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					HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS
Checklist
This plan belongs to the family of: Date: Number of persons in Household: In preparation of Hurricane: Address: City, State, Zip Telephone
Flossie

Family Readiness Plan 2007 Begin 72 hours before storm’s arrival

Note:

You should begin preparations for the possible arrival of a hurricane at least 72 hours in advance. Be thorough and complete with your planning process and remember to communicate your plans to at least one family member or friend who lives far outside of the storm’s potential path. This person can act as a single point of contact to relay messages to other friends and family in the aftermath of an emergency.

CHECKLIST:
√ Supplies: You should be prepared for up to 4 days of self-sufficiency following a severe hurricane. This should include: 1 gallon of water per person per day 1 gallon of water per pet per day & sufficient food (DO NOT leave pets behind) Non-perishable food items (Foods that do not require cooking are best bets) 1 flashlight per person including extra batteries 1 battery powered transistor radio including extra batteries Medical prescriptions (refill in advance of the storm if needed) First Aid Kit 2 changes of clothes per person – preferably placed in backpacks or other easy to carry bags 1 pair of sturdy non-sandal type shoes per person (packed as above) Sunscreen, insect repellant, hats and sun glasses (packed as above) Infant formula, diapers, and other baby supplies (if applicable) (packed as above) Toiletry items (toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, etc) (packed as above) If you have a cell phone, remember to have it fully charged before the hurricane makes landfall and to use it sparingly in the aftermath of the storm. Keep your car’s gas tank full in the days before a storm’s arrival You may wish to secure a small grill and charcoal or other type of camping stove to have on hand in the event you experience a loss of electricity for an extended period of time. Plastic garbage bags, paper plates, plastic utensils, watertight plastic storage bags, a sharp pocket knife, and manual can opener should be placed with emergency food supplies. Plywood or metal window coverings to protect your property (if applicable) Do not forget nails, screws, hammers, or other equipment needed to install these items.

Author: Bennett L Dale

August 11, 2007 Honolulu, HI

This form may be photocopied or reprinted for personal use. It is intended as an awareness guide only. In an emergency or disaster situation, you should undertake whatever means necessary to ensure your life-safety and security

72 HOURS BEFORE THE STORM:
Begin monitoring the hurricane every 6 to 8 hours. Record any changes in strength, projected path, and forward speed. Adjust your preparations accordingly Examine the exterior of your home. Look for any items that could turn into dangerous projectiles in high winds or heavy rains. Keep in mind that even a plastic toy can shatter a window at speeds of 100 mph or greater. Remove any potentially dangerous items from your outdoor property. Assist your neighbors as well! Their outdoor belongings, like yours, can become a community hazard. If you have elderly or handicapped neighbors, inform them of your plan, share your checklists and ask if you can assist them in any way. Complete a “Family Disaster Plan” and discuss it with all household members. This plan should include a central meeting place in the event you must evacuate your property and become separated. It should also include the names and telephone numbers of important contacts such as your SPoC (Single Point of Contact family member – outside the hurricane zone) as well as doctors, family cell phone numbers, etc. MAKE COPIES of this plan and provide one to each family member. Call your SPoC and tell them that you are fine, ask if they will act as your single points of contact, and tell them that once the storm is over, you will let them know where you are and that you are safe and sound. Start preparing meals with foods that are highly perishable especially those frozen items that you may have on hand. By consuming these foods in advance of the storm, you free up space to begin making or storing ice! Stock up over the next 72 hours.

48 HOURS BEFORE THE STORM:
Monitor the hurricane’s projected path, strength, and forecasted landfall times every 4 to 6 hours and adjust preparations accordingly. Contact your employer and child’s school (if applicable) to find out what their emergency plans and procedures will be. If you live above the 10th floor, in a low-lying area, in a landslide zone, or directly along the beachfront, consider your evacuation alternatives. Contact your local Red Cross or emergency services to find out where the nearest available shelter will be located. DO NOT DIAL 911! This number is for emergency purposes only. If you have a pet, note that not all shelters will accept pets. Contact your vet or local humane society to find out which shelters in your area will allow them. DO NOT LEAVE ANIMALS BEHIND! If necessary, board them with a local kennel or veterinary clinic. Secure the exterior of your property. Remember: TAPE DOES NOT PREVENT WINDOWS FROM BREAKING! If you need to protect glass windows in your home, use plywood or metal protective sheeting – attached to the outside of the house. Never board them from the inside as high winds can force these barriers loose. Gather any important documents such as insurance papers, bank records, passports, etc and place them in a secured lock box. If a safe or lock box is unavailable, consider placing them in a safe deposit box, or packing them along with your spare clothes and emergency supplies. Examine the interior of your home and determine which areas of your house will serve as the
Author: Bennett L Dale August 11, 2007 Honolulu, HI

This form may be photocopied or reprinted for personal use. It is intended as an awareness guide only. In an emergency or disaster situation, you should undertake whatever means necessary to ensure your life-safety and security

“Safety Zone” during the storm. Ideally this zone will be on a lower floor (unless in a flood prone area) and will be well away from any exterior windows and doors. Inside hallways generally make excellent safe zones since you can close doors to rooms with exterior windows and usually have increased structural support overhead and underfoot. Place your emergency supplies in this safe zone and explain its sheltering purpose to all members of the family. Encourage children to participate in this process by having them create a camping environment with sleeping bags, radio, and related items. Check on your neighbors, especially the elderly or handicapped and ask if you can be of any assistance.

24 HOURS BEFORE THE STORM:
Monitor the hurricane’s projected path, strength, and landfall time every 2 to 4 hours and adjust preparations accordingly Turn your refrigerator to its coldest setting and keep the door closed. One effective way of preserving your refrigerated foods is to tape a piece of paper to the door that specifies the exact time every 4 to 6 hours when the door will be opened to take out supplies. If you have any trees, large shrubs, or other plants that might become a hazard, trim them back, tie them down, or move them (if in pots). Pick any large, heavy fruits or seeds that could pose a hazard in high winds. Pull trash cans and any other heavy items that can not be taken indoors up against the side of your home preferably in a wind-protected location Examine the interior of your home. If you are in a low lying flood prone area or near the beachfront, you may wish to consider removing pictures and paintings from downstairs walls, and moving any memorabilia or small furniture items to more protected areas on upper floors. Otherwise check each room that has exterior doors and windows and consider removing any small, valuable, or keepsake items to a hallway closet or other interior safe zone space. If you live along the beachfront or in flood or landslide zones, complete all tasks needed to secure your property, pack your emergency supplies in your vehicle, REMEMBER TO TAKE YOUR PET and any important documents, lock all doors to your home, and proceed to your designated shelter. Check on your neighbors, especially if they are elderly or handicapped and ask if you can be of any assistance. Consider keeping on-hand a reasonable amount of cash in small denominations. If there is no power, retailers will not be able to accept credit card purchases and/or they may not have sufficient quantities of small change available. If you are ordered by authorities to evacuate the area, collect your emergency supplies, take pets, and proceed to a hurricane shelter. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO REMAIN IN AN AREA THAT HAS BEEN ORDERED TO EVACUATE! Emergency authorities have your life-safety in mind. Always obey orders to leave a dangerous area. If you are unable to get to a designated shelter, call 911 and inform them that you have been told to evacuate but are unable to do so. Just before the storm approaches, fill your bathtub and/or any large containers with tap water. If the storm disrupts the water supply, this can be used for flushing toilets, washing dishes, limited bathing, etc.

DURING THE HURRICANE:
Author: Bennett L Dale August 11, 2007 Honolulu, HI This form may be photocopied or reprinted for personal use. It is intended as an awareness guide only. In an emergency or disaster situation, you should undertake whatever means necessary to ensure your life-safety and security

Winds can ebb and gust very unexpectedly. Do not go outdoors simply because it is not raining or you do not see signs of heavy winds. This scene can change instantly and dramatically. Stay safe by staying indoors. Recent scientific advances have improved our understanding of how hurricanes derive their destructive power and one such discovery has identified a major culprit in the destruction of property and injury or loss of life in these storms: Hurricanes often produce tornadoes. They strike within the storm itself and without warning. Doppler radar is often unable to distinguish these tornados from the hurricane itself and is not able to provide warning to those it its path. DURING THE STORM: stay safe and in your safe zone! Continuously try to monitor the storm. If electrical power is lost, revert to your battery powered radio in your emergency supplies kit. If you are experiencing ultra high winds that suddenly and inexplicably cease, DO NOT take this to mean that the storm is over. The central core, or windless “eye”, may be directly overhead. Exercise extreme caution if you venture outdoors. If you do so and it is possible to check on any neighbors in need, proceed carefully, but remember, you are only HALFWAY through the storm and the fury and power of its ultra high winds will be returning in a very short while. If your home has been severely damaged or you are injured and in need of assistance, dial 911 and request an emergency evacuation. Remain in a sheltered area as best you can. Do not attempt to venture outside in the storm unless your life is in imminent danger at your present location.

AFTER THE STORM:
CAREFULLY assess any damage to your home or property. Beware of possible downed electrical lines and other dangerous debris that might be hidden underfoot. If your home is unsafe, proceed to a designated shelter area, taking your emergency supplies, identity documents such as drivers licenses and passports, pets, clothes, etc. Proceed with extreme caution as hazards will most likely be all around. Wear sturdy shoes, long pants (if on hand) and walk carefully. Hurricanes and other large storms often displace local wildlife as well as humans. After a storm be very alert to the possible dangers of insects, reptiles, or other animals that have been forced from their familiar territories. Exercise caution when clearing debris or making repairs to damaged structures. Be careful with candles. Due to the large areas that can be covered with debris, it is generally unwise to choose candles over flashlights. Emergency services will be hard-pressed following a disaster and do not need to add fire control to their already stressed workloads. TETANUS: If you experience a puncture wound from a nail, fencing, or other sharp metal object, do not delay. Go to an area hospital or clinic and ask for a tetanus vaccination right away. Call your SPoC! Tell them that you and your family are safe and give them your contact location or alternate contact number if needed. Stay off your cell phone as much as possible. Save battery power for calling 911 in the event you need emergency assistance and power/phone lines are still down. Check on your neighbors and see if they need any assistance. Volunteer to participate in relief services with your local community organizations.

Author: Bennett L Dale

August 11, 2007 Honolulu, HI

This form may be photocopied or reprinted for personal use. It is intended as an awareness guide only. In an emergency or disaster situation, you should undertake whatever means necessary to ensure your life-safety and security


				
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Description: A FEMA approved home preparation checklist to prepare for an oncoming hurricane