Volunteers Handbook 2010 _15.7

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Volunteers Handbook 2010 _15.7 Powered By Docstoc
					Brisbane Writers Festival
Volunteer Handbook
Fifth Edition 2010




    1
Welcome .................................................................................................................................... 6
 Message from the Chairman .................................................................................................. 6
 Message from the Artistic Director......................................................................................... 6
Mission Statement ................................................................................................................... 7
Vision Statement ...................................................................................................................... 7
History of the Brisbane Writers Festival ............................................................................... 7
Why the Brisbane Writers Festival involves Volunteers..................................................... 7
The People of the Brisbane Writers Festival ........................................................................ 8
       Artistic Director ............................................................................................................ 8
       Youth Literature Program Manager ................. Error! Bookmark not defined.Error!
       Bookmark not defined.
       Development Manager ............Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not
       defined.
       Artistic Liaison & Special Projects Manager .... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error!
       Bookmark not defined.
       Administration Co-ordinator ....Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not
       defined.
       Technical Manager .. Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
       Volunteers Co-ordinator ..........Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not
       defined.
       Publicity ................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
Volunteer Roles & Job Descriptions ................................................................................... 11
  Front of House ...................................................................................................................... 11
  Venue /Stage Manager ........................................................................................................ 12
  Venue Manager Assistant .. Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
  Usher .................................................................................................................................... 15
  Production Assistant............................................................................................................. 17
  Green Room Manager.......................................................................................................... 15
  Assistant Production Manager ............................................................................................. 15
  Green Room Assistant ....... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
  Volunteers‟ Green Room Manager ...................................................................................... 18
  Volunteer Assistant............................................................................................................... 19
  Artist Liaison ....................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
  Artist Liaison, Mantra – South Bank..................................................................................... 20
  Administration/ IT Assistant.................................................................................................. 20
  Marketing Assistant .............................................................................................................. 22
  Photography Assistant ...... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
  Development Assistant......................................................................................................... 23
  Information Booth Attendant and Directionall Assistant ...................................................... 23
  Book Signing Assistant ........................................................................................................ 24
Volunteers............................................................................................................................... 28
  Policy & Procedure ............................................................................................................... 28
       1. Purpose ..................................................................................................................... 28
       2. Objectives.................................................................................................................. 28
       3. The Selection and Recruitment Process .................................................................. 28
       4. Guidelines ................................................................................................................. 28
          4.1 Legal responsibilities ........................................................................................... 28
          4.2 Financial responsibilities ..................................................................................... 29




                                                                                                                                           2
             4.3 Human Resource Management .......................................................................... 29
             4.4 Marketing ............................................................................................................. 29
Employee Code of Conduct.................................................................................................. 31
 Policy .................................................................................................................................... 31
      1. Purpose ..................................................................................................................... 31
      2. Objectives.................................................................................................................. 31
      3. Guidelines ................................................................................................................. 31
         3.1 Conflicts of interests ............................................................................................ 31
         3.2 Dealing with conflicts of interests ........................................................................ 32
         3.3 Gifts, benefits and hospitality .............................................................................. 32
         3.4 Disclosure of official information ......................................................................... 32
         3.5 Diligence .............................................................................................................. 33
         3.6 Use of alcohol and drugs .................................................................................... 33
         3.7 Ethics obligation 5: Economy and efficiency ...................................................... 33
         3.8 Authority to approve expenditure ........................................................................ 33
         3.9 Home and community use of assets................................................................... 33
General Work Guidelines ...................................................................................................... 34
Anti-Discrimination ................................................................................................................ 35
  Policy and Procedure ........................................................................................................... 35
       1. Purpose ..................................................................................................................... 35
       2. Scope ........................................................................................................................ 35
       3. Definitions .................................................................................................................. 35
          3.1 What is discrimination? ....................................................................................... 35
          3.2 What is not illegal discrimination? ....................................................................... 36
       4. Procedure .................................................................................................................. 36
          4.1 Responsibilities.................................................................................................... 36
            4.1.1 Management ................................................................................................. 36
            4.1.2 Contact Officers ............................................................................................ 36
            4.1.3 Employees .................................................................................................... 36
          4.2 Sources of Advice ............................................................................................... 36
          4.3 Complaints Process ............................................................................................ 36
          4.4 Investigation Process .......................................................................................... 38
            4.4.1 Interview the complainant ............................................................................. 38
            4.4.2 Interview the alleged perpetrator .................................................................. 38
            4.4.3 Interviewing witnesses.................................................................................. 39
            4.4.4 No witnesses available ................................................................................. 39
          4.5 Outcomes of Investigation................................................................................... 39
            4.5.1 Where the complaint is substantiated .......................................................... 39
            4.5.2 Outcomes where the complaint is not substantiated ................................... 39
          4.6 Other Matters....................................................................................................... 39
            4.6.1 Disciplinary Action ........................................................................................ 40
     Anti Vilification ................................................................................................................ 41
   Policy and Procedure ........................................................................................................... 40
        1. Purpose ..................................................................................................................... 40
        2. Scope ........................................................................................................................ 41
        3. Definitions .................................................................................................................. 41
           3.1 What is vilification? .............................................................................................. 41
           3.2 What is not vilification?........................................................................................ 42
        4. Procedure .................................................................................................................. 42
           4.1 Responsibilities.................................................................................................... 42
             4.1.1 Management ................................................................................................. 42
               4.1.2 Contact Officers ............................................................................................ 42
               4.1.3 Employees .................................................................................................... 43
             4.2 Sources of Advice ............................................................................................... 43
             4.3 Complaints Process ............................................................................................ 43
             4.4 Investigation Process ......................................................................................... 44
               4.4.1. Interview the complainant ............................................................................ 44
               4.4.2 Interview the alleged harasser...................................................................... 45
               4.4.3 Interviewing witnesses................................................................................. 45
               4.4.4 No witnesses available ................................................................................. 45
             4.5 Outcomes of Investigation.................................................................................. 45
               4.5.1 Where the complaint is substantiated ......................................................... 45
               4.5.2 Outcomes where the complaint is not substantiated .................................. 45
             4.6 Other Matters....................................................................................................... 45
               4.6.1 Disciplinary Action ....................................................................................... 46
Patron Complaints ................................................................................................................. 47
  Policy and Procedures ......................................................................................................... 47
         1. Preamble ............................................................................................................... 47
         2. Definition of “Legitimate Patron Complaint” .......................................................... 47
         3. Complaint Procedure............................................................................................. 47
Privacy Policy ......................................................................................................................... 48
        Review Procedure ..................................................................................................... 48
Sexual Harassment ................................................................................................................ 49
  Policy and Procedure ........................................................................................................... 49
       1. Purpose ..................................................................................................................... 49
       2. Scope ........................................................................................................................ 49
       3. Definitions .................................................................................................................. 49
       4. Procedure .................................................................................................................. 50
          4.1 Responsibilities.................................................................................................... 50
            4.1.1 Management ................................................................................................ 50
            4.1.2 Contact Officers ........................................................................................... 50
            4.1.3 Employees ................................................................................................... 51
          4.2 Sources of Advice ............................................................................................... 51
          4.3 Complaints Process ............................................................................................ 51
          4.4 Investigation Process .......................................................................................... 52
            4.4.1 Interview the complainant ............................................................................. 53
            4.4.2 Interview the alleged harasser...................................................................... 53
            4.4.3 Interviewing witnesses.................................................................................. 53
            4.4.4 No witnesses available ................................................................................. 54
          4.5 Outcomes of Investigation................................................................................... 54
            4.5.1 Where the complaint is substantiated .......................................................... 54
            4.5.2 Outcomes where the complaint is not substantiated ................................... 54
          4.6 Other Matters....................................................................................................... 54
            4.6.1 Disciplinary Action ........................................................................................ 54
Workplace Harassment Prevention ..................................................................................... 55
 Policy and Procedure ........................................................................................................... 55
      1. Policy Statement ....................................................................................................... 55
      2. Definitions .................................................................................................................. 56
         2.1 Definition of workplace harassment .................................................................... 56
         2.2 Actions that are not workplace harassment........................................................ 56
         2.3 Workplace strategies to eliminate workplace harassment ................................. 56
         2.4 Responsibilities of workers.................................................................................. 56
         3. Procedures ................................................................................................................ 57
            3.1 Where workers can go for assistance................................................................. 57
            3.2 Commitment to promptly investigate complaints ................................................ 57
            3.3 Consequences of breach of policy...................................................................... 57
Workplace Health and Safety................................................................................................ 58
 Corporate Policy ................................................................................................................... 58
     1. Purpose ..................................................................................................................... 58
     2. Responsibilities ......................................................................................................... 58
        2.1 Supervisors‟ Responsibilities .............................................................................. 58
        2.2 Employees‟ Responsibilities................................................................................ 58


Appendices:
Patron Complaint Form ............................................................................................................ 60
Incident Report Form ............................................................................................................... 62
Session Report Form ............................................................................................................... 64
    Welcome
      Message from the Chairman


Jonathan Fulcher is the head of Minister Ellison‟s Native Title
practice. He is an Adjunct Associate Professor at Griffith
University. He has negotiated numerous native title and cultural
heritage agreements on major development projects, and has
been working on agreement-making since 1994 for both
Government and industry.

Jonathan has degrees in history, law, and a PhD in history from
the University of Cambridge.

He recently became chair of Brisbane Writers Festival, as he has an interest in the assisting
with the management of the strategic direction and financial underpinnings of this major
Brisbane arts festival. He also happens to like reading.


                                                                               Jonathan Fulcher
                                                                                      Chairman




      Message from the Artistic Director

Welcome to the Brisbane Writers Festival.

Our volunteers are the life-blood of the Festival. Quite simply we could not function without the
generosity, dedication, and goodwill of people like you.

Volunteers willingly give their enthusiasm, skills, and talents to every level of the festival,
contributing their knowledge to such diverse areas as maintaining our database, assisting with
marketing, looking after our sponsors, and of course taking care of our audience and writers.

I am thrilled that you have chosen to be part of our Festival. I hope and trust that you will enjoy
the journey as, together, we create Brisbane's premier literary event.


                                                                                     Jane O'Hara
                                                                                 Artistic Director
    Mission Statement
Celebrate, collaborate, and change with the Brisbane Writers Festival.


    Vision Statement
The Brisbane Writers Festival (BWF) will collaborate with audiences, writers, industry, and other
public bodies to celebrate and showcase writing, and to provide a forum to discuss the ideas
that inspire writing. The Festival, with its outdoor, friendly, relaxed atmosphere, combined with a
sharp sense of intellectual curiosity, will change and challenge the way audiences, writers, and
the industry engage with writing.


    History of the Brisbane Writers Festival

The Brisbane Writers Festival is Queensland‟s premier literary event. It grew out of Warana
Writers Week, which began in the 1960s, to be incorporated as the Brisbane Writers Festival in
1996. The Festival now showcases local, national, and international writers, and attracts an
ever-expanding and dedicated audience.

The Festival presents to the public a world-class, mostly free and accessible annual event. The
program features award-winning and best-selling writers while also providing a platform for
emerging writers to launch their careers, and showcase their work. These writers take part in
panel sessions, performances, book launches, discussions, and interviews as they debate,
challenge each other‟s ideas, and engage their audiences over the four days of this jam -packed
event.

Past Festivals have attracted some of the world‟s most celebrated literary and cultural figures
including Australian writers such as Nick Earls, Kaz Cooke, Andrew McGahan, John
Birmingham, Tom Keneally, Peter Carey, and Kate Grenville. International writers have included
award-winners such as Cathy Kelly, Andrew O‟Hagan, Romesh Gunaskera, Jasper Fforde, and
Patrick McGrath, to name a few.


    Why the Brisbane Writers Festival involves Volunteers
Volunteers bring with them a lifetime‟s experience. They augment our existing staff‟s expertise
with their varied skills and dedication. The BWF could not take place without the generous
donations of time, and goodwill that our volunteers bring with them.
The People of the Brisbane Writers Festival
           Festival Director

Jane O'Hara

Jane O'Hara brings to the role of Artistic Director of the Brisbane Writers Festival a
history of artistic program development in addition to strategic partnership and event
management.
Jane has recently (March 2009) produced and delivered the 2009 Ideas Festival
schools program (Think Do Tank) in addition to the previous three years producing and
delivering the Brisbane Writers Festival youth program Word Play.


         Chief Operating Officer



Yvonne Jensen

Yvonne, formerly BWF Development Manager, has combined that experience with her
energy and skills in business management for the role of Chief Operating Officer.

Her journey to date is the motivation to ensure that every day is a gift to be filled with
love, passions and colour. BWF fits perfectly!



           Project Manager

Molly Palmer

Molly Palmer has produced Word Play: for young readers, writers, and illustrators for
the past two years.

Molly joined the Festival team in 2008 and has a diverse background including that
of hair stylist, community worker and event manager. Molly performs with Brisbane girls
The Deep C Divas and cooks regularly in secret kitchens located around Brisbane with
her culinary friends



           Program Manager


Charis Holt

Charis takes on each day at BWF armed with a Bachelor of Health Science, experience
in event management, and a bundle of happy memories from her travels around the
world. In her role of Program Manager, Charis coordinates the myriad of details that
come together to ensure the event happens! Flights, accommodation, schedules,
contracts - the list is endless!
          Administration Co-ordinator


Eden Baras

Eden has spent many years exploring and travelling the world with her family, before
deciding to settle in Brisbane in 2002. With a diploma in Events Management in hand,
Eden has taken on the role of Administration Co-ordinator with gusto.


          Development Manager

Zoe Connolly

From practising law in Brisbane to teaching English in the heart of Spain, Zoe's life
journey so far has been rich and varied. She is passionate abo ut her family and her
studies in English Literature, and is very excited to be joining the dynamic BWF team in
2010.


          Volunteers Co-ordinator


Jennifer Eggleton

A teacher in a former life, involvement in community organisations has always been part
of her life. Jennifer joined the BWF corporate development team in 2008. Now as
another page of her life turns, she relishes the opportunity to be a part of the wonderful
team that creates the Brisbane Writers Festival as the Volunteers Co-ordinator.



          Technical Manager

Bernd Neumann

Bernd joined the BWF team in 2008, with much experience and knowledge to make the
Festival a disaster-free zone.

Bernd keeps the Festival office entertained with his dry sense of humour and demands
for coffee!



          Marketing Manager


Keely Double

Along with her unquenchable love of books, languages, festivals, and travel, Keely
brings her experience as a commercial and corporate copywriter and as a previous
BWF marketing volunteer to the role of Marketing Manager. Prior to completing a
Master of Arts in Writing, Editing, and Publishing, she spent a wonderful year of her life
in a French country town eating, drinking, and occasionally teaching English.
         Publicity Manager


Cinnamon Watson

Cinnamon has worked in the field of Marketing and Publicity for the past 17 years, in
both commercial and not for profit environments, including a 5 year stint as QPAC's
Publicity Manager. Since leaving QPAC in 2006 she has started her own business and
relishes the work/life balance she has been lucky enough to find. With the support of
her husband and three gorgeous girls she is passionate about making the most of every
opportunity and can't wait to immerse herself in BWF 2010!
Office Address

12 Merivale Street
South Brisbane QLD 4101

Postal Address

PO Box 3453
South Brisbane QLD 4101

Phone (07) 3255 0254

Facsimile (07) 3255 0362
    Volunteer Roles & Job Descriptions
     Front of House

Responsible to: Volunteers Coordinator / Technical Manager / Festival Director / COO

Tasks:
 Be responsible for the Front of House management for 2010 Brisbane Writers Festival.
 Liaise with the Volunteers Coordinator re maintaining adequate staffing levels across all
  venues.
 Directly supervise the BWF venue managers, ushers and other volunteers as required.
 Assist in delivering on site training for BWF Volunteers.
 Ensure all legislative requirements and service standards regarding service delivery are met
  by all BWF Volunteers and ensure the highest level of professionalism and customer service.
 Other duties as directed by the Volunteers Coordinator and Technical Manager.

Times and days the job is available:
 Pre-Festival: mid Aug -15 September, hours are flexible.
 Festival : Various hours 1 September – 5 September 2010

Skills/qualifications required for this job:
 Good oral and written communication skills.
 Strong organisational and interpersonal skills, including good administration and record
  keeping skills.
 Experience in FOH essential.
 Ability to respond promptly, independently and effectively to enquiries and issues that arise.
 Ability to coordinate multiple tasks, prioritise time, and work within deadlines.
 (Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) Blue Card OR Police Card
  OR 100 points of ID.
 2 referees.

Characteristics required of volunteer:
 Proactive
 Enthusiastic
 Team player
 Organised
 Flexible
 Accurate
 People skills

Skills/benefits to be gained by doing this job:
 Networking in arts industry.
 Knowledge of the administration and organisation of an international event.
 Access to events when not on duty (subject to availability)
 Certificate of Participation.
 T-shirt.

Job training:
 BWF induction and training is mandatory.
      Venue Stage Manager

Responsible to: Technical Manager / Volunteers Coordinator / FOH


Tasks:
 Assist with the preparation of technical requirements for each venue.
 Ensure that the technical and operations schedule is adhered to.
 Oversee the smooth operation of your assigned venue - sessions run on time.
 Manage stage sets.
 Assist venue technical crew as required.
 Assist presenters/participants to ensure timely program delivery.
 Ensure taking and recording of accurate head counts by the AVM at each session Ensures
  all statistical information is delivered to the Volunteers Green Room by close of day.
 Ensures breaks are taken and responsibilities are covered for this absence.
 Ensure Assistant Venue Manager organises, distributes, collects all collateral
 Ensure staff levels appropriate.
 Manage ushers.
 Ensure that safety is adhered to in the venue.
 Other duties as directed by Technical Manager and Volunteers Co-ordinator.

Times and days the job is available:
 Various hours, 23 August – 7 September 2010

Skills/qualifications required for this job:
 Sound knowledge of industry practice for production.
 Training and basic experience in production is necessary. Previous or current study in
  Production/Events Management would be an advantage.
 Ability to respond independently and promptly to issues that arise.
 Good oral communication skills.
 Team player.
 (Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) Blue Card OR Police Card
  OR 100 points of ID.
 2 referees.

Characteristics required of volunteer:
 Enthusiastic
 Responsible
 Patient
 Confident
 Team player

Skills/benefits to be gained by doing this job:
 Opportunity to use /gain Production experience/ technical skills in a live event.
 Networking in arts industry.
 Access to events when not on duty (subject to availability)
 Certificate of Participation.
 T-shirt

Job training:
 BWF induction and training is mandatory
     Venue Manager Assistant

Responsible to: Volunteers Co-ordinator / Technical Manager / Front of House

Tasks may include:
 Assist with the preparation of each venue
 Oversee the smooth operation of your assigned venue.
 Manage all collateral – set up, distribute and clear for each session
 Assist venue technical crew if required.
 Assist presenters/participants to ensure timely program delivery.
 Manage ushers.
 Ensure staff levels appropriate.
 Ensure accurate head counts are taken and recorded for each session.
 Complete a session report with comments.
 Return all statistical information to the Volunteers Green Room
 Respond to enquiries from the public and Festival guests.
 Acquire a sound knowledge of the Festival program, participating writers, and venues.
 Other duties as directed by the Technical Manager and Festival staff.

Times and days the job is available:
 Various hours during the Festival: 1 September –5 September 2010

Skills/qualifications required for this job:
 Good people management skills.
 Good oral communication skills.
 Good organisational skills.
 Ability to provide leadership.
 Ability to work in high pressure situations.
 Ability to respond independently and promptly to enquiries and issues that arise.
 Ability to work within a team environment.
 Experience/training in venue/event management preferred.
 (Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) Blue Card OR Police Card
  OR 100 points of ID.
 2 referees.

Characteristics required of volunteer:
 Enthusiastic
 Responsible
 Confident
 Patient
 Team player

Skills/benefits to be gained by doing this job:
 Networking in arts industry
 Certificate of Participation
 Access to events when not on duty (subject to availability)
 T-shirt

Job training:
 BWF induction and training is mandatory.
     Usher

Responsible to: Volunteer Co-ordinator / Assistant Volunteer Co-ordinator/Front of House

Tasks:
 Escort writers from the Green Room to the appropriate venue
 Escort writers to the book signing table
 Distribute and collect Festival surveys
 Maintain a tidy venue and ensure the writers are comfortable
 Respond to enquiries from the general public and Festival guests
 Acquire a sound knowledge of the Festival program, participating writer, and venues
 Other duties as directed by the Venue Manager, Production Manager, and Festival staff

Times and days the job is available:
 Various hours: 1 September – 5 September 2010

Skills/qualifications required for this job:
 Good oral communication skills
 Ability to respond independently and promptly to enquiries and issues that arise
 Ability to work within a team environment B
 (Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) Blue Card OR Police Card
  OR 100 points of ID.
 2 referees.

Characteristics required of volunteer:
 Enthusiastic
 Confident
 Patient
 Team player
 Enjoys interacting with the public

Skills/benefits to be gained by doing this job:
 Networking in Arts Industry
 Access to events when not on duty (subject to availability)
 Certificate of Participation
 T-shirt

Job training:
 BWF induction and training is mandatory.


Additional notes:
Ushers may be asked to help conduct surveys to gather accurate market information during the
Festival period in September.
     Production Assistant

Responsible to: Technical Manager / Venue Stage Manager / Volunteers Co-ordinator


Tasks:
 Coordinate with technical crew, including venue/stage managers.
 Assist venue technical crew as required.
 Ensure that the production schedule is adhered to.
 Assist with the preparation of technical requirements for each venue.
 Ensure that safety requirements are adhered to in the venue.
 Assist presenters/participants to ensure timely program delivery.
 Other duties as directed by Technical Manager and Volunteers Co-ordinator.

Times and days the job is available:
 Various hours, 23 August – 7 September 2010

Skills/qualifications required for this job:
 Some knowledge of industry practice for production.
 Training and basic experience in production is preferred. Previous or current study in
  Production/Events Management would be an advantage.
 Ability to respond independently and promptly to issues that arise.
 Good oral communication skills.
 Team player.
 (Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) Blue Card OR Police Card
  OR 100 points of ID.
 2 referees.

Characteristics required of volunteer:
 Patient
 Confident
 Team player

Skills/benefits to be gained by doing this job:
 Opportunity to use technical skills in a live event.
 Networking in arts industry
 Opportunity to gain Production experience with a large scale arts festival.
 Access to events when not on duty (subject to availability)
 Certificate of Participation.
 T-shirt

Job training:
 BWF induction and training is mandatory
     Green Room Manager

Responsible to: Volunteers Co-ordinator / Assistant Volunteers Co-ordinator


Tasks:
 Oversee the smooth operation of the Green Room.
 Greet writers and escort them into the Green Room.
 Monitor the writers and ensure that all writers expected in the Green Room have been
  accounted for.
 Supervise the Assistant Green Room Manager and Green Room Assistants.
 Make sure all writers leave in time for their sessions and are escorted by the appropriate
  usher.
 Acquire a sound knowledge of the Festival program, participating writers, and venues.
 Other duties as directed by the Production Manager and Festival staff.
 Keep the Green Room clean, tidy, and stocked with provisions – tea/coffee, cold water, juice,
  food etc.

Times and days the job is available:
 Various hours during the Festival: 1 September –5 September 2010

Skills/qualifications required for this job:
 Good oral communication skills.
 Good liaison and interpersonal skills.
 Ability to work in high pressure situations.
 Ability to respond independently and promptly to enquiries and issues that arise.
 Ability to work within a team environment.
 Ability to delegate tasks.
 (Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) Blue Card OR Police Card
  OR 100 points of ID.
 2 referees.

Characteristics required of volunteer:
 Enthusiastic
 Responsible
 Confident
 Patient
 Team player

Skills/benefits to be gained by doing this job:
 Networking in arts industry
 Access to events when not on duty (subject to availability)
 Certificate of Participation
 T-shirt

Job training:
 BWF induction and training is mandatory.
     Green Room Assistant

Responsible to: Green Room Manager / Assistant Green Room Manager


Tasks:
 Assist the Green Room Manager in maintaining a tidy Green Room area and ensure the
  writers are comfortable.
 Respond to enquiries from the public and Festival guests.
 Acquire a sound knowledge of the Festival program, participating writers, and venues.
 Other duties as directed by the Green Room Manager, Technical Manager, and Festival
  Staff.

Times and days the job is available:
 Various hours during the Festival: 1 September – 5 September 2010

Skills/qualifications required for this job:
 Good oral communication skills.
 Ability to respond independently and promptly to enquiries and issues that arise.
 Ability to work within a team environment.
 (Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) Blue Card OR Police Card
  OR 100 points of ID.
 2 referees.

Characteristics required of volunteer:
 Enthusiastic
 Confident
 Patient
 Team player
 Enjoys interacting with the public

Skills/benefits to be gained by doing this job:
 Networking in arts industry.
 Access to events when not on duty (subject to availability)
 Certificate of Participation.
 T-shirt.

Job training:
 BWF induction and training is mandatory.
     Volunteers’ Green Room Manager

Responsible to: Volunteers Co-ordinator


Tasks:
 Oversee the smooth operation of the Volunteers‟ Green Room.
 Ensure that all volunteers sign in and sign out at the start and end of shifts.
 Assist with distribution of t-shirts, lanyards etc
 Update white board with QTIX information – venue tix availability; changes to program.
 Assist briefing volunteers commencing on the second and third shifts
 Co-ordinate the distribution of radio headsets to Venue Manager Assistants and ensure that
  the radio headsets have been signed out correctly.
 Provide back-up to Venue Managers to ensure venues are staffed adequately.
 If required, provide assistance to the Development Team with the roll-out of necessary
  publicity material for sessions (seat drops, banners, etc).
 Keep the Volunteer Green Room clean and tidy and stocked with provisions – tea/coffee,
  cold water etc.
 Collect lunch vouchers and distribute lunches

Times and days the job is available:
 Various hours during the Festival: 1 September – 5 September 2010

Skills/qualifications required for this job:
 Good oral communication skills.
 Good people management skills.
 Ability to work in high pressure situations.
 Ability to respond independently and promptly to enquiries and issues that arise.
 Ability to work within a team environment.
 Ability to delegate tasks.
 (Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) Blue Card OR Police Card
  OR 100 points of ID.
 2 referees.

Characteristics required of volunteer:
 Enthusiastic
 Responsible
 Confident
 Patient
 Team player

Skills/benefits to be gained by doing this job:
 Networking in arts industry
 Access to events when not on duty (subject to availability)
 Certificate of Participation
 T-shirt

Job training:
 BWF induction and training is mandatory.
      Volunteers Coordinator Assistant

Responsible to: Volunteers Coordinator


Tasks:
 Provide assistance with the recruitment, training and management of volunteers, as required.
 Ensure the smooth operation of the Volunteers‟ Green Room.
 Assist with administrative tasks, relating to the management of volunteers.
 Respond to enquiries from the public and Festival guests.
 Acquire a sound knowledge of the Festival program, participating writers, and venues.
 Other duties as directed by the FOH, Chief Operating Officer and Festival Director/CEO

Times and days the job is available:
 Pre-Festival: June – September, hours are flexible, approximately two days per week
 Various hours during the Festival: 1 September – 5 September 2010

 Skills/qualifications required for this job:
 Previous experience in event management or in working with volunteers.
 Good oral and written communication skills.
 Strong organisational and interpersonal skills.
 Good people management skills.
 Ability to respond independently and promptly to enquiries and issues that arise.
 Basic knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel.
 Ability to coordinate multiple tasks, prioritise time, and work within deadlines.
 Ability to adapt to working individually and within a team environment.
 (Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) Blue Card OR Police Card
  OR 100 points of ID.
 2 referees.

Characteristics required of volunteer:
 Confident
 Enthusiastic
 Team player

Skills/benefits to be gained by doing this job:
 Networking in arts industry
 Knowledge of the administration and organisation of an international event.
 Access to events when not on duty (subject to availability)
 Certificate of Participation.
 T-shirt.

Job training:
 BWF induction and training is mandatory.
     Artist Liaison

Responsible to: Volunteers Co-ordinator / Program Manager


Tasks:
 Help put Artist schedules together, for example, researching flight times.
 Assist with procuring items for the Artist‟s bags.
 Be onsite at information booth to assist.
 Distribute lanyards and Artist‟s bags.
 Respond to enquiries from participants.
 Direct Artists to Green Room.
 Be familiar with authors/guests – images and read biographies from website

Times and days the job is available:
 Pre-festival: July - September
 Various hours during the Festival: 1 September – 5 September 2010

Skills/qualifications required for this job:
 Punctual and reliable.
 Easily contacted – pager or mobile phone.
 Good oral communication skills and pleasant manner.
 Ability to respond independently and promptly to enquiries and issues that arise.
 Ability to work within a team environment.
 (Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) Blue Card OR Police Card
  OR 100 points of ID.
 2 referees

Characteristics required of volunteer:
 Enthusiastic
 Confident
 Patient
 Team player
 Enjoys interacting with the public

Skills/benefits to be gained by doing this job:
 Networking in arts industry.
 May be required to assisting one-on-one with artists.
 Access to events when not on duty (subject to availability)
 Certificate of Participation.
 T-shirt

Job training:
 BWF induction and training is mandatory.
      Artist Liaison, Mantra – South Bank

Responsible to: Volunteers Co-ordinator / Program Manager


Tasks:
 Respond to enquiries from participants about the Brisbane Writers Festival, the program, the
  State Library of Queensland, etc.
 Offer assistance to the artist if requested vis-à-vis places to go, things to do and see,
  transport, etc.
 Act as initial point of contact for the artist should difficulties arise during their stay in Brisbane
  and know who to contact from the Brisbane Writers Festival team.
 Some writers will require additional advice from their liaison person about offsite sessions.
 Acquire a sound knowledge of the Festival program, participating writers, and venues.
 Maintain the Information Booth at Mantra, South Bank.
 Offer information to the passing General Public as required.

Times and days the job is available:
 Various hours during the Festival: 1 September – 5 September 2010

 Skills/qualifications required for this job:
 Knowledge about the entire program.
 Knowledge about the Brisbane Writers Festival as an organisation.
 Punctual and reliable.
 Easily contacted – pager or mobile phone.
 Good oral communication skills.
 Pleasant manner.
 Ability to respond independently and promptly to enquiries and issues that arise.
 Ability to work within a team environment.
 (Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) Blue Card OR Police Card
  OR 100 points of ID.
 2 referees

Characteristics required of volunteer:
 Enthusiastic
 Confident
 Patient
 Responsible
 Team player
 Wide knowledge base of the Brisbane Writers Festival.

Skills/benefits to be gained by doing this job:
 Networking in arts industry.
 Access to events when not on duty (subject to availability)
 Certificate of Participation.
 One-on-one time with artists.
 T-shirt

Job training:
 BWF induction and training is mandatory.
     Administration / IT Assistant

Responsible to: Volunteers Co-ordinator / Administration Coordinator/Program Manager


Tasks:
 Assist the Festival staff in the preparation of documents and dissemination of information.
 Respond to enquiries from the public and Festival guests.
 Manage incoming telephone calls.
 Preparing Postage, handling mail outs
 Data entry
 Manage and complete project related work
 Proofreading
 Acquire a sound knowledge of the Festival program, participating writers, and venues.
 Other duties as directed by Festival staff.

Times and days the job is available:
 Pre-Festival: June – October, hours are flexible
 Various hours during the Festival: 1 September – 5 September 2010

Skills/qualifications required for this job:
 Good oral and written communication skills.
 Previous experience in an office environment and in customer service.
 Ability to respond independently and promptly to enquiries and issues that arise.
 Basic knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel.
 Ability to co-ordinate multiple tasks, prioritise time, and work within deadlines.
 Ability to adapt to working individually and within a team environment.
 (Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) Blue Card OR Police Card
  OR 100 points of ID.
 2 referees

Characteristics required of volunteer:
 Proactive
 Enthusiastic
 Team player

Skills/benefits to be gained by doing this job:
 Networking in arts industry.
 Knowledge of the administration and organisation of an international event.
 Organisational and time management skills.
 Access to events when not on duty (subject to availability)
 Certificate of Participation.
 T-shirt

Job training:
 BWF induction and training is mandatory.
     Marketing Assistant

Responsible to: Chief Operating Officer / Marketing Manager


Tasks:
 Work with Marketing Manager and BWF staff to design and distribute Festival survey
 Under direction of Marketing Manager, write copy for various targeted marketing avenues
 Undertake market research activities including compiling and updating contact lists
 Maintain and provide content for social media outlets.
 Assist with administrative tasks such as correspondence.
 Acquire a sound knowledge of the Festival program, participating writers, and venues.
 Other duties as directed by the General Manager and Artistic Director.

Times and days the job is available:
 Pre-Festival: July – September, hours are flexible, approximately one day per week (plus
  some out-of-office preparation)
 Various hours during the Festival: 1 September – 5 September 2010

Skills/qualifications required for this job:
 An interest in and commitment to gaining marketing experience in the arts sector
 Strong ability to write engaging copy for varied audiences
 Strong oral communication skills (including telephone manner)
 Strong organisational and interpersonal skills.
 Good administration and record keeping skills.
 Ability to respond independently and promptly to enquiries and issues that arise.
 Basic knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel.
 Ability to coordinate multiple tasks, prioritise time, and work within deadlines.
 Ability to adapt to working individually and within a team environment.
 (Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) Blue Card OR Police Card
  OR 100 points of ID.
 2 referees.

Characteristics required of volunteer:
 Proactive
 Enthusiastic
 Team player

Skills/benefits to be gained by doing this job:
 Networking in arts industry,
 Knowledge of the administration and organisation of an international event,
 Access to events when not on duty (subject to availability)
 Certificate of Participation,
 T-shirt

Job training:
 BWF induction and training is mandatory.
     Photography Assistant

Responsible to: Marketing Manager / Festival Director /COO/ Volunteers Coordinator


Tasks:
 To generate images which may be used in general marketing for subsequent Festivals.
 To record high quality video footage of festival events and functions
 To edit footage and photographs as required
 To prepare venues for photo shoots and recordings
 To supply copies of recordings in a timely manner
 To upload images into the BWF website or other sites as arranged with Festival
  Director/CEO /Photographer / COO/ Marketing Manager
 Other duties as directed by Festival staff and Volunteers Co-ordinator.

Times and days the job is available:
 Various hours, 23 August – 10 September 2010

Skills/qualifications required for this job:
 Sound knowledge of photography and production
 Sound knowledge of video recording and editing and production
 Previous or current study in Production/Film and Television/Multimedia/ Creative Industries
  would be highly regarded
 Excellent Time management skills
 Ability to respond independently and promptly to issues that arise.
 Good oral communication skills.
 Team player.
 Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) Blue Card OR Police Card
  OR 100 points of ID.
 2 referees.

Characteristics required of volunteer:
 Enthusiastic
 Responsible
 Proactive
 Confident
 Creative
 Team player

Skills/benefits to be gained by doing this job:
 Opportunity to use skills in a live event.
 Opportunity to create and document Queensland premier Literary event
 Recording (not editing) equipment is available.
 Networking in arts industry.
 Opportunity to gain experience with a large scale arts festival.
 Access to events when not on duty (subject to availability)
 Certificate of Participation.
 T-shirt

Job training:
 BWF induction and training is mandatory.
    Development Assistant

Responsible to: Development Manager

Tasks:
 Maintain and update partnership schedule.
 Acquire a sound knowledge of the Festival program, writers, and venues.
 Assist with contacting sponsors to confirm availability of materials and co-ordinate delivery of
  materials and banners.
 Co-ordinate with Venue Managers in the distribution of sponsor materials and the installation
  of banners.
 Co-ordinate with Information Booth Attendants regarding supply of sponsor materials.
 Assist with arranging for the return/pick up of banners.
 Assist with administrative tasks, for example, record keeping and inventory of the materials
  and banners.
 Respond to enquiries from the public and Festival guests.
 Other duties as directed by the Development Manager.

Times and days the job is available:
 Pre-Festival: mid July – 30 September, one to two days per week, hours are flexible
 Various hours during the Festival: 1 September – 5 September 2010

Skills/qualifications required for this job:
 Good oral and written communication skills.
 Strong organisational and interpersonal skills, including good administration and record
  keeping skills.
 Experience in marketing would be desirable.
 Ability to respond independently and promptly to enquiries and issues that arise.
 Basic knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel.
 Ability to coordinate multiple tasks, prioritise time, and work within deadlines.
 Ability to adapt to working individually and within a team environment.
 Physically fit and able to manage banners and promotional materials.
 (Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) Blue Card OR Police Card
  OR 100 points of ID.
 2 referees.

Characteristics required of volunteer:
 Proactive
 Enthusiastic
 Team player
 Organised
 Flexible
 Accurate

Skills/benefits to be gained by doing this job:
 Networking in arts industry.
 Knowledge of the administration and organisation of an international event.
 Access to events when not on duty (subject to availability)
 Certificate of Participation.
 T-shirt.

Job training:
 BWF induction and training is mandatory.
      Information Booth Attendant

Responsible to: Volunteers Co-ordinator / FOH


Tasks:
 Respond to enquiries from Festival guests and the public.
 Acquire a sound knowledge of the Festival program, participating writers, and venues.
 Proactively distribute information displayed at the Information Booth.
 Be proactive in assisting guests and in situations requiring problem solving.
 Greet Festival guests arriving as groups.
 Give directional assistance to venues and off site events.
 Other duties as directed by the Technical Manager, Volunteers Co-ordinator and Festival
  staff.

Times and days the job is available:
 Various hours during the Festival: 1 September – 5 September 2010

Skills/qualifications required for this job:
 Good oral communication skills.
 Experience in dealing with the public.
 Ability to respond independently and promptly to enquiries.
 Team player.
 (Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) Blue Card OR Police Card
  OR 100 points of ID.
 2 referees.

Characteristics required of volunteer:
 Confident
 Patient
 Team player
 Willing to be adaptable if reassigned to another task
 Proactive
 Problem solve
 Good listener

Skills/benefits to be gained by doing this job:
 Networking in arts industry.
 Access to events when not on duty (subject to availability)
 Certificate of Participation.
 T-shirt.

Job training:
 BWF induction and training is mandatory.

Additional Notes:
Information Booth Attendants and Directional Assistants may be asked to help conduct surveys
to gather accurate market information during the Festival period in September.
     Book Signing Assistant

Responsible to: Volunteers Co-ordinator


Tasks:
 Co-ordinate members of the public who are waiting to have books signed.
 Ensure the writers are comfortable- water, pens and chairs available
 Prepare tables
 Monitor the signing queues.
 Erect authors signs on the tables – ensure spelling accurate
 Respond to enquiries from both writers and public.
 Other duties as directed by Festival staff.

Times and days the job is available:
 Various hours during the Festival: 1 September – 5 September 2010

Skills/qualifications required for this job:
 Good oral communication skills.
 Ability to respond independently and promptly to enquiries.
 Team player.
 (Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) Blue Card OR Police Card
  OR 100 points of ID.
 2 referees.

Characteristics required of volunteer:
 Confident
 Patient
 Team player
 Willing to be adaptable if reassigned to another task
 Proactive
 Problem solver
 Good listener

Skills/benefits to be gained by doing this job:
 Networking in arts industry.
 Access to events when not on duty (subject to availability)
 Certificate of Participation.
 T-shirt

Job training:
 BWF induction and training is mandatory.


Additional Notes:
Book Signing Attendants may be asked to help conduct surveys to gather accurate market
information during the Festival period in September.
    Volunteers
       Policy & Procedure


         1. Purpose
Volunteers are an integral part of the production and delivery of the Festival. The Brisbane
Writers Festival is committed to developing and maintaining a volunteer program , which is
mutually rewarding, effective and efficient.


         2. Objectives
In formulating this policy, the BWF seeks to fulfil the following objectives:
       To attract and retain an adequate number of appropriate volunteers.
       To achieve an appropriate environment for the undertaking of an effective and efficient
        volunteer program.
       To provide a mutually rewarding experience for both volunteers and festival staff.


         3. The Selection and Recruitment Process
The BWF Volunteer team allows for the high level delivery of a comprehensive program of event
annually. Volunteers are recruited from around Queensland via a variety of sources including,
but not limited to:
                  Previous Festival volunteers
                  Volunteering Queensland
                  Seek Volunteer and Go Volunteer websites
                  Local University lecturers
                  Student Notice boards, union websites and newspapers
                  Arts Hub
                  Newsletters of other organisations including QPAC

All recruits are required to undergo an interview with the Volunteer Coordinator (or other
suitable person).

As part of our risk management and HR procedures volunteers are required to provide 100
points of ID. This can be in the form of Blue Cards previously issued through BWF. Drivers
Licence and other documentation will be copied as a record of documentation produced.
Verification of identity is a requirement of a position with the BWF.

The BWF will endeavour to ensure that each and every volunteer is placed in a position where
they are able to utilise their existing skills and build upon these skills.

         4. Guidelines

          4.1 Legal responsibilities

BWF has legal obligations to ensure the safety of its volunteers.
        Actions:
              BWF will ensure that volunteers are covered by adequate volunteer insurance, in
               the BWF office at the Merivale Street Studio and at all festival venues.
              BWF will ensure its public indemnity cover is adequate (minimum $10m).
                  BWF will ensure that its occupational health and safety responsibilities are
                   met.

Volunteers have legal rights and obligations.
       Actions:
              BWF will ensure that volunteers are informed of their legal rights and obligations
               through an induction package and at a briefing.
              BWF will ensure that all volunteers sign a volunteer and confidentiality
               agreement. BWF will ensure that volunteers are aware that they have no
               authority to communicate with persons from the media or post on any website in
               a formal or informal capacity on behalf of the BWF regarding any policy or matter
               concerning the BWF.
              BWF will ensure that all volunteers are given a copy of all policies and
               declarations that impact upon their role as a part of the BWF Volunteer
               Handbook


          4.2 Financial responsibilities
The BWF has a duty to ensure that volunteers are clear about their financial rights and
responsibilities.
       Actions:
                  BWF will ensure that volunteers are fully aware that they have no authority to
               make financial arrangements on behalf of the BWF and that such arrangements,
               if made without prior authority from the Chief Operating Officer, will not be
               honoured.
                  BWF will provide clear reimbursement guidelines for volunteers.
                  Volunteers will be made aware of their financial responsibilities through an
               induction package and at a briefing meeting


       4.3 Human Resource Management
BWF must ensure that appropriate volunteers are recruited, placed and trained.
       Actions:
      BWF will provide a comprehensive job description for volunteers.


          4.4 Marketing

Volunteers for the BWF are part of the public profile of the festival and, as such, are a vital part
of the marketing image.
       Actions:
      BWF will ensure that volunteers are in full command of the information they need to
       satisfactorily fulfil their role as BWF ambassadors.
      BWF will induct volunteers so that they are aware of the importance of their role in
       promoting the festival through courtesy and informed advice.
      BWF will provide volunteers with suitable promotional material to maximise marketing of
       the festival (e.g. word of mouth marketing).
      Volunteers will ensure that they are dressed and presented appropriately, whenever they
       are representing the Festival.



Revised March 2010
    Employee Code of Conduct
       Policy

         1. Purpose
This Code of Conduct has been developed for the Brisbane Writers Festival Assn Inc (BWF)
and applies to all officers employed at the Festival. This code covers all officers of the
organisation, including voluntary workers insofar as they use public resources or have access to
official information.


         2. Objectives
The policy aims to inform the activities of BWF staff in ethics and decision-making. Ethics form
part of the values and beliefs that are brought into play when making decisions and are not just
about distinguishing right from wrong. Often these values or beliefs are not consciously held,
but they influence all the choices and decisions we make on a daily basis nonetheless.

         3. Guidelines

BWF Employees are expected to:
       Base decisions and other actions on thorough and dispassionate analysis
       Exercise powers and distribute resources to the sole advantage of agency goals and
        beneficiaries
       Safeguard official information and not disclose or use it improperly
       Declare private interests where they might present a conflict of interests with employees‟
        public duties
       Refrain from seeking gifts and benefits for personal or private gain in connection with the
        performance of official duties
       Avoid concurrent outside employment or post-separation employment if it involves or is
        perceived to involve conflict of interests
       Respect the rights of the owners of intellectual property and copyright


            3.1 Conflicts of interests
Conflict of interests is the most significant issue of integrity facing most employees. This section
will deal with conflicts of interests in general. The following sections will deal with specific
conflicts of interests such as gifts and benefits, and declaring and registering personal interests.

A conflict of interests arises in situations where staff members have a private or personal
interest sufficient to influence the independent exercise of their official duties. Conflicts of
interests that are criminal offences include:
       Bribery – the acceptance of money by an official for special favours
       Influence peddling – attempts by an official to influence decisions in favour of a third
        party in order to secure personal gain
       Improper use of official information – provision of inside information for personal
        advantage;
       Insiders trading with official financial transactions – where officials may stand to make
        personal gain if they make certain decisions.
      Gifts and entertainment – seeking or accepting gifts which may influence impartially;
      Outside employment – part-time employment or consulting outside of official duties
       which may have an adverse impact on the performance of those duties;
      Future employment – the giving of favourable treatment to private organisations which
       may be future sources of employment; and
      Relatives and friends – using an official position to do favours for relatives and friends


          3.2 Dealing with conflicts of interests
Immediately on becoming aware that a conflict between private interest and official duty,
whether real or apparent, has arisen or is likely to arise, staff are required to approach their
manager and explain the potential conflict and the reasons for that conflict. If at any time staff
are unsure whether a conflict of interests exists, they are to discuss the issue with their
manager.


            3.3 Gifts, benefits and hospitality
BWF staff shall not ask for or encourage the offer of any gift or benefit in connection with the
performance of their official duties. Nor should BWF employees accept any form of benefit or
gift in connection with the performance of their official duties, except where:
      The gift or benefit is of token or nominal value only (generally with a market value not
       exceeding $100); or
      The gift is offered when the employee retires or leaves the workplace, or on similar
       social occasions where a personal gift of nominal value is customary; or
      The gift or benefit is to be treated as a reportable gift and retained by the Festival.
      Gifts and benefits that are received are classified as either Retainable or Reportable.


          3.4 Disclosure of official information
In any event, official information should not be treated carelessly or left in circumstances where
unauthorised persons may inadvertently gain access to it. All official information should be
appropriately stored and access regulated to those persons requiring it for legitimate purposes.

Staff are to be sensitive to the needs of the public, the news media, and elected
representatives, for access to information on BWF and other publicly available information.
Requests for information that is already in the public domain are to be dealt with and provided
promptly.

Volunteers are not to discuss any aspect of the organisation, program or artists with any
member of the media, make posts on internet forums or blogs, or in any way publicise the
festival without the written permission of either the Chief Operating Officer or the Festival
Director/CEO.




          3.5 Diligence
You are required to exercise due diligence, care and attention, and shall seek at all times to
achieve high standards of performance in relation to the duties and responsibilities of your
official position.


         3.6 Use of alcohol and drugs
You should not:

      At any time, allow the consumption of alcohol or other drugs adversely to affect staff
       work performance or official conduct; or
      Consume alcohol while on duty except where related to official duties and subject to the
       Festival Director/CEO‟s approval and conditions.


          3.7 Ethics obligation 5: Economy and efficiency
All employees are required to:
      Use or manage both human and material resources efficiently and effectively;
      Seek to optimise program outcomes;
      Conserve and safeguard public assets;
      Implement corruption prevention strategies;
      Budget honestly;
      Not misuse agency equipment or vehicles; and
      Respect the environment.


          3.8 Authority to approve expenditure

Expenditure must be validated and authorised by an independent person with a delegated
authority to approve expenditure. In most cases, this will be the employee‟s supervisor.

The guiding principle for a delegate to consider when approving expenditure is that the
expenditure must be:
      For official purposes;
      Properly documented; and
      Reasonable.

In all instances, the expenditure must be publicly defensible through the maintenance and
retention of adequate declarations and documentation.


           3.9 Home and community use of assets
The home use of assets shall only be approved in cases where the asset is required to be used
for official purposes. Assets are not to be made available for private, non-official purposes and
are to be used with due care and diligence and returned to the workplace in good order upon
the expiration of the approval.

Revised March 2010
    General Work Guidelines
The Brisbane Writers Festival wants to encourage a safe and pleasant work atmosphere. This
can only happen when everyone cooperates and agrees to suitable standards of conduct.

The following are acts that the organisation considers non-acceptable. Any employee found
engaging in these will be subject to disciplinary actions including reprimand, warning,
suspension, or dismissal:
      Wilfully damaging, destroying, or stealing property belonging to fellow employees or the
       company
      Fighting or engaging in horseplay or disorderly conduct
      Refusing or failing to carry out any reasonable instruction of a supervisor
      Ignoring work duties or wasting time during work hours
      Coming to work under the influence of alcohol or any drug, or bringing drugs onto
       company property
      Intentionally giving any false or misleading information to obtain a leave of absence
      Using threatening or abusive language toward a fellow employee
      Smoking contrary to established policy or violating any other fire protection regulation
      Wilfully or habitually violating health and safety regulations
      Failing to wear clothing conforming to standards set by the company
      Being late, leaving early or taking unexcused absences from work
      Not taking proper care or, neglecting, or abusing company equipment
      Using company equipment in an unauthorised manner
      Possessing firearms or weapons of any kind on company property



Revised March 2010
    Anti-Discrimination
      Policy and Procedure

         1. Purpose
The Brisbane Writers Festival (BWF) is a professional business operation and expects its
employees to treat the public, hirers and work colleagues in a manner befitting such an
organisation.

To facilitate this, the BWF has endeavored to establish a working environment free from
discrimination of any sort. Discrimination is unlawful and as such has no place at the BWF
where equal opportunity for all employees is an objective.

Any form of discrimination will not be tolerated in the workplace. This requires the co-operation
of all staff.

         2. Scope
All employees and the public have a right to be treated fairly and to work and participate in an
environment free of discrimination. This policy and guideline applies to all employees of the
BWF and is extended to include interaction with members of the public.

         3. Definitions

            3.1 What is discrimination?
In general terms, discrimination is any practice that makes distinctions between individuals or
groups to disadvantage some and advantage others.
The Act establishes certain areas of life in which discrimination is prohibited, as well as detailing
the attributes based on which discrimination is prohibited.
To decide whether discrimination has occurred involves a comparison between how the person
has been treated, and how another person without that "attribute" or with a different attribute is
treated.

The Act says it is against the law to discriminate against a person because of their:
    Sex
    Relationship or parental status
    Race
    Religious belief or activity
    Political belief or activity
    Impairment
    Trade union activity
    Lawful sexual activity
    Pregnancy
    Breastfeeding needs
    Family responsibilities
    Gender identity
    Sexuality
    Age

It is also unlawful to discriminate against a person because they are linked to someone from
one of these groups.
          3.2 What is not illegal discrimination?
Exceptions, or exemptions, are allowed in some cases. In many of these cases, it is just
common sense. For example, it is lawful to set aside parking spaces for people with an
impairment, or to take some actions to help „level the playing field‟, such as allowing only
Indigenous people to apply for certain jobs.

         4. Procedure

          4.1 Responsibilities
            4.1.1 Management
      Ensure they are conversant with the Brisbane Writers Festival's policy on anti-
       discrimination.
      Model the type of behaviour expected from staff in the work area.
      Monitor the work environment and ensure that workplace behaviour conforms to
       prescribed standards.
      Promote the benefits of a workplace free of discrimination.
      Ensure any complaints of discrimination are treated seriously and confidentially.
      Ensure complainants are not victimised.
      Investigate discrimination complaints.

            4.1.2 Contact Officers
The role of Contact Officers shall be in addition to their normal position within the BWF.

Contact Officer responsibilities include:
    Ensure they are conversant with the Brisbane Writers Festival‟s policy on discrimination.
    Assist in providing support for employees subjected to discrimination.
    Being available to listen and provide advice regarding options available and the usual
      steps taken in pursuing a complaint.
    Facilitate the informal resolution of complaints.
    Act as an advisory resource to management on general issues associated with
      discrimination.
    Keep confidential the details of any complaints and content of any advice given.

Employees with concerns regarding discrimination should contact any of the following:
     Festival Director/CEO
     Chief Operating Officer
     Volunteer Coordinator
     Human Resources Representative from the Management Committee

             4.1.3 Employees
All employees are responsible and accountable for their own behaviour and have a
responsibility to prevent and resolve any incidents of discrimination.


          4.2 Sources of Advice
The following contacts have particular responsibility and may be approached by complainants
on discrimination incidents for advice, guidance or support:
     Any of the staff listed above
     The Anti Discrimination Commission
     The Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission


          4.3 Complaints Process
There are two processes for resolving complaints of discrimination:
            Informal; and
            Formal.

It is usually preferable for all parties if the issue can be managed informally, locally and
internally. If it is resolved quickly, stress may be reduced and normal workplace relationships
are more likely to be able to be resumed. However, it is the individual's right to choose a course
of action and that choice must always be respected.

Informal complaints and problem solving
The use of informal measures to resolve discrimination promotes a range of benefits including:
                 The least disruption with the individuals concerned continuing to work
      together;
                 Allowing the individuals concerned to take positive action themselves to
      resolve the situation;
                 A focus on improving future working relationships by clarifying what is
      regarded as acceptable behaviour for all staff; and
                 A safeguard against escalation of the matter.

The informal process may be taken on the initiative of the employee or following discussions
with the Chief Operating Officer. Responsibility and control is, however, taken by the individual.

Options are:
       a. Taking no action
       This is an option; however, unless a person is told his/her behaviour is offensive, he/she
       will probably assume that there are no objections and continues such behaviour and
       harassment.
       b. Dealing with the matter individually
       This option is appropriate where the complainant has not previously told the alleged
       harasser that the behaviour is offensive. In this instance, the person harassed should
       approach the alleged harasser, indicate immediately and directly that the behaviour is
       objectionable, and ask that it stop.

The following Assertiveness Word Map is a useful tool for the person being discriminated
against to use to effectively express their feelings to the alleged harasser.

Assertiveness Word Map
"When you..... (Name the specific behaviour)... it makes me feel ... (describe how you feel)...
and I find your behaviour offensive. Please do not do it again."

Another strategy that can be utilised if the aggrieved person does not want to tell the other
person face-to-face is to write a confidential letter asking that the person stop, framed in the
same way as above.

Formal complaints and problem solving
Formal mechanisms may be appropriate where informal measures fail or the nature of the
situation requires a more formal approach.

Options are:
       a. Grievance Procedure
       The Grievance Procedure in place at the BWF details how a grievance can be lodged.
       For more information on the grievance procedure refer to the Grievance Policy, which
       can be found in the policies section of the BWF Employee Handbook.
       All parties involved shall maintain confidentiality of information.

       b. Anti-Discrimination Commission
       Employees may lodge a complaint of discrimination with the Anti-Discrimination
       Commission. The Anti-Discrimination Commission process is for confidential conciliation
       through to judicial hearing if this becomes necessary.


         4.4 Investigation Process
The investigation of a complaint is the responsibility of the Chief Operating Director. The
complainant shall have input into the choice of investigator if so desired.
Confidentiality and impartiality are paramount with all dealings of a discrimination complaint, i.e.
do not prejudge the matter. Complaints must also be taken seriously and handled
sympathetically.

            4.4.1 Interview the complainant
The Chief Operating Officer would normally interview the complainant first to fully establish the
nature of the allegations being made.
The interview should be conducted in private, without interruptions. First a broad outline of the
grievance should be obtained, then a step-by-step account; two interviews may be necessary.
The information needed from the complainant is:
      Who was involved
      What specifically was said or done.
      How they reacted.
      The time and place of the incident/s.
      Witnesses, if any.
      Any previous incidents; if yes, what were the details.
      Whether the person whose behaviour is objected to has been asked to stop.
      What they would like to see happen.
Accurate notes should be taken using the complainant's own words where possible. Any
documentation associated with the complaint or investigation, such as written records of
interview, must be kept secure and confidential. Both the complainant and the investigator
should sign any notes to verify their accuracy.
The complainant's permission should be gained before proceeding further with the investigation
process.

            14.4.2 Interview the alleged perpetrator
Those allegations should then be put by the investigator to the person/s whose conduct has
been the subject of the complaint. This should be done separately and impartially. The alleged
perpetrator/s should be given the opportunity to put the other side of the story on record.
Often the person/s whose behaviour has caused offence will readily admit to the behaviour
when asked. In those situations it will not be necessary to interview any witnesses.
It is possible that some people who have discriminated against others may be unaware of the
effect of their behaviour. The problem presented for some investigators in these situations will
not be substantiating the fact that the behaviour took place, but rather explaining why that
behaviour is not appropriate in the workplace.
Sometimes people accused of discrimination will insist that there was no intention to upset
anybody. However, it must be understood that regardless of their intentions, their behaviour has
caused offence and so that type of behaviour is inappropriate in the workplace.

            4.4.3 Interviewing witnesses
In some instances the person whose alleged behaviour is the subject of a complaint will deny
behaving in that way. The person investigating the matter should then interview witnesses (if
any) to the behaviour.
The interviews of witnesses should be done in private and individually. The information required
is their direct observation of what took place (what they saw and/or heard). Witnesses should
also be asked to keep the matter confidential.

            4.4.4 No witnesses available
There is the possibility that the alleged behaviour will be denied and there will have been no
witnesses. The investigator will be placed in the position of having to decide whether
discrimination occurred when the only evidence available is one person's word against
another's. A great deal of care should be exercised in coming to a decision in circumstances
such as these.
However, the investigator may not be able to conclude that one party's testimony is more
plausible than the other's. In such cases the conduct cannot be substantiated and no action can
be taken.

          4.5 Outcomes of Investigation
            4.5.1 Where the complaint is substantiated
If the investigating officer concludes that the complaint is substantiated:
      Both parties are to be advised of the decision and the reasons for it (preferably privately
       and individually).
      A decision made on immediate and appropriate steps to prevent the behaviour from
       recurring.
      In conjunction with the Human Resources Representative, consider what disciplinary
       action (if any), is appropriate for the harasser. Discipline may involve a warning,
       counseling or dismissal, depending on the circumstances.
      Follow up at a later date to ensure that the behaviour has, in fact, stopped and that the
       solution is working satisfactorily.
It is crucial that the complainant or witnesses are not victimised or disadvantaged in any way as
a result of a complaint. If this happens, then either the issue of discrimination will not surface or
complainants will be forced to seek redress externally, e.g. through the Anti-discrimination
Commission.

            4.5.2 Outcomes where the complaint is not substantiated
      Advise both the complainant and the alleged harasser (privately and individually) of the
       outcome and that no specific action will be taken in respect of the alleged conduct.
      Reaffirm the standards of behaviour that are required in the workplace.
      Advise the complainant of his/her right to take the case to the Anti-discrimination
       Commission if he/she is not satisfied.
      Retain records of the investigation in case there is a need to refer to them at a later date.

          4.6 Other Matters
            4.6.1 Disciplinary Action
The Brisbane Writers Festival‟s Code of Conduct and Disciplinary Procedure support these
guidelines.

Criminal Offences
Where there could be a risk to the safety of others, such as where a possible criminal offence
has occurred (e.g. someone has been assaulted or perhaps physically threatened) a decision
will need to be made in regard to referring the matter to the police. In this instance, the Chief
Operating Officer & Human Resources Representative will take the following into consideration:
       The seriousness of the alleged offence
       The risk to the safety of others
       The wishes of the complainant

Records
Records should be kept of any formal complaint of discrimination. It is possible that one of the
parties may lodge a subsequent complaint with the Anti-Discrimination Commission, and
records should show that a thorough investigation was undertaken.             In the event of
discrimination not being substantiated or where no disciplinary action was considered
warranted, it would not be appropriate to keep written records on the personal file of the person
whose conduct led to the complaint. Rather, the records should be kept secure with access
limited to the Festival Director/CEO and Manager.



Revised March 2010




    Anti-Vilification
       Policy and Procedure

         1. Purpose
The Brisbane Writers Festival (BWF) is a professional business operation and expects its
employees to treat the public, hirers and work colleagues in a manner befitting such an
organisation.

To facilitate this, the BWF has endeavoured to establish a working environment free from
harassment, intimidation, discrimination and vilification. Vilification is a form of discrimination
and as such has no place at the BWF where equal opportunity for all employees is an objective.
Any form of discrimination will not be tolerated in the workplace. This requires the co-operation
of all staff.


         2. Scope
All employees and the public have a right to be treated fairly and to work and participate in an
environment free of vilification or the threat thereof. This policy and guideline applies to all
employees of the BWF and is extended to include interaction with members of the public.

         3. Definitions

            3.1 What is vilification?
Vilification is a public act of hatred, severe ridicule or serious contempt and focuses on race,
religion, sexuality or gender identity. Vilification is also covered under the Anti-Discrimination
Act. This is the sort of public behaviour, which incites people to hate others because of their
race, religion, sexuality or gender identity. The Act says this type of behaviour may be unlawful.
It is also a criminal offence to incite hatred of others by threatening physical harm towards a
person or their property.

This sort of hatred can be shown in a number of ways including through (but not limited to) hate
speech, graffiti, websites, and public abuse or media remarks. For it to be vilification, the
behaviour must:
     Happen in a public place; and
     Incite others to hatred, severe ridicule or serious contempt, because of your sexuality,
       gender identity, race or religion.

Examples in relation to sexuality might include:
    Websites inciting hatred of people who are gay or lesbian
    People encouraging others in the workplace to abuse people because of their sexuality
    Deriding people on the basis of their sexuality in public meetings.

Examples in relation to gender identity might include:
    Workers using the public address system to make denigrating comments about you
    Staff in the reception area of a business discussing you as a 'cross dressing freak' and
      encouraging members of the public to join in
    Co-workers asking you what sex you are today, publicly abusing you and urging other
      workers to also abuse you.

Examples in relation to race and religion might include:
    Racial or religious hate graffiti in public places, including churches or places of worship
    Public speeches that incite racial and religious hatred
    Public abuse that incites others to hate people because of their race or religion
    Remarks in the media that incite hatred of others because of their race or religion
    People wearing badges or clothing with slogans that incite hatred
    Internet sites with pictures or words that incite people to hate others
    Public gestures which incite others to hate people
    Posters or stickers in a public place that incite this hatred.

There is no onus on the person being harassed to say they find the conduct objectionable;
many people find it difficult to speak up.

Employees are responsible and accountable for their own behaviour.
            3.2 What is not vilification?
Vilification must happen in public for it to be vilification.

          4. Procedure

           4.1 Responsibilities
             4.1.1 Management
       Ensure they are conversant with the Brisbane Writers Festival‟s policy on vilification.
       Model the type of behaviour expected from staff in the work area.
       Monitor the work environment and ensure that workplace behaviour conforms to
        prescribed standards.
       Promote the benefits of a workplace free of harassment.
       Ensure any complaints of vilification are treated seriously and confidentially.
       Ensure complainants are not victimised.
       Investigate vilification complaints.

             4.1.2 Contact Officers
The role of Contact Officers shall be in addition to their normal position within the BWF.

Contact Officer responsibilities include:
    Ensure they are conversant with the Brisbane Writers Festival‟s policy on vilification.
    Assist in providing support for employees subjected to vilification.
    Being available to listen and provide advice regarding options available and the usual
      steps taken in pursuing a complaint.
    Facilitate the informal resolution of complaints.
    Act as an advisory resource to management on general issues associated with
      vilification. Keep confidential the details of any complaints and content of any advice
      given.

Employees with concern regarding vilification should contact any of the following:
      Festival Director/CEO
      Chief Operating Officer
      Volunteers Coordinator
      Human Resources Representative from the Management Committee

             4.1.3 Employees
All employees are responsible and accountable for their own behaviour and have a
responsibility to prevent and resolve any incidents of vilification.

             4.2 Sources of Advice
The following contacts have particular responsibility and may be approached by complainants
on vilification incidents for advice, guidance or support:
     Any of the staff listed above
     The Anti Discrimination Commission
     The Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission

          4.3 Complaints Process
There are two processes for resolving complaints of vilification:
    Informal; and
    Formal.
It is usually preferable for all parties if the issue can be managed informally, locally and
internally. If it is resolved quickly, stress may be reduced and normal workplace relationships
are more likely to be able to be resumed. However, it is the individual's right to choose a course
of action and that choice must always be respected.
Informal complaints and problem solving
The use of informal measures to resolve vilification complaints promotes a range of benefits
including:
                  The least disruption with the individuals concerned continuing to work
        together;
                  Allowing the individuals concerned to take positive action themselves to
        resolve the situation;
                  A focus on improving future working relationships by clarifying what is
        regarded as acceptable behaviour for all staff; and
                  A safeguard against escalation of the matter.

The informal process may be taken on the initiative of the employee or following discussions
with the Chief Operating Officer or a Contact Officer. Responsibility and control is, however,
taken by the individual.

Options are:
       a. Taking no action
       This is an option; however, unless a person is told his/her behaviour is offensive, he/she
       will probably assume that there are no objections and continues such behaviour and
       harassment.
       b. Dealing with the matter individually
       This option is appropriate where the complainant has not previously told the alleged
       harasser that the behaviour is offensive. In this instance, the person harass ed should
       approach the alleged harasser and indicate immediately and directly that the behaviour
       is objectionable and ask that it stop.

The following Assertiveness Word Map is a useful tool for the person harassed to use to
effectively express their feelings to the alleged harasser.

Assertiveness Word Map
"When you ........ (name the specific behaviour)....... it makes me feel ....... (describe how you
feel)....... and I find your behaviour offensive. Please do not do it again."

Another strategy that can be utilised if the aggrieved person does not want to tell the other
person face-to-face is to write a confidential letter asking that the person stop, framed in the
same way as above.

Formal complaints and problem solving
Formal mechanisms may be appropriate where informal measures fail or the nature of the
situation requires a more formal approach.

Options are:
       a. Grievance Procedure
The Grievance Procedure in place at the BWF details how a grievance can be lodged. For more
information on the grievance procedure refer to the Grievance Policy, which can be found in the
policies section of the BWF Employee Handbook.
       All parties involved shall maintain confidentiality of information. Investigation of a
       vilification grievance shall be in accordance with the provisions of this guideline under
       "Investigation Process".


       b. Anti-Discrimination Commission
       Employees may lodge a complaint of discrimination with the Anti-Discrimination
       Commission. The Anti-Discrimination Commission process is for confidential conciliation
       through to judicial hearing if this becomes necessary.


         4.4 Investigation Process
The investigation of a complaint is the responsibility of the Chief Operating Officer. The
complainant shall have input into the choice of investigator if so desired.

Confidentiality and impartiality are paramount with all dealings of a vilification complaint, i.e. do
not prejudge the matter. Complaints must also be taken seriously and handled sympathetically.

            4.4.1. Interview the complainant
The Chief Operating Officer would normally interview the complainant first to fully establish the
nature of the allegations being made.

The interview should be conducted in private, without interruptions. First a broad outline of the
grievance should be obtained, then a step-by-step account; two interviews may be necessary.
The information needed from the complainant is:
     Who was involved
     What specifically was said or done.
     How they reacted.
     The time and place of the incident/s.
     Witnesses, if any.
     Any previous incidents; if yes, what were the details.
     Whether the person whose behaviour is objected to has been asked to stop.
     What they would like to see happen.

Accurate notes should be taken using the complainant's own words where possible. Any
documentation associated with the complaint or investigation, such as written records of
interview, must be kept secure and confidential. Both the complainant and the investigator
should sign any notes to verify their accuracy.

The complainant's permission should be gained before proceeding further with the investigation
process.

            4.4.2 Interview the alleged harasser
Those allegations should then be put by the investigator to the person/s whose conduct has
been the subject of the complaint. This should be done separately and impartially. The alleged
harasser/s should be given the opportunity to put the other side of the story on record.

Often the person/s whose behaviour has caused offence will readily admit to the behaviour
when asked. In those situations it will not be necessary to interview any witnesses.

It is possible that some people who have vilified others may be unaware of the effect of their
behaviour. The problem presented for some investigators in these situations will not be
substantiating the fact that the behaviour took place, but rather explaining why that behaviour is
not appropriate in the workplace.
Sometimes people accused of vilification will insist that there was no intention to upset anybody.
However, it must be understood that regardless of their intentions, their behaviour has caused
offence and so that type of behaviour is inappropriate in the workplace.

             4.4.3 Interviewing witnesses
In some instances the person whose alleged behaviour is the subject of a complaint will deny
behaving in that way. The person investigating the matter should then interview witnesses (if
any) to the behaviour.

The interviews of witnesses should be done in private and individually. The information required
is their direct observation of what took place (what they saw and/or heard). Witnesses should
also be asked to keep the matter confidential.

            4.4.4 No witnesses available
There is the possibility that the alleged behaviour will be denied and there will have been no
witnesses. The investigator will be placed in the position of having to decide whether vilification
occurred when the only evidence available is one person's word against another's. A great deal
of care should be exercised in coming to a decision in circumstances such as these.

However, the investigator may not be able to conclude that one party's testimony is more
plausible than the other's. In such cases the conduct cannot be substantiated and no action can
be taken.


          4.5 Outcomes of Investigation
            4.5.1 Where the complaint is substantiated
If the Chief Operating Officer concludes that the complaint is substantiated:
      Both parties are to be advised of the decision and the reasons for it (preferably privately
        and individually).
      A decision made on immediate and appropriate steps to prevent the behaviour from
        recurring.
      In conjunction with the Human Resources Representative, consider what disciplinary
        action (if any), is appropriate for the harasser. This should be based on the Brisbane
        Writers Festival‟s Code of Conduct and Disciplinary Procedure. Discipline may involve a
        warning, counseling or dismissal, depending on the circumstances.
      Follow up at a later date to ensure that the behaviour has, in fact, stopped and that the
        solution is working satisfactorily.

It is crucial that the complainant or witnesses are not victimised or disadvantaged in any way as
a result of a complaint. If this happens, then either the issue of vilification will not surface or
complainants will be forced to seek redress externally, e.g. through the Anti-discrimination
Commission.

            4.5.2 Outcomes where the complaint is not substantiated
      Advise both the complainant and the alleged harasser (privately and individually) of the
       outcome and that no specific action will be taken in respect of the alleged conduct.
      Reaffirm the standards of behaviour that are required in the workplace.
      Advise the complainant of his/her right to take the case to the Anti-discrimination
       Commission if he/she is not satisfied.
      Retain records of the investigation in case there is a need to refer to them at a later date.


          4.6 Other Matters
           4.6.1 Disciplinary Action
The Brisbane Writers Festival‟s Code of Conduct and Disciplinary Procedure support these
guidelines.

Criminal Offences
Where there could be a risk to the safety of others, such as where a possible criminal offence
has occurred (e.g. someone has been assaulted or perhaps physically threatened) a decision
will need to be made in regard to referring the matter to the police. In this instance, the Chief
Operating Officer & HR Representative will take the following into consideration:
      The seriousness of the alleged offence
      The risk to the safety of others
      The wishes of the complainant

Records
Records should be kept of any formal complaint of vilification. It is possible that one of the
parties may lodge a subsequent complaint with the Anti-Discrimination Commission, and
records should show that a thorough investigation was undertaken. In the event of vilification
not being substantiated or where no disciplinary action was considered warranted, it would not
be appropriate to keep written records on the personal file of the person whose conduct led to
the complaint. Rather, the records should be kept secure with access limited to the Festival
Director/CEO & the Chief Operating Officer.



Revised March 2010
     Patron Complaints
      Policy and Procedures

          1. Preamble

The Brisbane Writers Festival system for processing and resolving legitimate patron complaints
should:
    Ensure BWF staff and volunteers understand their responsibilities in handling
        complaints;
    Ensure complaints are resolved promptly, effectively and fairly;
    Be simple and easily understood, thus providing an accurate record of complaints and
        facilitating the pursuit of an appropriate course of action;
    Help resolve the complaint to the satisfaction of the patron as far as is reasonable, and
        mitigate any negative repercussions for the festival;
    Assist with making decisions to redress the dissatisfaction and prevent similar
        complaints in the future;
    Allow BWF management to learn from patron complaints; and
    Confirm BWF‟s commitment to quality services.

          2. Definition of “Legitimate Patron Complaint”

BWF considers that a legitimate patron complaint is any reasonable incident, action, or process
associated with the event that a patron highlights as having detracted from their experience or
enjoyment in some way.

          3. Complaint Procedure

Generally, the remedy of patron complaints is the responsibility of management. If you are a
volunteer in a non-managerial role (ushers, technical assistants etc.), the matter should be
referred to your venue manager.
For venue managers, these matters should wherever possible be resolved promptly by simply
providing appropriate advice. Where this is not possible, the volunteer should provide the
complainant with an explanation of the steps being taken to address the complaint.

In such a case, it is important that volunteers recognise where responsibility rests for handling
the complaint. While it is encouraged that straightforward complaints are resolved at the first
point of contact, it is extremely important that volunteers do not exceed their authority in forming
responses to public grievances. If there is any doubt whatsoever, further instruction should
immediately be sought from a relevant superior.

However, if the volunteer discerns that they have the authority, knowledge, or means to
responsibly deal with a patron complaint to the mutual satisfaction of both parties, the complaint
is to be dealt with accordingly, and acknowledged promptly in writing by completing a patron
complaint form. All completed patron complaint forms are to be delivered to the Green Room
for registration. Furthermore, a copy of any written complaint received is to be attached to the
corresponding patron complaint form, which follows.

In the event of injury, or damage to property, do not under any circumstances accept or
admit liability on the part of the Festival or any of its staff.
       Privacy Policy
The Brisbane Writers Festival collects, stores and uses:
       Employee personal information – this information is held for the purpose of ensuring
        correct human resource management functions can be carried out, which may include
        (but is not limited to) the payment of wages, contracts, recording of employee
        entitlements in relation to Award provisions and performance management issues. This
        information is also held and made available where necessary, under certain compulsory
        legislative requirements including areas such as Workers Compensation, Workplace
        Health and Safety, Australian Taxation Office orders and Social Security requests. The
        information is also for rostering of staff and administrative purposes. Access to this
        information is limited to management staff and QPAC payroll staff.
       Personal information on our members is also collected which includes name, address
        and phone number. In general terms, personal information provided by members is held
        for the purpose of maintaining various data assets relative to their collection. Any
        personal information associated with these databases is accessible only to management
        staff. These datasets can be used for mailing lists and market surveys and are only
        accessible by staff authorised to use the information


          Review Procedure

If you believe that personal information held about you by BWF has not been dealt with in
accordance with an Information Privacy Principle (IPP), you are entitled to make a complaint to
us seeking an internal review. A request for an internal review must be made in writing and must
be made within six months from the date when the breach was suspected to have occurred.

Requests should be forwarded to:
Chief Operating Officer
Brisbane Writers Festival
PO Box 3453
South Brisbane QLD 4101
info@brisbanewritersfestival.com.au

Requests for review will be acknowledged in writing within 14 days from the date on whic h the
application was received and we will process the request within 60 days from the date on which
the application was received. Applicants will be advised of the outcome.



Reviewed March 2009
    Sexual Harassment
       Policy and Procedure

         1. Purpose
The Brisbane Writers Festival (BWF) is a professional business operation and expects its
employees to treat the public, hirers and work colleagues in a manner befitting such an
organisation.

To facilitate this, the BWF has endeavoured to establish a working environment free from
hostility, offensiveness, intimidation and harassment. Sexual harassment is a form of sex
discrimination and as such has no place at the BWF where equal opportunity for all employees
is an objective.

Any form of discrimination will not be tolerated in the workplace. This requires the co-operation
of all staff.

         2. Scope
All employees and the public have a right to be treated fairly and to work and participate in an
environment free of sexual harassment. This policy and guideline applies to all employees of
the BWF and is extended to include interaction with members of the public.

         3. Definitions
What is sexual harassment?
Sexual harassment is a form of discrimination on the basis of sex. It involves physical or verbal
conduct of a sexist or sexual nature, which is uninvited, unwelcome, intimidating and/or
offensive.

It is a problem that interferes with workplace productivity and must be taken seriously. The key
to understanding sexual harassment is the word 'unwelcome'. The person who decides whether
behaviours are unwelcome is the person "on the receiving end". If the behaviour is unwelcome
and is sexually oriented, then it is sexual harassment. Examples of conduct, which could be
labeled sexual harassment, are:
       Physical contact - e.g. kissing or embracing someone against their will, patting, pinching,
        brushing against someone, touching, sexual assault and rape.
       Verbal comments - e.g. requests for sexual favours, suggestive comments about
        someone's appearance or body, persistently inviting someone out, questions about a
        person's private life, smutty jokes.
       Non-verbal actions - e.g. indecent exposure, leers, stares, displays of sexually explicit
        material, cartoons, pictures or posters with a sexual connotation, offensive body and
        hand movements, suggestive letters and drawings.

There is no onus on the person being harassed to say they find the conduct objectionable;
many people find it difficult to speak up.

What constitutes sexual harassment to one person may be acceptable and inoffensive to
another. Employees are responsible and accountable for their own behaviour.

What is not sexual harassment?
Sexual harassment has nothing to do with mutual attractions. Such friendships are a private
matter. However, all employees have a clear responsibility to ensure that appropriate standards
of behaviour are maintained in the workplace at all times.
Other types of harassment
These guidelines deal specifically with sexual harassment. Sexual harassment is not the only
type of harassment that can occur at work. There are ranges of behaviours that individuals will
consider harassment that may fall outside the definition of sexual harassment. Other types of
harassment include racial or religious harassment. Often one form of harassment will have more
than one dimension to it, e.g. racial and sexual harassment. All types of harassment are
unacceptable in the workplace and are of concern to everyone. These guidelines deal
specifically with sexual harassment but may be helpful as a point of first reference in dealing
with all forms of harassment in the workplace. BWF‟s policy on Workplace Harassment should
also be referred to in regard to all other forms of harassment in the workplace.

         4. Procedure

          4.1 Responsibilities
            4.1.1 Management
      Ensure they are conversant with the BWF's policy on sexual harassment.
      Model the type of behaviour expected from staff in the work area.
      Monitor the work environment and ensure that workplace behaviour conforms to
       prescribed standards.
      Promote the benefits of a workplace free of harassment.
      Ensure any complaints of sexual harassment are treated seriously and confidentially.
      Ensure complainants are not victimised.
      Investigate sexual harassment complaints.

            4.1.2 Contact Officers
The role of Contact Officers shall be in addition to their normal position within the BWF.

Contact Officer responsibilities include:
      Ensure they are conversant with the BWF's policy on sexual harassment.
      Assist in providing support for employees subjected to sexual harassment.
      Being available to listen and provide advice regarding options available and the usual
       steps taken in pursuing a complaint.
      Facilitate the informal resolution of complaints.
      Act as an advisory resource to management on general issues associated with sexual
       harassment.
      Keep confidential the details of any complaints and content of any advice given.
Employees with concerns regarding Sexual/Workplace Harassment should contact any
of the following:
       Festival Director/CEO
       Chief Operating Officer
       Volunteer Coordinator
       Human Resources Representative from the Management Committee

            4.1.3 Employees
All employees are responsible and accountable for their own behaviour and have a
responsibility to prevent and resolve any incidents of sexual harassment.

          4.2 Sources of Advice
The following contacts have particular responsibility and may be approached by complainants
on sexual harassment incidents for advice, guidance or support:
      Any of the staff listed above
      The Anti Discrimination Commission
      The Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission

          4.3 Complaints Process
There are two processes for resolving complaints of sexual harassment:
      Informal; and
      Formal.

It is usually preferable for all parties if the issue can be managed informally, locally and
internally. If it is resolved quickly, stress may be reduced and normal workplace relationships
are more likely to be able to be resumed. However, it is the individual's right to choose a course
of action and that choice must always be respected.

Informal complaints and problem solving
The use of informal measures to resolve sexual harassment promotes a range of benefits
including:
                  The least disruption with the individuals concerned continuing to work
       together;
                 Allowing the individuals concerned to take positive action themselves to
       resolve the situation;
                 A focus on improving future working relationships by clarifying what is
       regarded as acceptable behaviour for all staff; and
                 A safeguard against escalation of the matter.

The informal process may be taken on the initiative of the employee or following dis cussions
with the Chief Operating Officer. Responsibility and control is, however, taken by the individual.
Options are:
       a. Taking no action
       This is an option; however, unless a person is told his/her behaviour is offensive, he/she
       will probably assume that there are no objections and continues such behaviour and
       harassment.

       b. Dealing with the matter individually
       This option is appropriate where the complainant has not previously told the alleged
       harasser that the behaviour is offensive. In this instance, the person harassed should
       approach the alleged harasser and indicate immediately and directly that the behaviour
       is objectionable and ask that it stop.

The following Assertiveness Word Map is a useful tool for the person harassed to use to
effectively express their feelings to the alleged harasser.

Assertiveness Word Map
"When you ........ (Name the specific behaviour)....... it makes me feel....... (describe how you
feel)....... and I find your behaviour offensive. Please do not do it again."

Another strategy that can be utilised if the aggrieved person does not want to tell the other
person face-to-face is to write a confidential letter asking that the person stop, framed in the
same way as above.

Formal complaints and problem solving
Formal mechanisms may be appropriate where informal measures fail or the nature of the
situation requires a more formal approach.

Options are:
       a. Grievance Procedure
       The Grievance Procedure in place at the BWF details how a grievance can be lodged.
       For more information on the grievance procedure refer to the Grievance Policy, which
       can be found in the policies section of the BWF Employee Handbook.

       All parties involved shall maintain confidentiality of information. Investigation of a sexual
       harassment grievance shall be in accordance with the provisions of this guideline under
       "Investigation Process".

       b. Anti-Discrimination Commission
       Employees may lodge a complaint of discrimination with the Anti-Discrimination
       Commission. The Anti-Discrimination Commission process is for confidential conciliation
       through to judicial hearing if this becomes necessary.


         4.4 Investigation Process
The investigation of a complaint is the responsibility of the Chief Operating Officer. The
complainant shall have input into the choice of investigator if so desired.

Confidentiality and impartiality are paramount with all dealings of a sexual harassment
complaint, i.e. do not prejudge the matter. Complaints must also be taken seriously and handled
sympathetically.
            4.4.1 Interview the complainant
The Chief Operating Officer would normally interview the complainant first to fully establish the
nature of the allegations being made.

The interview should be conducted in private, without interruptions. First a broad outline of the
grievance should be obtained, then a step-by-step account; two interviews may be necessary.
The information needed from the complainant is:
      Who was involved
      What specifically was said or done
      How they reacted
      The time and place of the incident/s
      Witnesses, if any
      Any previous incidents; if yes, what were the details
      Whether the person whose behaviour is objected to has been asked to stop
      What they would like to see happen

Accurate notes should be taken using the complainant's own words where possible. Any
documentation associated with the complaint or investigation, such as written records of
interview, must be kept secure and confidential. Both the complainant and the investigator
should sign any notes to verify their accuracy.

The complainant's permission should be gained before proceeding further with the investigation
process.

            4.4.2 Interview the alleged harasser
Those allegations should then be put by the investigator to the person/s whose conduct has
been the subject of the complaint. This should be done separately and impartially. The alleged
harasser/s should be given the opportunity to put the other side of the story on record.

Often the person/s whose behaviour has caused offence will readily admit to the behaviour
when asked. In those situations it will not be necessary to interview any witnesses.

It is possible that some people who have sexually harassed others may be unaware of the
effect of their behaviour. The problem presented for some investigators in these situations will
not be substantiating the fact that the behaviour took place, but rather explaining why that
behaviour is not appropriate in the workplace.

The issue, however, is acceptable standards of behaviour in the workplace. Conduct with
sexual connotations is inappropriate at work, even if all involved are willing participants.

Sometimes people accused of harassment will insist that there was no intention to upset
anybody. However, it must be understood that regardless of their intentions, their behaviour has
caused offence and so that type of behaviour is inappropriate in the workplace.

            4.4.3 Interviewing witnesses
In some instances the person whose alleged behaviour is the subject of a complaint will deny
behaving in that way. The person investigating the matter should then interview witnesses (if
any) to the behaviour.

The interviews of witnesses should be done in private and individually. The information required
is their direct observation of what took place (what they saw and/or heard). Witnesses should
also be asked to keep the matter confidential.
            4.4.4 No witnesses available
There is the possibility that the alleged behaviour will be denied and there will have been no
witnesses. The investigator will be placed in the position of having to decide whether sexual
harassment occurred when the only evidence available is one person's word against another's.
A great deal of care should be exercised in coming to a decision in circumstances such as
these.

However, the investigator may not be able to conclude that one party's testimony is more
plausible than the other's. In such cases the conduct cannot be substantiated and no action can
be taken.


          4.5 Outcomes of Investigation
            4.5.1 Where the complaint is substantiated
If the investigating officer concludes that the complaint is substantiated:
      Both parties are to be advised of the decision and the reasons for it (preferably privately
       and individually).
      A decision made on immediate and appropriate steps to prevent the behaviour from
       recurring.
      In conjunction with the Human Resources Representative, consider what disciplinary
       action (if any), is appropriate for the harasser. This should be based on the BWF's Code
       of Conduct and Disciplinary Procedure. Discipline may involve a warning, counseling or
       dismissal, depending on the circumstances.
      Follow up at a later date to ensure that the behaviour has, in fact, stopped and that the
       solution is working satisfactorily.

It is crucial that the complainant or witnesses are not victimised or disadvantaged in any way as
a result of a complaint. If this happens, then either the issue of sexual harassment will not
surface or complainants will be forced to seek redress externally, e.g. through the Anti-
discrimination Commission.


            4.5.2 Outcomes where the complaint is not substantiated
      Advise both the complainant and the alleged harasser (privately and individually) of the
       outcome and that no specific action will be taken in respect of the alleged conduct.
      Reaffirm the standards of behaviour that are required in the workplace.
      Advise the complainant of his/her right to take the case to the Anti-discrimination
       Commission if he/she is not satisfied.
      Retain records of the investigation in case there is a need to refer to them at a later date.


          4.6 Other Matters
            4.6.1 Disciplinary Action
These guidelines are supported by the BWF's Code of Conduct and Disciplinary Procedure.

Criminal Offences
Where there could be a risk to the safety of others, such as where a possible criminal offence
has occurred (e.g. someone has been assaulted or perhaps physically threatened) a decision
will need to be made in regard to referring the matter to the police. In this instance, the Chief
Operating Officer & Human Resources Representative will take the following into consideration:
      The seriousness of the alleged offence
      The risk to the safety of others
       The wishes of the complainant

Records
Records should be kept of any formal complaint of sexual harassment. It is possible that one of
the parties may lodge a subsequent complaint with the Anti-Discrimination Commission, and
records should show that a thorough investigation was undertaken. In the event of sexual
harassment not being substantiated or where no disciplinary action was considered warranted,
it would not be appropriate to keep written records on the personal file of the person whose
conduct led to the complaint. Rather, the records should be kept secure with access limited to
the Festival Director/CEO and the Chief Operating Officer.




       Workplace Harassment Prevention
       Policy and Procedure

         1. Policy Statement
The Brisbane Writers Festival (BWF) is committed to ensuring a healthy and safe workplace
that is free from workplace harassment. Workplace harassment is unacceptable and will not be
tolerated under any circumstances.
         2. Definitions

          2.1 Definition of workplace harassment
(1) A person is subjected to workplace harassment if the person is subjected to repeated
behaviour, other than behaviour amounting to sexual harassment, by a person, including the
person‟s employer or a co-worker or group of co-workers of the person that –
   (a) Is unwelcome and unsolicited; and
   (b) The person considers to be offensive, intimidating, humiliating or threatening; and
   (c) A reasonable person would consider being offensive, humiliating, intimidating or
       threatening.

(2) Workplace harassment does not include reasonable management action taken in a
reasonable way by the person‟s employer in connection with the person‟s employment.

(3) In this section – sexual harassment see the Anti-Discrimination Act 1991, section
119.

Detailed below are examples of behaviours that may be regarded as workplace harassment, if
the behaviour is repeated or occurs as part of a pattern of behaviour. This is not an exhaustive
list – however, it does outline some of the more common types of harassing behaviours.
Examples include:
      Abusing a person loudly, usually when others are present;
      Repeated threats of dismissal or other severe punishment for no reason;
      Constant ridicule and being put down;
      Leaving offensive messages on email or the telephone;
      Sabotaging a person‟s work, for example, by deliberately withholding or supplying
         incorrect information, hiding documents or equipment, not passing on messages and
         getting a person into trouble in other ways;
      Maliciously excluding and isolating a person from workplace activities;
      Persistent and unjustified criticisms, often about petty, irrelevant or insignificant matters;
      Humiliating a person through gestures, sarcasm, criticism and insults, often in front of
         customers, management or other workers.
      Spreading gossip or false, malicious rumours about a person with an intent to cause the
         person harm.

           2.2 Actions that are not workplace harassment
Legitimate and reasonable management actions and business processes, such as, actions
taken to transfer, demote, discipline, redeploy, retrench or dismiss a worker are not considered
to be workplace harassment, provided these actions are conducted in a reasonable way.

          2.3 Workplace strategies to eliminate workplace harassment
BWF will endeavour to take the following actions to prevent and control exposure to the risk of
workplace harassment:
      Maintain a code of conduct for employees and officials to follow;
      Maintain a complaint handling system and inform all employees on how to make a
       complaint, the support systems available, options for resolving grievances and the
       appeals process;
      Regularly review the workplace harassment prevention policy, complaint handling
       system and training.

          2.4 Responsibilities of workers
BWF requires all workers to behave responsibly by complying with this policy, to not tolerate
unacceptable behaviour, to maintain privacy during investigations and to immediately report
incidents of workplace harassment to any of the following:
        Festival Director/CEO
        Chief Operating Officer
        Volunteer Coordinator

Managers and supervisors must also ensure that workers are not exposed to workplace
harassment. Management is required to personally demonstrate appropriate behaviour,
promote the workplace harassment prevention policy, treat complaints seriously and ensure
where a person lodges or is witness to a complaint, that this person is not victimized.



         3. Procedures

          3.1 Where workers can go for assistance
A worker who is being harassed can contact their immediate supervisor or any of the above with
regards to the management and resolution of a workplace harassment complaint.

           3.2 Commitment to promptly investigate complaints
BWF has a Grievance handling system that includes procedures for reporting, investigating,
resolving, and appealing workplace harassment complaints. Any reports of workplace
harassment will be treated seriously and investigated promptly, fairly and impartially. A person
making a complaint and/or who is a witness to workplace harassment will not be victimised.

           3.3 Consequences of breach of policy
Disciplinary action will be taken against a person who harasses a worker or who victimises a
person who has made or is a witness to a complaint. Complaints of alleged workplace
harassment found to be malicious, frivolous or vexatious might make the complainant liable for
disciplinary action.




       Workplace Health and Safety
       Corporate Policy

         1. Purpose
Brisbane Writers Festival (BWF) supports the objectives of the Workplace Health and Safety Act
and Regulations and recognises its obligations to protect all employees and non-employees at
the workplace from the risk of injury and work related diseases by:
       Providing a safe place and system of work
       Providing adequate safety equipment
       Training employees in safe operating practices
       Reviewing procedures and work conditions on a continuing basis with the establishment
        of measurable objectives
       Providing adequate workplace health and safety resources
       Managing risks by implementing management systems to identify, assess, monitor and
        control hazards
Brisbane Writers Festival regards all workplace accidents, diseases and unsafe work practices
and methods as preventable and is committed to continually improving workplace health and
safety.

        2. Responsibilities

         2.1 Supervisors’ Responsibilities
Supervisors shall be responsible for:
      Adopting a safe system and method of work
      Ensuring safe plant and equipment are used
      Ensuring employees are competent to carry out tasks requested of them
      Ensuring sufficient employees are assigned to carry out the tasks safely
      The induction of new employees and continued training of other employees
      Under their control in relation to safe work methods and practices
      Overall supervision of matters which could affect the health or safety of employees
       under their control
      Assisting the investigation of near misses, accidents and injuries to ensure identification
       of hazards and correction of unsafe practices and methods
      Reporting accidents, unsafe plant, practices, near misses to the Safety Officer
      Compliance with appropriate legislation, codes of practice and Corporate Policy


         2.2 Employees’ Responsibilities
Every employee of the BWF shall be responsible for:
      Working safely and observing all health and safety instructions, Standards and practices;
      Using safety devices and wearing personal protective equipment as directed by their
       supervisor;
      Maintaining safety devices and personal protective equipment in an operational and
       hygienic condition at all times;
      Promptly reporting to their supervisor any work accident, injury or occupational health or
       safety problem;
      Reporting to their supervisor any situation which the employee believes is a work hazard
       or an unsafe practice;
      The health and safety of fellow employees and non-employees at the workplace.
      Awareness of issues relating to workplace health and safety including legislative
       changes, newsletters etc.
Appendices

Patron Complaint Form
        Complainant Details


Name:

Address:

Cont act telephone number:

Email address:



        Complaint Details


Time & date:                  Session details:

Nature of complaint:
What is the patron‟s preferred outcome?




       Complaint Receipt Details & Progress


Complaint received by:                        Position:

Complaint referred to:                        Position:

Action taken:




Outcome:
Was the complainant notified of the outcome?

Additional notes:
Incident Report Form
      Incident Receipt Details & Progress

To be completed by Festival staff


Report received by:                         Position:

Incident referred to:                       Position:

Action taken:




Outcome:




Volunteer notified of outcome?

Additional notes:
    Session Report Form
To be completed and returned to the Volunteers Green Room at the completion of each session.

   Date:

   Time:

  Venue:

 Session:

  Venue
 Manager:
 Audience
 Number:
 Session
Comments:




 Technical
Comments:




 Additional
Comments: