Southern_California

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Southern California

Southern California
Though there is no official definition for the northern boundary of Southern California, most definitions in use include all the land south of the Tehachapi Mountains, located about 70 miles (113 km) north of Los Angeles.[1] On the west of Southern California lies the Pacific Ocean; to the south is the international border between the United States and Mexico; to the east are the Mojave and Colorado Deserts and the Colorado River at the state’s border with Arizona and Nevada.

Downtown Los Angeles skyline

Significance
Within its boundaries is a major world city, Los Angeles, and three of the country’s largest metropolitan areas.[2]

Downtown San Diego Its counties of Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego, San Bernardino, and Riverside are in the top 15 most populous counties in the United States. The region is also home to Los Angeles International Airport, the thirdbusiest airport in the United States by passenger volume (see World’s busiest airports by passenger traffic) and the second by international passenger volume, Van Nuys Airport (see Busiest airports in the United States by international passenger traffic), the world’s busiest general aviation airport, major commercial airports at San Diego, Orange County, Ontario, Burbank and Long Beach and numerous smaller commercial and general aviation airports. Southern California is

Many major companies are headquartered in Southern California, particularly in Los Angeles. Southern California, or So Cal, is defined as the southern portion of the U.S. state of California. Its population centers on the cities of Los Angeles, San Diego and as well as San Bernardino and Riverside. The region is home to approximately 24 million people and is the nation’s second most populated region, behind only the BosWash Region in the Northeastern United States.

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also home to the Port of Los Angeles, the United States’ busiest commercial port, and the adjacent Port of Long Beach. Also of note in the region is the freeway system, which is the world’s busiest. Six of the seven lines of the commuter rail system, Metrolink, run out of Downtown Los Angeles, connecting Los Angeles, Ventura, San Bernardino, Riverside, Orange, and San Diego counties with the other line connecting San Bernardino, Riverside, and Orange counties directly, the nation’s first suburb-to-suburb commuter rail line.

Southern California

The famous Hollywood sign in Los Angeles, a symbol of the city’s world famous entertainment culture. and Warner Brothers, and as well as Univision, Activision, and THQ. Southern California is also home to the world’s largest adult entertainment industry, located primarily in the San Fernando Valley. Besides the entertainment industry, Southern California is also home to a large surf and skateboard culture. Companies such as Volcom, Quiksilver, O’Neill clothing division, No Fear, Lost Enterprises, Sector 9[3], RVCA, Body Glove and Surfline[4] are all headquartered here. Professional skateboarder Tony Hawk, professional surfers Rob Machado, Tim Curran, Bobby Martinez, Pat O’Connell, Dane Reynolds, and Chris Ward, and professional snowboarder Shaun White live in Southern California. Some of the world’s legendary surf spots are here as well, including Trestles, Rincon, The Wedge, Huntington Beach, and Malibu, and it is second only to the island of Oahu in terms of famous surf breaks. Some of the world’s biggest extreme sports events including the X Games[5], Boost Mobile Pro[6], and the U.S. Open of Surfing are all in Southern California. Southern California is home to many sports franchises and sports networks such as Fox Sports Net. Teams that are located in the region include the Los Angeles Lakers, Los Angeles Clippers, Los Angeles Dodgers, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, San Diego Padres, Los Angeles Kings, Anaheim Ducks, Los Angeles Galaxy, Chivas USA, Los Angeles Riptide, and San Diego Chargers. Southern California also hosts a number of popular NCAA sports programs, such as the UCLA

Part of downtown San Bernardino The Tech Coast is a moniker that has gained use as a descriptor for the region’s diversified technology and industrial base as well as its multitude of prestigious and worldrenowned research universities and other public and private institutions. Amongst these include five University of California campuses (Los Angeles (UCLA), Irvine, Riverside, Santa Barbara, and San Diego (UCSD) campuses), 10 California State University campuses (Channel Islands, Dominguez Hills, Fullerton, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona), Northridge (CSUN), San Bernardino, San Diego (SDSU), and San Marcos campuses), as well as private institutions such as Caltech, the University of Southern California, Pepperdine University, Loyola Marymount University, the Claremont Colleges and the University of San Diego (USD). Southern California is also the entertainment (motion picture, television, and recorded music) capital of the world and is home to Hollywood, the center of the motion picture industry. Headquartered in Southern California are The Walt Disney Company (which also owns ABC), Sony Pictures, Universal, MGM, Paramount Pictures (parent company of Dreamworks), 20th Century Fox

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County Los Angeles County San Diego County Orange County Riverside County San Bernardino County Ventura County Kern County San Luis Obispo County Imperial County Southern California Population (Jan 2007 estimate) 10,331,939 3,098,269 3,098,121 2,031,625 2,028,013 825,512 779,869 257,005 172,672 23,044,650 Land Area (mi²) 4,061 4,200 789 7,207 20,105 1,846 8,141 2,737 3,304 4,175 56,565

Southern California
Density (per mi²) 2,544.2 737.7 3,926.6 281.9 100.9 447.2 95.8 145 77.8 41.36 407.4

Santa Barbara County 421,625

Bruins, the USC Trojans, and the SDSU Aztecs.

Northern boundary

Southern California counties The region’s northern boundary is subject to a broader degree of interpretation than those of the West, East, and South. The most commonly used physical boundary between "Southern California" and the rest of the state is the Tehachapi Range, located about 70 miles (113 km) north of Los Angeles, and the Transverse Ranges[7] in Santa Barbara County west to Point Conception. Seven counties (listed in descending order of population) are included: Los Angeles, San Diego, Orange, San Bernardino, Riverside, Ventura, and Imperial, as well as the southern part of Santa Barbara. A more inclusive definition coinciding neatly with county lines uses the sixth standard parallel south[8] of Mount Diablo (144 miles south of Mt. Diablo at 35°47′28″N)

Tehachapi Mountains which forms the northern borders of San Luis Obispo, Kern, and San Bernardino counties as the boundary. The rest of Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, and Kern County, California are included as well for a total of ten counties. Kern County is also part of the San Joaquin Valley, and San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties are also considered part of California’s Central Coast.

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Southern California

Urban landscape
Southern California is in part a heavily developed urban environment, along with vast arid areas that have been left undeveloped. It is the second-largest urbanized region in the United States, second only to the Washington, D.C./Philadelphia/New York/Boston megalopolis (BosWash). Whereas the BosWash cities are dense, with major downtown populations and significant rail and transit systems, much of SoCal is famous for its large, spread-out, suburban communities and use of automobiles and highways. The dominant areas are Los Angeles, Orange County, San Diego, Riverside, and San Bernardino, each of which is the center of its respective metropolitan area, which are in turn composed of numerous other cities and communities. Traveling south on Interstate 5, the main gap to continued urbanization is Camp Pendleton. The communities along Interstate 15 and Interstate 215 are so inter-related that Temecula has as much connection with San Diego County as it does with the Inland Empire. To the east, the United States Census Bureau considers the San Bernardino and Riverside County areas, Riverside-San Bernardino Area as a separate metropolitan area from Los Angeles County. While many commute to L.A. and Orange Counties, there are some differences in development, as most of San Bernardino and Riverside Counties were developed in the 1980s and 1990s.

San Bernardino in the winter, with snow covering the upper parts of the San Bernardino Mountains in the distance • • • • • • • • • • Long Beach - 492,642 - 353,184 Anaheim - 346,823 - 328,692 - 296,842 Chula Vista - 231,305 Irvine - 209,806 Glendale - 207,157 - 205,493 Huntington Beach - 201,993

Other cities with over 100,000 inhabitants

The Downtown Los Angeles skyline seen on an average hazy June day, from the Santa Ana Freeway. At 1,018 feet (310 m), 73 floors, The U.S. Bank Tower stands as the West Coast’s tallest since 1989.

Ventura City Hall in Old Town Ventura • • • • • • • • • • Oxnard - 194,905 Fontana - 188,498 Moreno Valley - 183,860 Oceanside - 178,806 Santa Clarita - 177,045 Rancho Cucamonga - 174,308 Ontario - 173,690 Garden Grove - 173,067 Pomona - 163,405 Torrance - 148,965

Regions
Major cities (over 200,000 inhabitants)
Population figures for California cities are 2008 State of California estimates[9] • - 4,045,873 • - 1,336,865

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Southern California

Counties
• Imperial • San Diego • Riverside • Ventura • Orange • Los Angeles • San Bernardino North of the San Gabriel and San Bernardino mountains • Northern Los Angeles (Antelope Valley, Santa Clarita) • Northern San Bernardino (Mojave Desert) • Santa Barbara • San Luis Obispo • Kern Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, and Ventura are also counties in the Central Coast.

Geographical regions

Downtown Santa Monica • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Pasadena - 148,126 Palmdale - 147,897 Corona - 147,428 Lancaster - 145,243 Escondido - 143,389 Orange - 140,849 Fullerton - 137,437 Thousand Oaks - 128,650 El Monte - 126,053 Simi Valley - 125,657 Inglewood - 118,878 Costa Mesa - 113,955 Downey - 113,379 West Covina - 112,666 Norwalk - 109,695 Ventura - 108,261 Burbank - 108,029 Victorville - 107,408 Carlsbad - 103,811 South Gate - 102,816 Temecula - 101,057 Murrieta - 100,173

Marriott Hotel in downtown San Diego Southern California is also divided into the Coastal Region (Orange County, Los Angeles County, San Diego County, Santa Barbara County, and Ventura County) and the larger, more sparsely populated, desert Inland Empire (San Bernardino County, Riverside County, and Imperial County). The division between the Coastal Regions and the Inland Empire winds along the backs of the coastal mountain ranges such as the Santa Ana Mountains. A related geographical term is cismontane Southern California, which refers to the portion of California on the coastal

Other county seats (under 100,000 inhabitants)
• Santa Barbara - 90,305 • San Luis Obispo - 44,697 • El Centro - 43,316

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
side of the Transverse and Peninsular mountain ranges. The term "Southern California" often refers to this region specifically, as opposed to largely desert areas comprising the rest of the southern portion of the state, which are referred to as transmontane Southern California.

Southern California

Geographic features

Sunset in Huntington Beach • • • • • • • • • • • • • Summits in the eastern San Gabriel Mountains, Angeles National Forest, San Bernardino County • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Big Bear Lake (San Bernardino County) Cajon Pass (San Bernardino County) Channel Islands (Ventura County) Chino Hills (Orange, Los Angeles, Riverside & San Bernardino Counties) Coachella Valley (Riverside County) Colorado River (San Bernardino, Riverside & Imperial Counties) Conejo Valley (Ventura County) Cucamonga Valley (San Bernardino County) High Desert (Los Angeles, Kern, & San Bernardino Counties) Imperial Fault (Imperial County) Imperial Valley (Imperial County) In-Ko-Pah Mountains (San Diego County) Inland Empire (Riverside, San Bernardino Counties) Jacumba Mountains (San Diego County) La Jolla Cove (San Diego County) Laguna Mountains (San Diego County) Lake Arrowhead (San Bernardino County) Lake Casitas (Ventura County) Lake Castaic (Los Angeles County) Lake Piru (Ventura County) Lakeview Mountains (Riverside County) Los Angeles Basin (Los Angeles County) Los Angeles River (Los Angeles County) Low Desert (Imperial, Riverside & San Bernardino Counties) Mojave Desert (Los Angeles, Kern & San Bernardino Counties) Mugu Lagoon (Ventura County) New River (Imperial County) Orange Coast (Orange County) Oxnard Plain (Ventura County) Palomar Mountain (San Diego County) Palos Verdes Peninsula (Los Angeles County) Peninsular Ranges (San Diego County)

View from La Jolla Cove in San Diego

Coachella Valley Preserve in the Colorado Desert in Riverside County • Antelope Valley (Los Angeles and Kern Counties) • Ballona Wetlands (Los Angeles County)

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• Point Mugu (Ventura County) • Pomona Valley (Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties) • Puente Hills (Los Angeles County) • Pyramid Lake (Los Angeles County) • Rio Hondo (Los Angeles County) • Saddleback Valley (Orange County) • Salton Sea (Imperial & Riverside Counties) • San Andreas Fault (All Counties) • San Bernardino Mountains (San Bernardino County) • San Bernardino Valley (San Bernardino County) • San Diego River (San Diego County) • San Fernando Valley (Los Angeles County) • San Gabriel Mountains (Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties) • San Gabriel River (Los Angeles County) • San Gabriel Valley (Los Angeles County) • San Jacinto Mountains (Riverside County) • San Pedro Bay (Los Angeles County) • Santa Ana Mountains (Los Angeles, Riverside & Orange Counties) • Santa Ana River (San Bernardino, Los Angeles & Orange County) • Santa Ana Valley (Orange County) • Catalina Island (Los Angeles County) • Santa Clara River (Ventura County) • Santa Clara River Valley (Ventura County) • Santa Clarita Valley (Los Angeles County) • Santa Margarita River (Riverside, Orange & San Diego Counties) • Santa Monica Bay (Los Angeles County) • Santa Monica Mountains (Los Angeles & Ventura Counties) • Santa Susana Mountains (Los Angeles & Ventura Counties) • Sonoran Desert (San Diego County, Arizona, Mexico) • Tijuana River (San Diego County) • Ventura River (Ventura County) • Victor Valley (San Bernardino County)

Southern California

The Great Southern California ShakeOut
The Great Southern California ShakeOut is based on a potential magnitude 8.0 earthquake on the southern San Andreas Fault— approximately 5,000 times larger than the magnitude 5.4 earthquake that shook southern California on July 29, 2008. [11] The question is not if but when southern California will be hit by a major earthquake, one so damaging that it will permanently change lives and livelihoods in the region. The magnitude 8.0 ShakeOut earthquake is modeled to cause about 2,800 deaths and $213 billion of economic losses.

Transportation

One of the large LAX signs that greet visitors to LAX. This sign is at the Century Boulevard entrance to Los Angeles International Airport

Airports
The following airports currently have regularly scheduled commercial service: • Los Angeles International Airport • San Diego International Airport • John Wayne Airport (Orange County) • LA/Ontario International Airport • Bob Hope Airport (Burbank) • Long Beach Airport • Santa Barbara Municipal Airport • Palm Springs International Airport • Meadows Field (Bakersfield) • San Luis Obispo County Regional Airport • McClellan-Palomar Airport (Carlsbad) • Santa Maria Airport • Oxnard Airport • Imperial County Airport

Earthquakes
Each year the southern California area has about 10,000 earthquakes. Most of them are so small that they are not felt. Only several hundred are greater than magnitude 3.0, and only about 15-20 are greater than magnitude 4.0. [10]

Central business districts
The following are central business districts in Southern California: • Downtown Long Beach

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Southern California

• • • •

San Diego Freeway (Interstate 405) San Gabriel River Freeway (Interstate 605) Long Beach Freeway (Interstate 710) Jacob Dekema Freeway (Interstate 805)

• Future Interstate 905 U.S. Highway system Ventura Freeway/Hollywood Freeway/Santa Ana Freeway/El Camino Real (U.S. Route 101) California State Routes Note: highway segments with names listed in italics are surface streets and not freeways. • Pacific Coast Highway (PCH)/Lincoln Boulevard/Sepulveda Boulevard/Oxnard Boulevard/Coast Highway/Camino las Ramblas (State Route 1) Angeles Crest Highway/Glendale Freeway/Santa Monica Boulevard (State Route 2) Antelope Valley Freeway (State Route 14) • • • • • • • • • • • in • • • Rosemead Boulevard/Lakewood Boulevard (State Route 19) Seventh Street/Garden Grove Freeway (State Route 22) Decker Road/Mulholland Highway/ Westlake Boulevard Topanga Canyon Boulevard Ojai Freeway (State Route 33) San Gabriel Canyon Road/Azusa Avenue/Beach Boulevard Manchester Boulevard Terminal Island Freeway/Seaside Avenue/Vincent Thomas Bridge Soledad Freeway South Bay Freeway/2nd Street Costa Mesa Freeway/Newport Boulevard (State Route 55) Ted Williams Freeway (State Route 56) Orange Freeway (State Route 57) Pomona Freeway/Moreno Valley Freeway (State Route 60) •

Downtown San Bernardino Hotel, known as The Clarion Hotel • • • • Downtown Downtown Downtown Downtown Los Angeles Riverside San Bernardino San Diego

Transport
Freeways
Interstate Highways • Golden State Freeway/Santa Ana Freeway/San Diego Freeway/Montgomery Freeway (Interstate 5) Ocean Beach Freeway/Mission Valley Freeway (Interstate 8) Santa Monica (Rosa Parks) Freeway/Golden State Freeway/San Bernardino Freeway/Indio (Dr. June McCarroll) Freeway/Blythe Freeway (Interstate 10) Mojave Freeway/Barstow Freeway/Ontario Freeway/Corona Freeway/Temecula Valley Freeway/Escondido Freeway (Interstate 15) Century (Glenn Anderson) Freeway (Interstate 105) Harbor Freeway (Interstate 110) Foothill Freeway (Interstate 210, expected to expand along current near future) •

•

•

• •

•

• • •

Barstow Freeway/San Bernardino Freeway/Moreno Valley Freeway/Escondido Freeway (Interstate 215)

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Southern California

• • • • • • • • • •

Foothill Boulevard and E Street (also known as Historic U.S. Route 66) Julian Road/San Vicente Freeway Corona Expressway/Chino Valley Freeway (State Route 71) Firestone Boulevard/Whittier Boulevard San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor (toll road) (State Route 73) Ortega Highway/Palms to Pines Highway (State Route 74) San Diego-Coronado Bridge/Silver Strand Boulevard Mission Avenue/Pala Road/Cuyamaca Highway Vista Freeway/San Pasqual Valley Road

•

Eastern Transportation Corridor (toll road)/Laguna Canyon Road (State Route 133) Ventura Freeway (State Route 134) Carbon Canyon Road Cabrillo Freeway (State Route 163) Hollywood Freeway/Highland Avenue (State Route 170) Pierce Street (Proposed to be called Salton Sea Street) and Box Canyon Road Catalina Boulevard/Canon Street/ Rosecrans Street Foothill Freeway (Merges with San Dimas, formerly the ) in

• • • • • • •

• • • • • • •

Western Avenue Foothill/Eastern Transportation Corridor (toll road) (State Route 241) State Route 259 Freeway Balboa Avenue 3rd/4th Street Cahuilla Road Otay Mesa Freeway/Otay Mesa Road ( once the freeway is complete.)

Winchester Road/Temecula Parkway/ Firefighter Steven Rucker Memorial Highway (State Route 79) • Historic U.S. Route 80, officially called Imperial County Route S80 Barbara Worth Highway • • Euclid Avenue Indio Boulevard which is Historic U.S. Route 99 (locally known as the NAFTA Highway, proposed to be called East Valley Parkway) Marina Freeway/Imperial Highway/Richard Nixon Freeway (State Route 90) Artesia Boulevard/Gardena Freeway/Artesia Freeway/Riverside Freeway (State Route 91) Martin Luther King Jr. Freeway/Campo Road Hawthorne Boulevard Pasadena Freeway (State Route 110) Grapefruit Boulevard (Proposed name: Desert Cities Highway or Desert Resorts Highway) Ronald Reagan Freeway (State Route 118) La Mesa Freeway (State Route 125) Santa Paula Freeway (State Route 126)

•

Major public transit organizations
• Metrolink • Los Angeles County MTA, or Metro • San Diego trolley and San Diego County MTS • Orange County Transportation Authority • OmniTrans (San Bernardino County) • Santa Barbara MTD • Gold Coast Transit (Ventura County) • NCTD (North San Diego County) • COASTER (Oceanside to San Diego) • The Sprinter (Oceanside to Escondido) • Santa Monica Big Blue Bus

•

• • • •

Metrolink commuter lines
• 91 Line (Union Station - RiversideDowntown) • Antelope Valley Line (Union Station Lancaster) • Inland Empire-Orange County (IEOC) Line (San Bernardino - San Juan Capistrano)

• • •

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• Orange County Line (Union Station Oceanside) • Riverside Line (Union Station - RiversideDowntown) • San Bernardino Line (Union Station - San Bernardino/Riverside-Downtown) • Ventura County Line (Union Station Downtown Oxnard)

Southern California
• 858 - Northern San Diego (including La Jolla) and its suburbs (including Del Mar and Poway) • 909 - San Bernardino, Pomona, Ontario • 949 - Southern Orange County (Irvine, Newport Beach, Laguna Niguel & San Clemente) • 951 - Riverside, Temecula, wetsern Riverside County

Communication
Telephone area codes

College and universities
[12]

Map of major Southern California area codes • 213 - Downtown L.A. - originally covered all of Southern California • 323 - Doughnut-shaped area surrounding downtown, including Hollywood, MidWilshire, East Los Angeles • 310 - West Los Angeles, Santa Monica, South Bay, Catalina Island • 424 - Overlay with 310 • 562 - Long Beach, southeastern Los Angeles County • 619 - San Diego including downtown, East County and the South Bay • 626 - Pasadena, San Gabriel Valley • 657 - Overlay with 714 • 661 - Bakersfield, Santa Clarita, Antelope Valley • 714 - Santa Ana, Anaheim, northern Orange County • 760 - Oceanside, Escondido, Palm Springs, El Centro, Victorville, Barstow, Ridgecrest • 805 - Santa Barbara, Ventura and San Luis Obispo Counties • 818 - San Fernando Valley, Glendale

• California State University, San Bernardino • California State University, Channel Islands • California State University, Northridge • California State Polytechnic University, Pomona • California State University, Dominguez Hills • California State University, Long Beach • California State University, Fullerton • California State University, Los Angeles • California Institute of the Arts • California Institute of Technology • Cal Poly San Luis Obispo • University of California at Los Angeles • University of Southern California • University of California at Santa Barbara • University of California at Irvine • University of Redlands • University of California at Riverside • University of California at San Diego • San Diego State University • San Bernardino Valley College • Riverside Community College • Claremont Colleges • Claremont McKenna College • Harvey Mudd College • Pitzer College • Pomona College • Scripps College • Chapman University

See also
Law Schools
[13]

Graphic Design Schools
[14]

• Chapman University School of Law

• The Art Institute of California Inland Empire

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Team Los Angeles Avengers Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim Los Angeles Dodgers San Diego Padres Los Angeles Clippers Los Angeles Lakers San Diego Chargers Anaheim Ducks Los Angeles Kings Chivas USA Los Angeles Galaxy • Southern California Institute of Law • University of California at Los Angeles - School of Law • University of West Los Angeles School of Law • University of San Diego - School of Law • Santa Clara University School of Law • Ventura College of Law • Whittier Law School • Taft Law School • The Art Institute of California Hollywood • The Art Institute of California - San Diego • LA College International • Westwood College • Marinello Schools of Beauty - Los Angeles (Downtown) • SBB College Palm Desert Soccer Major League Soccer Football National Football League Sport Arena football Baseball League Arena Football League American League (Major League Baseball) National League (Major League Baseball) Basketball National Basketball Association

Southern California
Venue Staples Center Angel Stadium of Anaheim Dodger Stadium PETCO Park Staples Center Qualcomm Stadium Honda Center Staples Center The Home Depot Center California School of Dentistry

Ice hockey National Hockey League

Art Schools
[17]

Beauty Schools
[15]

Dental Schools
[16]

• Everest College - Anaheim • Everest College - West Los Angeles • Charter College - Canyon Country • Charter College - Long Beach • Lancaster Beauty School

• Loma Linda University • University of California, Los Angeles School of Dentistry • University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry • University of Southern

• Art Center College of Design Incorporated • Chapman University, Dodge College of Film and Media Arts • Los Angeles Music & Art School • Musicians Institute • Otis College of Art & Design • The Los Angeles Film School • Santa Monica College • UCLA The School of the Arts and Architecture, School of Theatre, Film and Television • USC School of Architecture, School of Music & Theatre • UC Irvine School of Fine Arts • UC San Diego • University of California, Riverside • Loma Linda University • Loma Linda University Medical Center • La Sierra University

Sports teams See also
• Greater Los Angeles • History of the west coast of North America

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• • • • • • Northern California Central Valley (California) Central Coast of California San Angeles San Diego-Tijuana Metropolitan Area Bajalta California

Southern California
[11] "The ShakeOut Earthquake Scenario". data from Southern California Earthquake Center. http://www.shakeout.org/scenario/. Retrieved on 2009-03-18. [12] "List of Colleges & Universitys". analyzed data from numerous sources. http://www.geocities.com/rhorii/ SocalTours.html. Retrieved on 2009-03-23. [13] "Law Schools in Southern California". The State Bar of California. http://www.calbar.ca.gov/state/calbar/ calbar_generic.jsp?cid=10115&id=5128. Retrieved on 2009-03-23. [14] "Graphic Design Schools in Southern California". analyzed data from numerous sources. http://www.gdschools.com/ graphic_design_schools_in_california.php. Retrieved on 2009-03-23. [15] "Beauty Schools in Southern California". PlattForm Zuma, Inc / analyzed data from numerous sources. http://www.beautyschoolsdirectory.com/ search/CA. Retrieved on 2009-03-23. [16] "Dental Schools in Southern California". analyzed data from numerous sources Also from About.com. http://dentistry.about.com/od/ californiadentalschools/ Dental_Schools_in_California.htm#. Retrieved on 2009-03-17. [17] "Art Schools In Southern California". analyzed data from numerous sources. https://oteam.otis.edu/wiki/index.php/ Art_Schools_In_Southern_California. Retrieved on 2009-03-23.

References
[1] McWilliams, Carrey (1973). Southern California, An Island on the Land (9th ed.). Layton: Gibbs Smith. ISBN 9780879050078. [2] The three metropolitan areas are: 1) Los Angeles–Long Beach–Santa Ana (the second largest in the US), 2) Riverside–San Bernardino–Ontario (the Inland Empire) and 3) San Diego–Carlsbad–San Marcos - see: United States metropolitan areas [3] Sector 9 Incorporated - San Diego, CA [4] Surfline - Huntington Beach, CA [5] X Games Take a Turn for the Better - Los Angeles Times [6] "Construction Stirs Debate on Effects on ‘Perfect Wave’". The New York Times. 2006-09-13. http://www.nytimes.com/ 2006/09/13/sports/othersports/ 13surfing.html. Retrieved on 2008-09-13. [7] California’s Coastal Mountains [8] Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District [9] "Population Estimates for Cities, Counties and the State with Annual Percent Change". Calfornia Department of Finance. http://www.dof.ca.gov/ research/demographic/reports/estimates/ e-1_2006-07. [10] "USGS facts". data from Southern California Earthquake Center. http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learning/ facts.php. Retrieved on 2009-03-18.

External links
• Historical Society of Southern California • Southern California Subbuteo Club official site

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