Newtons Laws of Motion in Racing by sammyc2007

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									Newton’s Laws of Motion
By: Alicia and Kendra Gleason

February 19, 2006
• • • • • • • Heart Pounding Edge of your Seat Action Non Stop Excitement Two Hundred Laps Five Hundred Miles Jeff Gordon WHAT ARE WE TALKING ABOUT!?!?!?

Lesson Description
• Balloon Races • Newton’s First Law • Newton’s Third Law

Newton’s First Law
• • • • An object at rest will stay at ______ An object in motion will stay in _______ UNLESS a force acts upon that object Ex. Your sister will continue to sit on the sofa unless you kick her. Then, she will get up and beat the snot out of you.

Newton’s Third Law
• Forces always act in equal and opposite _____. • In pairs, come up with an example of this and be ready to share it with the class.

Objectives
• The students will be able to:
– Identify the conditions under which an object will obey Newton’s First Law. – Describe forces as they apply to Newton’s Third Law.

JOBS
• Materials Person • Recorder • Timer

• Spokes Person

Materials Person
• Get the materials • Put the materials away when done • Help keep your area clean

Recorder
• Complete hand outs with data • Use legible handwriting • At the end, write data on board

Timer
• Tell your group when you press start • Press stop when other group members say so • Be accurate, two digits after the decimal point

Spokes Person
• Come to an agreement with your group before speaking • Speak clear and loud enough to be heard • When speaking, respect others

Materials
• • • • • • • • • 3 balloons of different sizes and shapes 3 drinking straws String Tape Markers Stop Watch Calculator Meter Stick One “Balloon Race” Sheet per person in group

Step One:
• Run a string across the classroom to make a race track. Tape one end of the string securely to a wall. Leave the other end loose.

Step Two:
• Thread the string through one straw. Tape the straw length wise to the middle of the zigzag balloon with the open end pointing towards the loose end of the string.

Step Three:
• Blow up the balloon. Hold it closed.

Step Four:
• With your marker, mark on your string the starting point for your races. This should be directly above the nose of your balloon.

Step Five:
• Have one person tightly hold the string level horizontally. As the timer says “GO” and starts the stopwatch, the person holding the balloon closed lets go.

Step Six:
• Stop the stopwatch when the balloon stops moving. Record time to the nearest 100th of a second (two places after the decimal point) in the appropriate data table.

Step Seven:
• With your marker, mark on your string the end point for this run. This should be directly above the nose of your balloon. Measure the distance the balloon traveled in centimeters. Record the measurement to the appropriate data table.

Step Eight:
• Repeat steps 3 through 7 two more times with the same balloon.

Step Nine:
• Repeat steps 2 through 8 with the straight balloon.

Step Ten:
• Repeat steps 2 through 8 with the oval balloon EXCEPT blow up balloon prior to taping it to the straw.

Step Eleven:
• Calculate the average speed for each trial and then the overall average speed for each of the three balloon racers.

Data Analysis
• Send the Recorder up to the white board to record your groups data into the correct location.

Closure
• As a group, discuss the following questions and have the Spokes Person ready to share your answers.
– What aspects of these balloons made them travel far and fast? – How does the Balloon Race Experiment relate to Newton’s First and Third Law?

Objectives
• The students will be able to: – Identify the conditions under which an object will obey Newton’s First Law. – Describe forces as they apply to Newton’s Third Law.

References:
• Clip Art • www.greatatlantictravel.com/ nascar/daytona.html • www.thetravelcompany.net/ Sports6.html • http://phys.csuchio.edu/kagan/NSCT/work shops/ws4-sheryl12.html


								
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