concerned with growing spiritually. So share
                      how this trip:
                          o   was a spiritual milestone for you
                          o   put you in a situation of being dependent on G0d – He gave you strength in an
                              unfamiliar situation
                          o   He gave them the opportunity to share the message with people who had never
                              heard it before

        D. Integrate this trip into your life. You have just been a goer, now choose between five roles (the
           Global Outreach team can help with any of these):

            -       Intercessor - pr@y for Global Workers, followers, and seekers on the field




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                                                                              Casas Global Outreach



-   Welcomer - reach out to the "world at our door" - refugees, international students, and
    immigrants, possibly from the region or country they went to
-   Sender - give financial, emotional and logistical support for Global Workers
-   Goer - go on lightning trips to Mexico, South Tucson, or Sells; plan for future overseas
    short-term trips, or consider long-term service
-   Mobilizer - help the people of Casas catch G0d's heart for the world by sharing the story of
    your trip experience, helping with the Street Fair, or volunteering in other ways with the
    Global Outreach m1n1stry




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                                                                                 Casas Global Outreach




                   Giving a Report on Your Global Trip
Leaders of Casas-led trips will help their teams prepare to give a report to the individual Senders
and the B!ble Fellowship(s) on their Global Trip according to these standards.

Why give a report:

          Short-term workers‘ reporting on their global trips to their chvrches is an ancient
          Chr1stian practice.

          “They sailed back to Antioch, where they had been committed to the grace of G0d for
          the work they had now completed. On arriving there, they gathered the chvrch together
          and reported all that G0d had done through them and how he had opened the door of
          faith to the Gentiles.” (Acts 14:26, 27)

          Friends and family have pr@yed for you and some may have given financially. They
          deserve to hear how G0d answered their pr@yers and what G0d did with their
          investment.

How to plan the report:

          Each trip member should send all his/her supporters a note about the trip. This note
          may include a few carefully chosen photos and a brief description of the G0d impact
          related to that photo. It is best to keep your letter to one-two pages, easy to read, and
          focusing on three to four highlights from the trip. Basically, follow the guidelines
          provided here.

          If it is a group presentation, choose someone to facilitate the presentation, like an
          emcee. The emcee is responsible to plan it and assign who talks when and about what.
          He or she puts the photos in order and make sure they are shown at the right time, etc.
          The emcee is a lot like the director of a film - you have a great story, now you need to
          tell the story well.

          The B!ble Fellowship (BF) report presentation date must be set up with the BF Director
          prior to the trip, and this date should be confirmed after the trip. Clarify how much time
          you will have for the presentation (usually 20-30 min.).

          a. Make sure your team has thoroughly debriefed; the Trip Leader will include the
             presentation guidelines during the final debriefing before returning to the U.S.

          b. Many things happened in the 200 hours you were on your trip, but you only have a
             few minutes to communicate them.
                  Don‘t be distracted by communicating things unrelated to the purpose of your
                   trip – awkward cultural moments, travel annoyances, etc. Your mind tends to
                   drift to these things.
                  Instead, ask yourself – what do I want those who pr@yed for me and invested
                   in me to think of when they think of my trip?
                  Hint: it probably has something to do with G0d. People want to know: ―Did my
                   pr@yers and my gifts help you achieve the purpose G0d set before you?‖

          c.   Key questions to get you thinking:

               (1) What was the most eye opening part of the trip for you?
               (2) When did you sense G0d stretching you the most?




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              (3) How have you come to understand m1ssi0nary work in a new light as a result
                  of this trip?
              (4) Would you be willing to come and live here for a year or two? Why or why not?
              (5) Are there people in your B!ble Fellowship class that you think should be part of
                  a trip like this? Do they have skills that could aid the m1ssi0nary‘s strategy?
                  Would the trip be a good spiritual growth experience for them?
         d. Stories – Use the above questions to lead you to three to five of the best, most
            moving stories. Write them down.

         e. Keep the m1n1stry in the forefront - avoid presenting the outreach as a vacation,
            using bathroom stories, and inside jokes (e.g. food humor).

How to structure the report:

         a. Before you start - Pr@y before you go into the room. Then be excited about what
            G0d did on your trip, and what He will do during your report!

         b. Introduction

              (1) Give some very short specific bullet points - where, when, what, why - purpose
              of team, members of team, location of m1n1stry, who you served with. (For
              example:

              “Six people from our B!ble Fellowship went in mid-July to have English
              conversations with college students in Central Asia. Michael, Jennifer, Jeanette,
              Chris, Patricia, and I went. We worked with full-time m1ssi0naries from Kampus
              Krusade who are part of the team of our Casas m1ssi0nary Doug Burklebuckle.”)

              (2) Give comparisons (For example, “The city we went to was about the size of
              Tucson, about the size of Los Angeles, etc.”).

              (3) If your people group was least-reached, say so and give its name and what
              percent are evangelical believers (see www.joshuaproject.net).

              (4) Explain how your B!ble Fellowship took a role in your trip through
              comm1ss1oning, providing pr@yer, emotional, logistical, communication, and re-
              entry support.

              (5) Describe how Casas Global Outreach Funding helped you go on your trip. i.e.:
              insurance paid by Casas Global Outreach, materials and supplies that were paid
              by GO or long–term workers who are partially paid by GO funds.

         c.   Heart of the Report - Most of the time should be spent on the relational incidents
              and what-you-saw-G0d-do incidents

              (1) Stories - Pick three to five stories, and help the team format them into clear
                  stories (intro the characters, conflict, resolution of conflict, and tie up loose
                  ends) add details in character development and creation of conflict so your
                  listeners feel the emotions you felt and imagine the scene that you saw.

              (2) Pictures - Only show those pictures that relate to the stories no more, no less,
                  and do not comment on the pictures since the story explains them.
                     The pictures add to the story not the other way around. Eliminate what you
                      don‘t need such as city shots or unnecessary shots of yourself or the
                      people you especially liked that have nothing to do with the story you are
                      telling. Avoid the phrase, ―and in this next picture…‖



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                     A general rule of thumb is to have about one picture per minute. However,
                      unless you are thoroughly rehearsed, it is difficult to speak only one min.
                      per photo. For teams, it works better to allow each member to select one
                      photo related to a G0d impact moment he/she had on the trip and keep the
                      total photos to 10-15.
                     Plan on using an overhead projector to show your photos to the group.
                      The BF televisions are too small for everyone to enjoy the impact of your
                      photos. You may borrow a chvrch projector for the presentation.

             (3) Each member - Have 2-4 team members share for 60 seconds each (with a
                 timer) on the most meaningful part of the trip for them. This is the bullet point
                 for them, the take away lesson. What it did in them, how this moment has and
                 will change their life. For example, "At that moment I realized we are probably
                 the only Chr1st followers out of all of these people.‖

             (4) Questions – Allow at least the final five minutes for the listeners to ask
                 questions.

             (5) Vision – Invite the Global Outreach Pastor to share why it is so important for
                 Americans to join G0d in this country. This is the part where you share your
                 passion and allow G0d to use your words and heart to touch the hearts of
                 those who hear you. This is often when people feel G0d calling them to join
                 Him.

             (6) Next Steps – The Global Outreach Pastor will also share the nitty-gritty
                 details of how people can be involved now. For example people can pr@y,
                 they can give they can go on the next trip.

Talking about money - see http://www.gocasas.com/policy-fund.htm

Special situations:

         a. For a less traditional (sitting in a circle) presentation, ask two or three people to each
         ask a specific question to get things started and then let the others jump in.

         b. If you're feeling like doing something really different, you could make your
         presentation into a game show quiz with people holding up signs or raising their hands
         or holding up a red card or a blue card, boys vs. girls, etc., give prizes for winners, or
         make people do activities like on Survivor like solving a giant jigsaw puzzle to go on to
         the next section, etc.

         c. If you were invited to give your report as part of the Principles of Global Outreach
         Series, make the presentation a maximum of 30 minutes. Presentations should also
         allow time for questions from the class; this is the standard teaching mode for the
         Outreach lessons. Under no circumstances go over!




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                                                                                   Casas Global Outreach




             Short-Term Trip Presentation Outline Example
    Spend 20-30 min. sharing positive information about the trip, using 10-15 activity photos
    With large teams, it is better to select just a few speakers, so your story is heard within the
     time constraints
    Goers recall a story from the trip which shares G0d’s work in the field
    Provide enough context in the story, so that the audience can understand how G0d’s plan
     worked on the trip


1.     Welcome & Brief Vision for the presentation: why are we presenting today? – by
       Goer
       (Photo of region, city streets, eating with nationals, etc) – 5 min.
       a. Team introduction
       b. Celebrate what G0d did: trip to XX on X dates, with X# people, for X# days;
          funding both w/ supporters and GO (insurance, materials/supplies, team funds
          raised)
       c. Who were we trying to help and to reach?
       d. Daily Schedule: brief description of a day there and/or special events with the
          people
2.     G0d‘s successes – by Goers (5 Photos of interactions with nationals) – 15 min:
       a. Story of how you grew spiritually during the trip.
       b. Story of how Indigenous Hearers grew spiritually during your trip.
       c. Story of how you grew relationally, closer to the Global Workers.
       d. Story of how you grew relationally, closer to Indigenous Hearers.
       e. Story of how you grew relationally, closer to your ABF.
       f.   Ask audience to pr@y for team and ABF to remain connected to this work.

3.     Invitation to JOIN G0d in his work – by Global Outreach Pastor – 5 min.
       a. Appreciation to Leadership (trip leader & field workers)
       b. Celebrate how the ABF connected in the roles they played: 5 sending roles,
          comm1ss1oning, pr@yer, finances, and with family support (checking on
          families while Goer was gone, etc.)
       c. Vision for going back again – why it is so important for Americans to join G0d in
          this country
       d. Vision for staying in touch with this country‘s m1n1stry throughout the year and
          meet their needs as best we can
4.     Q&A (as time allows) – 5 min. as time allows

5.     Close with pr@yer



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                                                                                Casas Global Outreach




                   Health & Safety Skills Section Questions


After reading this section, answer the questions below and email or hand your answers to your
trip leader before the next team meeting.



Self-test questions:

1.   I have read the entire Health & Safety Skills section of the Trip Member manual:
                                                    (sign or type your full name)

2. What are some good security strategies for your team to follow?

3. If a fellow trip member were speaking too loudly or being too outlandish, how could you
   diplomatically handle the situation?

4. What food and water hazards do you think will be most relevant for your trip?

5. Since individual illness impacts a team, what will you do to prevent sickness?

6. What should be your first response in any urgent situation?

7. In case the group gets separated, what would be a good idea to most efficiently get everyone
   together again?

8. Begin your packing list for your trip: will you be taking just a carry-on?

9. Which Communication Method have you decided to use with your international friends?

     If you haven‘t decided yet, remember your decision is due by the Saturday following the
     Recap training over this section.

10. Once you have returned from the trip, you may feel frustrated and even depressed. What
    can you do to transform these negative feelings into a positive direction?



Team discussion questions:

1. Share your solutions for the three scenarios (at the beginning of this section) with your team.

2. How do you feel about your safety going on this trip?



     back to top




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                                                    Casas Global Outreach




              Appendices


1. Trip Agreement

2. Five Basic Stages of Culture Stress

3. Team Roles

4. Liability Release Agreement – IMB version

5. Gallagher Charitable International Insurance Services

6. Casas Mission Trips Contribution Form Sample




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                                                                                  Casas Global Outreach




                                        Appendix 1:
                                     Trip Agreement

            From the Application for Short-Term Trip Members, this page is
            to remind you of the agreement you made when you submitted your
            application for a Casas Short-Term Trip.

Because Casas wants each person going on a short-term trip to have a safe and effective
experience, the church asks each person to commit to the following actions.

By submitting this application, either electronically or on paper, I:
1. Affirm that to the best of my knowledge, all of the information in this application is true and
   complete.
2. Affirm that I have emailed/sent my references asking them to each fill out a Reference Form.
3. Authorize Casas to inquire of my references.
4. Release references and all persons providing information from all liability to inquiries in
   connection with my application.
5. Release Casas from liability attached to any Global Outreach of which I am a part.
6. Give permission to Casas Global Outreach to use any video and photos taken of myself while
   preparing for and during this short-term trip and I release Casas to use these for promotional
   and/or ministerial purposes.
7. Commit to complete all training, including reading the Trip Member Manual and submitting
   the answers to all manual questions by the due dates, in order to be an effective ambassador
   to another culture.
8. Commit to fulfilling the responsibilities of a Trip Member.
9. Commit to being prepared for and attending all team meetings.
10. Submit to the authority of the Trip Leader throughout trip process (pre-, on-, and post-trip).
11. Commit to raise my own financial support by the due dates (Orientation and Finance Training
    from Casas Global Outreach and/or your Trip Leader must be completed before raising any
    financial support).
12. Collaborate with the team members to resolve that God‘s purposes for this trip may come to
    fulfillment.
13. Commit to give up any social habits that might lessen my effectiveness and influence, while I
    am participating on a short-term trip; i.e. I will not purchase nor consume alcohol or tobacco
    products during a short-term trip.
14. Submit my passport or passport application copy digitally with this application or by bringing it
    to the Orientation and Finance Training.
15. Submit the Background Release Authorization form digitally with this application or by
    bringing it to the Orientation and Finance Training.




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                                                                              Casas Global Outreach




                                   Appendix 2:
                 Five Basic Stages of Culture Stress
There are five basic stages of culture shock. The International M1ssi0n Board‘s Volunteer
Cross – Cultural Training lists them as The Honeymoon on the Mountain, Loneliness in the
Valley, Climbing Out of the Valley, The Slow Climb, and Integration Partway Up the
Mountain. The stage most experienced on short-term trips is the Honeymoon.

The Honeymoon on the Mountain – This stage begins even before the team gets on the
plane. It is when the individual feels an emotional high. When they step into the country,
every thing seems quaint, charming or picturesque. It‘s a time for taking photos.

It‘s also a time when people feel safer than if they are in the US. They will sometimes let
down their guard. They think there is less crime in this country and as a result, women might
get purses stolen or someone might be more likely to be pick pocketed.
Loneliness in the Valley – This is an emotional low. It seems everything in this country is
difficult to understand. You may feel under – utilized or under – appreciated. You may feel
anger toward local people, trip members or G0d. There is rising stress, short temper, physical
illness, withdrawal, homesickness, worry and spiritual depression.

Climbing out of the Valley- Spend more time with G0d in B!ble study, worship and pr@yer.
Let G0d show you what He is doing. Focus on how this country and your country are alike,
how these people and the people from your country are alike. If you don‘t like the food,
remind yourself of eating Aunt Sylvia‘s grated carrot salad. If the bed is hard, remember that
camping trip or the bed you tested in the mall. Talk to someone else about how you are
feeling. Let them help you pr@y and talk it out. Find your sense of humor and laugh. Write in
your journal at least one positive experience every day. And most importantly, keep busy with
what ever task you are given. If you aren‘t given a task, find one.

The Slow Climb – This is when you begin to see some good in the community you are in.
You may not completely understand everything about the customs, habits and culture, but
you appreciate it‘s good points. For a short – term trip, this may not happen until the trip is
over and you are reflecting on it at home. If you have reached this point, you will begin to feel
a connection with the people. It is important to make your good – byes without making
promises of on – going emails, letters and phone calls that you can‘t keep. Make no
entanglements that the local pastors will have to sort out when you are gone.

Integration Partway Up the Mountain – Here you can enjoy the community with
understanding. Most likely, you will not get here on your first short – term trip. This normally
takes several trips to attain. If he/she has been there several years, the local m1ssi0nary has
usually entered this stage.




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                                                                                    Casas Global Outreach




                                          Appendix 3:

                                       Team Roles
Each team is led by a Trip Leader chosen by the Global Outreach Pastor and Short-term Trip
Coordinator. On some trips, other leaders are included: an Apprentice Trip Leader, a M1n1stry
Pastor, and/or an Associate or Senior Pastor. Each leader has a significant role to fulfill.

                                          Trip Leader
To Global Outreach Staff and Long-Term Global Workers - Aligns the trip with the chvrch and
communicates with the chvrch
   Give input to the Initial Trip Approval plan with the Global Outreach Pastor.
   Along with the Global Outreach Pastor, chooses an apprentice leader
   Meets on a regular basis with the GO Short-Term Director to report on, plan, and problem-
    solve recruiting, team finances, team training, and the upcoming trip
   Completes the Trip Leader training in this document and attends Trip Leader training
    scheduled by Global Outreach
   Prepares arrangements ahead of time with the host (long-term Global Worker)
   Propose team travel arrangements, discuss and approve with GO Short-Term Director, carry
    them out. Proposed airfare should be the cheapest route that has a reasonable schedule.
    Report to GO Short-Term Director the proposed airfare vs. the cheapest airfare and the
    proposed itinerary (airport stops) vs. the cheapest itinerary.
   Propose team lodging arrangements, discuss and approve with GO Short-Term Director,
    secure agreement of host, and carry them out.
   Propose any overnights outside work location (if any, i.e., debrief, cultural experience, rest
    day) to meet Casas guidelines:
    1. Cost must not exceed 10% of total trip cost (cost includes all costs for these overnights
       including food, lodging, airport transfer, cultural activities, visa, and any increased airfare
       beyond the cheapest itinerary).
    2. Must be the cheapest route that has a reasonable travel schedule.
    3. Overnights for cultural experiences must be in cultures closely related to the destination
       culture (religiously, culturally, politically, and/or historically).
   Propose daily schedule, including time for team meeting, discuss and approve with GO
    Short-Term Director, secure agreement of host, and carry out this schedule.
   Propose a two hour time slot the morning of the last day or during a long layover in a hub
    airport for the Debrief, Re-Entry, and Trip Presentation training, discuss and approve with GO
    Short-Term Director, secure agreement of host, and lead this training.
   Propose in-country travel arrangements-metro, trains, buses, etc. Discuss the arrangements
    and approve with the GO Short-Term Director, and carry them out.
   With the GO Short-Term Director, choose a journal/devotional guide for trip members to use
    pre-trip, on-trip, and post-trip.




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Pre-Trip - Oversees and leads the team members to successfully prepare for the trip
   Work with the appropriate B!ble Fellowship Director(s), Division Director(s), and Division
    Pastor(s) to recruit Team Members.
   The final cost per person will be decided and published as a Trip Summary Sheet before any
    fundraising begins and will not be changed later.
   Ensures that team members carry out the steps in the sending process (participate in all
    Global Outreach-sponsored training, fill out applications and references, submit funds for
    plane ticket purchase by the set deadline date, etc.) and reports this to GO Short-Term Trip
    Coordinator.
   Approves support letters for each team member. Four parts of the letter consist of: statement
    of the trip purpose, the costs and due dates, an invitation for partnership with supporters, and
    the contributor coupon.
   Receives and compares mailing lists (names only) to identify any common people among
    Team Members. Informs Team Members not to send individual letters to these common
    people.
   Writes team fundraising letter to shared donors who should otherwise receive multiple
    fundraising letters from the same team. This will help ensure only one fund raising letter from
    any given team. Write each Team Member‘s name on each letter. Mail these team letters.
   Tracks donations to trip members via donation forms and regularly submits forms and checks
    to GO Short-Term Director.
   Communicate regularly with team.
   Lead pre-trip team meetings. These times should include corporate pr@yer, input on spiritual
    growth, cultural information, language practice, health checks (inoculations/ walking),
    devotional, team task preparation, journal/book discussion (if team is using a journal/book),
    and logistics.
   Consider taking one team meeting to walk with a backpack loaded with five or ten pound of
    flour or sugar. See who tires easily. Encourage further walking.
   Ensures that travel arrangements for the team are made
   Identifies a qualified Finance Manager and ensures that they understand the required
    accounting procedures are followed for the trip.
   Identifies team members to take responsibility for team roles such as devotion manager,
    photography manager, video manager, etc.
   Ensures that team members follow the Casas guidelines for fundraising
   Ensures that team members give a report in their B!ble Fellowship(s).
   Ensures that team members are comm1ss1oned by their B!ble Fellowship
   Get evaluation forms from GO Short-Term Director. (Give to team at end of trip.)

On Trip - Leads the group to accomplish the goals of the trip in a safe, effective, G0dly,
spiritually healthy, culturally-sensitive way
   Shepherds the group (leads or delegates leading devotions, encouraging people)
   Lead daily team meetings, with portions delegated to Devotion Manager and/or others. These
    meetings will principally address three issues, ―What did G0d do today?,‖ ―What did you
    struggle with today?,‖ and ―What do we need to pr@y for?‖




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   Steps in and takes charge when a problem requires it; lovingly but directly confronts team
    members who are creating problems
   Provides G0dly and culturally-sensitive perspective on unforeseen situations that arise
   Meets daily to process with Apprentice Trip Leader(s) (who has/have been selected with the
    Global Outreach Pastor) on how the team is being led.
   Makes sure that the tasks that the team went to accomplish get accomplished.
   Leads a two hour Debrief , Re-Entry, and Trip Presentation training the morning of the last
    day or during a long layover in a hub airport.
   Give team members an evaluation form to fill out so Casas can learn from their experience –
    get from GO Short-Term Director.

Post-Trip - Ties up loose ends with team members, GO staff, and finances, and Global
Workers in a spiritually healthy, responsible way
   Reports on trip to GO Pastor and staff including stories, highlights, challenges, suggested
    changes for future years, team members, and relationship with Global Workers
   Ensures that Finance Manager accounts for all finances.
   Debriefs with selected team members concerns to be addressed before future trips are taken
   Organizes the team to give a report to their B!ble Fellowship(s). Gather the team‘s stories
    and supporting photos for a Trip Presentation which Trip Members will give in their B!ble
    Fellowship(s) according to Casas‘ trip presentation guidelines.




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                                Apprentice Trip Leader
An Apprentice Leader is someone identified by both the Trip Leader and the GO Team as a
potential future Trip Leader and who meets the basic qualifications of a Trip Leader (faithful
believer in Jesus, emotionally and socially mature enough to successfully lead a group, and
organized enough to successfully handle the details of trip donations and trip planning). The Trip
Leader will discuss any candidates to be Apprentice Leader with the GO Team before
approaching anyone.
Duties of Apprentice Leader are the same as a Team Member with the addition of:
   Trains beside the Trip Leader
   Knows all schedules, hotels and other information
   Is ready to take over the management of the team, for a day or the rest of the trip, if the Trip
    Leader becomes incapacitated.
   If pre-approved to be an Apprentice Leader, takes over the leadership of the trip halfway
    through the trip. (The Trip Leader remains available for support if needed.)




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    Trip Leader with a Pastor of Their M1n1stry Members on a Trip
    Give input to the Initial Trip Approval form.
    Work with the Pastor to recruit Team Members from his/her m1n1stry.
    Ensure that each team member has turned in their Applications/References/Updates.
    Inform Pastor of Approved team members.
    Propose team travel arrangements, discuss and approve with Pastor, carry them out.
    Propose team lodging arrangements, discuss and approve with Pastor, secure agreement of
     host, and carry them out.
    Propose daily schedule, including time for team meeting, discuss and approve with Pastor,
     secure agreement of host, and carry out this schedule.
    Propose a two hour time slot the morning of the last day or during a long layover in a hub
     airport for the Debrief, Re-Entry, and Trip Presentation training, discuss and approve with
     Pastor, secure agreement of host, and lead this training.
    Communicate with team.
    Lead pre-trip team meetings. These times should include corporate pr@yer, cultural
     information/ language practice, health checks (inoculations/ walking), devotional, work on
     team task, book discussion ( if the team is reading a book), and logistics.
    Lead daily on-trip team meetings, with portions delegated to Devotion Manager and anyone
     else you see fit. These meetings will principally address three issues, ―What did G0d do
     today?‖ ―What did you struggle with today?‖ and ―What do we need to pr@y for?‖
    Propose in-country travel arrangements-metro, trains, buses, etc. Discuss the arrangements
     and approve with the Pastor, and carry them out.
    Propose solutions to the Pastor for cultural and travel conditions. Discuss and decide
     together.
    Support the Pastor in the eyes of the Team.
    Disagree with Pastor in private.
    Pr@y with Pastor.
    When there is a disagreement between Trip Leader and Pastor, the Trip Leader is
     responsible for the final decision.




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                              Pastor - Leader on the Trip
   A Pastor can become a Trip Leader if he/she goes through the Trip Leader training process.
   Recruit team members from his/her m1n1stry area.
   Participate in fund raising.
   Follow the Guidelines for Global Outreach Short-Term Trips.
   Encourage the Trip Leader as a leader, affirm your confidence in the Trip Leader; reinforce
    the role of the Trip Leader in the eyes of the team.
   Discuss any need for moral or ethical confrontation of team members, either personal or
    interpersonal, with the Trip Leader. Decides on a plan of action with the Trip Leader.
   Carry out the plan of action with the team members.
   Disagree with the Trip Leader in private.
   Pr@y with your Trip Leader.
   The Trip Leader is the final authority on the trip.




                            Pastor Not Leading on a Trip
   Same duties as any other Team Member.




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                                       Team Roles
              Team Member/Goer Roles and Responsibilities
Every Short–Term team needs to work together to be successful. Trip Leaders will work with the
Goers to identify roles for each person to manage during the pre, on, and post trip experience.

                               Communication Manager
                          (Possibly the Trip Leader or Apprentice Leader)

Description: the Communication Manager is a wise, discrete, G0dly person who can shed a
positive light on any situation, so as not to cause undue concern among the people. This person
must also keep in mind Level 3 security.


PRE-Trip Tasks:
   Prepares an email address list of Team Member family/supporter contacts who will be
    receiving emails while the team is on the field. Give this list to the Contact Point Person (see
    details below).
    o   If a family member does not have email, a phone number will be provided.
    o   The GO Short-Term Trip Coordinator will be included on the list
        (anncrippen@gmail.com).
    o   The GO Pastor will be included on the email list (casasglobaloutreach@gmail.com).
   Chooses one person who will be the Contact Point Person for the team in Tucson; the
    Contact Person is a wise, discrete, G0dly person who can shed a positive light on any
    situation, so as not to cause undue concern among the people at home. This person must
    also keep in mind Level 3 security.
   Contact Point Person sends a test email introducing his/her self to the contact list.
   Emails contacts every two weeks with a progress note regarding the preparations for the trip
    (general cross-cultural info, language progress, prayer requests, etc)
    o   Before trip, provide the Real Time Flight View website for Senders to follow the departure
        and return flights: http://www.flightview.com/traveltools/default.asp (choose ―By
        City‖ tab, then enter cities and date of flight).
   If possible takes a laptop on trip. Taking a laptop, pda or blackbury type device may become
    a distraction from the trip focus if Goer doesn‘t limit use.
ON- Trip Tasks:
   The Communication Manager emails the GO Short-Term Trip Coordinator and Contact Point
    Person, who will disseminate the information.
   Sends Contact Point Person and GO Short-Term Trip Coordinator one email within three
    hours of arriving on the field verifying the team arrived safely. If email is unavailable then text
    GO Short-Term Trip Coordinator who can forward info to point person.
   Sends an email every 2-3 days with a report of how things are progressing.
    o   This email may be short. Include photo(s) if possible to show to ABF.
    o   Limit home news as it may be depressing or distract field focus




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   Sends an email within 24 hours prior of departure summing up arrival information: airline,
    terminal, approximate arrival time.
   If a flight has been missed, sends an email or phones the GO Short-Term Trip Coordinator
    (520-878-1274) as soon as possible.

POST- Trip Tasks:
   Upon arrival in Tucson, send out short email stating the team is home

   Follow up in a couple of days with a brief statement regarding the success of the trip; this
    should not diminish other Goer‘s trip stories

   Send email requesting pr@yer for Goers as they fit their new spiritual growth into their
    Tucson routines and find how they will connect locally in G0d‘s work




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                                                                                   Casas Global Outreach




                                    Devotion Manager
Description: the Devotion Manager is willing to lead short devotions and worship time for the
team or who is willing to seek another Goer to help lead these. Team Devotions are essential to
team building and keeping the focus on G0d‘s trip plan.
PRE- Trip Tasks:
   Offer worship times during Pre-, On-, and Post-Trip experiences led by you or delegate.
   Coordinate scheduling of Pre-, On-, and Post-Trip devotional times with Trip Leader.
   If possible, provide printed words to familiar worship songs, which may be simple to sing
    without accompaniment.
   Plan and delegate the leading of 5-20 minute daily devotional times during trip (Serendipity
    B!ble provides questions/thoughts to extend verses; GO has one copy in office).
ON- Trip Tasks:
   Be flexible with time available for daily devotions on trip; this time slot may vary per day
    depending on the field work.
   Work with the Trip Leader to assure the daily devos happen; be the advocate.
   On-Field could include but not be limited to scripture, pr@yer, and singing.
   Ensure the environment is comfortable for participation; worship songs can help create this.
   Provide opportunities for each Team Member to respond either silently or aloud.
   If there is one or two-day debriefing at the end of the trip, coordinate with the Trip Leader so
    that time is as spiritually effective as possible.

POST- Trip Tasks:
   Lead devotion and worship at post-trip debriefing.
   Incorporate scripture or favorite worship song from trip devos into trip presentation




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                                                                                  Casas Global Outreach




                                      Finance Manager
Description: The Finance Manager should be someone who is careful with his/her own book
keeping and who is comfortable with monitoring the team members‘ finances Pre-, On-, and Post-
Trip. The Manager will work with the Trip Leader to keep track of the finances and be in charge
of the large sum of money needed for the team while On-Trip.
PRE-Trip Tasks:
   This should not be the Trip Leader.
   Will collect the contributions from the Goers, review the forms and checks for accuracy, and
    submit the contributions to the GO Short-Term Trip Coordinator.
   With the Trip Leader, follow the Global Outreach Contribution Form method of book keeping.
   The financial spreadsheet will be given to the TL to maintain; the TL may review it with the
    Finance Manager.
ON-Trip Tasks:
   Handles the money for the trip.
   This should be in conjunction with the Trip Leader (TL).
   Note the total funds (cash, ATM, etc) the Team has access to On-Trip.
   The Finance Manager will pay for meals, hotels, metro cards, etc. with the oversight of the
    Trip Leader.
   The Finance Manager will hand out any daily money that goes to Trip Goers with the
    oversight of the Trip Leader (see envelopes) and collect receipts from Trip Goers.
   The Finance Manager will pay the Global Worker for necessary expenses.
   Go over finances everyday with the Trip Leader
   Keep all receipts; often receipts are not given in foreign countries, so a receipt may need to
    be created in that situation.
   Log all expenditures daily, especially when there are no receipts.
POST-Trip Tasks:
   At the end of the trip, sit down with the Trip Leader to reconcile the finances.
   The GO Short-Term Trip Coordinator turns in the balanced Cash Advance Package to
    Finance




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                                                                                    Casas Global Outreach




                                     First Aid Manager
Description: The First Aid Manager should be a people person who likes to interact with and
assist others when needed. This Manager does not need to have medical credentials, but he/she
should be sensitive to the needs of others and be able to sensitively handle any concerns.
PRE-Trip Tasks:
   Medication Lists: each Goer submits a medication list with the application. The First Aid
    Manager should remind the Trip Leader (TL) that two copies of the lists are needed from the
    Short-Term Trip Coordinator just before the trip.
            o    The medical lists need to remain confidential and kept so unless needed to give
                 to a physician during the trip
            o    The First Aid Manager should place each copy in a separate envelope, label it
                 with the Goer‘s name, and divide up the two sets into two larger envelopes
            o    The First Aid Manager should carry one set of these envelopes throughout the
                 trip to submit to a physician if needed during the trip
            o    The Trip Leader will carry the second set throughout the trip; if the team is
                 divided into two groups, the TL goes with one and the Manager with the other
   Check with airlines to verify if you may take the Travel First Aid Kit in your carry-on luggage
    or go into checked luggage; this Kit will also contain syringes.
ON-Trip Tasks:
   Carries the Travel First Aid Kit: small pack to fit in a backpack to carry at all times
   In conjunction with Trip Leader, plans an emergency meeting place while located on the field.
   Checks daily with Team Members as to how they are doing.

   Discusses all concerns with the TL

   At the Tucson airport, returns the medical information envelopes to each Goer.

POST-Trip Tasks:
   Inventory the First Aid Kit and note what supplies were used for
   Return the Kit to the GO Short-Term Trip Coordinator
   Check with Team Members occasionally and at the Post-Trip Debrief to see how they are
    doing. If there are concerns, discuss these privately with the TL, who may let the GO Pastor
    know for follow up if needed.




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                                    Luggage Manager
PRE-Trip Tasks:
   Discuss with the Trip Leader what identifying mark should be placed on each bag.
   At the packing meeting, make sure each piece of luggage has a tag with a name, phone
    number and address as well as nothing that compromises security (such as the name of a
    chvrch when going to a level 2-3 country).
   Place the identification marker on each bag (such as a ribbon, mark with nail polish, etc.)
   Choose a helper (or two) to help organize loading and unloading luggage into any vans.
ON-Trip Tasks:
   Has sufficient change in US airports to get carts from luggage cart lines (get change from Trip
    Leader or Finance Manager).
   Use the same helper(s) with moving luggage in airports and to coordinate getting luggage off
    luggage carrousels, and on to luggage carts.

   Ensure each person carries their own load (unless they are sick, hurt, etc.) and does not take
    advantage of others. If there is a problem, refer it to the Trip Leader.




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                                                                                 Casas Global Outreach




                                      Photo Manager
Description: The Photo Manager is able to select to 2-3 people, of which the Manager may be
one, to be the team photographers to capture the type of photos needed for the trip presentation
and for Global Outreach promotional use. Each Goer is welcome to take their own photos on the
trip, but the team photographers will strive to achieve the Objective below.
Objective: to visually tell a beginning to ending story with pictures of what G0d did with the team
and what He is doing on the field.
    o   Provides numerous action shots of the team working with the smiling people.
    o   Ensures that each event and each Team Member is covered.
    o   Provides numerous heart touching/ emotion eliciting pictures of team and people group.
    o   Limits pictures of people looking at the camera and pictures of groups.
PRE- Trip Tasks:
   Leads photographers to take photos during meetings of the team preparing, e.g. worshiping,
    studying training materials, preparing the field project, packing, etc.
   Checks for equipment (cameras with high resolution capabilities, sufficient memory/
    chargers) for trip related shots, including Global Outreach equipment if needed.
   Videos: Discusses a list of possible Pre-trip, On-Trip and Post-Trip videos with the Trip
    Leader, team and GO Pastor. These may include 10 second videos of hosts asking Casas
    people to come to help them reach their region (no country name if a sensitive country).
ON- Trip Tasks:
   Ensures that the team photographers are indeed taking photos during all parts of the trip:
    travel, activities, meetings, etc.
   If the team is divided for tasks, see that a photographer is included in each group.
   The team photographers should strive to use only first names or nick names for the
    Indigenous people in the photos, especially in Level 3 situations.
   Review shots per day and select a few that meet the Objective criteria for the
    Communications Manager to email home to the ABF and supporters.
POST- Trip Tasks:
   Team photographers should also take photos at the post-trip meeting(s).
   Photo Manager copies all digital photos from Trip Member on the last day onto a laptop or
    hard drive, perhaps in an airport, or does this in Tucson if a laptop is not taken on trip.
   Team photographers select 10-20 photos that meet the Objective above and tell the story of
    G0d‘s trip project. E.g. photographers may choose 10 of their own shots to submit to the
    Manager, and the Manager selects the final 10-20 to submit to Global Outreach. You may
    want to include a good photo from one of the other Goers too.
   Copy the 10—20 photos on a CD for Global Outreach.
   All trip photos, may be uploaded to a safe site, such as Walgreens where you must be invited
    to see the pictures. Or, a CD of team photos may be provided for all Team Members.
   Provides a DVD of team videos for Team Members and the GO office.
   Send the 10-20 selected shots to the Global Worker as a memento.

   After checking with Global Outreach before making purchases, submit receipts to be
    reimbursed for CD/DVDs and other materials (CDs can be made in Global Outreach office).



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                                                                                Casas Global Outreach




                                 Story Scribe Manager
PRE-Trip and ON-Trip Tasks:
   Provides writing/recording equipment of his/her choice: notebook – pen; PDA, recorder etc.
   Listens to the stories that Team Members share Pre, On, and Post Field and makes notes of
    story topics and who shared the story.
   Ask Goer(s) to write down that one story you heard in their journal to email you when home
POST-Trip Tasks:
   Request stories to be emailed to you after getting home.
   Gives each Team Member a copy of all the stories.
   Gives the Global Pastor a copy of all the stories. Global Pastor may contact a Goer whose
    story may be appropriate for sharing in an ABF or Worship, to get more details for sharing.




                            The Team Huddle – On-Trip
   The Team Huddle has the following members: Trip Leader, Pastor (when acting as a
    Leader), Apprentice Leader (if there is one) and the Finance Manager.
   The Huddle gets together when there are decisions that affect the team (i.e., flight canceled,
    hotel reservations lost, someone sick, etc.).
   The Huddle is intended to cut down on the amount of distress and confusion that can arise
    when a large group attempts to solve a problem.
   The Huddle may not be necessary for small teams.




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                                                                                Casas Global Outreach




                                       Appendix 4:

            Liability Release Agreement – IMB
                                        (only for IMB trips)

         The undersigned wishes to participate in a short-term m1ssi0n trip (herein the
―Activity‖) with Casas Adobes Baptist Chvrch: sponsored by the International M1ssi0n
Board, Inc., a Virginia non-profit religious corporation (herein the ―International M1ssi0n
Board‖) who is providing assistance in arranging this trip.

        The International M1ssi0n Board and the undersigned agree that the Activity poses
risks including the following specific risks: sickness, crime, political instability, governmental
opposition to m1ssi0ns‘ activities, as well as similar and dissimilar risks (herein the ―Risks‖).

        For and in consideration of the INTERNATIONAL M1SSI0N BOARD assisting the
participant in the Activity, and other good and valuable consideration the receipt and
sufficiency of which is hereby acknowledged, the undersigned for himself/herself and his/her
personal representatives, assigns, heirs, distributes, guardians and next of kin (herein the
―Releasors‖), hereby irrevocably and unconditionally releases, waives, discharges and
covenants not to sue the INTERNATIONAL M1SSI0N BOARD and its affiliate, subsidiaries,
divisions, members, directors, officers, employees and agents (herein the ―Releasees‖), for
and from all claims of any nature nor or hereafter existing whether known or unknown,
including but not limited to, all liability to the Releasors, on account of injury to the
undersigned or death to the undersigned or injury to the property of the undersigned, whether
caused by the negligence of Releasees or otherwise, while the undersigned is participating in
the Activity.

       The undersigned is fully aware of the Risks and other hazards inherent in the Activity,
and voluntarily assumes the Risks and all other risks of loss, damage, or injury that may be
sustained by the undersigned while participating in the Activity.

         The undersigned further agrees that he/she bears the sole responsibility for any and
all medical expenses which he/she incurs while participating in the Activity, whether for injury
or illness, and whether required as a result of the undersigned‘s participation in the Activity,
or not. The undersigned acknowledges Releasees are under no obligation to, and do not,
provide medical insurance for the undersigned.

       The undersigned warrants that he or she has fully read and understands this Liability
Release Agreement and voluntarily signs the same, and that no oral representations,
statements or inducements apart from the foregoing written agreement have been made to
the undersigned.



                              READ BEFORE SIGNING

________         ____________________________                  ___________________________
(Date)          (Please Print Name of Participant)             (Signature of Participant)



_________        ____________________________                  ____________________________
(Date)          (Please Print Name of Witness)                 (Signature of Witness)


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                                          Appendix 5:

                                                                         ®

                             Formerly Adams & Associates International
  Insurance Programs for International Missionaries and Mission sending Agencies

INSURANCE BENEFITS FOR A&AI Volunteer Travel Program

A&AI Travel Insurance

SUMMARY OF COVERAGES
Accidental Death and Dismemberment                                                  $100,000
Principal Sum
(reduced to $10,000 for those under age 12 and over
70)
Medical Expense, $100 deductible                                                     $10,000
$2500 of this limit is available to pay US providers: no
pre-existing condition exclusion
Emergency Medical Evacuation                                                        $100,000
Coordinated by SAS: will bring insured back to USA:
no pre-existing condition exclusion.
Family Coordination & Repatriation of Mortal                                         $25,000
Remains
Combined limit for both benefits
Includes $2,500 sublimit for extra expenses incurred
during an approved medical evacuation
Assistance Service                                                                  $100,000
Available 24/7/365 for assistance with worldwide
medical emergencies: provided by SAS
Crisis Management Service                                                           $100,000
Available 24/7/365 for assistance with worldwide non-
medical emergencies: provided by SAS
General Liability                                                                 $1,000,000
Worldwide jurisdiction: covers volunteer and sending
organization; includes coverage for injury to a
volunteer
Property Property                                                                     $2,500
Replacement cost coverage: includes checked
baggage: "door to door" coverage
Disability Income
  First 100 months - Accident                                                $1,000 / per mo.
  Months 101-200 - Accident                                                   $500 / per mo.
  50 months - Sickness (after 3 month waiting period)                         $250 / per mo.
Aggregate Limit                                                                 $20,000,000
Provides the full $100,000 AD&D benefit for up to 200
persons in a common accident; higher limits available



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Contact us for groups over 200


RATES                                                               $ 3.30 per person per day
The rates are computed from the date of leaving home
to date of arrival home


This brief summary is not an insurance policy; rather, it outlines some of the features of this
coverage. For specific details, please consult the Master Policy. This is not a major medical
policy. Major Medical Coverage is available for individuals and groups on Short-Term and
Long-Term Volunteer missionary assignments. If this is a need specific to your group,
please contact us for details.

To secure coverage, complete the form entitled Enrollment, Volunteer Missionary Insurance
and return this along with your check for the premium made payable to: Adams &
Associates International-Arthur J. Gallagher. In computing the number of days, count the
departure day as well as the day of return. If coverage is being secured for a group, the
group would be responsible for requiring all Volunteers to carry this insurance. In the event
the entire group is not traveling on the same dates, please attach a separate sheet grouping
the Volunteers by the dates they are traveling.



                                                                               - Updated 10/05/2010




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                              Formerly Adams & Associates International
  Insurance Programs for International Missionaries and Mission sending Agencies

SAS INTERNATIONAL SERVICES
Provided for Serving Overseas.
A&AI Volunteer Travel Program
Provisions have been made for comprehensive travel assistance while traveling and serving
overseas, by simply calling the telephone number provided.
MEDICAL ASSISTANCE
Medical Assistance can help the travelers get medical attention when someone suddenly
becomes ill or is in an accident by:

     Locating medical facilities, including physicians, hospitals, or dentist
     Verifying insurance coverage
     Making arrangements with providers of medical care to avoid cash deposit, where
     possible, prior to obtaining treatment
     Communicating with family members, personal physicians, and employers back
     home on the patient's condition
     Assisting family or friends who are traveling with the patient


EMERGENCY MEDICAL EVACUATION
Emergency Medical Evacuation will make proper medical care available from anywhere.
Medical Advisers are always on hand to consult with attending physicians to make sure patients
are receiving the correct medical care. However, sometimes more sophisticated treatment is
warranted - treatment which may require evacuation to better medical facilities.
If deemed medically necessary by SAS International Services, arrangements will be made for
land and air transportation, including passage on either a commercial or chartered air ambulance,
with in-flight physicians, paramedics or nurses and in-flight equipment and supplies. All family
arrangements and immigration and customs details will also be handled.
Approved travel expenses associated with medical evacuation will be covered up to $75,000
under this program.
REPATRIATION
Arrangements for repatriation of the remains of a deceased person will be made. (Some
countries forbid the shipping of the deceased.)
FAMILY COORDINATION
Approved expenses of family members travelling with a person requiring medical evacuation, or
with the remains of a deceased person combined limit of $25,000.
LEGAL ASSISTANCE
Legal Assistance provides travelers with a resource to find English-speaking attorneys if they are
in danger of being arrested as the result of any non-criminal action, or needing to replace lost or
stolen documents, such as passports, or personal items, such as luggage.
WHAT IS red24 alert?




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red24 alert is a worldwide security service available to help members manage or avoid personal
risk to themselves and their families. This is accomplished through effective risk management
support and an evacuation and repatriation program.
Members have access to advice on both a preventative and reactive level, relating to personal
security, risk and travel, through:
       A members-only website
       Personalized briefings
       Assistance online, phone and email, 24/7
       Access to a 24-hour physical response service to life-threatening situations, anywhere in
        the world
       Peace of mind that potential risks are being minimized and that removal from a potentially
        life threatening situation is both planned and possible
The crisis response team assesses each situation and deploys a security specialist, if necessary,
to assist the client. The specialist will assist in the assessment, containment and management of
the incident and the member will be evacuated to the nearest place of safety, at our discretion; or
repatriated to their country of permanent residence.
SCENARIOS COVERED BY red24 alert
"I have been the victim of identity fraud and am being threatened by men outside my home
demanding money."
"My 17 year old daughter thinks she is being stalked."
"I am on a trip to Manila and there are protest marches throughout the city and directly outside
my hotel."
"My husband is missing in Sri Lanka following the tsunami disaster there."
These are examples and do not illustrate the full range of scenarios that would warrant red24's
assistance.
SERVICES NOT COVERED BY red24alert
red24's services do not cover evacuations due to a medical epidemic or breakout (e.g., SARS or
Avian Flu).
red24's services do not cover emergency medical evacuations. However, these are covered by
an Assistance Service as part of our Volunteer Missionary Travel Insurance program.
COUNTRIES EXCLUDED BY red24alert
In countries deemed Extreme Risk, red24 reserves the right to not deploy a security Specialist if it
would endanger the life of the Specialist. In these areas, red24 may choose to offer consultation
and other assistance by phone or email only.
As of 22 May 2009, Extreme Risk countries are: Afghanistan, Chad, Colombia, Haiti, Iraq,
Pakistan, Somalia, and Sudan.
Either after, or while contacting proper personnel, also contact SAS International Services.
Please have your enrollment number available or identify yourself as working through Adams &
Associates International®. The following are the telephone numbers to use for medical, legal and
other assistance services:

                                        SAS Assistance
                             Call London, England - 24 Hour Service
                               Telephone: +44 (0) 207 902 7149
                                 Facsimile: +44 (0) 207 928 4748
                             Email: Operations@specialty-assist.com

                                                                             - Updated 10/05/2010




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TRIP CANCELLATION & INTERRUPTION                       Companion or Travel Companion's Family
                                                       Member.
           SCHEDULE OF BENEFITS                        We will not pay this benefit if Your Illness, Injury or
    MAXIMUM BENEFIT PER PARTICIPANT                    death is a result of a Pre-Existing Condition. This
    • Trip Cancellation/Interruption: $10,000          Pre-Existing Condition exclusion is waived if
    • Travel Delay: $500 ($100 per day)                coverage is purchased within 14 days from the
                                                       date Your initial deposit for the Covered Trip was
    • Baggage Delay: $100
                                                       paid to the Travel Supplier, and all Insureds are
BENEFITS                                               medically able to travel on the date coverage is
Trip Cancellation / Interruption                       purchased.
Subject to the limitations stated below, We will       2. Financial Default of a Travel Supplier (other
pay for non-refundable, unused payments and            than the Travel Supplier from whom You
deposits, not to exceed the lesser of the total trip   purchased the Covered Trip) which stops service
protection purchased, or the maximum benefit           more than 30 days after the date Your coverage
shown on the Schedule of Benefits, if Your             became effective.
Covered Trip is cancelled or interrupted as a          Financial Default of a Travel Supplier before or on
result of anyone of the following events which         the date Your coverage became effective or within
occurs after Your coverage is in effect and before     30 days after the date Your coverage became
such coverage terminates:                              effective is excluded. This coverage must be
1. Emergency Illness, Injury or death to:              purchased within 14 days from the date of initial
                                                       deposit for the Covered Trip.
a) You;
b) A Family Member;                                    3. A Terrorist Incident, if You are scheduled to
                                                       arrive at a Destination within 30 days following the
c) A Business Partner;
                                                       Terrorist Incident and the Travel Supplier is not
d) A Travel Companion; or                              offering a substitute itinerary. Travel to any
e) A Travel Companion's Family Member.                 Destination for which travel warnings have been
The Emergency Illness or Injury must be so             issued by the U.S. State Department at the time
disabling as to reasonably cause a Covered Trip        this coverage is purchased is excluded. Travel to
to be delayed, canceled or interrupted upon the        any Destination in which such a Terrorist Incident
written opinion of a treating Physician. For Trip      has occurred in the 180 days prior to the date this
Cancellation benefits, an actual examination by a      coverage was purchased is excluded.
Physician must take place before the cancellation      4. Organized Labor Strike, natural disasters or
is made. For Trip Interruption benefits, this          bad weather resulting in the complete cessation
examination must take place during the Covered         of services by a Travel Supplier for at least 24
Trip. If the Emergency Illness or Injury occurs to a   consecutive hours.
Family Member or Travel Companion's Family
Member, that person must require Your care or          5. You or a Travel Companion being hijacked or
the care of a Travel Companion. We will not pay        medically quarantined by order of a
for those unused payments or deposits that are         governmental health authority.
non-refundable as a result of Your failure to notify   6. You or a Travel Companion being summoned
the Travel Supplier of the cancellation of a           to serve on a jury or served with a court order
Covered Trip within 10 days after the death of a       issued after the date Your coverage became
Family Member, Business Partner, Travel



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effective, which mandates the appearance in court     delay per Covered Trip. Travel Delay must be
during the time period of the Covered Trip.           caused by:
7. Your home or the home of a Travel Companion        1. Travel Supplier delay;
is made uninhabitable by fire, windstorm,             2. Lost or stolen passport, travel documents or
vandalism or flood.                                   money;
8. A traffic Accident directly involving either You   3. Medical quarantine;
or a Travel Companion, substantiated by a police      4. Natural disaster; or
report, while en route to a scheduled departure       5. Injury or Emergency Illness of You or a Travel
point for the Covered Trip.                           Companion. Any benefit payable under this
9. You or a Travel Companion is on active             coverage will be reduced by all amounts credited
military duty in the United States Armed              or refunded to You by any other source.
Forces or is an active duty police officer or fire    Baggage Delay
fighter, whose personal leave is revoked within
                                                      In the event Your checked Baggage is delayed by
10 days before Your Departure Date. Such
                                                      a Common Carrier on a Covered Trip for 8 hours
revocation must be in writing by a superior officer
                                                      or more from the actual time of arrival at a
and must not be due to a base or unit
                                                      Destination, subject to the limitations stated
mobilization, unit or personal reassignment for
                                                      below, We will reimburse costs You incurred up to
any reason (whether temporary or permanent), or
                                                      the maximum benefit shown on the Schedule of
disciplinary action.
                                                      Benefits for reasonable additional clothing and
10. Employer termination or Your layoff. You          essential personal articles You purchased.
must have been employed with the same                 Verification of the delay by the Common Carrier
employer for at least one year, and You must          and receipts for the necessary purchases must
have worked at least 30 hours per week,               accompany any claim. The following limitations
excluding time off for paid vacation and holidays,    will apply:
for the entire period of employment.                  1. This benefit does not apply if Baggage is
If Your Covered Trip is interrupted due to any of     delayed after You have reached Your Return
the events listed above, We will reimburse You for    Destination.
a oneway economy airfare to return You to the         2. We will cover only one Baggage Delay per
starting point of Your Covered Trip, less any         Covered Trip.
amounts credited or refunded to You; except You
                                                      3. This benefit is in excess of any reimbursable
will not be reimbursed if a Family Member or
                                                      costs paid by a Common Carrier.
Travel Companion with whom You permanently
reside suffers an Illness, Injury or death as a
result of a Pre-Existing Condition that is not        CLAIM PROVISIONS
waived.                                               To help facilitate prompt payment of claims, You
Travel Delay                                          should report all claims as soon as possible
Subject to the limitations stated below, We will      directly to the program manager:
pay up to the maximum benefit shown on the             Gallagher Charitable International Ins. Services
Schedule of Benefits for additional reasonable                         PO Box 5845
traveling expenses that are incurred by You on a                 Columbia, SC 29250-5845
Covered Trip because of a travel delay of at least                 Phone: (800) 922-8438
8 hours, and are not otherwise paid by a Travel                     Fax: (803) 252-1988
                                                                  Email: aaiclaims@ajg.com
Supplier or Common Carrier. You must make
every reasonable effort to avoid additional           Written notice of claim must be given to us within
expenses. This benefit is payable for only one        30 days after a covered Injury, Illness or loss
                                                      occurs or begins. If such notice cannot be given



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during such time, then it must be done as soon as       6. Being under the influence of any intoxicant,
reasonably possible. The notice must include the        drug or narcotic unless prescribed by a Physician.
claimant's name, your name and the confirmation
number.                                                 7. Training, practicing or participating in any motor
                                                        sport or motor racing.
                                                        8. Parachuting, hang gliding, parasailing, hot air
INSURANCE PROVISIONS                                    ballooning, scuba diving below 135 feet or any
                                                        type of scuba diving without the proper diving
Eligibility and Effective Date                          training and certification from a professional
Subject to our acceptance of your enrollment and        organization, rock or mountain climbing, or
payment of the participation fee in full, coverage      hunting.
for all benefits except Trip Cancellation will begin
                                                        9. Pregnancy or childbirth when you are expected
on the Departure Date. The Trip Cancellation
                                                        to give birth within two months from the date of a
benefit will begin at 12:01am on the day after your
                                                        Covered Trip or an elective abortion.
enrollment date.
Termination Date                                        10. Traveling against the advice of a Physician,
                                                        traveling while on a waiting list for inpatient
All coverage for a Covered Trip ends on the
                                                        Hospital or clinic treatment, or traveling for the
earliest of:
                                                        purpose of or competition.
1. Arrival at Your Return Destination;
                                                        12. Any emotional, psychological, mental or
2. The Return Date; or
                                                        nervous disorder.
3. Cancellation of Your Covered Trip.
                                                        13. Any potentially fatal condition which was
EXCLUSIONS                                              diagnosed before the date your coverage became
We will not pay for any Illness, Injury or loss         effective, or any condition for which you are
caused by or as a result of:                            traveling to seek treatment.
1. A Pre-Existing Condition, except as waived by        14. Dental treatment due to normal wear and tear
us under the terms of the policy.                       or the normal maintenance of dental health.
2. War or any act of war (whether declared or
undeclared), civil disturbance, riot or insurrection.
3. Serving in one of the armed forces of any
country or international authority.
4. Operating, learning to operate, piloting or riding
in or on any aircraft or flying device, other than
riding as a passenger in a licensed commercial
aircraft.
                                                                                       - Updated 10/05/2010
5. Suicide or attempted suicide, while sane;
intentionally self-inflicted Injury or Illness.




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Appendix 6:
SAMPLE FORM




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                                 Appendix 6:
             USING Casas Mission Trips CONTRIBUTION FORM

Each Goer must submit all contributions using the Casas NCR form:
1. Forms are available through the Trip Leader and the GO Short-Term Trip
   Coordinator.
2. After entering the information for at least five checks on the sheet, write total
   the amount of the listed checks on your sheet. Do the same for the cash
   listed.
3. Verifies that each check is made out to Casas (Casas Church, CABC), and
   the check is dated and signed.
4. Verifies that the check information matches the Contributor Coupon
   information; if it does not match, submit the coupon with the check
5. Attaches any cash contributions to the appropriate Contributor Coupons.
6. Keeps the bottom copy of the form and the Contributor Coupons which match
   the check info for your records, to confirm any conflicts.
7. Submits to the Trip Leader the rest of the form with the checks and
   appropriate Coupons attached to the form.
8. Does NOT hold onto contributions for more than two weeks; submit them at
   least every two weeks, even if you don‘t have at least five donations.


The Trip Leader will process the teams collected contributions:
1. The TL will review each contribution sheet to see that they are correctly
   completed as above.
2. The TL will record the total amount submitted per sheet per Goer in a GO
   financial spreadsheet to track the team‘s fundraising progress.
3. The TL will verify the financial spreadsheet monthly with Goers; this can be
   done by email. If a discrepancy occurs, the TL will meet with the Goer and
   review the Contribution Forms with the spreadsheet to make corrections.
4. The TL will NOT hold onto contributions for more than five days, but will
   submit them to the GO Short-Term Coordinator as soon as possible.


The GO Short-Term Coordinator reviews the financial spreadsheet with the
Trip Leader at least monthly.




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