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Analysis: Once a critic, Nixon now cutter-
in-chief
By DAVID A. LIEB     Associated Press Writer
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) -- As a candidate, Jay Nixon pledged to reverse budget cuts. As Missouri
governor, Nixon has become the cutter-in-chief.
With tax revenues in decline, Nixon has made six rounds of spending cuts totaling more than $900 million within
the past year. And he's already planning to make about $350 million of cuts for the new budget year that begins
July 1.
But rather than lamenting his situation, Nixon has embraced it. He talks regularly of reducing the size of state
government, touts the more than 2,000 employee positions eliminated under his watch and highlights the ever-
rising dollar figure of his spending cuts.
"My primary responsibility is to make sure we have a government that is the right size," Nixon said following the
conclusion of a legislative session that failed to produce as much savings as the governor desired.
That comes from the same man who made restoration of Gov. Matt Blunt's 2005 Medicaid cuts the cornerstone
of his gubernatorial campaign and proposed more than a dozen program expansions as a candidate just two
years ago.
Nixon's transformation is largely one of necessity, since the constitution requires the governor to maintain a
balanced budget. But it also may prove politically advantageous.
Generically speaking, Missourians like their government to spend less instead of more. Voters have approved
constitutional amendments limiting the growth of state revenues and mandating that they get the final say on big
tax increases.
Missourians haven't passed a general statewide tax increase since 1987. And they haven't looked too favorably
on politicians who have sought to raise revenues.
Democratic Gov. Bob Holden lost a showdown with the Republican-led Legislature in 2003 when he repeatedly
sought to generate more tax revenues to plug a budget shortfall. He was defeated the following year in the
primary election.
Perhaps taking a lesson from recent history, Nixon has flatly ruled out any tax increases to help balance
Missouri's budget - even though more than 30 other states have hiked taxes since the economic downturn
began.
Instead, Nixon proposed to "right-size" government by merging agencies, eliminating state holidays, laying off
more employees, getting rid of state vehicles, scaling back employee pension and health benefits, privatizing
child support collections and curtailing Missouri's expansive tax credit programs.
Many of Nixon's ideas died in the Republican-led House, where some members said the proposals needed more
study. Although House leaders claimed to have passed a balanced budget, Nixon's administration said last week
that he will need to cut an additional $350 million.
State Sen. Jason Crowell, who worked closely with Nixon to try to curtail tax credits and pension costs, said
some of his fellow Republicans appear to believe they can ding Nixon's popularity by forcing him to make budget
cuts.



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"I think they're making a political miscalculation," said Crowell, of Cape Girardeau, who was the House majority
leader during the 2003 spending showdown with Holden. "I think our friends on the other side of the building are
going to let a Democratic governor outflank conservatives on fiscal management."
When then-Republican Gov. John Ashcroft had to cut budgets passed by a Democratic-led Legislature a couple
decades ago, Ashcroft ended up benefiting politically, Crowell said.
The key for Nixon is to keep the conversation about the big-picture need for budget cuts, not the specific
programs being cut. Blunt struggled to accomplish that in 2005, when his message about controlling runaway
spending was drowned out by attention to the 100,000 low-income Missourians who lost their health coverage.
"Individual cuts are unpopular, but the idea of cutting is popular in the abstract," said Eric Morris, an assistant
communications professor at Missouri State University who focuses on political rhetoric, polling and campaigns.
If a governor makes cuts, "the best way to put makeup on it is to emphasize the broader, more general reducing-
the-size-of-government angle," Morris said.
That is exactly what Nixon has done - even as he has contradicted some of the specific objectives he laid out as
a candidate.
Nixon, for example, pledged as a candidate to expand the Parents as Teachers early childhood development
program. But while Nixon has been governor, the program's budget has been cut by more than half.
Similarly, Nixon pledged as a candidate "to see if the state can do more" to subsidize school busing. Now that he
is governor, Missouri is providing less money for school busing.
Those decisions have caused angst among some of Nixon's fellow Democrats, who wish he would do more to
raise revenues instead of just cutting spending.
Rep. Jeanette Mott Oxford, D-St. Louis, says Missouri could reap many millions of dollars by joining other states
in improving tax collections on Internet sales, or by raising Missouri's lowest-in-the-nation cigarette tax.
"I understand him being a vigorous cheerleader on some of those things would carry some risk perhaps"
politically, Oxford said. "But at the same time, I would like to see him help educate the public about some things
that need to be changed."
---




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$25M Missouri River study begins
comment phase
By WAYNE ORTMAN
Associated Press Writer
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) -- A lengthy review of how the Missouri River system is managed by the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers will be done with a backdrop of politics, special interests - and low confidence in the corps.
The $25 million, five-year study was authorized by Congress to determine whether changes need to be made in
the 1944 law that sets eight purposes for the dams, reservoirs and lower free-flowing river: flood control,
navigation, hydropower, irrigation, water supply, recreation, water quality, and fish and wildlife.
The massive study begins as a recent report by a Colorado consulting group says eight of 10 people it
questioned through interviews and focus groups said changes are needed in how the corps manages the basin
system, which stretches some 2,300 miles from Montana to St. Louis.
More than a third of those interviewed said "major" changes were needed in how the corps manages the river.
"Realistically, there's not enough water to do everything for everybody, and there's always that dilemma," said
David Pope, executive director of the Missouri River Association of States and Tribes (MoRAST), which
requested the study two years ago.
"I think what's pretty apparent to a lot of people is that there's been tremendous change - socially, economically,
environmentally - (in) the way in which water is used. All of those things have changed a lot since 1944," Pope
said.
Management of the river system has often been a contentious issue between upper basin and lower basin states
and has resulted in lawsuits. Upper basin states generally want rising or stable water levels for fish reproduction
and summer recreation. Lower basin states desire flood control and a steady flow for barges and municipal or
commercial water uses.
Next up for the corps is gathering comment at 41 meetings through August in the basin states of Montana,
Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri and Kansas and in Denver, New Orleans,
Memphis, Tenn., and Rock Island, Ill.
Eleven meetings invite participation by American Indian tribes, some of whom lost land and were relocated when
reservoirs were built in the upper basin.
The meetings begin at three South Dakota locations Tuesday through Thursday.
"This is the point where we're really going to hone in specifically on what we are going to study and how much
we're going to study," Monique Farmer, spokeswoman for the corps' district office in Omaha, Neb., said of the
summer meetings. "We like to say the size and the shape of what the study is going to be."
The Osprey Group is the Colorado consultant hired by the federal government to assess how the corps can
develop a project management plan that includes the diverse interests in the basin.
Difficulties it cited include a highly politicized environment, the possibility that various interests could derail the
process at any time, and low public confidence in the Corps of Engineers.
"The corps is characterized with words such as secretive, inflexible and unresponsive," The Osprey Group report
said. "This reputation results in a good deal of public skepticism."


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Farmer discounted that conclusion.
"I think the majority of people would probably tell you that the Corps of Engineers is a great engineering force
and that we're highly disciplined," she said, "and that we're doing the most we can particularly with this study to
ensure that people know public involvement is a key piece of it for our success and for the success of the study
overall."
The Osprey Group said divisions within the basin, deep-seated conflict, advocacy positions and the complexity
of the issues will make it difficult to arrive at consensus during the study phase, set to begin later this year and
run into 2014.
It suggested that the corps use an executive council of about 15 members made up of its senior leadership, a
representative from each basin state and a representative from other federal agencies. The group would
exchange information and perspectives but make no decisions and take no votes. The final decision-making
authority would rest with the corps.
"We're still deciding how to move forward with some of those recommendations, how we're going to handle
them," Farmer said.
Ideally, the study will provide information, objective analysis and common ground that can benefit the entire
basin without someone losing and someone winning, said Pope, whose MoRAST group is comprised of state
and tribal representatives from Montana, Wyoming, the Dakotas, Nebraska, Iowa and Kansas.
"But there's a lot of things that have not been dealt with in the basin that this could be the impetus for, such as
water supply needs in rural areas and on Indian reservations," he said.
Changing the 1944 Flood Control Act to redefine priorities would require approval by Congress.
"The political environment is perhaps the most influential factor affecting the Authorized Purposes Study," the
Osprey report said.
"Unless the various interests are engaged and believe in the efficacy of the study process and findings, they will
likely pursue political channels to derail the study."
---
Online:
http://www.mraps.org
http://www.mo-rast.org




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More State Park Beaches Close Due to E.
Coli
By KSPR News
By Will Carter
Story Created: May 23, 2010 at 10:19 PM CDT
Story Updated: May 23, 2010 at 10:47 PM CDT

Chances are, if you go swimming at some of Missouri's biggest lakes, you could get sick.
Now, the state is cracking down and closing beaches altogether.
The Missouri Department of Natural Resources has closed six beaches because of E. Coli, just days before the
summer's first big holiday.
Half of those closures are in the Ozarks including Lake of the Ozarks and two at Pomme de Terre.
Last year Governor Nixon was embarrassed when it was discovered that high levels of E. Coli went untreated
and unreported.
This year, his office is making clean water a priority, by closing beaches.
Today we visited Pomme de Terre Lake to see if people are heeding warnings while on the water.
"We just came down with my parents for the weekend to do some boating, go out on the water, have a little fun,
swim a little bit," said Erin Trail.
But swimming at two of Pomme de Terre Lake's beaches is currently off-limits for this couple from Kansas City.
Signs and gates block access to the beaches warning of high E. Coli levels.
"I'm at least happy that they are telling us about it, rather than people getting sick, and not wanting to come out
to the lake thinking there is something wrong with it permanently," said Trail.
Out on the lake we caught up with Baylie Jones and his parents.
He says while he doesn't really know much about E. Coli, it's not going to ruin his summer.
"I've come out here since I was little. So, the lake means a lot to me. I'm still going to come out here no matter
what," said Jones.
From the middle of Pomme de Terre Lake you can see Hermitage Beach.
It's one of the beaches closed due to elevated E. Coli levels.
It's also flooded out.
That may be partly to blame for these levels, because of all of the heavy rainfall we've seen in the last couple of
weeks.
But while its still unknown exactly what's causing the elevated E. Coli levels, the Missouri Department of Natural
Resources is testing water at all lakes once a week.
"Public safety is number one with the department. That's our main concern. That's why we do the tests is to
make sure we meet the parameters that's been established to keep it safe for the public," said Bill Arnold with
DNR's Lake of the Ozarks office.
So, with warnings in place, lake visitors say they are using caution, but not overly concerned.


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"We are just going out there, having fun, having that little voice in the back of our head saying there's extra E
Coli, don't drink the water, but that should be a given," said Trail.
We also spoke with the Army Corps of Engineers, which manages Table Rock Lake in Stone and Taney
counties.
We're told E. Coli levels there are not an issue, and will not affect the start of the summer tourism season.
DNR will test E. Coli levels again Monday 5/24
That will determine whether beaches will open for the upcoming Memorial Day weekend.
As soon as we have those results, we'll let you know.
You can also monitor DNR's interactive map which shows what beaches are closed by clicking here.




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Missouri's governor feels the squeeze as
state budget continues to tighten
By STEVE KRASKE
The Kansas City Star
JEFFERSON CITY | Oh, to be governor of Missouri these days.
The recently passed state budget is already $350 million out of balance. The next state budget? Spending may
have to be cut by as much as $1.2 billion more, and that‘s after Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon and lawmakers
slashed it by hundreds of millions of dollars after coming into office last year.
Democrats are grumbling. They want more than just budget cuts. Republicans are grumbling, too. They want
better communication with Nixon.
Lawmakers chewed up — and spit out — a good share of Nixon‘s initiatives this year. A Republican-controlled
General Assembly is expected to become even more Republican following November‘s midterm elections. New
GOP leaders may be even more aggressive in challenging Nixon.
The job of governor, analysts agree, is only getting tougher. And Nixon shows every sign of wanting a second
term in 2012.
―Crunch time is still ahead,‖ predicted George Connor, a Missouri State University political scientist.
Sen. Brad Lager, a Republican who represents northwest Missouri, said the most difficult year is coming.
―We‘re talking about fundamentally changing the way government operates,‖ he said, adding that this is ―a
horrible time to be governor.‖
Yet in an interview last week, just days after the conclusion of his second session as governor, Nixon was
anything but downbeat. The challenges aren‘t insurmountable, he said.
―My priorities are going to remain the same: create jobs, reform the government,‖ Nixon said. ―I‘ve governed, I
believe, in a bipartisan way since day one. I‘ve tried to work with everybody.‖
Despite an economy that‘s been slow to generate new tax revenue, Nixon has proved to be a consistently
upbeat chief executive, highlighting accomplishments, downplaying setbacks and traveling the state relentlessly
to tout even the smallest achievements.
He has forged a steady, middle-of-the-road governing style while avoiding major confrontations with
Republicans. The key to his success: avoiding any talk of tax increases. Nixon even rejected the idea of boosting
cigarette taxes, even though Missouri ranks last nationally at 17 cents a pack.
―I certainly don‘t lose sleep over having low taxes,‖ Nixon said.
That‘s a departure from the approach of the state‘s last Democratic governor, Bob Holden, who proposed more
than $700 million in tax increases to avoid cuts to schools. Holden lost the 2004 Democratic primary in his re-
election bid, the first sitting governor in state history to do so.
―Nixon saw what happened to Holden and said, ‗I can‘t follow the same ‖ Connor noted. road,‘
Poll numbers suggest Nixon‘s approach is working. A Rasmussen Reports survey this month showed that 56
percent of likely voters approved of Nixon‘s job performance, while 39 percent disapproved.
In contrast, only 42 percent of Missouri voters approved of President Barack Obama‘s performance, with 56
percent disapproving.

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But maintaining those lofty poll numbers for Nixon will be tricky. In what has become a ritual for governors
entering their second year, lawmakers started grousing about perceived shortcomings.
Democrats said they‘ve grown weary of the cut-cut-cut approach to government and the devastation to mental
health facilities, among other social programs. They‘ve complained that Nixon is taking Democrats for granted as
he reaches out to Republicans who control the legislature.
Talk of tax increases, some Democrats have argued, can no longer be kept off the table.
―I‘m frustrated with any politician who won‘t at least talk about (a cigarette tax increase),‖ said Sen. Jolie Justus,
a Kansas City Democrat. ―When you have a billion-dollar shortfall, you need to talk a little bigger.‖
Some Democrats said they also were taken aback by Nixon‘s temper, revealing that the governor privately
admonished House leaders with about two weeks to go in the session for opposing an education funding bill.
Many Democrats thought the bill didn‘t provide enough money.
House Republicans, meanwhile, complained about a lack of communication by Nixon and his staff. That
breakdown led to problems in passing key bills, said Rep. Bryan Pratt, a Blue Springs Republican.
―When there‘s no communication between the House and the governor‘s office, the legislative agenda fails
because there‘s no support,‖ he added.
Nixon declined to directly address such complaints.
―I ran saying I would govern from the center,‖ he said. ―I‘ve tried to govern from the center. I think we have solid
results.‖
Nixon can point to several accomplishments, including the second year of a tuition freeze at universities, a stiffer
drunken driving law and a mandate for insurance coverage of autism-related disorders.
But he fell short on others, such as a package to save jobs at Ford Motor Co.‘s Claycomo plant, a bill to revamp
the state employees pension system and a measure aimed at attracting more high-tech jobs.
Even a push to ―rightsize‖ state government and save money met with mixed results. Nixon launched the plan
midway through the legislative session.
He managed to pass a bill that combined the Highway Patrol and the Water Patrol. But a measure to merge two
education agencies eventually crumbled. Perhaps most notably, his plan to slash tax credits as a way to boost
revenues also fell short.
Nixon said lawmakers simply ran out of time and he hopes for more progress next year.
―I was heartened that there wasn‘t a strong argument against what I thought was a thoughtful plan,‖ he said.
What‘s more, Nixon believes better days are ahead, noting that a net 2,300 new jobs were created in February,
7,800 in March and 15,000 in April. ―Ultimately, we‘re going to get to the point where growth matches demand,‖
he said.
But the lingering political question is will most Missouri voters buy a budget-slashing Democrat? Political
scientists such as Connor think they will.
―He can go around the state and say, ‗I cut $1 billion. I balanced the checkbook.‘ He‘s a pretty darn conservative
Democrat,‖ Connor said. ―That‘s a platform to run on.‖




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Cash-strapped districts cutting summer
school
By HEATHER HOLLINGSWORTH
Associated Press Writer
Amber Bramble had to scramble to arrange summer plans for her 5- and 7-year-old daughters after their
suburban Kansas City school district gutted its summer school program this spring.
Her daughters were among about 2,500 of the Raymore-Peculiar district's 6,000 students who enrolled for free
last summer in a program that combined traditional subjects with enrichment classes like music. But with state
funding uncertain, the district decided to focus this year on about 800 students who either need to make up
credits to graduate or are struggling to keep up with classmates.
Across the country, districts are cutting summer school because it's just too expensive to keep. The cuts started
when the recession began and have worsened, affecting more children and more essential programs that help
struggling students.
And in districts like Raymore-Peculiar, although lawmakers ultimately decided to maintain summer school
funding, they made the decision so late in the session that many administrators already had eliminated or scaled
back the programs.
The cuts come even as President Barack Obama and Education Secretary Arne Duncan call for longer school
days and shorter summer breaks. But in many states districts cutting summer school outnumber those using
stimulus money to expand their offerings.
"At a time when we need to work harder to close achievement gaps and prepare every child for college and
career, cutting summer school is the wrong way to go," Duncan said in a written statement. "These kids need
more time, not less."
With the Raymore-Peculiar district trimming its program, Bramble's daughters were unable to participate.
"I think it gets them out of the rhythm," she said. "You lose the momentum."
An American Association of School Administrators survey found that 34 percent of respondents are considering
eliminating summer school for the 2010-11 school year. That's a rate that has roughly doubled each year, from 8
percent in 2008-09 to 14 percent in 2009-10.
Noelle Ellerson, a public policy analyst for the group who managed the study, said the cuts illustrate how
strapped school districts are.
Experts say studies show summer break tends to widen the achievement gap between poor students and their
more affluent peers whose parents can more easily afford things like educational vacations, camps and sports
teams.
On average, low-income children fall between two and three months behind in reading skills over the summer
while their middle-income peers stagnate or make very slight gains, said Ron Fairchild, chief executive officer of
the Baltimore-based National Summer Learning Association.
He said both low- and higher-income students lose ground in math.
"Most people generally think summer is a great time for kids to be kids, a time for something different, a time for
all kinds of exploration and enrichment," Fairchild said. "Our mythology about summer learning really runs



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counter to the reality of what this really is like for kids in low-income communities and for their families when this
faucet of public support shuts off."
The cuts are not isolated to Missouri. In New York, the East Aurora Union Free School District in suburban
Buffalo is dropping a summer program that had served several dozen struggling first- to sixth-graders, said
Superintendent Jim Bodziak.
In Indiana, the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corporation, located across the river from
Louisville, Ky., suspended its traditional summer school. It had offered enrichment courses as well as classes for
kindergarten to 12th-graders who were falling behind their classmates. But this year it will only offer online
classes for high-schoolers needing to make up credits to graduate.
In financially strapped California, summer cutbacks continue this year, with the Pasadena Unified School District
among those paring back its program. The district is keeping its summer classes for high school students
needing to make up credits to graduate but canceling other summer programs.
"I know they are struggling with trying to put in summer school," said Pam Slater, a California Department of
Education spokeswoman. "Many at the local level are limited to those who need tutoring to pass the high school
exit exam. I know a lot of the subjects I used to take in summer school aren't offered because of the funding
situation."
In Missouri, the talk of cuts has been a jolt because of the program's popularity. Last year, 480 out of 523 school
districts offered summer school, serving about 34 percent of the state's total K-12 enrollment, according to the
Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.
Fairchild of the National Summer Learning Association said he was not aware of another state that has that high
of a summer school participation percentage.
For years, Missouri districts actually made money offering summer school because of the way the state funded
it. Some districts offered incentives - like gift cards - so students would attend in greater numbers.
But that ended a few years back, and this year some lawmakers wanted to pare back state funding for summer
school significantly because of budget problems. The cuts didn't win approval, but the issue could return.
Brent Ghan, a spokesman for the Missouri School Boards' Association, said education funding is still at risk,
especially since the state budget director has said $350 million in cuts will need to be made before the budget's
approved, which should happen in mid-June.
Should there be cuts in basic funding for k-12 schools, state funding for summer school would take the same hit
as would classes offered during the regular school term. And next year doesn't look any better.
"I sadly suspect that the funding for summer school will be eliminated by next year," said Jeff Kyle,
superintendent of the Raymore-Peculiar district. "I hope I'm wrong, but I don't think I am."




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Lawmaker wants to delay transfer of
mentally ill prisoners
Fred Bodimer Reporting

ST. LOUIS (KMOX) -- More discussion is needed -- according to a state representative from south St. Louis --
before the Missouri Department of Mental Health transfers sixty mentally ill inmates to a psychiatric facility on
Arsenal.
Concerned neighbors who live near the St. Louis Psychiatric Rehabilitation Center say they want some answers,
as does State Representative Mike Colona:
"When you have a charter school -- or any school -- right next door to something like that, it's only normal and
quite frankly expected for citizens to be concerned," Colona said. "If the department has a plan, or explanation,
of the safeguards they are going to make sure are in place, it may alleviate a lot of fear."
Colona says he's also concerned about the safety of people who use the YMCA near the Arsenal facility.




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Altering Reality
Program makes alternative sentencing possible.
COLUMBIA DAILY TRIBUNE By Brennan David
Sunday, May 23, 2010

It‘s not a ―hug a thug‖ program.
They don‘t tell you everything is going to be OK, and being honest with clients from the start about the tough
road ahead is not pessimism.
Fighting substance-abuse problems is hard, said Reality House Security Director Rob Harrison, and most people
can‘t do it alone. Structure and treatment are necessary for most offenders, he thinks, and too often substance
abusers do not receive the treatment required for long-term success.
At 1900 E. Prathersville Road, Reality House serves as the foundation for the rejuvenation of many Boone
County residents‘ lives. Through the not-for-profit organization, Harrison and staff members provide clients with
the tools necessary for substance-abuse recovery and the structure to support that change and growth.
Many people know about Reality House because they or loved ones have found themselves at crossroads in life,
Harrison said. And others who know it exists might think of the program as simply housing inmates, a function
that spans Realty House‘s 40-year existence. But with the evolution of the court and correctional systems,
Reality House has transformed, too.
―Yes, we house inmates when the Boone County Jail is full. That‘s just overflow,‖ Harrison said. ―We do so much
more.‖
Counselors and staffers today work to provide a variety of programs to combat substance abuse. The unique
set-up offers residential and outpatient treatment, educational services, housing, detention and diversion
services to adult men, all while continuing to serve as a working corrections facility.
REALITY TAKES ROOT
Alternative sentencing is a social experiment that has taken root in Boone County Circuit Court, which has four
programs: drug, DWI, mental health and reintegration courts. All four courts work with Reality House to serve
nearly 200 county residents. More participants are expected to enter the program as the newly-founded DWI
Court gets under way.
Reality House contracts with the circuit court as a treatment provider for the drug and reintegration courts.
Additionally, Reality House serves offenders going through the new DWI Court and has a seat on the mental
health court‘s board.
Offenders don‘t have to go through these special courts and the Reality House program, but it‘s a way they can
find help and dodge the traditional corrections system. Reality House participants show their commitment to
treatment by agreeing to pay a fee for each day they‘re in the program after they find steady employment. Fee
amounts vary by individual needs.
Reality House provides treatment by requiring participants to undergo random drug and alcohol testing to make
sure they‘re staying sober and helps offenders find Narcotics Anonymous and Alcoholics Anonymous meetings.
Additionally, Reality House helps participants find work or opportunities to further their education.



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Staff at Reality House work with probation officers, too, to monitor home plans and make sure offenders have
alternatives to environments where they‘re at risk of falling back into their old ways.
That was Joe Cole‘s fear when he was released from a Missouri prison in early 2009. Given the option to enter a
rehabilitation center such as Reality House, he asked not to be placed in a St. Louis facility. Moving back to his
old stomping grounds, he worried, would result in a continued life of gang and drug activity.
Cole, 46, said he needed a fresh start. Columbia seemed like the right city, and Reality House was the haven
that provided him the structure and resources to do so. With a bed to sleep in, clothes to wear and three meals a
day provided at Reality House, the lifelong criminal said he found direction in life and has followed that direction
to success.
―My caseworker brought me on interviews,‖ Cole said. ―Everything was laid out. You couldn‘t help but to work out
because they made it so easy.‖
Reality House made it easy to do the right thing, said Cole, who works as crew leader at International House of
Pancakes on Conley Road. Cole is engaged and said he is his happiest when he thinks about his lack of desire
to drink, do drugs and hide every time he hears a police siren.
It took him three months to get on his feet while participating in the reintegration program. Even though he found
success, Cole said he understands it could take only one sip of alcohol to turn his life upside down.
―They consider what I do is a success story,‖ he said. ―I don‘t. I consider it the things I should have been doing
years ago.‖
REALIZING POTENTIAL
Christine Carpenter, who presides over Boone County‘s alternative sentencing courts, is grateful Reality House
is flexible to meet individual needs.
―They started out as a unique alternative deal for us,‖ she said. ―They have done whatever they need to do to fit
the needs of the community.‖
In March, Carpenter played an important role in the launch of DWI court, Boone County‘s fourth alternative
sentencing court. The new program is for second-time DWI offenders and is less costly to the county and, in
some ways, stricter for offenders.
Those guilty of driving while intoxicated more than once who go through the program are allowed to go to work
or attend classes, but they‘re required to wear electronic ankle bracelets while they‘re on home detention. They
also agree to undergo treatment for alcohol abuse and submit to random alcohol tests through Reality House.
Participants in the specialty courts have just a 10 percent rate of committing another crime, Carpenter said. And
that can translate into millions of dollars in savings to the county. Inmates in the Boone County Jail are housed at
a rate of $50 a day.
―I think that money generated from this is what enables them to operate,‖ Carpenter said. ―Instead of housing
prisoners, people are paying to be in work release. If we had everyone in jail at a cost, we would be spending
millions more.‖
In his annual State of the Judiciary address to the Missouri General Assembly, Chief Justice William Ray Price
Jr. warned the legislature of the strain put on the judicial and correctional systems by laws passed over the past
20 years have.
He warned that the state is following a broken strategy of cramming inmates into prisons and not providing the
type of drug treatment and job training that is necessary to break the cycle of crime.



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―Nonviolent offenders need to learn their lesson. Most often they need to be treated for drug and alcohol
addiction and given job training,‖ he said. ―Putting them in a very expensive concrete box with very expensive
guards, surrounding them with hardened criminals for long periods of time, and separating them from their
families, who need them and could otherwise help them, does not work. Proof is in the numbers: 41 percent are
back within two years.‖
Alternative sentencing courts often receive the bulk of the credit for the reorganization of the correctional system
that results in cost savings, but those improvements would not be possible without Reality House, said Michael
Princivalli, drug court administrator.
IMPROVING REALITY
Perhaps the best evidence that Reality House changes realities is found in those who come back to work with
the program.
Today, offenders know Robert Brubeck as a substance-abuse counselor for the program. But the former drug
court participant was once a client of Reality House who used to cheat his way through the system.
―I would go into a 28-day treatment program to satisfy people so I can go back to doing what I wanted to do,‖ he
said. ―Drug court is not set up like that.‖
Today, employees such as Brubeck are the face of the program, said Michelle Thompson, Reality House
administrative director.
Although not every client is successful in the program, it only takes 12 months to turn these lives around.
―Rob Harrison would say, ‗Give me a year of your life. If you don‘t like it, you can refund your misery,‘ ‖ Brubeck
said.
Another client, Red Herring, 47, is a former convict who completed reintegration court and is now off parole.
Herring said he has found direction in life through an anonymous 12-step program he attends and for the first
time is finding success in the work force.
Upon his release in January 2006, Herring wanted to integrate as quickly as possible and found a job on his first
day. After 30 days in Reality House, he transitioned into a halfway house also operated by Reality House, finding
himself one step closer to success.
Today, he operates his own construction-remodeling company because the structure of the program allowed him
to save money.
―When I arrived at Reality House, I was wearing state-issued underwear,‖ he said. ―Today, I own a home, two
motorcycles and a truck.‖
Because Reality House introduced Herring to a substance-abuse program that worked for him, he has remained
sober and drug-free for more than five years through his consistent participation in the program. The program is
different from the other substance-abuse treatment options he‘d tried because he feels comfortable in the
meetings and had supportive counselors at Reality House, Herring said.
Today, he remains an active participant in treatment programs, organizes meetings for others and works as
Cole‘s sponsor at the substance-abuse meetings they attend together.
Although Reality House has proved it can be successful, Herring warned that offenders also have to play their
part.
―It‘s up to the individual to do what they can. Reality House cannot fix a loser,‖ he said. ―If they are not willing to
put forth the effort, it‘s not going to happen.‖



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Lawmakers Share Their Thoughts About
The 2010 Session Missouri’s 2010
Legislative Session A Big Disappointment
By Eric L. Wesson KANSAS CITY CALL Staff Writer

Missouri lawmakers ended their legislative session on Friday, May 14, in a relatively quiet session this year. In
fact many, including some lawmakers themselves, contend that it was an unproductive session.
Sen. Yvonne Wilson said she was pleased that two of her legislative priorities were approved by lawmakers and
sent to the governor. However, Sen. Wilson said there were few other bright spots during the 2010 session due
to budget constraints that forced legislators to reduce or eliminate funding to a number of state programs and
services.
Sen. Wilson has served on the Senate Appropriations Committee since 2007 and says this was the most difficult
budget process she has endured.
―I think we did a good job of working together in a bipartisan fashion to address the budget shortfalls our state is
facing,‖ Sen. Wilson said. ―But it was an extremely frustrating process. Every month we got more bad news
about declining state revenues that forced more cuts on top of the painful cuts we had already made, and there
are concerns that next year will be worse,‖ she said.
Missouri lawmakers approved the 13 House bills that comprise the $23.3-billion budget for Fiscal Year 2011 a
week ahead of schedule. The Legislature cut more than $450 million from the governor‘s original budget
proposal in light of an unprecedented decline in revenue, but continued to sustain current funding levels for the
K–12 education foundation formula. It also maintained an agreement with the state‘s colleges and universities to
limit the cuts to higher education in exchange for a tuition freeze.
Sen. Wilson applauded passage of House Bill 2297 on the final day of session. The bill, which is substantially
similar to Senate Bill 1002 sponsored by Sen. Wilson, establishes the Kansas City Zoological District. The
district, if approved by voters in Cass, Clay, Jackson and Platte counties, would allow each county to impose,
again with voter approval, a 0.25% sales tax to provide financial support for zoo activities in the district. The
sales tax would not be collected in Cass, Clay or Platte counties unless Jackson County also collects the tax.
―It is very unusual for a bill to be approved the same year it is introduced,‖ Sen. Wilson said. ―The version I
sponsored was approved by my Senate colleagues, but the measure did not receive the support of the House
Local Government Committee. Fortunately, the House version remained alive and was passed in the final hours
of the last day of session. This measure will help ensure the Kansas City Zoo remains a world-class facility that
attracts visitors from across the globe.‖
Another one of Sen. Wilson‘s legislative priorities followed a more traditional path to passage, taking several
years of persuasion and persistence to achieve approval. House Bill 1543 includes language sponsored by Sen.
Wilson that adds ―cyberbullying‖ and electronic communications to the list of required elements for school district
anti-bullying policies. Sen. Wilson sponsored an anti-bullying provision for public schools in 2006, and expanded
the measure to include the new phenomenon of ―cyberbullying‖ in 2007. She has sponsored similar legislation in
each subsequent year, ultimately securing passage of her anti-bullying provisions on the final day of the 2010
session.



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―As a former teacher, principal and education consultant, I know the importance of having a safe and secure
school environment, and this measure will help our public schools create an inclusive, enriching learning
environment free from fear,‖ Sen. Wilson said.
Sen. Wilson expressed disappointment several other measures she sponsored failed to be enacted this year.
Senate Bill 693 creates the Foster Care and Adoptive Parents Recruitment and Retention Fund, with money
generated by the fund used to promote foster care and adoption promotion recruitment programs. SB 693 was
approved by the Senate and by the House Children and Families Committee, but failed to move out of the House
Rules Committee.
Senate bills 612 and 613 would have restored food stamp eligibility to persons convicted of felony drug
possession or use if that person had successfully completed a drug abuse treatment program, complied with all
court orders and legal obligations, and met other criteria for food stamps. Neither bill was voted out of
committee.
Senate Bill 692, which makes it a crime to display a noose with the intent of intimidation, also failed to gain
committee approval.
―Sometimes the General Assembly defies common sense,‖ Sen. Wilson said. ―Given the troubled history of this
nation, how can anyone think it‘s ok to display a noose for any reason? This is the third year I have sponsored
this bill. I don‘t understand the reluctance to outlaw this despicable behavior.‖
State Rep. Jonas Hughes agrees.
  ―The 2010 Session of the Missouri House became a mockery of what a representative government is supposed
to be,‖ he said.
―Rather then debating the merits of important bills, such as the jobs bill, which would have provided incentive for
Ford to invest in the Claycomo Automotive Plant to ensure that the cars of the future are assembled in Missouri,‖
Rep. Hughes said.
―In this economy, jobs should have been at the the top of our list of things to provide. Instead all roads lead to
partisan rhetoric on national hot button issues of the moment that served no purpose but to provide a platform for
partisan grandstanding. That didn‘t stop the Kansas City delegation from being successful in other areas. We
worked together to save important community organizations and programs from being completely cut from the
budget,‖ Rep. Hughes stated.
Rep. Hughes concluded by saying, ―Each Representative was successful in passing a bill out of the House, and
attaching amendments to important legislation, to ensure our community‘s needs were recognized and
addressed. We will continue to fight as a unit to make the sure the people of our community get what they
deserve.‖
State Rep. Shalonn ―Kiki‖ Curls expressed her concern also about this legislative session not addressing core
issues.
―It‘s unfortunate that we couldn‘t pass more meaningful legislation this year,‖ Rep. Curls said.
―We spent alot of time on meaningless resolutions denouncing the Federal healthcare plan, when we could‘ve
been creating more opportunities for economic growth and stability for our constituents. It‘s probably the most
unproductive session we‘ve had since I‘ve been there,‖ she said.
―It was a tough year all-around, especially due to the budget crisis. We made drastic cuts to many worthwhile
programs greatly needed by members of our community. We were able to get legislation through which allowed
the opportunity for additional police officers to be hired using the Public Safety Sales Tax for Kansas City, but
many other attempts at good legislation failed. It was a disheartening year,‖ Rep. Curls said.


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State Rep. Mike told THE CALL that it was a session of missed opportunities and managed poorly.
―I think that this session was a session of missed opportunites due to poor management by the majority party,
Republicans, and that is unfortunate, he said.
―We missed putting real issues together such as the jobs bill and working on the budget and creating new
revenue streams to help the budget while people were playing the political gottcha‘ games,‖ Rep. Tallboy said.
―There were some good things that we did with autism and the ethics bill which needed a little more bite in it but
we were a ship without a captain or a rutter,‖ Rep. Tallboy said.




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Veterans remember ‘Forgotten War’
By Amye Buckley
Neosho Daily News
Posted May 23, 2010 @ 01:36 AM
Neosho, Mo. — To those who were there, the Korean War will never be forgotten.
Veterans, their family members and supporters gathered to remember during a Saturday afternoon program at
the Newton County Historical Park, ―Tales of the Forgotten War-Korea: For Those Who Lived It.‖
The event was a forum for veterans – the people who ought to tell what happened – to tell their stories, said park
director Wes Franklin.
During the Korean War, 36,516 American servicemen died and 8,176 are listed as missing in action. Five
Newton County men died: Herbert Bowman, Delmas Decker, Alex Rolek, William Wright in the Army and
Charles Ferguson in the Marines.
State Rep. Kevin Wilson and State Sen. Gary Nodler addressed the crowd and Seventh District Congressman
Roy Blunt sent a letter with his thanks and then the microphone was handed to veterans.
Don Rice joined the military in 1945. During his first physical, the army rejected him citing a heart murmur, but 10
days after a second physical, he found himself at boot camp.
When he landed in Korea they marched a quarter mile through dirt roads – turned to bog by the rains – into
Seoul.
―Our boots sunk down about four inches into the mud,‖ Rice said. ―It really made a mess with my spit-polished
combat boots.‖
May was monsoon season.
―The combat was bad and it was frightful,‖ Rice said, ―but the most depressing thing to us was the constant rain.‖
Three times that month he didn‘t have a dry uniform for a full week.
Eight Korean War veterans addressed the group: Harold Brown, Carson Bunch, James Gibson, Joe Johnson,
Dale Lundstrom, Don Rice, Bruce Saltzman and Don Wall. The group also recognized local veteran Charles
Richard Camerer, who died earlier this year.
To those who were there, Korea has not and will not be forgotten. Though some label it a ―conflict,‖ Rice said to
the man on the ground it was war and the same sacrifices were required of the people there.
―It looked just like a war, it smelled like a war, it felt like a war,‖ Rice said.




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State Sen. Delbert Scott bidding farewell
to job
SEDALIA DEMOCRAT Dennis Rich
2010-05-22 22:39:38
State Sen. Delbert Scott looks out the window of his Capitol office and watches a rain-swollen Missouri River
wind into the distance.
After 25 years, the ―dean of the Legislature‖ has all but wrapped up work on his final term in office, but says he is
still ―overwhelmed by the beauty and grandeur‖ of life in the state Capitol.
―The river, the building — it is hard not to recognize the aura of the place. To be able to work in state
government has been a wonderful privilege,‖ Scott said on Thursday as he filed his final end-of-session report.
Scott, a Lowry City Republican serving the 28th District, was first elected to the Missouri House of
Representatives in 1985 and served there for 18 years — the last four as minority leader. He was elected to the
Missouri Senate in 2002 and is leaving office due to term limits. The 28th District includes parts of Barton,
Benton, Cedar, Dallas, Henry, Hickory, Pettis, Polk and St. Clair counties. Missouri voters in 1996 approved
limits of 8 years per chamber.
Scott, who took over in December 2009 as president of the Kansas City College and Bible School, which he
attended for three years and where he met and later married his wife, Donna.
Scott called term limits a ―mixed bag,‖ but feels ―it is time for me to go anyway.‖
―No one that comes here should ever forget that these are supposed to be temporary jobs,‖ Scott said.
Scott said under the pre-term limit system, ―senators never left‖ and doubts he would have served in the Senate
if not for term limits.
Scott said term limits helped bring in fresh ideas and prevented incumbents from becoming too entrenched, but
agrees with other legislators that it takes time to learn the legislative process. He said term limits ―force the most
aggressive politicians to jump out in front early.‖
He called the minority leader position ―the most difficult job in the building.‖
―You oversee a diverse caucus that has no power and no stick. You do your best to articulate a unified voice, but
in the end the most you can hope for is to put out some good ideas and hopefully make bad bills less bad,‖ Scott
said.
He said coming into the Senate and serving in the majority was ―a different world,‖ and said junior Republican
senators might have a tough time in the coming years learning the ―fine art of compromise‖ necessary to
negotiate being in the minority party.
―I don‘t know when, but it will turn over again. Whenever the party in power becomes arrogant and stops
listening to the people, the people turn them out,‖ Scott said.
He said the difference between life in the two bodies was stark.
―I always tell people that the House is like a fourth-grade class where everyone is up and yelling and making
noise — it‘s just organized chaos. By comparison, the Senate is like a nice quiet nursing home,‖ Scott said.
He described his time in office as ―a learning experience‖ that taught him that ―while some issues we deal with
are big ones that impact the whole state, others are more limited and may only effect a small group.‖



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―To them the issues are very important and you can‘t forget that your action can have a lot of impact,‖ Scott said.
He said of all the legislation he had a hand in crafting, taking up tort reform and a law that brought abortion
providers under the same regulations as ambulatory clinics were major achievements.
He said he regrets that attempts to push voter identification legislation — his bill passed and was later struck
down by the Missouri Supreme Court — was not successful but hopes ―others will take it up.‖
State Senate Speaker pro tem Charlie Shields, a St. Joseph Republican who also is leaving office due to term
limits, called Scott ―a dear friend and mentor.‖
―Delbert is one of the most respected members of the General Assembly. The thing about Delbert is, he is
honest.
He has a great family, he is solid in his faith and he is a great public servant. He always did things for the right
reason — that‘s why he is so respected,‖ Shields said.
Shields said Scott was always a reliable voice in a body that sometimes favors rhetoric over the truth.
―I could always turn to him and ask him a question and get an absolutely truthful and honest answer. In politics,
that is unusual,‖ Shields said.




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Lawmakers cite successes in recent
legislative session
By Susan Redden Joplin Globe Staff Writer

CARTHAGE, Mo. — Despite state budget woes, there were some accomplishments in the just-concluded
legislative session, local lawmakers said Friday.
Members of the area legislative delegation recapped the hits and misses in an ―eggs and issues‖ forum at the
Grace Pointe Assembly of God Church in Carthage.
The breakfast also was a bit of a swan song for term-limited lawmakers who are ending their legislative careers.
Only state Rep. Tom Flanigan, R-Carthage, is eligible to return to the House of Representatives next year.
The remainder have ended their eight years in Jefferson City in their current incarnation, though state Rep. Ron
Richard, R-Joplin, and state Rep. Ed Emery, R-Lamar, are running for seats in the Missouri Senate, and Sen.
Gary Nodler, R-Joplin, is seeking the Republican nomination for the U.S. House from Missouri‘s 7th District.
Goals for state Rep. Marilyn Ruestman, R-Joplin, are closer to home; she‘s running for the post of Newton
County presiding commissioner. State Rep. Kevin Wilson, R-Neosho, said he hasn‘t decided what‘s next.
Nodler, who until last year was a member of the Senate appropriations committee, said lawmakers cut $487
million from the state budget proposed by Gov. Jay Nixon. Since revenues are continuing to decline, the
governor will be required to withhold more spending from the budget passed by lawmakers earlier in the session.
―But because of conservative spending earlier, Missouri isn‘t bankrupt like several other states,‖ Nodler said.
―And we‘re the only state in the Midwest to keep its AAA bond rating.‖
Richard, who has served as House speaker for the past two years, said the departure of most local lawmakers
from the House will ―lead to a shake-up, because we‘ve always worked together.‖
In addition to Richard‘s leadership post, Wilson, Emery and state Rep. Bryan Stevenson, R-Webb City, who was
absent Friday, all were House committee chairmen, and Ruestman was secretary of the House GOP caucus.
Richard said local lawmakers had done ―yeoman‘s work‖ with common-sense legislation and conservative
budgeting.
―We wanted to get through the session without raising taxes, and we did,‖ he said.
Emery, who has been working with local residents on legislation to rein in sexually oriented businesses, served
as House handler of a bill sponsored by state Rep. Matt Bartle, R-Lee‘s Summit, to further restrict the
operations.
―I think it will have a positive impact on Missouri‘s future,‖ Emery said.
Wilson chaired a special committee named by Richard to draft an ethics reform bill. He said the bipartisan
panel‘s proposal encountered ―political problems at the end of the session,‖ adding, ―now at least we have
something that‘s headed the right direction.‖
The bill gives the Missouri Ethics Commission more enforcement powers, but Wilson said he also hoped it would
include a provision that banned political consulting by lawmakers and required lawmakers to wait for at least a
session before they could start work as a lobbyist.



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―I wasn‘t that bothered it didn‘t include contribution limits, because I really think that‘s something that should be
handled as a separate bill,‖ he said.
Wilson also chaired the House insurance committee that authored a bill that requires insurers to cover some
costs of autism testing and treatment.
About 75 people attended the breakfast, including several candidates running for the legislative seats being
vacated.
‗Missed opportunity‘
State Rep. Mike Talboy, D-Kansas City, praised the ethics reform bill proposed by Wilson‘s bipartisan committee
and said lawmakers ―missed an opportunity‖ by not enacting the measure. He said the pared-down law that was
passed is a good first step. Talboy, who is Democratic leader-elect in the House, was in Joplin on Saturday for a
private fundraiser.




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Election official wants stronger rules for
name changes
By MICHAEL MANSUR
The Kansas City Star
A Kansas City election official says it‘s time to require voters requesting a change in name to back it up with
some legal proof.
That would safeguard against candidates filing for office with names similar to opponents in an effort to confuse
or mislead voters.
Most of the time, voters do offer some proof when they request a name change, election officials say. But when
they don‘t, Kansas City election officials have accepted them at their word.
Recently, a Kansas City woman, Diane K. Williams, filed for the Jackson County Legislature after changing her
voter registration in Kansas City to a name, D. Crystal Williams, that was similar to an opponent. But Diane K.
Williams withdrew from the race a day before she faced questioning under oath about it.
Shelley McThomas, a Kansas City election board director, said it‘s unclear exactly what happened that day, but
Diane K. Williams submitted an affidavit asking for her name to be changed. She wouldn‘t have necessarily been
asked for proof under old procedures, McThomas said.
―Absolutely, we should be more vigilant about name changes,‖ she said. ―I‘m sure, after this incident, we will be.‖
McThomas said the election board will review the proposed change this week.
At the Jackson County election board, director Bob Nichols said that most people requesting a name change
bring proof of their new legal name. If they don‘t have it, they can file an affidavit that‘s signed under penalty of
perjury.
The election board, Nichols added, would turn over any question about a name change to its attorneys and
potentially to the Jackson County prosecutor.
If someone alerted the election board that the name change wasn‘t legal, it would investigate.
―Then we‘d turn it over to the prosecutor,‖ Nichols said.
The Kansas City election board hasn‘t recently pursued such action.
Missouri law says that a voter making a ―lawful name‖ change can request a change in voter registration. But it
doesn‘t specify how an election board is to police it, McThomas said.
―There may be somewhat of a loophole‖ in state law, she said.
But McThomas acknowledged that state law does say ―lawful.‖
―Probably we could do a double-check, say against a driver‘s license,‖ she added. ―It‘s clear a second step
needs to take place.‖




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As they cut budgets, governments
overlook parking lots
By Jake Wagman
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
05/23/2010

Local governments across the region have been forced to cut services and slash spending as the sagging
economy has put a dent in their bottom lines.
Their parking lots tell a different story.
Despite lean budgets, many public officials in the St. Louis area continue to enjoy a perk rooted in more flush
times: a taxpayer-funded automobile.
So-called "take-home cars" have long been a staple in law enforcement and public safety, allowing officers to
respond to an emergency at a moment's notice.
But scores of officials whose need to respond quickly is less apparent — county commissioners, airport chiefs,
economic development aides — enjoy a set of wheels paid for by the public.
In St. Louis County, department heads — already at the top of the pay scale — get a county vehicle as part of
their compensation.
In Kirkwood, the parks director drives a hybrid sedan. In Belleville, the mayor drives a new Crown Victoria. Many
officials can use their vehicles for personal business, as well as commuting. Typically, taxpayers cover
insurance, maintenance and fuel.
Policies dictating who gets a vehicle can be murky — often the choice is driven more by tradition than necessity.
Critics question whether purchasing and maintaining vehicles is the best use of taxpayer money.
In St. Louis, where City Hall is grappling with a $45 million budget deficit, at least some of the dozens of take-
home cars may be on their final miles.
"In a $580 million budget, it is a very small amount of money," said Jeff Rainford, the mayor's chief of staff, said.
"But when it comes to taxpayers, it's the kind of thing that ticks them off."
FRINGE BENEFIT
In St. Louis County, need is less a prerequisite for a car than job title. Department heads are entitled to a county-
owned take-home car that they can use for unlimited personal business.
County Counselor Pat Redington is one of several county officials with a 2010 Ford Fusion hybrid. Redington
says she uses the car — which the county bought for $25,166 — "occasionally for business."
"It's treated primarily as a fringe benefit," said Redington, who is paid a $148,000 salary, before benefits, as the
county's top lawyer. "I do believe that paying county employees is a good use of county resources."
The county's director of revenue, Eugene K. Leung, also drives a county-owned Ford Fusion hybrid, which he
described as a "major inducement" to leave his previous employer, the Metro transit agency.
Others in county government with take-home cars include chief operating officer Garry Earls (2005 Ford
Explorer), Parks Director Lindsey Swanick (2007 Jeep Liberty) and Denny Coleman, head of the county
Economic Council (2008 Chevy Impala).


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St. Louis County Executive Charlie A. Dooley and a top aide, Mike Jones, both drive taxpayer-funded Chevy
Impalas.
County officials with take-home cars are also given a gas card for fuel. In total, the county has 34 take-home
cars, including several assigned to health employees on a state contract to inspect dairy facilities.
But county officials appear to be having second thoughts about the policy.
When asked last month about the vehicle policy, Dooley spokesman Mac Scott said: "The county executive
agrees with our policy of giving department directors the option of having a county car," which was in effect
before Dooley took office.
Two weeks later, Scott offered an amended response: "Given the continued economic stresses that we and all
county citizens are living under, careful consideration will certainly be given to the usage of the cars when we
create the budget for 2011. At that point it is possible that we may decide to phase out the use of the remaining
cars."
ON-CALL NEED
Elsewhere, use of a take-home car is based on need, even if that need isn't always obvious.
In St. Charles County, the manager of the two-runway county airport commutes to work in a county-owned 2008
Ford Escape.
"The big thing is, I'm on call," Tracy Smith said. "If something happens at the airport, regardless of when it
happens, I end up having to come out here."
Are there many after-hours incidents that require his attention?
"Depends on what you mean by 'a lot,'" Smith said. "It's not a routine" occurrence, he said.
More than 30 of Jefferson County's 53 take-home cars are in the Public Works Department. They include cars
for mechanics, engineers and one for a "right of way agent," who scouts out properties that the county may
need.
"I'm not exactly sure what to say," said Jefferson County Director of Administration Steve Stoll. "It does seem like
an awful lot of cars."
Stoll said the county had discussed not replacing some take-home cars after the current models are past their
useful lives.
Public officials with take-home cars don't necessarily get a free ride — they have to pay taxes on the benefit to
the IRS, adding as much as 50 cents a mile to their taxable income.
Still, even after paying Uncle Sam, take-home cars offer substantial personal saving to public officials.
While some officials can use the car only for commuting and incidental personal use — such as stopping at the
store on the way home — others have no restrictions.
Either way, it is usually far cheaper for cities to reimburse officials for mileage than to purchase them a vehicle,
said Richard Battersby, fleet director at the University of California-Davis, who has studied the use of take-home
cars.
"It's not even close," Battersby said. "When you assign a take-home vehicle, you incur that expense every single
day that person goes to work. When you pay mileage, you only pay it when that person goes out" on
government-related business.
There are rare instances where providing take-home cars is economical, Battersby said, such as when an
employee spends his or her day on the road and does not have a permanent office.

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"Barring a legitimate and documented business need, a government-assigned take-home vehicle is little more
than an employment perk provided at taxpayer expense," he said.
PARING DOWN
St. Louis has about 140 take-home cars, not including the fire, police or sheriff's department. The airport, which
is run by the city, has an additional 32 take-home cars.
The Excise Division, which issues liquor licenses, has three take-home cars. Parks Director Gary Bess drives a
taxpayer-owned 2005 Chevy Tahoe, originally purchased for $31,542. His department, which includes forestry
workers and park rangers, uses an additional 11 take-home cars.
Bess said that he was trimming his department's take-home fleet by two automobiles but that others were
necessary for workers who routinely traverse the hills and narrow paths of city parks.
"Just like a computer for a secretary," Bess said. "It's a tool they need for their job."
The office of the Building Commissioner has 63 take-home cars, more than any other City Hall department.
Many of the cars are for building inspectors, a position that has traditionally come with a vehicle to save time —
inspectors would report to work straight from home to a job site.
But, within the last several years, building inspectors began starting their day at City Hall, making the reason for
their car privileges largely obsolete.
Still, they've kept the vehicles.
"Now that they are stopping at the office in the morning, no one changed the tradition," said Public Safety
Director Charles Bryson, who oversees the Building Commissioner's office. "Tradition is a hard thing to break in
city government."
Not for everyone. Bryson recently relinquished the car — a Ford Escape hybrid — that he inherited from his
predecessor. The city is also in the process of taking back the sport utility vehicle assigned to the city's director
of emergency management, Gary Christmann.
The reason?
During emergencies — such as the powerful storms that knocked out power around the region in 2006 —
Christmann typically does not drive. Instead, officials come to him at a bunker-like headquarters in the basement
of Soldiers Memorial, eliminating the need for a personal vehicle.
"It seemed to me that whenever we have an emergency, we go to his office," Rainford said.
The city's Estimate Board — which comprises the comptroller, mayor and aldermanic president — passed a
vehicle policy last year that is applied haphazardly across City Hall.
For instance, the city's vehicle policy manual allows take-home cars for employees who "regularly respond to
requests for emergency services" or "who begin or end the workday at a different work location daily."
Many of the city's independently elected officials, however, write their own automobile rules, allowing office
holders who rarely if ever respond to emergencies — the tax collector, business license collector and recorder of
deeds — their own vehicles.
Mayor Francis Slay does not have a take-home vehicle; instead, like previous mayors, the police department
provides him with a car — a 2008 Chevrolet Impala, which cost the department about $19,000 — and a driver,
who is part of the mayor's security detail.




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Comptroller Darlene Green and Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed each drives a city-owned 2009
Mercury Grand Marquis purchased for $13,192, an amount that includes a discount for trading in a previous
vehicle.
The comptroller has authorized three additional take-home cars for her department, including a 2009 Chevy
Impala, purchased for $14,400, for the manager of the municipal garage, which Green controls.
"For employees in our office who are on call to respond to city issues outside of normal business hours, use of a
city vehicle is appropriate," the comptroller's spokesman, John Farrell, said in a statement.
Farrell did not respond to repeated questions seeking a specific instance where a garage employee was needed
outside of normal working hours.
AMERICAN CARS
Officials in smaller municipalities may have less ground to cover, but no shortage of take-home cars available.
In Kirkwood, the city's Park Board — an independent panel that runs the city's parks — bought Parks Director
Murray Pounds a 2009 Chevy Malibu hybrid for $23,500.
"You can make an argument that we shouldn't be doing this," said Park Board President Alan Hopefl.
Belleville Mayor Mark Eckert is one of the few, if not the only, area mayors with a city car — a new Crown
Victoria, outfitted with radio communications equipment, which the city purchased last year for $24,000.
Belleville, unlike cities of similar size, does not have a city manager or administrator. "I'm the city manager, I'm
the mayor, all in one," Eckert said. "I do have a vehicle, and I'm not apologizing for that. It is definitely
necessary."
Eckert's predecessor, however, did not have a car.
Other cities in the area have found ways around providing take-home cars to employees. In St. Charles, city
employees in the street and water divisions take home a vehicle on a rotating basis only when they are "on call"
for emergencies. Creve Coeur offers three of its top employees a monthly car allowance between $300 and
$550, which the city says is less expensive than buying vehicles.
"You consider all the costs of maintaining that car, buying that car and filling that car up with gas," said Jaysen
Christensen, the assistant to the city administrator. "The car allowance is a lot cheaper."
Several local officials who have take-home cars say they, too, are cost-conscious.
St. Clair County Chairman Mark Kern drives a 2001 Crown Victoria with 125,000 miles. Webster Groves City
Manager Steve Wylie was driving a nine-year-old Ford Taurus before the city bought him a 2009 Chevy Impala.
Despite the differences, most, if not all, local officials' cars share one distinction — none is from a foreign
manufacturer.
"I think its a good idea," Wylie said, "for us to be driving American cars."




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Committee to support health care repeal
referendum formed
 Local consultant Patrick Tuohey has filed paperwork to establish Missourians for Health Care Choice, a
committee working to pass a statewide referendum on the national health care law.
  The legislature put the question on the August ballot. It would broadly deny the government the ability to
penalize people who don't buy health insurance, as the new federal law generally requires.
  Most experts believe the measure won't have any real effect, even if it passes, because state laws can't nullify
federal law.
  But lots of eyes will be on Missouri, apparently the first state in the nation to hold a referendum on the health
care law.

Submitted by Dave Helling KC STAR




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Jay Nixon tries to reignite economic
development effort
By Tony Messenger
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
05/22/2010


KANSAS CITY — Gov. Jay Nixon walked his political agenda across a tightrope Friday, balancing the need to
produce jobs against the necessity of cutting millions of dollars from the out-of-balance budget.
Nixon announced a new advisory board of private business leaders who will help the Democratic governor come
up with a five-year-plan to bring more jobs to Missouri. With the fresh sting of last week's failure of the
Legislature to pass any economic development legislation, Nixon set his sights firmly on 2011, saying that his
new board will come up with a plan by the end of this year.
"We will have a clear, focused, data-driven blueprint for where economically the state needs to go," Nixon said at
the Kauffman Foundation in Kansas City. The governor said such a plan would guide legislative priorities for
economic development when lawmakers return.
But on the same day, some business leaders were dismayed by the Nixon administration's decision to cancel a
meeting in Jefferson City of the Missouri Housing Development Commission, which was poised to award millions
of dollars in tax credits to projects throughout the state, including several in St. Louis.
The future of some of those projects — including the $20 million redevelopment of Council Towers near St. Louis
University — could hang on whether the governor decides to allow MHDC to meet again before the state's fiscal
year ends June 30.
Nixon said he may not.
He said his administration reached a consensus on "slowing down" the process of awarding tax credits while
trying to get a handle on $350 million in budget cuts he will have to make in the next month. Each dollar of tax
credits wipes out a dollar of state income taxes or other business taxes owed. Overall, the cost of the 61 tax
credit programs in the state climbed to $587 million last year, up 85 percent over the past decade.
Nixon pushed lawmakers to cap some tax credit programs in the session that ended May 14, but he ran into
opposition from developers and some business and government leaders, including St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay.
Missouri ranks first in the nation in spending on historic preservation tax credits and second in low-income
housing tax credits, and the programs are often combined on single development projects.
The dueling issues — giving some businesses incentives to grow, while cutting back on others — has Nixon in a
political quandary as he seeks to get the business community behind his efforts with a unified voice.
Nixon said he would continue on his plan to rein in the state's various tax credit programs even as the new
advisory board studied what forms of business incentives would be most effective. The advisory board will seek
input from several regional boards that Nixon plans to create as part of the process.
David Steward, chairman of St. Louis-based World Wide Technology Inc., is one of four businesspeople
appointed to the new board. The process will be guided by the state's economic development director, David
Kerr.
Nixon said his intent is to let the voices of business leaders guide the state's decisions on economic
development. At his news conference, the governor was asked whether he has been listening to business

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leaders who have lobbied him to leave the state's low-income housing and historic preservation tax credits
alone.
"I'm always willing to listen, but I don't think my tune is going to change," Nixon said.
Nixon's move to exercise control over the MHDC mirrors what some are calling his strong-arm efforts to oust the
former chairman of the St. Louis Police Board. In both cases, once Nixon had appointed enough members to
control a majority of members, he moved to put his appointees in charge.
Nixon has denied any direct involvement with the Police Board changes, but that's not so in the case of the
MHDC.
State Treasurer Clint Zweifel, who until last week was the chairman of the MHDC, made the decision to cancel
the meeting after being requested to do so in a letter from Nixon aide Rex Burlison. Nixon appointee Jeffrey Bay
took the helm of the housing commission from Zweifel, a Democrat, shortly after that decision was made.
Nixon's decision to slow down the awarding of low-income housing tax credits, particularly after the Legislature
failed to act on the proposal, was panned by the St. Louis development community.
"This will be a hell of a blow to the state," said Tim Barry, executive director of a coalition of developers and
builders known as the Missouri Workforce Housing Association. "Everybody understands the crisis the budget is
in. But before he goes after the tax credit, I wish he'd stand back and figure out if it produces more money than it
costs."
Barry cited two studies that indicate several of the state's tax credit programs, including the low-income housing
tax credit, are economic drivers because of the number of jobs they produce. He said slowing down the tax
credit process could put several development deals in jeopardy and lead to construction workers losing jobs.
If Nixon's effort is to be successful, the business community will have to unite around a common vision on tax
credits and economic development, said Richard Fleming, president and CEO of the St. Louis Regional
Chamber of Commerce.
"If we can get the business community on the same page, hopefully we can break the logjam that has a few
senators holding up everything," said Fleming, who flew in from St. Louis for the news conference.




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Nixon appoints advisory board to come up
with 5-year jobs plan
By Tony Messenger
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
KANSAS CITY – Gov. Jay Nixon set his sights firmly on the 2011 legislative session with an announcement today
that a group of business leaders he has appointed will come up with a plan for the state‘s economic future by the
end of the year.
While Nixon refused to call the just-ended session a failure because no economic development bills passed, he
made it clear that he expects his new advisory board to come up with a clear plan that will help push legislation
through next year.
Before lawmakers return to Jefferson City next January, Nixon said his economic development advisory board
will develop six to 10 strategic objectives to help bring jobs to Missouri.
―We will have a clear, focused, data-driven blueprint for where economically the state needs to go,‖ Nixon said.
Nixon appointed four private industry business leaders to work with economic development director David Kerr to
work over the next several months developing a five-year plan for the state‘s jobs strategy. The board includes
David Steward, chairman of St. Louis-based World Wide Technology.

At his news conference at the Kauffman Foundation, Nixon said the he would continue forward on his plan to
rein in the state‘s various tax credit programs even as the new advisory board studied what forms of business
incentives would be most useful in Missouri. Some business leaders, including developers in St. Louis, have
criticized that effort because several tax credit programs have been key to urban redevelopment in the city.
After saying his intent was to let the voices of business leaders guide the state‘s decisions on economic
development, Nixon was asked whether he‘s been leading to those business leaders lobbying him to leave the
state‘s low-income housing and historic preservation tax credits alone.
―I‘m always willing to listen, but I don‘t think my tune is going to change,‖ Nixon said.
If Nixon‘s effort is to be successful, the business community will have to unite around a common voice on tax
credits and economic development, said Richard Fleming, president and CEO of the St. Louis Regional Chamber
of Commerce.
―If we can get the business community on the same page, hopefully we can break the logjam that has a few
senators holding up everything,‖ said Fleming, who flew in from St. Louis for the news conference.




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Nixon launches plans to devise statewide
economic development strategy
By KEVIN COLLISON
The Kansas City Star
Gov. Jay Nixon came to Kansas City on Friday to launch a statewide planning effort to establish a five-year
economic development strategy, saying Missouri needed a ―rock-solid foundation‖ for future growth.
One week after the Missouri General Assembly concluded what critics say was a dismal session regarding
economic development programs, the governor used the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, a nationally
recognized center for promoting entrepreneurship, to announce his initiative.
―As governor, my top priorities are creating jobs and moving our economy forward,‖ Nixon said, ―and this
economic plan will help us do just that.‖
To lead the endeavor, Nixon is appointing a four-member executive advisory board that will join David Kerr,
director of the Missouri Department of Economic Development. Bill Downey of Kansas City Power & Light was
named along with Ann Marie Baker, a UMB executive from Springfield; Paul Combs of Baker Implement in
Kennett; and David Steward of World Wide Technology in St. Louis.
The group will help establish a statewide steering committee with 25 to 30 members that will in turn work with six
regional steering committees to determine recommendations within seven months. A final report is expected by
the end of the year, which will then become a blueprint for legislative action.
Nixon said the strategy was expected to be the product of recommendations from business, labor, education and
local government leaders across the state. The goal is to utilize state resources more effectively in a coordinated
and more focused approach to economic development.
―This is not about figuring out a way to spend more money,‖ Nixon said.
In fact, the governor continued his call to substantially reduce the state‘s use of tax credits, a position that has
put him at odds with many business groups.
―I don‘t think my tune is going to change with tax credits,‖ he said. ―Our tools need to be measurable.‖
Earlier in the day, the governor and legislature were criticized at a meeting of the Kansas City Economic
Development Corp. for failing to pass economic development legislation, including a bill that would have helped
Ford‘s Claycomo assembly plant.
―I‘m very distressed we weren‘t able to get any economic development legislation approved,‖ said Kansas City
Councilman John Sharp, an EDC board member.
Nixon agreed the session had been disappointing in that regard but countered that balancing the state budget
and avoiding tuition increases at universities to ensure a continuing, educated work force were important to the
state‘s business climate.
―To say we did nothing is far from what was accomplished in Jefferson City,‖ he said.
The governor said conversations continued with Ford despite the failure of a bill that would have provided
incentives to encourage the automaker to reinvest in the plant when production of the popular Ford Escape
model is discontinued. He also left the door open for a possible special legislative session.
―We have not forestalled that option,‖ he said, ―but a significant amount of prework would have to be done.‖


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Nixon calls for focusing Missouri’s
incentives on fewer targets
St. Louis Business Journal - by Rob Roberts

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon named David Steward, chairman of St. Louis-based World Wide Technology, to a
new four-member executive advisory board being formed to help Missouri Economic Development Director
David Kerr guide development of a new five-year plan for economic growth.
With state budgetary challenges expected to continue, Nixon announced a new economic development planning
initiative that could result in incentives being more focused on a narrow group of growth industries. He also
announced formation of the executive advisory board, comprised of business leaders from across the state, as
he spoke Friday at the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation in Kansas City.
In addition to Steward, the four-member board includes Bill Downey, CEO of Kansas City Power & Light
Co.; Ann Marie Baker of UMB in Springfield; and Paul Combs of Baker Implement in Kennett.
The final outcome of the planning process, to be completed by the end of 2010, will be the creation of six to 10
strategic objectives for transforming Missouri‘s economy, Nixon said. The objectives will involve existing and
future industries expected to drive growth, he said.
By early June, Kerr and the executive advisory board are expected to identify members of a statewide steering
committee to help with the planning. Including representatives of business, industry, labor, economic
development organizations and other sectors, it will work with regional planning committees including 25 to 30
members from each of six areas of the state.
One of the goals of the process, Nixon said, will be to help the state brand itself.
―The world needs to know what Missouri is when it comes to business and what‘s the best here,‖ Nixon said.
The governor said the new economic development planning process did not have anything to do with the failure
of the economic development initiatives that he pushed during the legislative session that ended last week.
However, he said the development of the new plan probably would involve discussion of the state‟s tax credit
program, which he unsuccessfully sought to reform.
The General Assembly‘s failure to trim tax credits also led to the failure of other Nixon-supported initiatives,
which many lawmakers said they would oppose without tax credit reform.
The failed initiatives included Missouri First, which would have raised job-creation incentive caps by as much as
10 percent for Missouri companies; the Missouri Science and Innovation Reinvestment Act (MOSIRA), which
would have created a $600 million stream of state revenue to reinvest in bioscience companies; and an incentive
package aimed at retaining jobs at the Ford Motor Co. plant in Claycomo.
Nixon said he wouldn‘t rule out calling a special session aimed at passing incentives to ensure that the
Claycomo plant gets to build Ford‘s vehicles of the future in addition to the Ford F-150 trucks and hybrid
Escapes it currently manufactures. But he will bring lawmakers back only if ―significant prework has been done‖
to ensure quick resolution of the issue.
―I‘m not going to call a special session for a debating society to come to Jefferson City,‖ he said.


Rob Roberts is a writer for the Kansas City Business Journal, an affiliated publication.


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State Rep: Ban on texting while driving
would lead to other bans
JEFFERSON CITY (KMOX) -- While Wisconsin was becoming the 25th state in the nation to ban texting while
driving, a similar proposal in Missouri, never made it out of committee during the just concluded legislative
session.
One of the representatives who shot down the Missouri bill is Washington Republican Scott Dieckhaus who says
texting is just one of many dangerous thing people do while driving.
"I don't see the rationale, I guess, for banning one of those activities, you know, we could in future years be
looking at banning eating in the car, changing radio stations, swopping CDs, putting on make-up, reading books
in the car, any of those things are dangerous," explains Rep. Dieckhaus.
Plus, he says its tough for an officer to know why a motorist is pushing buttons on a cell phone. "How does he
know if I'm texting, oppose to dialing, as oppose to doing any number of things that phones can do now a days,"
said Dieckhaus.
According to a Virginia Tech study texting while behind the wheel increases the risk of having an accident by 23
times. Rep. Dieckhaus says making it illegal just goes too far, "to me, it just made more sense that this would
serve as an issue for a good public service announcement."
While Dickhaus would like to see repeal of the current Missouri law banning texting by those under 21. He says
he would consider a blanket ban on all cell phone use while driving, except for hands free.
He does expect the issue to come again next year.




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After seven-year fight, Missouri
Legislature passes restrictions on large
carnivores
By Virginia Young
POST-DISPATCH JEFFERSON CITY BUREAU
05/22/2010


JEFFERSON CITY — As curator of mammals and carnivores at the St. Louis Zoo, Stephen Bircher once
traveled to central Missouri to check on a privately owned tiger.
The full-grown animal was confined in a pen whose fence was only 8 feet tall. Fifty yards away was a school bus
stop.
The owner assured Bircher that the animal wouldn't try to escape, saying, "I know this tiger."
"That's absolutely ridiculous," Bircher told a Missouri House committee this year. A tiger's behavior can't be
predicted, and the fencing was half the recommended height at zoos, he said.
Last week, legislators agreed more safeguards are needed, both for the public's and the animals' sake. A bill that
passed on the Legislature's final day on May 14 would set new rules for those who own, breed and transport
large carnivores in Missouri.
If the bill is signed by Gov. Jay Nixon, a state permit and health certificate would be required for each animal
beginning Jan. 1, 2012. Owners would be required to carry $250,000 in liability insurance. Facilities would have
to meet U.S. Department of Agriculture standards.
Supporters were jubilant. They have pushed the bill for eight years.
"It'll be real good for everybody, and good for the animals," said Keith Kinkade, president of the National Tiger
Sanctuary near Bloomsdale, Mo.
Kinkade said some people want a cute tiger cub as a pet but then, "They get bigger and they just can't handle
them."
Missouri is one of about 10 states with no licensing requirements for owners of large carnivores, according to a
2008 survey. The eight states around Missouri either require a license or ban private ownership.
The push for the Missouri bill began in Warren County, when neighbors of an exotic animal farm near Warrenton
became concerned about unsafe conditions. The farm housed more than 60 lions, tigers and other exotic
animals.
They took their concerns to Rep. Mike Sutherland, R-Warrenton, at his first town hall meeting in 2003. He has
championed the "Large Carnivore Act" ever since.
Momentum grew in 2008, when a volunteer lost part of his leg in a tiger attack at the Warren County facility. It
closed shortly afterward.
Still, the bill died because of concerns about government red tape and the cost of increased regulation.
This year was Sutherland's last shot because of term limits, which cap service at eight years in the House and
eight years in the Senate.


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So he narrowed the focus to the big cats most likely to pose danger: tigers, lions, jaguar, leopards, snow
leopards, clouded leopards and cheetahs. The bill also covers bears.
He addressed the Missouri Department of Agriculture's objections by allowing the state to charge a permit fee of
up to $2,500 per animal, with the money going to an earmarked fund to pay for enforcement.
Most important, House Agriculture Committee Chairman Tom Loehner, R-Koeltztown, agreed to shepherd the
bill by including it in an omnibus agriculture measure.
"You're very persistent, I can say that," Loehner told Sutherland at this year's hearing on the bill.
Sutherland said the final product includes "most of what we want. Definitely we got the framework of something
that will make a real difference."
For example, for the first time, the state will collect data to track the animals. Before a permit is issued, a
veterinarian must conduct a physical examination and place a microchip with an identification number under the
animal's skin. The permit must say where the animal is being kept.
The zoo's Bircher said that over three decades of work, he has observed animals kept in conditions that were
"appalling and many times, quite frightening."
The bill could change that.
"It doesn't prohibit people from keeping these kinds of animals," he said. "It does ensure that these animals
receive better husbandry and care."




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West regains candidacy for House seat
JOPLIN GLOBE Staff Writer From staff reports
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Jim West of Joplin has been reinstated as a Democratic candidate for the 129th
District in the Missouri House of Representatives, records of the Secretary of State elections office show.
West was one of about 40 candidates disqualified April 23 after missing a deadline to file a personal finance
disclosure with the Missouri Ethics Commission.
West said Friday that he traveled to Jefferson City on Wednesday and was allowed to refile as a candidate after
obtaining the support of his party to do so.
West said that the previous financial disclosure oversight occurred because of the volume of paperwork he
obtained when he first filed. He said state election workers briefed him Wednesday on the remaining paperwork
that is to be filed by his campaign before the election.
Another Joplin candidate, Adolpho Castillo, remains disqualified as a Republican candidate for the seat for the
same reason as West.
Under state law, if there is more than one candidate from the party for a position, a disqualified candidate isl not
be permitted to re-enter the race.
West is the lone Democrat while there are two other Republicans, Shelly Dreyer and William ―Bill‖ White, on the
GOP ticket.
There were 15 other House candidates throughout the state who were disqualified for missing the deadline to file
personal financial reports, according to an Ethics Commission report filed with the secretary of state‘s office and
displayed on the secretary‘s website.
Two candidates for nationwide offices were also disqualifed, according to the ethics commission list. They were
Republican Bob Brown, of Springfield, who was running for U.S. Representative in the 7th District; and
Libertarian candidate Martin Lindstedt, of Granby, for the U.S. Senate.
West held a general seat on the Joplin City Council until last month. He did not seek re-election to it because he
decided to run for the 129th District House post.




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Fees for Missouri water enforcement to
expire
By CHRIS BLANK
Associated Press Writer
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) -- Fees paying for more than one-quarter of Missouri's water regulation program
will expire this year, and that has some concerned about a potential takeover of the duties by the federal
Environmental Protection Agency.
Missouri's water permits bring in about $4 million for the $15 million water quality enforcement program. The fees
expire at the end of this year, and lawmakers wrapped up their annual session without renewing them.
That has led to concerns that the federal EPA could take over water regulation that's currently conducted by the
state Department of Natural Resources.
"We're headed in that direction unless someone stops the bus," said Roger Walker, the executive director for the
Regulatory Environmental Group for Missouri, a Jefferson City-based trade association that represents
businesses such as utility, manufacturing and chemical companies in regulatory matters.
Walker said state the water program has some problems, such as industries that do not pay their true cost. But
he said nothing would be fixed by allowing the fees to expire. A federal takeover would make water enforcement
more legal-driven and the appeals process more cumbersome.
"This is our water, and it's our right to enforce," he said.
Legislation to extend the water fees cleared the House but did not come to a vote in the Senate.
Sponsoring Sen. Brad Lager said simply renewing the fees would not solve problems with water enforcement in
Missouri. He said he wants the Department of Natural Resources to meet with permit-holders to figure out what
water enforcement will cost and find workable ways to pay for it. Also, he wants state regulators to be more
efficient and accountable to permit-holders.
Lager said some money remains for DNR's program and that his impression is that a federal takeover is the last
option.
"I don't think this is a crisis," said Lager, R-Savannah. "There is still plenty of time to get done what needs to get
done."
States can enforce water quality rules if their programs meet federal requirements. Four states and Washington,
D.C., do not have their own enforcement programs, and the EPA said none have had enforcement authority
withdrawn.
An EPA spokesman said Friday it is aware of Missouri's water-fee situation but that it is too soon to speculate on
its affects until the federal agency knows more about how state environmental officials plan to handle it.
The Missouri Department of Natural Resources said it worked to get the fees extended and is coming up with a
strategy for dealing with their expiration.
"We're disappointed that what we thought was a very fair proposal - which was the extension - was unable to be
voted on," DNR spokesman Judd Slivka said.
One option - suggested by a trade association for businesses - is a special legislative session later this year to
renew the fees.


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Gov. Jay Nixon has not called a special session since taking office in 2009 and has said he only favors them
when there is consensus on an issue. The Democratic governor said his administration would determine whether
the Department of Natural Resources has enough money in its accounts to continue enforcement through
January or February.
"We want to continue those (fees) and maintain those important programs in our state so we don't see the
federal government take over necessary functions when it comes to water in our state," Nixon said.
The fees are only the most recent Missouri water quality controversy. Lawmakers last year investigated how
environmental officials handle water testing after it was revealed that it took DNR a month to report water
samples showing high levels of E. coli at the Lake of the Ozarks.
Ultimately no legislation passed, but the agency changed policies to ensure quicker public notification. Critics of
DNR's actions last year say the attention alone has made some things better.
The situation "has improved to the extent that there's a lot more public notification," said Ken Midkiff, the
chairman of the Sierra Club's Missouri Clean Water Campaign. "I think the quality of water has remained the
same or has gotten worse."




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Conservation Department to consider
$6.17 million bid for new Columbia office
COLUMBIA MISSOURIAN By Emily Smoucha
May 21, 2010 | 5:13 p.m. CDT
COLUMBIA— A large classroom, nature trail and modern labs are among the features in a new regional office
the Missouri Department of Conservation plans to build on Columbia's south side.
Construction on 17 acres on Gans Road next to the city's Gans Creek Recreation Area could begin as soon as
July and is expected to take 18 to 20 months.
"We expect it ready in spring of 2012," Conversation Department's design and development chief Jacob
Careaga said.
On Friday, the Missouri Conservation Commission is scheduled to consider a low bid of $6.17 million from
Verslues Construction Co. Inc. of Jefferson City and authorize the project.
"It will be a new public contact office, so folks from the central region can go there, get permits and ask
questions," department spokesman Joe Jerek said.
The new facility is designed to include a classroom large enough to house about 100 people for conservation-
related programs and meetings, such as hunter education classes.
Visitors to the center would also have the opportunity to get an education on urban conservation on a one-third
mile paved trail. The trail is designed to include educational signs about backyard and urban conservation
including rain and butterfly gardens as well as native plant displays.
"It's a nice opportunity to have a trail where people can both enjoy nature and learn how to apply conservation
principles to their own backyards," Jerek said.
The new facility would replace the regional office located on Hillcrest Drive just off Old 63. Some workers at the
agency's research center on College Avenue would also be relocated in the new center.
"We're taking staff from two different campuses and combining them into one for more efficient operation,"
Careaga said.
The new building will include modern labs for research on natural resource topics including forestry, fisheries
and wildlife, including monitoring and managing the state's deer herd and a long-term ecosytem study on forest
harvesting.
The research center on College Avenue dates to 1969, and lab equipment and methods have modernized since
the construction. Research is taking place in spaces that weren't initially designed as labs but have been
modified for research purposes.
"The building itself won't influence the kind of research we do," Resource Science Center Chief Mike Kruse said.
"The new facility will take into consideration the kind of work that's done today."
Jerek said the new facility is "much needed" because the current regional office has limited meeting and storage
space.
The new facility would have better "energy use, better collaboration between the scientists and the biologists,
and a better facility for the public to come learn about conservation and what they can do in an urban setting,"
Careage said.

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Licensing process new to current Missouri
Gaming Commission members
Sunday, May 23, 2010
By Rudi Keller ~ Southeast Missourian
When the Missouri Gaming Commission meets Wednesday in Jefferson City, the five members will embark on
something none of them has ever done -- considering license applications.
The last time the commission chose an applicant to build a casino was in September 2004, before any of the
current members were appointed. And while two commissioners appointed by then-Gov. Matt Blunt in 2005 were
a part of supervising the construction of both Lumiere Place in St. Louis and the newest casino, River City in
Lemay, Mo., in south St. Louis County, the two newest commissioners will be attending their first meeting this
week.
The commission chairman, former state senator Jim Mathewson of Sedalia, Mo., took his post in April 2009.
Voters in November 2008 approved a casino-sponsored initiative to limit the number of licenses available in the
state. A license will become available July 1 for the first time since that vote when the President Casino,
operated by Pinnacle Entertainment, closes because its certification as a passenger vessel from the U.S. Coast
Guard will expire. That puts pressure on the commission to get another casino operating as quickly as possible,
Mathewson said.
"We have a situation here that probably in my lifetime won't happen again," Mathewson said.
After commission executive director Gene McNary suggested Tuesday that an applicant could be chosen by
Sept. 1, a statement was issued Thursday clarifying that the winning application would be chosen by the end of
the year.
The commissioners want to be thorough and careful about how they handle the application process, Mathewson
said in a telephone interview Friday.
"While that license is not being used, there is no income coming into the education fund," Mathewson said. "It
behooves the commission to make an effort at least to have a casino operating as quickly as possible. But you
can't shut off the discussion of allowing folks to put together a presentation."
When the commission meets, the members will discuss the timetable they want to follow as they consider
applications. That discussion will be guided by information that was gathered by staff members Tuesday when
they met community and casino development representatives.
"They will report to us, and at that point we will start evaluating when we can get true applications in and start
setting some timelines," Mathewson said.
Cape Girardeau, Sugar Creek, Mo., Louisiana, Mo., St. Louis, Spanish Lake, Mo., and West Alton, Mo., have all
expressed interest in winning the license. Some are further along than others in choosing a casino company as a
community partner. Cape Girardeau will begin that process June 3 at a special city council meeting.
In the past, casino developers have taken from two and a half to four years from the time an application is
approved to when the doors open, said LeAnn McCarthy, spokeswoman for the commission.
While many details of the selection process will be outlined Wednesday, some aspects are known. The
commission wants to see an economic analysis from each potential developer by July 15. At some point after
that, the applications will be due and the commission will pare the competitors down to a short list of viable
proposals.

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At that point, Mathewson said, he and the commission will visit each community in contention for a public
hearing on whether that community is ready for and supportive of a casino operation.
Each aspect of a proposal will be considered in depth, whether it is the size of the investment, the ability to begin
operations quickly or the potential for state revenue, among others, Mathewson said.
"Everything right now is on the table, and there is not one thing more important than another," he said.




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Moving Crops Back on the River
HARTSBURG - Farmers are looking at ways to cut costs to move crops.
Terry Hilgedick makes his living growing corn, his farm is just a stone's throw from the Missouri River but for
years he hasn't been able to use the river to ship crops. Instead, he's been forced to deliver his food with wheels.
"I-70 is a great example of poor planning in terms of shipping large quantities of freight. The road is beat to
pieces from trucks and cars alike and you know, there is a river corridor that runs in parallel to I-70, and
connects the two largest big cities in the midwest."
Now MoDot says the time is right to get business back on the river.
Ernest Perry of MoDot says, "We've got plenty water in the river right now, and we're expecting to have a full
navigation season with the water that's in the upstream reservoirs, and on top of that the industry is very
interested in getting back on the river. So this year looks to be pivotal and a great year in the waterways industry
in Missouri."
With this year's rainfall Perry says it's more fuel efficient to haul by barge, than by rail or by truck. That means it's
also cheaper for farmers. Bill Jackson has been working in the barge industry for more than 30 years. While
others have gone out of business - he's stayed afloat.
This year - Jackson says he offers the best buy for goods shipped out of Missouri as well as the fertilizer he
brings up river from New Orleans.
"It costs $45 per ton to ship fertilizer from New Orleans to Brunswick by barge. Compare that to $70 per ton to
ship by rail. The cost by truck is even higher."
Bill Jackson, Barge Operator: "Trucks are so high that it would be prohibitive to try to truck fertilizer from New
Orleans to Brunswick, so we don't even consider that."
MoDot's interest in promoting barges also helps relieve congestion on highways. Perry says it ultimately saves
money on road repairs.
"Everybody is looking back to the waterways as the last solution we have, especially given the financial crunch
we are having in investing in all our transportation modes."
Perry estimates a single barge could replace up to 70 trucks on Missouri's highways. His department can't count
on high river levels forever - but for now, he hopes producers will take advantage of the conditions while they
last.

KOMU-TV Posted by: Ashley Colley




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BLOG ZONE
St. Louis County Democrats say Dooley's
success would boost statewide ticket
By Jo Mannies, Beacon Political Reporter
Posted 1:30 a.m. Sun., 05.23.10 - St. Louis County Democrats honored some of their own Saturday night, while
underscoring the campaign challenge facing their party in November.
"St. Louis County is the linchpin in statewide elections," said County Executive Charlie Dooley, as he addressed
a couple hundred activists attending the banquet for county Democrats' annual Thomas Jefferson Days, held this
weekend at the Airport Hilton.
Dooley has a lot riding on his party's grassroots efforts, since he is running for re-election this fall. His chief
Republican rival is lawyer Bill Corrigan.
As Missouri's largest bloc of votes, St. Louis County often has been crucial in determining the outcome of
statewide elections.
Dooley campaign manager John Temporiti -- who was honored Saturday night with county Democrats' annual
Thomas F. Eagleton Award for his activism -- noted that Sen. Claire McCaskill's entire statewide victory in 2006
came from her 55,000-vote edge in the county, over then-Republican incumbent Jim Talent.
McCaskill got a boost, said Temporiti, by Dooley's strong showing. In 2006, he got 68 percent of the vote.
"What happened in 2006, the Republicans are not going to allow to happen in 2010," Temporiti said. That means
county Democrats must work even harder, he added.
County Democratic Party chairman Matthew Robinson, who's also the mayor of Hazelwood, explained the
statewide stakes. "A strong Democratic turnout in the county, Robinson said, "helps Robin and Susan as well."
He was referring to state Auditor Susan Montee, who is seeking re-election, and Missouri Secretary of State
Robin Carnahan, who is running for the U.S. Senate.
As a result, Temporiti and Robinson said there's little doubt Dooley's re-election is "the No. 1 goal" of county
Democrats this fall.
The county's political significance also explains why state and county Republicans have located a satellite state
office in the county, as well as the headquarters for their best-known candidate for the U.S. Senate, U.S. Rep.
Roy Blunt.




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Missouri's U.S. Senate candidates tangle
over Big Banks, Big Oil
By Jo Mannies, Beacon Political Reporter
Posted 4 p.m. Fri., 05.20.10 - Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan, who's running for the U.S. Senate,
has announced her cool response to the Senate's financial overhaul bill approved Thursday night.
She says the Senate version "does not go far enough to protect consumers, or to prevent future ‗too-big-to-fail‘
situations where taxpayers could end up footing the bill."
Carnahan also put in a pitch for her own financial prowess in her current job: "My office has stood up for Missouri
consumers, especially seniors, against financial fraud. In the past three years alone, when folks in Washington
were asleep at the switch, we‘ve helped tens of thousands of people get back over $10 billion from big financial
institutions and small time scam artists. As Missouri‘s chief securities regulator, I have consistently advocated for
strong enforcement powers for state regulators, who are the local ‗cops on the beat,‘ as Congress debates this
reform in Washington."
Meanwhile, her best-known GOP rival -- U.S. Rep. Roy Blunt (above), R-Springfield -- has yet to take a public
stance on that Senate vote.
But Blunt does accuse Carnahan of failing to go far enough to punish Big Oil for that Big Spill.
Two days after Blunt told the Regional Chamber and Growth Association that he thought any changes made to
federal penalties wouldn't apply to BP's existing accident in the Gulf of Mexico, he now is advocating stiffer
sanctions.
Blunt announced Thursday that he is sponsoring a bill that "would establish a new liability cap equal to the last
four quarters of the responsible party‘s profits or double the current limit, whichever is greater."
The House bill is a companion measure to one already introduced by several Republican senators from Gulf
states: David Vitter (La.), Jeff Sessions (Ala.), and Roger Wicker (Miss.).
Blunt's campaign explained that "in addition to establishing a new, higher liability cap, the legislation would also
establish much greater reserve requirements for the amount of oil containment barriers, known as 'boom,'
capable of withstanding up to six-foot waves and would direct work on technology capable of capping leaks. The
bill would also require an exhaustive report by Sep. 1 from all agencies involved in the recent response in the
Gulf of Mexico to evaluate the effectiveness of their practices and procedures."
Blunt said in a statement Thursday: "While extremely rare, an oil spill under current law exposes taxpayers to the
risk of bearing the steep cost of clean-up. An environmental tragedy quickly becomes a fiscal tragedy in cases
like we‘ve seen in the Gulf of Mexico over the last month. Instead, responsible parties should be held fully
accountable, and taxpayers should not be left paying a nickel of the cost of cleaning up oil spills."
"The legislation I‘ll introduce shortly will ensure that responsible parties bear the full costs -– where appropriate,
well above the current $10 billion cap" proposed by some Democrats.
In the case of BP, Blunt says his liability formula would put the oil company "on the hook for $20 billion."
But on Tuesday at the RCGA, Blunt had said that the current $75 million cap -- whether one likes it or not -- was
the one that legally would apply to BP, even if it agrees to pay more. Blunt also emphasized the rarity of a Gulf
oil spoil, which hasn't been seen in 40-plus years.



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A spokesman said today that Blunt was simply talking about the need for caution, in dealing with the spill. His
bill, said spokesman Rich Chrismer would make his much higher penalities retroactive.
"He believes the companies at fault should pay for the cleanup, not the taxpayers," Chrismer said.
Carnahan spokesman Linden Zaluka disagrees with Blunt's intent and jabbed the congressman for waiting more
than a month after the Gulf spill before taking any position or outlining any proposals. "Big Oil has given him over
$1 million in contributions,'' the Carnahan spokesman said.
Meanwhile, the Blunt camp replied that Carnahan came out too swiftly in favor of the Democrat version
sponsored by Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., and "found herself supporting a weaker bill with a smaller cap for
big oil and no preventative measures."




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Tax credits haven’t increased film
employment in Missouri
By David Nicklaus
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
The Show-Me Institute’s Christine Harbin has been a steady critic of Missouri‘s film-making tax credits, as have I. Today,
she adds a valuable bit of information to the debate: Using Bureau of Labor Statistics data, she finds that Missouri’s
film-industry employment has actually fallen since the credit was enacted in 1998.

The motion picture and sound recording industry employed 4,143 Missourians in 1997 and just 3,949 in 2009.
The recession wasn‘t the culprit, either; the number was roughly flat from 2006 to 2009. This just hasn‘t been a
growth industry in Missouri — which isn‘t surprising, since we have no comparative advantage over big
moviemaking states like California.
Harbin uses her data to ask some good questions:
The data show that the film industry in Missouri hasn‘t experienced significant job growth as a consequence of
film tax credits. In fact, the number of Missourians employed in the film industry has decreased. Why, then, has
the Missouri state government spent approximately $13 million over the last 10 years on this program? Why are
there continued calls for expanding this program?
I would add that if Gov. Jay Nixon is serious about tax-credit reform, this program might be a good place to start.




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MISSOURINET
Missouri WWII veterans visit memorial in D.C. today; nearly 500 vets
flown through Honor Flight to date
by Jessica Machetta on May 24, 2010
Missouri‘s World War II veterans are in Washington today to see the memorial dedicated to them and to their
fallen comrades. Honor Flight volunteer Mike Beck says many of the World War II veterans on this Honor Flight
trip to our nation‘s capitol are in fragile condition, so many doctors and nurses are accompanying them on the
trip.
World War II veteran Francis Pearman, Moberly, visits the state capitol with other Honor Flight participants. He
stands next to a bust of Harry Truman, who he remembers fondly.
Even so, it‘s not a trip for the weak in spirit. The bus departed for the airport at 3 a.m., and after a busy day in
Washington, the elderly veterans will return to Mid Missouri around 11 o‘clock tonight.
Francis Pearman of Moberly returned from the last trip recently just before visiting the Missouri Capitol. He says
it was his first trip to D.C., where the World War II Memorial and the Iwo Jima Memorial were ―awe inspiring.‖ It
wasn‘t his first trip to the Capitol in Jefferson City though. He said he‘d been there in 1938.
Honor Flight runs solely on private donations and has flown nearly 500 veterans from the Show-Me State to the
memorial that pays tribute to them, the 16 million who served in the armed forces of the U.S., and the more than
400,000 who were killed in World War II.
Congressman Ike Skelton greets the veterans when they arrive in Washington.
―I‘ve met most of them at the World Ware II Memorial,‖ Skelton said, ―but I met one group at Arlington Cemetary.‖
Beck explained that in addition to the World War II Memorial, they take the veterans to other points of interest if
time allows.
―It means awful lot to these guys that you take the time to visit with them,‖ he told Skelton.
―Well you know, I grew up in World War II,‖ Skelton replied. ―These are my heroes.‖



MO anesthesiologist calls national board‟s „ban‟ on lethal injection
“vindictive”
by Ryan Famuliner on May 23, 2010
The American Board of Anesthesiologists has taken a firm stand against lethal injection that could threaten the
career of an anesthesiologist taking part in the procedure.
The ABA has asserted its belief that anesthesiologists are healers, not executioners, by saying that the board
will revoke the certification of any member who participates in a lethal injection.
Stephen Smith, the new President of the Missouri Society of Anesthesiologists, says he agrees with the stance
on execution.
―We have no training or expertise in (lethal injection) and we don‘t participate in this,‖ Smith said.
But he does not agree with this move.




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―There‘s clear statutory support for this. I think for us to take action against somebody who does a legal
procedure that maybe we just don‘t agree with politically; That‘s vindictive and I think it‘s completely wrong,‖
Smith said.
What‘s more, he says the revocation of a certification shouldn‘t be possible in Missouri anyway. Participants in
an execution have their anonymity protected under a state statute.
―The Missouri statutes are pretty clear on the execution team, that it cannot be released, and that no agency can
take any action against anyone (on the team),‖ Smith said.
He also says that statute only calls for some one ‘such as medical personnel‘ to be on hand for an execution. He
doesn‘t think that has to be an anesthesiologist.
―There are plently of resources in text books and certainly on the internet to talk about these types of
medications and what dosages (are necessary),‖ Smith said.
In 2006, a judge ordered the state to revise its execution procedures and consult an anesthesiologist. The matter
is still hung up in the courts.



Years of work pays off for state rep, families with autistic children
by Brent Martin on May 23, 2010
A state representative reaps the reward of years of hard work, work that he hopes will benefit children suffering
from autism disorders as well as their families.
He came close a year ago, but fell short.
This year, Rep. Dwight Scharnhorst (R-Manchester) succeeded in shepherding autism coverage through the
legislative session.
―I feel a humble satisfaction,‖ Scharnhorst says. ―I‘ve got a lot more to do is why. I don‘t want to go up to high or
down too low.‖
Scharnhorst says he knew the legislation would pass, eventually.
―And it‘s not enough. I will admit, there are a lot of children out there guys (who) aren‘t covered by this,‖
according to Scharnhorst.
Just shy of a third of Missouri children with autism disorders will be covered by CCS SCS HCS HB 1311 & 1341.
The legislation will require that insurance companies licensed by the state provide coverage for the treatment of
autism spectrum disorders. It caps the payments for applied behavior analysis at $40,000 per year, indexed to
inflation. The legislation exempts MO HealthNet, the state Medicaid program.
Some call it a mandate. Scharnhorst calls it a matter of fairness.
―If we‘re going to insure people through bad lifestyle choices, through excessive alcohol abuse, tobacco and diet
that require by-passes and transplants; if we‘re going to pay for those people who knowingly abuse the system
then, my God, how can we turn away these people?‖

He doesn‟t care for the conclusion, but backs the action (AUDIO)
by Brent Martin on May 21, 2010
He doesn‘t agree with their conclusion, but does back the action they are taking.
House Budget Committee Chairman Allen Icet, a Republican from Wildwood, has insisted that the legislature
approved a balanced budget; that legislators cut more than $400 million from the budget submitted by Governor



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Nixon in January. While Icet doesn‘t agree with the administration that the budget is $350 million out of balance,
he does agree steps should be taken now to reduce spending.
―That is the governor‘s opinion which I understand, but it is just the governor‘s opinion,‖ Icet says. ―Now, I do
agree that they should continue to withhold, because we know where we‘re going for 2012. So, I support that.
But to say the budget is not balanced, I‘d like to know the basis on which they make that statement.‖
State Budget Director Linda Luebbering earlier this week announced that the Nixon Administration would be
cutting $350 million from the budget on the first day of the fiscal year, July 1st. Luebbering says lawmakers failed
to approve bills authorizing $89 million in government efficiency steps. She says other assumptions made in the
budget likely won‘t be realized, such as decreasing the Medicaid caseload. State sales tax collections continue
to lag far behind. Luebbering now believes they will fall $200 million short of projections for the next fiscal year.
Icet says that the administration does need to prepare for Fiscal Year 2012, which is expected to be even worse
that FY 2011 which begins this July. The legislature will not be able to rely on $900 million in federal budget
stabilization funds, though $300 million might be made available.
No matter who might be right in the subject of balance or out-of-balance, lawmakers face an even tougher
budget next year, according to Icet.
―The difficulty in cutting almost $500 million was a significant challenge. Trying to cut twice that amount next year
would seem to be insurmountable.‖
Icet says that even if the economy rebounds, it is highly unlikely to bounce back strong enough to bring tax
revenues up to the levels seen in 2008.




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EDITORIALS … & Letters to the Editor
Voters need to know consequences of
earnings tax ban
POST-DISPATCH By Editorial Board
Missouri votersmay well be asked in November whether to ban local earnings taxes in municipalities that don‘t
now impose them. If the measure passes, voters in St. Louis and Kansas City, the two cities that now levy
earnings taxes, would have to reauthorize the tax in 2011 and every five years thereafter.
If big-city voters decide to eliminate the e-tax, there‘s no turning back, even in the case of a financial emergency.
The tax would phase out over 10 years, but once it‘s gone, the referendum says, it can‘t be reimposed.
Proponents say they have filed petitions containing signatures of 210,000 registered voters — about twice the
number needed for the proposition to qualify for ballot. The Missouri secretary of state‘s office and local election
boards must certify the signatures, but probably there will be more than enough valid signatures for the measure
to reach the ballot.
―Based on the large number of signatures gathered, it is clear that Missourians want a say on local earnings
taxes,‖ said a spokesman for Let Voters Decide, the campaign committee behind the initiative.
There‘s another explanation for the wealth of signatures. St. Louisan Rex Sinquefield, a multimillionaire retired
mutual fund executive, contributed $1.75 million toward the petition drive. That amounts to $8.33 for every
signature gathered.
Mr. Sinquefield  is a generous contributor to many worthy charitable causes. He also has become famous for
gaudy displays of checkbook democracy. He has established himself in recent years as the single greatest
source of political contributions in the state.
He‘s doctrinally opposed to taxes on income. He believes earnings taxes especially undermine economic growth
in urban centers, including the two in his home state.
He has put forward no convincing proof of this proposition. And before he threw his wallet into the ring, there had
been no discernible interest among voters to set aside the modest 1 percent e-tax levied in St. Louis and Kansas
City.
Voters can‘t make a reasoned decision about his initiative unless they are told the truth about its potential
consequences.
The truth isn‘t pretty.
St. Louis and Kansas City long have depended on earnings taxes to pay for basic municipal services — the kind
that are essential to keeping commercial districts and neighborhoods safe and attractive. If their earnings taxes
are lost, and replacement taxes are not found, both cities would descend into financial chaos.
Mr. Sinquefield doesn‘t dispute this fate.
If his initiative succeeds, how could St. Louis and Kansas City make up the earnings loss without huge increases
in local property and sales taxes?
Mr. Sinquefield hasn‘t put forward any realistic proposal.



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What would be the effect of the new taxes on regional economic stability? Can Mr. Sinquefield rule out the
possibility of municipal bankruptcy if the earnings tax is banned and no political agreement can be reached on
replacement                                                                                             taxes?
Who would be left to pick up the pieces in that case?
Voters are entitled to answers to these questions.
The process  of certifying signatures must be completed by Aug. 3. Before then, Mr. Sinquefield should start
explaining to voters the full implications of what he and his $1.75 million have set in motion. He also should clear
up a misconception in his campaign literature.
The ―Let Voters Decide‖ campaign claims that ―Voters currently have no say on local earnings taxes.‖ But they
do have complete say over who serves as mayors and city council members — the officials who set local tax
policy.
Mr. Sinquefield‘s initiative takes away local voters‘ say. It would give voters in places like Peculiar and Chillicothe
the right to impose mandates on St. Louis and Kansas City.
It would prevent all Missouri communities from enacting the local tax policies they deem best.




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Our opinion: Shields set example for
others
ST. JOSEPH NEWS PRESS Saturday, May 22, 2010 at midnight

Senate President Pro Tem Charlie Shields, R-St. Joseph, delivers an opening address to colleagues at the start
of the legislative session Jan. 6 in Jefferson City, Mo. Mr. Shields said passing ethics reform was one of his main
goals.
As Charlie Shields prepares to depart St. Joseph for new career opportunities, it‘s worth a moment of reflection
to consider the importance of his leadership to the city, region and state over the past 20 years.
Some will cite Mr. Shields‘ achievement in rising from the Mid-Buchanan R-V Board of Education, to the Missouri
House of Representatives, to the Missouri Senate, to the office of Senate president pro tem — perhaps the
second-most powerful position in state government behind only Gov. Jay Nixon himself.
Others may be inclined to list Mr. Shields‘ contributions to legislation, including the reworking of the Missouri
School Foundation Formula, important bills governing workers compensation and tort reform, and Medicaid
reforms.
His colleagues will recall him as someone who recognized the limits of government, but refused to accept gross
unfairness in government. It was on his watch that school funding was rebalanced so more students could have
access to a quality education, no matter where they lived. And it was on his watch that the state‘s Medicaid
program began to shift its focus to keeping people healthy rather only treating sickness.
We did not agree with every decision or proposal Mr. Shields put forward or supported. But like the vast majority
of his constituents, we deeply appreciated his willingness to listen and his generally bipartisan approach to
governance. In fact, we think there is a lesson for future leaders in Mr. Shields‘ conduct over the past two
decades.
He did not always get his way, and his Republican Party faithful very possibly will reflect on this time and wish
certain proposals would have passed and others would have been defeated.
But we are prone to ask, would a more partisan, hard-edged, take-no-prisoners politician — of either party —
have been more successful in pushing his or her agenda? Would he or she have done more good for the larger
community they represented?
We think the answer to both questions is ―no.‖ But either way, this is a subject worth thoughtful consideration by
any candidate aspiring to elective office later this year. And it is one worth pondering by voters when they make
their choices known at the polls.




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A decent scorecard in a cash-strapped year
As the dust clears from the just-completed legislative sessions in Jefferson City and Topeka, the gains and
losses for the Kansas City region come into focus.
A scorecard:
Jobs incentives: Big loss

Some measures got tangled up in a fight over tax credit reform in Missouri. The upshot is that lawmakers went
home without an economic development bill, or a consensus on how to rein in the state‘s many tax credits.
Incentives for Ford Motor Co. to start a new product line at the Claycomo plant and a new agency to spur life-
sciences development were two essential measures that fell by the wayside.
Gov. Jay Nixon and legislative leaders must do their best to reach a workable economic development strategy
before the next session starts.
Schools: Loss, but it could have been worse

Cash-strapped school districts in Missouri and Kansas had to go without funding increases. But wise lawmakers
in both states fended off attempts to make deep cuts.
In Kansas, moderate Republicans tried, but failed, to allow some schools to raise more money locally. That
chance would have especially benefited districts in Johnson County. The Legislature should have at least let
county residents vote on whether to raise local taxes for schools.
Transportation: Win

Kansas passed a comprehensive transportation bill that includes $8 million to be spent in each Kansas county,
on any mode of transportation.
Also lawmakers approved a $35 million outlay from the state‘s Rail Assistance Program to kick-start the 1,000-
acre BNSF Railway inter-modal project in Johnson County. It‘s good news for the area, given that the project will
be one of our region‘s biggest economic development efforts. BNSF and the developer of an accompanying
warehouse and distribution complex will pay back $55 million over 35 years.
In another positive step for the area, Kansas lawmakers approved a plan allowing buses traveling on Interstate
35 to use the shoulder when traffic is backed up.
In Missouri, local lawmakers fought hard for $3 million for the Kansas City Area Transportation Authority.
Kansas City Zoo: Big win

Two minutes before their session‘s deadline, Missouri lawmakers passed a bill giving the zoo a chance to
broaden its funding base.
The Kansas City Zoological District could potentially include Jackson, Clay, Platte and Cass counties, if voters in
each county approve. The district could then ask voters to approve a sales tax to build a better zoo.
The zoo‘s leaders must work with civic leaders in each of the counties to build support.
Smokers: Win and loss

People can still purchase tobacco products in both states at ridiculously low prices. Missouri‘s tobacco tax, at 17
cents a pack, is now the lowest in the nation. The Kansas tax is 79 cents a pack. The national average is $1.41.
Neither legislature showed much interest in changing this perverse status quo. That‘s unfortunate. Higher
tobacco taxes not only raise income in tight times, they discourage an unhealthy habit, especially among young
people.

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In Kansas, smokers at least have to step outside of public places to light up. The Legislature wisely passed a
comprehensive public smoking ban, an overdue but welcome health initiative. It overrides a weak ordinance that
Kansas City, Kan., approved last year.
Meanwhile, Missouri continues to lag, once again giving short shrift to a proposed statewide smoking ban.
Fortunately, some cities such as Kansas City, Independence and Lee‘s Summit have moved forward with their
own restrictions.
Red light runners: Loss

Rural lawmakers fought mightily to outlaw cameras placed at intersections to catch risky drivers in the act of
running red lights. Their efforts fell short. That‘s for the best, regardless of what one thinks of the cameras, which
Kansas City installed more than a year ago. Elected city officials, not state legislators, should decide what
measures they want to take to enhance safety on the streets.
KC STAR




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Let’s go for a swim Gov. Nixon, Sen. Lager
By John Tucker
lakenewsonline.com
Posted May 21, 2010 @ 06:20 AM
Last update May 21, 2010 @ 02:25 PM
Lake of the Ozarks, Mo. — If history is any indication, at the end of this month, the Lake of the Ozarks will test
higher than normal for E. coli levels.
And, if history is any indication, the Lake of the Ozarks will test very well for the rest of the tourist season.
Based on its 3-year-old survey, the Department of Natural Resources agrees. As was stated in DNR‘s Lake
Ozark study released late last December, ―Each year of the survey, the E. coli levels were highest in the spring,
when precipitation and runoff were greatest and trended downward throughout the summer."
To reiterate: the explanation for the spring trend given by DNR was the same as it is for most lakes around the
country – heavy rainfall in the spring causes runoff from land that, in turn, causes higher than normal levels of E.
coli in the water. While the results for E. coli last year were higher than normal for a typical May, subsequent
months tests were actually lower than previous years.
In short, after the season was finished, there was little evidence that anything had changed for better or worse at
the lake from previous years – and previous years' testing has shown that the lake is a healthy one.
Unfortunately last June, for whatever reason, DNR was not responsive to media inquiries when they were asked
for the outcome of the May tests (our organization was one of the entities that requested the results and were
stalled). The media sensed a ―cover up‖ and indeed DNR was wrong for delaying the results. When the tests
were finally released, revealing a high level of E. coli, the media found the motivation behind the cover up.
There are few things that will excite journalists more than a good cover up story. The hype and speculation over
why the tests were stalled ensued. It was insinuated in the press that the DNR and the newly elected governor‘s
administration had held back test results to protect tourism dollars at the lake.
Soon after, the media started reporting the non-report, State Senator Brad Lager – doing what politicians do —
seized the opportunity to bring down his political opposition a notch by forming a Senate committee to look at the
cover up and whatever other ―problems‖ might be hidden at the lake.
Not to be outdone and being a Democrat, Governor Nixon quickly called a press conference at the shores of the
lake and dramatically announced he would clean up the lake and the beginning of a DNR study that I cited
earlier in this piece.
Back and forth it went, one party blaming the other party for covering up the problem. The only thing they could
agree upon was that the Lake of the Ozarks had a problem. Frankly, that agreement wasn‘t based on fact, and
that wasn‘t the kind of bipartisanship we were looking for at the lake.
Make no bones about it, the Lake of the Ozarks has its fair share of ―stuff‖ in it — all lakes do. We, as a
community of the lake, can and will do more to ensure our waters remain healthy. But this notion that the lake is
a polluted cesspool is nonsense. Our lake‘s waters are safe to swim in. Tests show this. Like most lakes, we
experience high E. coli levels after heavy rains that cause soil and ―stuff‖ to run into the water – but so does
every other lake in the country.
We fully expect the E. coli levels to be higher than normal again in May and significantly subside during the
tourist season. This has been the pattern for the three years we have tested.


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Unfortunately, the effect of this unfair publicity has caused some individuals to fear swimming in or making
contact with our lake waters. It‘s as if they believe the lake is filled with acid rain, and the water will melt their
skin.
To combat this notion and to educate the public, I would like to make a challenge to Governor Nixon, Senator
Lager, the media and anyone else in a leadership position who cares about the lake and the community that
lives around it: I have been swimming in the lake daily to illustrate to our readers that the water is safe to swim in
and also to promote health and fitness at the lake. (I feel pretty good by the way.) Now that the studies are in,
and it is evident that the lake is healthy, I am inviting you to show your leadership by joining me for a swim.
I understand time might not permit you to do so immediately, or that it may be a little cold in the water for you
right now, but I‘m hoping you will come at some point this summer and enjoy the lake. If you don‘t swim or don‘t
want to be seen in a swimsuit, how about fishing? We can go out on a boat and toss out a line – the fish are
plentiful here.
There are many people (and tourists) who have been influenced by the events and subsequent poor publicity of
last year – you can help alleviate unfounded fears by physically illustrating the lake is fine. That‘s what good
leaders do.
Let me know when you‘re coming – I‘ll have an extra towel waiting.
John Tucker is the publisher of Lake Media family of publications, which includes one daily and three weekly
newspapers, a bi-weekly magazine and a bi-monthly magazine at Lake of the Ozarks. You can view his 20-day
experience with the Fit and Fun Challenge, swimming and/or exercising at Lake of the Ozarks, at
www.LakeNewsOnline.com.




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SEMISSOURIAN OP-ED

Legislative leaders failed to support
Missouri manufacturers
Sunday, May 23, 2010
By Ray McCarty
Did you know Missouri manufacturers employ nearly 290,000 Missourians, representing more than 10 percent of
total nonfarm employment? Or that Missouri manufacturing workers earned an average $63,000 per year,
$13,000 more per year than workers in other fields?
Would you be surprised to learn Missouri manufacturing output is about 13.5 percent of the state's economy?
All true, according to a recent study based on federal employment statistics. But when employers presented the
Missouri Legislature with a bipartisan proposal that could increase Missouri's ability to attract and retain
manufacturing jobs, legislative leaders refused to approve the bill, despite the support of an overwhelming
majority of legislators in both chambers and Gov. Jay Nixon.
Missouri employers applauded the passage of bills that reversed harmful Supreme Court decisions, allowed
them to avoid full layoffs by extending the Shared Work program and allowed Missouri's unemployed to receive
their share of federally funded unemployment benefits. These measures did not improve the bottom line for our
businesses or enhance the business climate but simply allowed us to maintain the status quo.
Business leaders know that lower taxes and a less-burdensome regulatory environment allow employers to
create wealth in the economy. We are extremely disappointed that the legislature failed to pass a bill that would
have helped attract new product lines to our existing Missouri manufacturing plants.
The bill, called the Manufacturing Jobs Act, would have provided benefits to Missouri manufacturers and
suppliers that make new products -- products that have never been made by the companies in Missouri before.
Manufacturers would have been required to make capital investments of $100,000 per employee at their facilities
and export a percentage of the finished product. The incentive would have allowed these Missouri employers to
retain half of the withholding taxes from jobs that would be saved by using the program.
Suppliers to these manufacturers that added five or more jobs with good wages and benefits would also have
benefited from the program, as they would have been allowed to retain withholding taxes on new employees.
The bill would have provided employers with a valuable tool while protecting taxpayers. Incentives would need to
be repaid with interest if a manufacturer did not fully comply with the program. The total amount of the incentives
was limited. The bill had an expiration date, requiring the legislature to review the success of the program and
take action before the program could be renewed. The bill established no new tax credits but instead allowed
employers to retain some of the withholding tax that otherwise would have been paid for existing employees.
But our legislative leaders did not use the power granted to them by Missouri workers to provide manufacturers
this needed tool. Once again, Missouri manufacturers were forced to the sidelines as we continue to watch our
manufacturing operations -- and the associated jobs -- stream to other states and countries. This bill was a top
priority for Associated Industries of Missouri and would have had real, positive impact for Missouri manufacturers
and their suppliers. We worked on the bill until the legislative session's final hour, when it became clear that
politics would prevail over common sense and the legislation would not become law.
The bill became entangled in a debate over tax-credit reform despite our best efforts to educate legislators that
this was not a tax-credit program. While we support responsible tax-credit reform, making sure our tax dollars


          News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov
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are spent prudently to attract and retain Missouri jobs, we are extremely disappointed that the legislature's
inability to pass this bill will result in continued job losses at Missouri manufacturing locations.
In the end, the legislature imposed additional costs on Missouri employers that provide health insurance for their
employees as they passed another insurance mandate (in addition to more than 40 existing insurance
mandates).
The voting public needs to remind legislators of the importance of retaining quality jobs in manufacturing in
Missouri.
And employers should hold legislators responsible for providing the tools necessary to ensure Missouri
continues to be a leader in manufacturing, an industry that is vital to the state's economy.

Ray McCarty is president of Associated Industries of Missouri in Jefferson City.




          News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov
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Startups struggle as flow of venture
capital funds ebbs
By David Nicklaus     ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
05/23/2010

St. Louis has done a lot in the past decade to create an entrepreneurial ecosystem, but the money flowing into
local startups remains just a trickle.
Missouri companies attracted just $1 of every $750 invested by venture capital funds in the U.S. during the latest
12 months, according to a leading national survey. That's 0.13 percent, which is unacceptably low for a region
with such scientific assets as Washington University and the Danforth Plant Science Center.
St. Louis has built a network of incubators and other institutions to nurture them. The region's laboratories spin
out several innovations each year with the potential to create new medical, agribusiness or technology
companies.
The biggest missing piece is also the most important one — money.
Joseph Schlafly, a senior vice president at Stifel Nicolaus who heads the investment firm's venture-capital
efforts, says the region's shortcomings are most acute for the companies just emerging from the lab.
"If we brought some nourishment, meaning noninvestor capital, to the table for the very early stages of these
companies, then they could become venture-ready," Schlafly said.
In other words, create attractive companies and the venture capital will find them. St. Louis does, after all, have
four homegrown venture-capital funds along with the Arch Angel Network, a group of individuals who are willing
to invest in new businesses. Some observers, however, say the capital shortage extends beyond startups and
includes ventures that are already a few years into their development.
"My concern is that as hard as we're trying, ... our capacity in the region is limited," says Robert Calcaterra,
managing director of Startup Midwest Management in Clayton. "What I'm worried about is that we've hit a
plateau where it's going to be very hard for these companies to raise $3 million to $5 million. ... They will
progress, but they will struggle."
The financial crisis made things worse for St. Louis. As big institutions, such as university endowments, saw their
portfolios shrink, they decided to scale back their exposure to venture capital.
Venture capital firms, as a consequence, are conserving cash and taking fewer risks. When they make new
investments, they look for companies that already have a product on the market rather than those that need
years of research.
Because St. Louis has relatively few market-ready companies, and more startups that need years of nurturing,
the financial pinch has hurt us more than other places.
That's not to say we don't have some success stories.
Akermin, an enzyme-technology firm that emerged from research at St. Louis University, raised $10 million in
December from venture funds that included Prolog Ventures, based in Clayton; Chrysalix, based in Vancouver;
and Burrill, based in San Francisco.
"There's been a good network of people who have been willing to help us in St. Louis," says Barry Blackwell,
Akermin's chief executive. He said Akermin got local funding from the Arch Angels and Emerson in addition to
Prolog, and has found a home in a technology incubator at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.


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Akermin, which employs 20 people, hopes that by 2012 it will be getting revenue from a carbon-capture process
using its technology.
Divergence, based in Creve Coeur, also raised money last year from individual investors, Prolog and funds in
Indianapolis and Chicago. The 22-employee firm is developing ways to fight parasitic infections in plants and
animals, and expects its first product to be commercialized next year.
Divergence often gets mentioned as one of the region's most promising young companies, but it is more than a
decade old. "Between the challenges of science and the volatility of the markets, you have to be prepared for
things to take longer than you think they will," says Derek Rapp, the company's CEO.
That advice could apply to St. Louis as well. It has been nearly a decade since the region put several elements
in place to build entrepreneurship.
One venture capital fund, Prolog, was seeded with state tax credits; two others, Rivervest Venture Partners and
Oakwood Medical Investors, were founded with private money. Incubators such as the Nidus Center and Center
for Emerging Technologies were built to house startup companies. The Arch Angels were organized in 2005,
about the same time that a fourth local venture group, Vectis Life Sciences Fund, was established.
Add it all up, Rapp says, and this is a very good place to start a company.
"Being in St. Louis has been a clear advantage for Divergence. The success of a company like Divergence starts
with its people, and we are able to attract people here because they know this is a community with serious
scientific activity. ... I am convinced that the St. Louis we are going to see in five or 10 or 20 years is going to be
considerably larger in the area of life sciences entrepreneurship."
In St. Louis and Jefferson City, there is an ongoing debate about what role the state should play in helping those
future entrepreneurs.
Business groups proposed, and Gov. Jay Nixon endorsed, something called the Missouri Science and
Innovation Reinvestment Act (MOSIRA), which would funnel a small percentage of state revenue growth into a
technology investment fund. The Legislature failed to act on the proposal before adjourning this month.
The business groups argued that every other Midwestern state provides significant support for technology-based
startups, while Missouri invests next to nothing.
Baiju Shah, president of BioEnterprise in Cleveland, says Ohio's seven-year-old, $2 billion Third Frontier Fund
has given a big boost to entrepreneurial activity in the state. Shah has visited St. Louis a few times, and he says
it would benefit from a boost in public and private funding.
"You've got incredible assets," Shah said. "What's been missing has been a committed effort to grow and fund
emerging enterprise."
In the Midwest, he said, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Detroit and Minneapolis are far ahead of St. Louis in creating
biotech companies. "If you compare what the other regions have done with what St. Louis has done, it's an order
of magnitude difference," Shah said.
Some St. Louisans are ready to sound the alarm, saying we will never catch up without a state program such as
MOSIRA. Others are more optimistic, arguing that our ecosystem just needs more time to mature.
"It's impressive how much infrastructure has been put in place here to support this kind of activity," says Thomas
Melzer, a managing director of Rivervest. "Over time, we'll have a couple of companies that are started here and
get very big here, and then they'll start spinning people off."
In other words, success can beget more success. As St. Louis tries to get that virtuous cycle started, though,
money still seems to be the missing catalyst.


          News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov
   Missouri Senate online: www.senate.mo.gov — Senate Communications online: www.senate.mo.gov/newsroom
its people, and we are able to attract people here because they know this is a community with serious
scientific activity. ... I am convinced that the St. Louis we are going to see in five or 10 or 20 years is going to be
considerably larger in the area of life sciences entrepreneurship."
In St. Louis and Jefferson City, there is an ongoing debate about what role the state should play in helping those
future entrepreneurs.
Business groups proposed, and Gov. Jay Nixon endorsed, something called the Missouri Science and
Innovation Reinvestment Act (MOSIRA), which would funnel a small percentage of state revenue growth into a
technology investment fund. The Legislature failed to act on the proposal before adjourning this month.
The business groups argued that every other Midwestern state provides significant support for technology-based
startups, while Missouri invests next to nothing.
Baiju Shah, president of BioEnterprise in Cleveland, says Ohio's seven-year-old, $2 billion Third Frontier Fund
has given a big boost to entrepreneurial activity in the state. Shah has visited St. Louis a few times, and he says
it would benefit from a boost in public and private funding.
"You've got incredible assets," Shah said. "W hat's been missing has been a committed effort to grow and fund
emerging enterprise."
In the Midwest, he said, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Detroit and Minneapolis are far ahead of St. Louis in creating
biotech companies. "If you compare what the other regions have done with what St. Louis has done, it's an order
of magnitude difference," Shah said.
Some St. Louisans are ready to sound the alarm, saying we will never catch up without a state program such as
MOSIRA. Others are more optimistic, arguing that our ecosystem just needs more time to mature.
"It's impressive how much infrastructure has been put in place here to support this kind of activity," says Thomas
Melzer, a managing director of Rivervest. "Over time, we'll have a couple of companies that are started here and
get very big here, and then they'll start spinning people off."
In other words, success can beget more success. As St. Louis tries to get that virtuous cycle started, though,
money still seems to be the missing catalyst.


          News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov
   M issou ri Senate on lin e: www.senate.mo .go v — Senate Co mmu n icat ions on lin e: www.s en at e.mo .g ov/ news roo m

				
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