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					                         Agbiotech Bulletin
      Volume 9, Issue 4                                                     May, 2001

                         Published by Ag-West Biotech Inc.



     Educating the European public about
                biotechnology
 Some ways of teaching biotechnology are clearly more effective than others. But given
the diversity among people, particularly when we consider the geographic expanse and
the cultural and political differences across Europe, is it realistic to think that we can
develop a short list of techniques that will work best for everyone?
 This is the challenge faced by a network of about twenty people who are working on a
project called: Educating the European Public about Biotechnology. The project was
initiated a year ago with funding from the European Commission. The goal is to
document what is being done in each member country and what information is available
to the public from all sources. Then the group is to recommend what works best to
educate people about biotechnology.
 I was fortunate to be able to attend their latest meeting and provide them with specific
information about Ag-West Biotech‘s activities and a general idea of what resources are
available about biotechnology in Canada from various sources.
 The group itself is quite diverse. Several are researchers associated with universities and
affiliated with departments ranging from ethnology to microbiology; sociology to
biotechnology. Others are regulatory, communications or technology transfer specialists;
one is a publisher and two are high school teachers. Drawn together by a common vision
of the positive potential of biotechnology, and a hope that the acceptance of
biotechnology could be increased through educating the public, this group met in
Barcelona, Spain on April 6-7. Here they shared data, determined how to proceed and
developed a timeline for completion of their final report.
 Project coordinator, Professor Vivian Moses, of King‘s College London, had visited all
twelve of the original participating EU countries as well as Switzerland where he
discussed the work and helped collect data. Moses, jointly with the national partners,
interviewed local educators, representatives of government ministries and agencies, the
media and other relevant sources of information. Subjects included government activities
and funding, formal education (schools, universities, colleges), media activity, web sites,
book availability, industry participation and resources, and the views and activities of



                     Ag-West Biotech Inc. - AgBiotech Bulletin - Page 1 of 15
special interest groups including those opposed to biotech. Progress reports were made by
country, with questions and discussion around each.
  The Eurobarometer was a reference point for many of the participants. Eurobarometer
52.1, which is available at http://europa.eu.int/comm/research/pdf/eurobarometer-en.pdf,
is a 94-page report based on a public opinion poll that was published in March 2000. This
particular report attempts to gauge European attitudes to biotechnology, including: their
expectations from this field, their knowledge of genetics and the sources of information
that they trust. Polling is conducted by country to identify regional distinctions. This is
the fourth in a series of polls along similar lines, so in many instances readers can get a
sense of how opinions have changed over time.
 One can see for example that in general Europeans score about 10% lower in 1999
compared to 1996 in terms of their view of whether different types of biotechnology
applications are useful. Their overall assessment of whether the applications were risky
remained about the same, but their opinion about the moral acceptability dropped by 11
to 15% depending on the technology. Willingness to support biotech applications also
dropped considerably between 1996 and 1999 – by between 12 and 16 points.
 The lack of understanding of the science behind biotech was dramatic. About 50% of
Greeks, and 40% of Germans and French surveyed believed that there were no genes in
ordinary (non genetically modified) tomatoes. In four countries (Portugal, Spain, Ireland
and the United Kingdom), more than 50% of those surveyed did not know whether it was
possible to transfer animal genes to plants.
 Some workshop participants indicated that they felt an almost complete lack of trust of
the media to provide balanced reporting, whereas others indicated that this situation was
improving and though the headlines still may be sensational, the content of the articles
was fairly accurate. Several participants reported that they were providing support to
scientists to make it easier for them to speak to groups about the potential of
biotechnology. This included sharing slides for presentations and offering training in
media relations. The teachers in the group were eager to accept the new materials that I
had to share with them – just like most other teachers that I have worked with in Canada
over the years!
 In general, it was soon apparent that whether we are based in Europe or North America,
we experience similar challenges relating to communicating biotechnology to the public.
These challenges include regional differences in attitude, varied levels of education and
understanding of the issues, lack of coordination among the many groups offering
services, lack of resources, need for materials in many languages, lack of media
understanding of the science and a strong and vocal opposition to biotech.
 We are trying to develop programs to take the science to the public through displays,
mobile teaching labs, web site development and encouraging scientific experts to talk to


                     Ag-West Biotech Inc. - AgBiotech Bulletin - Page 2 of 15
school children and their neighbors and families. We are sharing presentations with
extension specialists, lending resources to schools and collaborating with industry
partners. We are consulting those who do not embrace the technology to gain their input
and understand their fears.
 It will be interesting to see the final report that comes out of this collaboration in about a
year from now. I predict that the list of best practices will not be a short one. We will still
see the need for many different and creative approaches to the subject of biotechnology to
meet the many needs of the public.

To follow the activity of this committee, see: http://www.boku.ac.at/iam/ebe
Judy Hume can be reached by email at: judy.hume@agwest.sk.ca


                                                  Table of Contents
Educating the European public about biotechnology ......................................................... 1
   New resources: CBI white papers ................................................................................... 4
   Monsanto supports Canadian Foodgrains Bank ............................................................. 4
President‘s Column ............................................................................................................. 4
   Biotechnology Human Resources Council ..................................................................... 4
Innovation ........................................................................................................................... 5
   Vaccine development critical to food safety................................................................... 5
   Genome Prairie bags $15 million ................................................................................... 7
   Help for agricultural and medical industries ................................................................... 7
   Your view is important ................................................................................................... 7
Regulatory Column ............................................................................................................. 7
   HACCP and on-farm food safety in Canada................................................................... 8
SABIC Column ................................................................................................................... 9
   Aventis Biotech Challenge Saskatoon Region 2001 ...................................................... 9
Web Watch........................................................................................................................ 10
Events ................................................................................................................................ 11
People Watch .................................................................................................................... 13
   New President for BIOTECanada ................................................................................. 13
   AWB President honoured ............................................................................................. 13
       SPONSORSHIP DRIVE UNDERWAY .................................................................. 13
   Ag-West Board of Directors ......................................................................................... 14



                                Ag-West Biotech Inc. - AgBiotech Bulletin - Page 3 of 15
New resources: CBI white papers
 We invite you to visit CBI‘s online media center to view eight new ‗white papers‘ that
have been developed by the Council for Biotechnology Information to address issues
related to biotechnology, such as allergenicity, the monarch butterfly and safety testing.
 Most of the documents have been developed by the Council through a process of
reviewing and summarizing credible research from multiple sources. In most cases, the
supporting or underlying studies and reports are referenced at the bottom of each
document. Most recent additions include the following subjects: Animal Feed Safety,
Testing for Allergenicity, Bt Protein in Soil, Bt Corn and Mycotoxins, Substantial
Equivalence in Food Safety Assessment, Bt Corn and the Monarch Butterfly, The Use of
Antibiotic Resistance Markers and Plant Biotechnology Offers New Opportunities for
Integrated Pest Management.
To view these documents, visit the CBI site at: http://www.whybiotech.com/en/pressrel/


Monsanto supports Canadian Foodgrains Bank
 Monsanto has announced significant support for the Canadian Foodgrains Bank, a
grassroots organization that provides food aid to hungry people around the world. The
donation for 2001 is in the form of no-fee Technology Use Agreements, Roundup and
other Monsanto products to more than 200 local growing projects across Western Canada
and in Ontario. This $100,000 donation makes Monsanto Canada one of the largest
corporate supporters of the Canadian Foodgrains Bank in 2001.
Source: Monsanto news release, May 1, 2001




President’s Column
Biotechnology Human Resources Council
By Peter McCann President
Ag-West Biotech Inc.
 The Biotechnology Human Resource Council (BHRC) is a partnership between the
biotechnology industry and Human Resources Development Canada. A non-profit
organization established in 1997, BHRC‘s mandate is to ensure that the Canadian
biotechnology industry has a pool of qualified, skilled, and experienced employees to
draw upon. BHRC strengthens Canada‘s biotechnology workforce by supplying a forum
and focal point to bring together available resources and expertise.



                      Ag-West Biotech Inc. - AgBiotech Bulletin - Page 4 of 15
 BHRC has progressed considerably in the field of preparing the Canadian biotech
workforce to meet present and future demand for skilled workers. The Directors are
drawn from large and small biotech companies, government agencies and regional
organizations. All areas of biotechnology are represented, from bio pharmaceutical to
agricultural and marine biotech.
 BHRC offers a wide range of services: information referrals, a monthly e-mail
magazine, joint initiatives with regional biotechnology associations, and a wealth of
expertise from their network of contacts.
 HR Professionals will benefit from the various tools and services provided by BHRC,
such as the Biotechnology Compensation and Benefits Survey, an electronic brochure
entitled Biotechnology and Immigration to Canada, and the Library of Biotechnology
Sector Intelligence Reports. The Biotech HR Pulse – the biotechnology industry‘s
premiere recruiting tool - combines an on-line job bank with aggressive, targeted job
advertising
 Biotechnology Buyers / Suppliers Guide showcases firms, individuals, and other
organizations providing additional services of benefit to the biotech HR community.
Professional development courses for the industry include: introduction to biotech for
non-scientists, Regulatory affairs training, GLP and GMP courses, and Intellectual
Property workshops, among others.
 Teachers will be interested in purchasing The Biotech Career Kit, which provides
opportunities for users to learn about career opportunities in biotechnology and what
skills and thinking processes are involved in biotechnology careers.
 Details about all of these services are available on the BHRC web site at:
http://www.bhrc.ca/. Please give me call if you require additional information on these or
any other biotech HR issues.
Peter McCann is a member of the BHRC Board and can be reached at:
peter.mccann@agwest.sk.ca



 Innovation
Vaccine development critical to food safety
 Tainted water in Walkerton. British livestock, felled by the fear of foot and mouth
disease. With lethal microbes on the prowl, how do we keep our food supply safe?
 Vaccines are a large part of the answer, according to Dr. Andrew Potter, Associate
Director of Science at the Veterinary Infectious Disease Organization (VIDO) in
Saskatoon. According to Potter, vaccinating animals that are raised for food makes sense,
as it can lower the incidence of microbes in the environment.

                     Ag-West Biotech Inc. - AgBiotech Bulletin - Page 5 of 15
 An example is E. coli O157:H7. This microbe is common in cattle and their manure.
Add rain, and the bacteria can contaminate water supplies with deadly results. In
Walkerton Ontario, water tainted by E.coli sickened and killed townspeople. A
collaborative effort between Potter and Dr. Brett Finlay at the University of British
Columbia may have yielded one of the first vaccines to control E. coli O157:H7 in cattle.
 ―We‘ve been able to demonstrate that by using technology developed by Finlay, it‘s
possible to substantially reduce the levels of (the bacteria) in vaccinated cattle,‖ Potter
says. Field trials of the vaccine are slated to begin in September, 2001.
 Foot and mouth disease is also an area where VIDO work may play an indirect role, in
providing more doses of vaccine than current manufacturing methods. Currently, there is
no good way to contain foot and mouth once it takes hold. As seen with the recent
outbreak in the United Kingdom, all animals infected or suspected of being infected are
slaughtered, burned and buried.
 Another strategy is to vaccinate all animals, but vaccines cause the same immune
response as the disease. Tests can‘t differentiate between infected animals and vaccinated
ones, so neither can be exported. Potter explains that one strategy being considered in the
U.K. is ―perimeter vaccination,‖ that is, destroying all infected animals, then vaccinating
those within a given area around the infection site. In either case, manufacturing enough
vaccine is a challenge.
 ―There‘s simply not enough of it,‖ Potter says. ―If there was an outbreak in Europe, in
North America there wouldn‘t be enough vaccine to vaccinate the animals.‖
 VIDO is collaborating with Saskatoon-based PharmaDerm to increase efficacy of
vaccines and multiply dose manufacturing. While this technology hasn‘t been applied to
foot and mouth, it has potential for wide application in animal and human health.
 ―What we were able to show at VIDO is, we took a vaccine that was in use and were
able to reduce the dose ten times,‖ Potter says.
 VIDO is also working on delivery systems that would make needles obsolete. These
oral, nasal and even suppository vaccines are hoped to induce an immune response right
where diseases attack – at the mucous membranes.
 Ultimately, vaccination is about healthier animals, and according to Potter, that means
safer food.
 ―I would rather, as a consumer, eat food from a vaccinated animal, than one that had
been exposed and had diseases caused by any number of viruses or bacteria,‖ he says.
For more information see: http://www.usask.ca/vido/ or contact Dr. Andrew Potter at:
potter@sask.usask.ca




                      Ag-West Biotech Inc. - AgBiotech Bulletin - Page 6 of 15
Genome Prairie bags $15 million
 Dr. Graham Scoles, Head of the Plant Sciences Department of the University of
Saskatchewan, leads a group of researchers who will study how wheat and canola tolerate
cold stress. They will also look at canola‘s response to metal and nutrient stresses.
Researchers involved in this study are drawn from six universities (Saskatchewan,
Lethbridge, Calgary, Alberta, Manitoba and Montreal), Agriculture and Agri-Food
Canada and National Research Council-Plant Biotechnology Institute. This is the only
agricultural project approved by Genome Canada to date.
 A second project that was approved relates to commercialization of biotech applications
and its policy and strategic implications. Three universities (Alberta, Calgary and
Saskatchewan) will collaborate on this project.
Source: Genome Canada News Release April 4, 2001

Help for agricultural and medical industries
 Saskatchewan Economic and Co-operative Development is providing $892,500 to the
Plant Biotechnology Institute (PBI) in Saskatoon for a high-resolution mass spectrometer.
This machine will greatly enhance biotechnology and biomedical research. PBI is an arm
of the National Research Council of Canada. The spectrometer can do specialized DNA
studies and protein analysis and sequencing. This research could lead to the development
of new drugs as well as enhanced resistance by plants and animals to disease and
environmental stresses. The spectrometer will be used by both public sector and
university researchers and will be available to help local companies in their research.
Source: Government of Saskatchewan News Release April 4, 2001

                          Your view is important
The Canadian Biotechnology Advisory Committee (CBAC) has released a consultation
document on the Biotechnological Intellectual Property and the Patenting of Higher
Life Forms that is designed to solicit stakeholder, expert and public input.
CBAC welcomes input on this document until Monday May 14, 2001 via
  Web site: http://www.cbac-cccb.ca/IPConsult_eng.htm
  fax: 613-946-2847
  toll-free number 1-866-748-2222, or for the hearing impaired 1-866-835-5830
  mail: CBAC, Room 570E 240 Sparks Street, Ottawa, K1A 0H5
 CBAC will provide the Government of Canada with a report and recommendations on
the Biotechnological Intellectual Property and the Patenting of Higher Life Forms in the
Summer 2001. This initial report will help set the stage for further discussions with
Canadians. Following its release, CBAC will welcome comments for a period of three



                    Ag-West Biotech Inc. - AgBiotech Bulletin - Page 7 of 15
months. On the basis of these comments, CBAC will review its initial advice and release
formal recommendations.



Regulatory Column
HACCP and on-farm food safety in Canada
 By Brian K. Treacy, Manager, Regulatory Affairs
 Ag-West Biotech Inc.
 The March 2001 Issue (Vol. 9, Issue 3) of my regulatory column used biopesticides as a
model to preview the regulatory requirements that must be achieved in the laboratory as
well as in field trials prior to the commercial approval of commodities. With spring in the
air and another crop year upon us, this is an opportune time to discuss the continued food
safety measures practiced downstream – on the farm.
 The term ―On-Farm Food Safety‖ refers to the Canadian On-Farm Food Safety Program
(COFFSP) that is a partnership between the federal government and national producer
organizations. It is funded through Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and
administered by the Canadian Federation of Agriculture (CFA). Established in 1997,
COFFSP provides an opportunity for national commodity associations to develop
strategies and the necessary supporting tools to educate producers and implement on-
farm food safety initiatives. These initiatives must be consistent with the Hazard Analysis
Critical Control Point (HACCP) definitions and principles established by the United
Nation‘s Codex Alimentarius Commission and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency
(CFIA).
  HACCP is a management tool to prevent and eliminate harmful chemical, physical and
biological hazards at critical areas in the food production and distribution chain. It does
so by identifying preventative measures and critical control points; establishing critical
limits; monitoring critical control points; establishing corrective action when deviations
occur; and establishing a strict record-keeping system and verification procedure.
HACCP is somewhat analogous to the ISO quality control system, with food safety
acting as the measuring stick of success. Like ISO, HACCP systems are unique for each
establishment and specific food sector and product. Please see: http://www.cfia-
acia.agr.ca/english/ppc/psps/haccp/modele.shtml for a detailed generic model.
 HACCP requirements have been adopted by the European Union, Canada, Australia,
New Zealand and Japan for livestock, seafood and poultry plants; fruit and vegetable
sectors; grocery stores; restaurants and other food handling facilities. For a list of
HACCP recognized establishments in Canada please see: http://www.cfia-
acia.agr.ca/english/ppc/haccp/estlist/rege.shtml.


                     Ag-West Biotech Inc. - AgBiotech Bulletin - Page 8 of 15
 At present in Canada HACCP programs are available to stakeholders from farm to plate
on a voluntary basis. Livestock and poultry sectors are moving towards the
implementation of mandatory HACCP programs. This transition should be relatively
easy, considering that over 80% of Canada‘s red meat is already processed in plants that
use HACCP. In addition, to encourage the adoption of the HACCP program, Canada is
working to develop an accreditation/certification label system for users of the On-Farm
Food Safety Program by June 2001.
 So far, HACCP programs have proved to be effective in increasing food safety. In 1996,
the Clinton-Gore administration overhauled the US meat and poultry sector by
implementing HACCP. In September 2000, a report showed that salmonella prevalence
in poultry dropped from 20% to 9.9%; in ground beef it dropped from 7.5% to 5%. For
further information on Canadian food safety initiatives please refer to: http://www.cfia-
acia.agr.ca/english/index/fssae.shtml.
Brian Treacy can be reached at: brian.treacy@agwest.sk.ca


 SABIC Column
Aventis Biotech Challenge Saskatoon Region 2001
 By Alix Hitchings, Coordinator
 Saskatchewan Agricultural Biotechnology Information Centre
 Ag-West Biotech Inc.
  The final event of the 2001 Saskatoon Regional Aventis Biotech Challenge, on April 27
- 28, saw 14 student researchers display their work for more than 700 visitors at the
University of Saskatchewan. Groups from schools across Saskatoon visited and
participated in interactive seminars presented by staff from the local research community.
 The 2001 Saskatoon Challenge was expanded to include two new services: in addition
to the presentations offered to schools, we incorporated a tour of the Agriculture and
Agri-Food Canada Saskatoon Research Centre, as well as a discussion session targeted
toward high school students. The high school session for 80 students focused on the
social, ethical and legal issues surrounding biotechnology, and involved an interactive
discussion with local expert, Lisa Jategaonkar of National Research Council-Plant
Biotechnology Institute.
 The winning projects and students in the 2001 Saskatoon Aventis Biotech Challenge
were:
  Junior category, Jane Simpson and Anna Marie Beatch: Can you get away with
  murder? DNA fingerprinting and food particle contamination; mentored by Dr. G.
  Appleyard.

                      Ag-West Biotech Inc. - AgBiotech Bulletin - Page 9 of 15
   Open category, Jerome A. Leis: Impact of Cattle and Hog Manure on Methane
   Emissions as Regulated by Volumetric Water Content in an Agricultural Soil;
   mentored by Dr. J.J. Schoenau and Dr. J.R.de Freitas.
 In thanking the mentors on behalf of all students, Jerome noted that his mentors always
had time for him. ―It was fun walking around with the grad students. ... I really felt at
home.‖
 Emma Day, another student researcher added: ―Biotechnology is the way of the future.
We had a chance to understand and experience what it has to offer.‖
 Started in the Toronto area in 1994 as the Connaught Student Biotechnology Exhibition,
the Aventis Biotech Challenge is intended to raise awareness among students, educators
and the public about the emerging science of biotechnology and its applications. Regional
Biotech Challenges across Canada feature the work of dedicated students who have
conducted biotechnology experiments of their own design. Cash prizes are awarded to the
top students and their schools based on the recommendations of judges from the
scientific, education, and industry communities.
 This national program enjoys the financial backing of Aventis Pasteur, the
Biotechnology Human Resource Council, and the NRC of Canada. Regionally, additional
sponsorship is provided by local educational institutions, industry organizations and
government agencies that share a common interest in improving the quality of
biotechnology education in Canada.
 The third annual Saskatoon Aventis Biotech Challenge involved 14 senior elementary
school and high school students working on ten projects, in cooperation with 14 mentors
from the local research community. Mentors were affiliated with the several departments
at the University of Saskatchewan, Dow AgroSciences Canada Inc., NRC-PBI, the
AAFC Saskatoon Research Centre, SIAST and the Plant Genetics Laboratory of the
Saskatchewan Research Council.
 We sincerely thank our sponsors and mentors – without your generous support, we
could not provide the students with such a fabulous learning opportunity!
Alix Hitchings can be reached at: alix.hitchings@agwest.sk.ca




 Web Watch
http://www.rdg.ac.uk/EIBE/ENGLISH/INTRO.HTM
 The European Initiative for Biotechnology Education (EIBE) seeks to promote skills,
enhance understanding and facilitate public debate throughout Europe. Visit this site to
access teaching materials for 16-19 year olds including a variety of experimental


                     Ag-West Biotech Inc. - AgBiotech Bulletin - Page 10 of 15
protocols, practical activities, role-plays, information and debates. Subjects include the
the human genome project; biotechnology and the environment, which includes a case
study of the Exxon-Valdez incident; and an enzyme game with all materials to make your
own board game for 3-4 players. Nineteen subject units are published in PDF format and
in several languages.
http://www.canola-council.org/index.shtml
 The Canola Council of Canada‘s web site – Canola Connection has just about any
information that anyone could want about canola from the farm gate to your dinner plate.
Included is the Growers Manual, an image library, food nutrition and recipes. The
biotechnolgy segment provides a comprehensive list of links to useful information.
http://ucbiotech.org
 This site features information of value to extension workers, teachers, students and
others wanting to learn more about biotechnology. Presentations are available to view or
download, a glossary of terms of biotechnology and a searchable scientific database are
some of the noteable features of this site. The education segments include a protocol for
extracting DNA from tomatoes and several valuable links to other resources.

 Events
May 2-4          Food of the Future? Part I: Comparing conventional, organic and
                 genetically modified food crops: Understanding and managing the risks
                 Vancouver, Canada
                 http://www.sfu.ca/cstudies/science/foodforthefuture/
May 12-15        The 5th Canadian Plant Tissue Culture and Genetic Engineering
                 Workshop Saskatoon, Canada http://www.pbi.nrc.ca/ptcgew
May 14 -26       Canadian Bioinformatics Workshop Calgary, Canada
                 http://www.bioinformatics.ca
May 16-18        International Food Ingredients and Additives Exhibition Tokyo
                 Contact Mike Price at: pricem@em.agr.ca
May 20-22        Biotech Evolutions - New Discoveries & Technologies San Francisco
                 http://www.biotechsummit.com
May 22-24        NABC 2001 High Anxiety and Biotechnology: Who’s Buying,
                 Who’s Not and Why Chicago, Illinois
                 http://www.aces.uiuc.edu/research/nabc2001/program.html
June 4-7         In situ and On-site Bioremediation – 6th International Symposium
                 San Diego, California http://www.battelle.org/conferences
June 4-8         REDBIO 2001 - Latin America Meeting on Plant Biotechnology of
                 the REDBIO/FAO Network Goiania Goias, Brasil
                 http://www.rlc.fao.org/redes/redbio/html/home.htm


                    Ag-West Biotech Inc. - AgBiotech Bulletin - Page 11 of 15
June 7 - 8      Food Network 2001 Guelph, ON Contact: Chris Young:
                youngjc@em.agr.ca
June 10-14      ESACT 2001 European Society for Animal Cell Technology annual
                conference Tylosand, Sweden http://www.esact.org/esact2001
June 15-18      ICABR Biotechnology, Science and Modern Agriculture: a New
                Industry at the Dawn of the Century Ravello, Italy
                http://www.economia.uniroma2.it/conferenze/icabr/Program.htm
                   th
June 21-23      44 Annual Meeting Canadian Federation of Biological Societies
                Ottawa, Canada
                http://www.cfbs.org
June 24-27      BIO 2001 International Convention and Exhibition San Diego,
                California
                http://www.bio.org/events/2001/event2001home.html
July 8-12       10th European Congress on Biotechnology: Biotechnological
                Challenges in the New Millenium Madrid, Spain sebiot@orgc.csic.es
July 16 -21     Canadian Bioinformatics Workshops: Genomics Fredericton,
                Canada
                http://www.bioinformatics.ca
July 26-28      Biotechnology Conference 2001 Updating Educators for the 21st
                Century Blacksburg, VA http://www.biotech.vt.edu
Aug.13-17       Drug Discovery Technology 2001 Boston, MA
                http://www.drugdisc.com/US
Oct. 21-23      5th International Forum of the Stragtegic Partnership in the
                Biotechnology and the Agri-Food Industry (BioAgroContact 2001)
                Quebec, Canada
                http://www.bioagrocontact.com
Nov. 28-30      Biotech Forum Stockholm, Sweden http:/www.stofair.se/biotech


                     May 14 at 1:15 - 5:00 p.m. Public Forum –
              Genetically modified plants & their environmental impact
University of Saskatchewan - see : http://www.pbi.nrc.ca/ptcgew/ for details




                   Ag-West Biotech Inc. - AgBiotech Bulletin - Page 12 of 15
 People Watch
New President for BIOTECanada
 Janet Lambert joins BIOTECanada as the new President effective April 23, 2001.She
brings to the association an extensive background in the pharmaceutical sector, having
worked in marketing, sales, business development and external affairs. She has been an
independent management consultant to Glaxo SmithKline and the Canadian Association
of Chain Drug Stores — with both, focusing on public affairs strategies. Ms. Lambert is
bilingual and holds a Biology degree from Queen‘s University and a Masters of Business
Administration from the University of Western Ontario.
Source: BIOTECanada Announcement


AWB President honoured
 Peter McCann, President of Ag-West Biotech Inc. since 1997, received the Golden
Wheel Award from the Rotary Clubs of Saskatoon on April 25. The award for Excellence
in Commerce and Industry acknowledged McCann‘s significant efforts to build and
promote Saskatoon‘s agbiotech cluster. Prior to beginning with Ag-West Biotech,
McCann served as president of Prairie Malt Ltd., was founder and first President of both
Great West Brewing Company and the BioProducts Centre. He led the formation of the
Canadian Value Added Cereals Consortium and was instrumental in the formation of the
Saskatchewan Nutraceuticals Network. Congratulations, Peter!
Source: Rotary Club Media Release April 25, 2001.

                      SPONSORSHIP DRIVE UNDERWAY
 International speakers, scientific researchers, policy-makers and industry leaders will
once again converge on Saskatoon, SK for the 4th Agricultural Biotechnology
International Conference – ABIC 2002 Agbiotech: Cultivating Convergence – being
held in Saskatoon, SK Canada Sept. 15-18, 2002. The ABIC 2002 conference program
highlights the exciting convergence of agricultural biotechnology with life sciences,
molecular farming, genomics, health care and nutrition and emphasizes the importance of
global stewardship for the benefit of the many stakeholders involved.
 Various sponsorship opportunities are currently being offered to organizations interested
in committing to the support and development of this industry‘s strengths and new
directions.
 If your organization is interested in profiling your involvement in agbiotech to a global
audience please contact the ABIC 2002 Conference Coordinator, Lucille Richardson at



                    Ag-West Biotech Inc. - AgBiotech Bulletin - Page 13 of 15
(306) 683-2242 or abic@abic.net. Further information regarding the ABIC 2002
conference may be obtained by visiting the website at http://www.abic.net.


Ag-West Board of Directors
Chair: Dr. Pete Desai, President, Desai & Desai Inc.
Secretary-Treasurer: Ms. Shelley Brown, Deloitte & Touche
Dr. Ernie Barber, Dean, College of Agriculture, University of Saskatchewan
Mr. Doug Billett, Manager, Production Technology, Director, Sustainable
              Production Branch, Saskatchewan Agriculture and Food
Dr. Kutty Kartha, Director General, NRC-Plant Biotechnology Institute
Dr. Ashley O‘Sullivan, Director, AAFC Saskatoon Research Centre
Dr. John Patience, President, Prairie Swine Centre Inc.
Dr. Carolyn Weeks-Levy, Vice-President, Research and Development, Alviva
                     BioPharmaceuticals
Mr. Ian McPhadden, Producer, Milden SK
Dr. Jim Russell, Partner, McDougall Gauley
Mr. Murray Trapp, President, MBR Inc.
Dr. Malcolm Devine, Manager, Biotech Research, Aventis CropScience




                   Ag-West Biotech Inc. - AgBiotech Bulletin - Page 14 of 15
Ag-West Biotech offers other publications at no cost.
Please e-mail: subscriptions@agwest.sk.ca or fax your selections to: 306-975-1966
  AgBiotech Infosource – an informative newsletter for schools.
    Available electronically at: http://www.agwest.sk.ca
  Newtrition (formerly Food Biotechnology Resource News) – a printed
    quarterly newsletter for the food industry now available – Spring 2001 Issue
  A Culture of Growth – NEW Saskatoon‘s Agbiotech Infrastructure




                       The AgBiotech Bulletin is produced by Ag-West Biotech Inc.
                 Editor: Judy Hume, Manager of Communications, Ag-West Biotech Inc.

Articles, comments, announcements and subscription requests are welcome. Please send your enquiries to:
bulletin@agwest.sk.ca or fax: 306-975-1966

Peter McCann, President           Phone: 306-975-1939
Ag-West Biotech Inc.              Fax: 306-975-1966
101-111 Research Dr.              Web site: http://www.agwest.sk.ca
Saskatoon, SK
Canada S7N 3R2

 Readers wishing to have their comments considered for inclusion are encouraged to send less than 500
 words via e-mail to: bulletin@agwest.sk.ca. Include your name and contact information. We reserve the
                                right to edit for length. J. Hume, Editor

                 Funding assistance is provided by Saskatchewan Agriculture and Food.




                       Ag-West Biotech Inc. - AgBiotech Bulletin - Page 15 of 15

                        Ag-West Biotech Inc. - AgBiotech Bulletin - Page 15 of 15

				
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