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Shrine by zzzmarcus

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									From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Shrine

Shrine

The shrine of the Hodegetria at the Assumption Cathedral in Smolensk, Russia, photographed by Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky (1912).

The Shrine, Oil on canvas, by John William Waterhouse (1895). Chinese folk religion and Shinto, as well as in secular and non-religious settings. Shrines can be found in various settings, such as churches, temples, cemeteries, or in the home, although portable shrines are also found in some cultures. This modern definition of a shrine is an extension of the original definition that was used in late antiquity, that of being a container, usually made of precious materials, used especially for a relic and often a cult image.

Shrine to Tin Hau at Repulse Bay, Southern District, Hong Kong. A shrine (Latin: scrinium "case or chest for books or papers"; Old French: escrin "box or case") is a holy or sacred place, which is dedicated to a specific deity, ancestor, hero, martyr, saint or similar figure of awe and respect, at which they are venerated or worshipped. Shrines often contain idols, relics, or other such objects associated with the figure being venerated. A shrine at which votive offerings are made is called an altar. Shrines are found in many of the world’s religions, including Catholicism, Shia Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Wicca, LaVeyan Satanism,

Types of Shrines
Site-specific shrines
In Christianity and Islam, a shrine does not usually denote any place where a deity is worshipped, but refers to a space set up and dedicated to an important religious event that happened there. These such sites commonly become places of pilgrimage, such as

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the Christian shrines in Lourdes and Walsingham, and the Ka’bah in Mecca, the most sacred site in Islam.

Shrine

Temple shrines
Most shrines are located within buildings designed specifically for worship, such as a church in Christianity, or a mandir in Hinduism. A shrine here is usually the centre of attention in the building, and is given a place of prominence. In such cases, adherents of the faith assemble within the building in order to venerate the deity at the shrine.

Household shrines
Historically, in paganism, as well as in modern faiths, such as Hinduism and Neopaganism, a shrine can commonly be found within the home, dedicated to a deity or to a localised household deity. Orthodox Christian shrine in Suzdal, Russia, from 1912.

Christianity
Shrines are found in many, though not all, forms of Christianity. Roman Catholicism, the largest denomination of Christianity, has many shrines, as does Orthodox Christianity; however Protestantism, another type of Christianity, is typically opposed to them.

Yard shrines
Small outdoor yard shrines are found at the places of many peoples, following various religions, including historically, Christianity. Many consist of a statue of Christ or a saint, on a pedestal or in an alcove, while others may be elaborate groupings, including paintings, statuary, and architectural elements, such as walls, roofs, glass doors and ironwork fences, etc. In the United States, many Christians have small yard shrines; some of these resemble side altars, since they are composed of a statue placed in a niche or grotto; this type is colloquially referred to as a bathtub madonna. Nativity scenes are also a form of yard shrine.

Religious shrines
Shrines are most commonly found as a place of religious significance, and shrines are found in most, though not all, religions. As distinguished from a temple, a shrine usually houses a particular relic or cult image, which is the object of worship or veneration, or is constructed to set apart a site which is thought to be particularly holy, as opposed to being placed for the convenience of worshippers. Shrines therefore attract the practice of pilgrimage.

Catholic shrine: glass coffin of Saint Catherine Labouré In the Roman Catholic Code of Canon law, canons 1230 and 1231 read: "The term shrine means a church or other sacred place which, with the approval of the local Ordinary, is by reason of special devotion frequented by the faithful as pilgrims. For a shrine to be described as national, the approval of the Episcopal Conference is necessary. For it to be described as international, the approval of the Holy See is required." Another use of the term "shrine" in colloquial Catholic terminology is a niche or

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alcove in most - especially larger - churches used by parishioners when praying privately in the church. They were also called Devotional Altars, since they could look like small Side Altars. Shrines were always centered on some image of Christ or a saint - for instance, a statue, painting, mural or mosaic, and may have had a reredos behind them (without a Tabernacle built in). However, Mass would not be celebrated at them; they were simply used to aid or give a visual focus for prayers. Side altars, where Mass could actually be celebrated, were used in a similar way to shrines by parishioners. Side Altars were specifically dedicated to The Virgin Mary, Saint Joseph or other saints. The long Roman Catholic tradition of veneration of saints has produced an impressive number of notable shrines, some of truly international renoun. There are separate articles on: • basilica • Shrines to the Virgin Mary A shrine may also designate a small altar in a home or place of business, or a room or item of furniture, which is decorated with religious symbols and used for private worship, as was common in the polytheist periods of Classical Antiquity. Devotions are generally to ancestral or tutelary spirits.

Shrine
On the other hand, Muslims have differing opinions on shrines and the intercession of saints (Tawassul). Shia Islam maintains a tradition of venerating late religious leaders (as there is no hierarchical church, the bond is personal; but often a ’successor’, maintains a following) and/or martyrs (usually at their grave). Shrines are even made in honour of the descendants of Shī‘ah Imāms, thus the Persian word imamzadeh. There are also sunnite equivalents, as among the ascetic marabouts of West Africa and the Maghreb.

Hinduism

Islam

A Hindu shrine dedicated to the god Ganesh. In Hinduism, a shrine is a place where a god or goddess is worshipped. Shrines are typically located inside a temple known as a mandir, though many Hindus also have a household shrine as well. Sometimes a human is venerated at a Hindu shrine along with a deity, for instance the 19th century religious teacher Sri Ramakrishna is venerated at the Ramakrishna Temple in Kolkata, India. Central to a Hindu shrine is a statue of a deity, which is known as a murti. Hindus believe that the deity that they are worshiping actually enters and inhabits the murti. This is given offerings like candles, food, flowers, and incense. In some cases, particularly among devotees of the goddess Kālī in northern India, animals are sacrificed to the deity. At a mandir, the congregation often assembles in front of a shrine, and, led by priests, give offerings and sing devotional hymns.

Pilgrims outside the Shrine of Imam Hussain ibn Ali in Karbala, Iraq. Muslims do not have shrines dedicated to Allah, and consider such a thing to be idolatry. Sunni Islam, which is the largest form of Islam, allows to have shrines and there are lots of shrines of sunni scholars and Ullama spread throughtout the world , the ka’bah, a central box in the city of Mecca is not a shrine it is actually the Qibla for Muslims.

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Shrine
• The Shrine of the Báb in Haifa, Israel.[2] • The Shrine of Bahá’u’lláh in Acre, Israel.[3]

Buddhism

Neopaganism
In the many different neopagan faiths, which include Wicca, Hellenic Polytheistic Reconstructionism, Neo-Druidry, and Germanic Neopaganism, shrines serve many different purposes. In the neopagan religion of Wicca, a shrine is a place where the Horned God and the Triple Goddess are worshipped. However, they are more commonly referred to with the term "altar." In other Pagan religions, shrines may be dedicated to one or many different Gods and Goddesses. As in Wicca, household worship is usually centered around them.

Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom In Buddhism, a shrine refers to a place where veneration is focused on the Buddha or one of the bodhisattvas. Monks, nuns and laypeople all give offerings to these revered figures at these shrines and also meditate in front of them. Typically, Buddhist shrines contain a statue of either the Buddha, or (in the Mahayana and Vajrayana forms of Buddhism), one of the various bodhisattvas[1]. They also commonly contain candles, along with offerings such as flowers, purified water, food, and incense. Many shrines also contain sacred relics, such as the alleged tooth of the Buddha held at a shrine in Sri Lanka. Site-specific shrines in Buddhism, particularly those that contain relics of deceased buddha’s and revered monks, are often designed in the traditional form known as the stupa.

Religions without shrines
Certain religions do not feature shrines at all, either because they believe they are fundamentally wrong, or because they simply do not need them. Spiritualism, whilst believing in a God, does not typically make use of shrines.

Secular shrines
In the United States and some other countries, landmarks may be called "historic shrines." Notable shrines of this type include: • The Alamo • Fort McHenry • Touro Synagogue in Newport, Rhode Island • Shrine of Remembrance, a war memorial in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia • Shrine of Remembrance, a war memorial in Brisbane, Australia. By extension the term shrine has come to mean any place (or virtual cyber-place) dedicated completely to a particular person or subject.

Bahá’í

The Shrine of the Báb and its Terraces on Mount Carmel, Haifa. The two most well-known Bahá’í shrines serve as the resting places for the respective remains of the two central figures of the Bahá’í Faith, the Báb and Bahá’u’lláh. They are the focal points of a Bahá’í pilgrimage:

Select list of shrines by location
Africa
Cameroon

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
• Basilique Marie-Reine-des-Apôtres (Mary Queen of the Apostles Basilica) in Yaoundé.[4]

Shrine
• Imam Ali Mosque, Najaf, Iraq – tomb of Ali, the cousin of Muhammad and First Shī‘ah Imām • Imam Husayn Shrine, Karbala, Iraq – tomb of Husayn, the son of Ali, grandson of Muhammad and Third Twelver Shī‘ah Imām • Hadhrat ‘Abbās Mosque, Karbala, Iraq – tomb of ‘Abbās, the brother of Husayn • Al-Kadhimiya Mosque, Kadhimiya, Iraq – tomb of the Seventh and Ninth Twelver Shī‘ah Imāms • Al-Askari Mosque, Samarra, Iraq – tomb of the Tenth and Eleventh Twelver Shī‘ah Imāms

Asia
China
• Our Lady of Carmel shrine in Tianjiajing, Henan.[5]

India
• Amarnath Shrine, in Jammu and Kashmir • Kashi Vishwanath Temple, at Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh • Vaishno Devi, in Jammu and Kashmir • Jagannath temple, poori, Orissa • Somnath temple, Gujarat • Tirumala Venkateswara Temple Balaji temple, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh • Srikalahasti siva temple, Andhra Pradesh • Mookambika temple, Karnataka • Arunachala siva temple, Tiruvannamalai, Tamil Nadu • Rameswaram temple, Tamil Nadu • Chidambaram Nataraja temple, Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu • Sriranganatha temple, Srirangam, Tamil Nadu • Devi Kanya Kumari temple, Kanyakumari, Tamil Nadu • Guruvayur krishna temple, Kerala • Padmanabhaswamy temple,Thiruvananthapuram,Kerala • Sabarimala temple, Sabarimala, Kerala • Minakshi temple, Madurai, Tamil Nadu • Ajmer Dargha, Rajasthan • One international shrine, in Ernakulam – Angamaly, of the Syro-Malabar Catholic Church: • Shrine Vailankanni Basilica Velankanni Town in India • Swaminarayan Temple, Ahmedabad, Gujarat • Swaminarayan Temple, Vadtal, Gujarat

Israel
• Dome of the Rock, Jerusalem • Shrine of the Báb in Haifa, Israel. • Shrine of Bahá’u’lláh in Acre, Israel.

Japan
• Fushimi Inari-taisha ( ??????, Fushimi Inari-taisha) in Kyoto, Kyoto Prefecture.[6] • Hakozaki Shrine ( ???, Hakozaki-jingū) in Fukuoka, Fukuoka Prefecture.[7] • Hiyoshi Taisha ( ????, Hiyoshi Taisha) in Ōtsu, Shiga Prefecture.[8] • Ise Shrine (????, Ise-jingū) in Ise, Mie Prefecture.[9] • Izumo Taisha ( ????, Izumo Taisha) in Izumo, Shimane Prefecture[10] • Isonokami Shrine ( ????, Isonokami-jingū) in Tenri, Nara Prefecture. • Iwashimizu Hachiman-gū ( ??????, Iwashimizu Hachiman-gū) in Yawata, Kyoto Prefecture.[11] • Kamo Shrine ( ????, Kamo-jinja) in Kyoto, Kyoto Prefecture.[12] • Kashihara Shrine ( ????, Kashihara Jingū) in Kashihara, Nara Prefecture.[13] • Kumano Hongū Taisha ( ??????, Kumano Hongū Taisha) in Tanabe, Wakayama Prefecture.[14] • Kumano Hayatama Taisha ( ??????, Kumano Hayatama Taisha) in Shingu, Wakayama Prefecture.[15] • Japanese Martyrs Shrine[16] in Nagasaki, Nagasaki Prefecture.[17] • Matsunoo Shrine ( ????, Matsunoo Taisha) in Kyoto, Kyoto Prefecture.[18] • Munakata Taisha ( ????, Munakata Taisha) in Munakata, Fukuoka Prefecture.[19]

Iran
• Imām Ridhā Shrine, Mashhad, Iran – tomb of the Eighth Twelver Shī‘ah Imām • Fātimah al-Ma‘sūmah Mosque, Qom, Iran tomb of Fātimah al-Ma‘sūmah, sister of the Eighth Twelver Shī‘ah Imām

Iraq

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• Kasuga Shrine ( ????, Kasuga Taisha) in Nara, Nara Prefecture.[20] • Usa Shrine ( ????, Usa-jingū) in Usa, Ōita Prefecture.[21]

Shrine
• Cathedral of Our Lady in Reims, where the French kings were crowned • National Shrine of Our Lady Help of Christians in Nice

Saudi Arabia
• Masjid al-Nabawi, Madīnah - tomb of the Islamic Prophet Muhammad

Germany
• Shrine of the Three Kings

Sri Lanka
• Katirkamam Murugan temple, Kathirgama.

Greece
• Mount Athos in

Ireland
• the minor basilica of Our Lady of Knock Queen of Ireland [BVM] in Knock

Syria
• Sayyidah Zaynab Mosque, Damascus, Syria – tomb of Zaynab, the sister of Husayn • Sayyidah Ruqayya Mosque, Damascus, Syria – tomb of Fātimah (commonly referred to by the titles: Ruqayya, Sukayna, and Sakina), the daughter of Husayn

Italy
• The shrine of the Blessed Virgin Mary cathedral at Loreto in Italy • Pontifical Basilica of St. Anthony of Padua, conventual

Latvia
• minor basilica of BVM Assumption in Aglona

Vietnam
• Lý Bát Đế Shrine in Từ Sơn District, Bac Ninh Province

Europe
Austria
• Basilica Mariä Geburt in Mariazell, Styria

Malta
• the minor basilica of National Shrine of the Blessed Virgin of Ta’ Pinu [BVM Assumption] in Għarb

Belgium
• The shrine of Our Lady at Scherpenheuvel-Zichem in Flanders

Poland
• Divine Mercy Shrine in Płock • Shrine to the Blessed Virgin Mary in Częstochowa • Wawel Cathedral of St. Stanislaus and St. Wenceslaus in Kraków • JHS Divine Mercy in Kraków-Łagiewniki • Sanctuary of Our Lady of Licheń in Licheń Stary • Supraśl Orthodox Monastery in

Croatia
• minor basilica of the Mother Mary of Bistrica • National Shrine of St. Joseph on Dubovac in Karlovac

Czech Republic
• St. Vitus Cathedral in Prague

Portugal
• Shrine of Our Lady of Fátima in Fatima

France
• Minor Basilica (upper church) of Our Lady of Lourdes in Lourdes • Chapel of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal in Paris

Spain
• The shrine of the Apostle Saint James the Great at Santiago de Compostela in Galicia, historically the third Catholic pilgrimage destination after Jerusalem and Rome

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• Santuario Nacional de la Gran Promesa [JHS Heart] in Valladolid • Mare de Déu de Montserrat [BVM] in Terrassa

Shrine
• National Shrine of Blessed Francis Xavier Seelos in New Orleans, Louisiana,[32] • National Shrine of National Shrine of Mary, Queen of the Universe in Orlando, Florida.[33] • National Shrine of Our Lady of Czestochowa in Doylestown, Pennsylvania.[34] • National Shrine of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal in Perryville, Missouri.[35] • National Shrine of Our Lady of the Snows in Belleville, Illinois.[36] • National Shrine of the Divine Mercy in Stockbridge, Massachusetts.[37] • National Shrine of the Little Flower in Royal Oak, Michigan.[38] • National Shrine of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton in Emmitsburg , Maryland.[39] • National Shrine of Saint Francis of Assisi San Francisco, California.[40] • National Shrine of Saint John Neumann in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[41] • National Shrine of St. Katherine Drexel in Bensalem Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania[42] • Our Lady of Victory Basilica National Shrine in Lackawanna, New York.[43] • Shrine of Christ the King Sovereign Priest in Chicago, Illinois.[44] • Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe in La Crosse,Wisconsin.[45] • Shrine of Our Lady of Martyrs in Auriesville, New York.[46] • Shrine of Saint Joseph in St. Louis, Missouri.[47] • Shrine of the Most Blessed Sacrament in Hanceville, Alabama.[48] • Shrine of the North American Martyrs in Auriesville, New York.[49] • Tsubaki Grand Shrine of America in Granite Falls, Washington.[50]

Ukraine
• Pochayiv Lavra

United Kingdom
• The shrine of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Walsingham (England) • The shrine of St Edward the Confessor in Westminster Abbey (England) • The shrine of St Winifred at Holywell (Wales) • Welsh National Shrine of Our Lady of Cardigan, Wales • The National Shrine of Saint Boniface at Crediton (England) website • The Shrine of Our Lady of Westminster in Westminster Cathedral

North America
Canada
• Basilica of Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré in Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré, Quebec.[22]

Mexico
• Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico City. [23]

United States
• Basilica and National Shrine of Our Lady of Consolation in Carey, Ohio.[24] • Basilica of Holy Hill National Shrine of Mary, Help of Christians in Hubertus, Wisconsin.[25] • Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Baltimore, Maryland.[26] • Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C..[27] • Basilica of the National Shrine of the Little Flower Catholic Church in San Antonio Texas.[28] • Catholic Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Atlanta, Georgia.[29] • Jaffa Shrine in Altoona, Pennsylvania.[30] • Light Of Truth Universal Shrine in Buckingham, Virginia.[31]

South America Oceania
Australia
• in Sydney, St. Mary’s Cathedral, a minor basilica • in Melbourne: St. Anthony’s National Shrine, National Shrine of Our Lady of Mount Carmel and National Shrine of Saint Thérèse of Lisieux

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Shrine
[23] Insigne y Nacional Basílica de Santa María de Guadalupe (Spanish) [24] Basilica and National Shrine of Our Lady of Consolation [25] Basilica of Holy Hill National Shrine of Mary, Help of Christians [26] Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary [27] Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception [28] Basilica of the National Shrine of the Little Flower [29] Catholic Shrine of the Immaculate Conception [30] Jaffa Shrine [31] Light Of Truth Universal Shrine [32] National Shrine of Blessed Francis Xavier Seelos [33] National Shrine of Mary, Queen of the Universe [34] National Shrine of Our Lady of Czestochowa [35] National Shrine of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal [36] National Shrine of Our Lady of the Snows [37] National Shrine of the Divine Mercy [38] National Shrine of the Little Flower [39] National Shrine of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton [40] National Shrine of Saint Francis of Assisi [41] National Shrine of Saint John Neumann [42] National Shrine of St. Katherine Drexel [43] Our Lady of Victory Basilica National Shrine [44] Shrine of Christ the King Sovereign Priest [45] Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe [46] Shrine of Our Lady of Martyrs [47] Shrine of Saint Joseph [48] Shrine of the Most Blessed Sacrament [49] Shrine of the North American Martyrs [50] Tsubaki Grand Shrine of America

See also
• Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine • Holiest sites in Islam (Shia) • Holiest sites in Islam (Sunni)

Notes
[1] http://www.buddhamind.info/leftside/ actives/shrine.htm [2] Bahá’í World Centre (2007). "Shrine of the Báb". Bahá’í World Centre. https://bahai.bwc.org//pilgrimage/Intro/ visit_3.asp. Retrieved on 2009-02-03. [3] Bahá’í World Centre (2007). "Shrine of Bahá’u’lláh". Bahá’í World Centre. https://bahai.bwc.org//pilgrimage/Intro/ visit_2.asp. Retrieved on 2009-02-03. [4] Basilique Marie-Reine-des-Apôtres, shrine [5] Pontificio Istituto Missioni Estere (Pontifical Institute for Foreign Missions): "Our Lady of Carmel shrine in Tianjiajing safe for now." November 12, 2007. [6] Fushimi Inari-taisha [7] Fukuoka/Hakata Tourist Information website: Hakozaki Shrine [8] Hiyoshi Taisha [9] Ise-jingū [10] Tsurugaoka Izumo Taisha (Japanese) [11] Iwashimizu Shrine [12] [1] [13] [2] [14] [3] [15] [4] [16] Yuki, Diego, S.J. "Japanese Martyrs Shrine;" Second Asian Congress on Pilgrimages and Shrines: Fr. Renzo De Luca, S.J., Rector of the Japanese Shrine of the 26 Martyrs of Nagasaki. November 2005. [17] Shrine of the 26 Martyrs [18] [5] [19] [6] [20] Kasuga Shrine [21] Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLITT): Usa Jinju Shrine [22] Basilica of Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré

External links
• Shrines of British Saints by J. Charles Wall. Full Text + Illustrations. • GigaCatholic • Hari Parbat

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shrine" Categories: Shrines

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Shrine

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