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									 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                     Emergency Manager’s Weekly Report
                                12-12-08
(The articles, reports and additional information contained in this edition were collected from 12-5
                                              to 12-12)

 “The world breaks everyone and afterward many are strong in the broken
  places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the
very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can
        be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.”
                                       Ernest Hemingway




The Weekly Report is also posted on the following websites:
    6P International
      (http://www.6pinternational.com/news.php?category=Emergency%20Managers%20Wee
      kly%20Report&)
    Big Medicine (http://www.bigmedicine.ca/stevedetwiler.htm)
    EMPOWER (http://www.empower-
      women.com/mc/page.do?sitePageId=49319&orgId=emp)
    All-Hands.net (http://www.all-
      hands.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2235&Itemid=114)
    Pearce Global Partners (http://pearceglobalpartners.com/NewsArticles.html)
    California Emergency Services Association, Southern Chapter
      (http://cesa.net/aoi.cfm?color=st)
    IAEM Oceania (http://www.oceania-iaem.com/resources/aoi)
    Florida Emergency Preparedness Association (http://www.fepa.org)
    APCO International (http://apco911.org/new/commcenter911/resource.html)




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 1
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                  Table of Contents
Contributions                                                                          3

U.S. News Reports                                                                      4

Emergency Management                                                                   4
Homeland Security, Defense and National Security                                       10
Campus Safety and Security                                                             20
Special Needs                                                                          21
Hazard Research and News                                                               26
Public Safety Communications, Interoperability, 3-1-1 and 9-1-1 News                   27
Other                                                                                  28

International News Stories                                                             29

Mumbai India Terrorist Attack                                                          29
Somali Coastal Piracy                                                                  38
Civil Preparedness, Security and Humanitarian Affairs                                  39
Hazard Research and News                                                               41
International Affairs                                                                  43

Global Warming/Climate Change News Articles (U.S. and International)                   48

Alternate Energy Research and Development News                                         50

Reports                                                                                55

Additional Information                                                                 56




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 2
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                     Contributions
The following individuals or groups contribute to the Emergency Management and Homeland
Security Articles of Interest.

Editor
     Steve Detwiler

Regular Contributors
    International Association of                         National Congress for Secure
       Emergency Managers                                  Communities
    National Emergency Management                        Fire Chief‟s Command Post
       Association                                        American City and County
    Florida Emergency Preparedness                       Corporate Crisis Response Officers
       Association                                         Association
    Emergency Management Institute,                      APCO International
       Higher Education Program                           The Institute of the North
    Montgomery County, PA                                Nena Wiley
       Department of Public Safety                        Dave Freeman
    Natural Hazards Center                               Gregory Banner
    U.S. Department of Homeland                          Arthur Rabjohn
       Security                                           Martha Braddock
    Interagency Coordinating Council on                  Bill Firestone
       Emergency Preparedness and                         Ed Kostiuk
       Individuals with Disabilities                      Eric Holdeman
    National Organization on                             Kenny Shaw
       Disabilities, Emergency                            Robin Storm
       Preparedness Initiative
                                                          Hal Newman
    EAD & Associates, LLC
                                                          Dave Bujak
    Emergency Information
                                                          Brendan McCluskey
       Infrastructure Project
                                                          Dean Larson
    ProtectingAmerica.org
                                                          Chris Floyd
    U.S. Access Board
    Florida Division of Emergency
       Management

Guest Contributors
    Suzanne Blake
    Peter Fucci




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 3
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                   U.S. News Reports

Emergency Management
Brad Pitt works to 'make it right' in New Orleans
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/12/04/lkl.brad.pitt/index.html

Long Term Recovery Teams Anticipate the Needs of Wildfire Survivors (California)
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=46936

Best practices story - Quick Reopening Of Supermarket Served First Responders (Texas)
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=46962

Apathy could be biggest danger of 2008 hurricane season
http://www.beaufortgazette.com/174/story/634645.html

Texas, FEMA feud over storm relief
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2008/dec/04/texas-fema-feud-over-storm-relief/

Mitigation is not for the beach set (Texas)
http://www.galvnews.com/story.lasso?ewcd=8774fd6710061edb&-
session=TheDailyNews:4137BE1F1d65808668tpmU3B0193

Overwhelmingly bad government (Texas)
http://www.galvnews.com/story.lasso?ewcd=8b98667f0dff6816&-
session=TheDailyNews:4137BE1F1d78428775uNl3474A6F

California to Merge Emergency Services and Homeland Security
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/568171

Best practices story - 1907 Elevation Saved Galveston Church from Flooding (Texas)
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=46995

Mayor Steers Tiki Island Turnabout (Texas)
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=47007

Public Assistance Pilot Program Will End December 31
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=46955

Responding to Mass Shootings Takes Planning, Preparation
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/568910

Langford brings back Foley to fill two Atlantic City posts (New Jersey)
http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/180/story/340405.html

EMA director under fire; county leaders want replacement (Ohio)
http://www.journal-
news.com/news/content/oh/story/news/local/2008/12/09/hjn120908Turner.html?cxtype=rss&cxsv
c=7&cxcat=16

EMA board expresses confidence in director, gives him a raise (Ohio)
http://www.journal-
news.com/news/content/oh/story/news/local/2008/12/10/hjn121008Turner.html?cxtype=rss&cxsv
c=7&cxcat=16
   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 4
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


Suit alleges racism in the homeland security dept. (Louisiana)
http://www.kplctv.com/global/story.asp?s=9474621

A year on the brink (Oklahoma)
http://www.tulsaworld.com/site/printerfriendlystory.aspx?articleid=20081207_261_G1_Autili46951
1

Emergency Managers roles; need revisions
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/566113

Hospital pandemic drill reveals major supply challenges
http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/panflu/news/nov_2508ppe-jw.html

Gerald Flasher, long-time Franklin County director of emergency services, dies at 52
(Pennsylvania)
http://www.publicopiniononline.com/ci_11133953?source%253Dmost_viewed.20F88DA3D7D369
F5BB70F372987EAE1F.html

County judge reflects on hurricane season (Harris County, Texas)
http://baytownsun.com/story.lasso?ewcd=a47d2a5623fe79b3

Dauphin Island will not be replenished (Mississippi)
http://www.wlox.com/Global/story.asp?S=9458551

Special tent to brace for worst at Marathon of the Palm Beaches (Florida)
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/content/sports/epaper/2008/12/04/a5c_disaster_1205.html?
cxtype=rss&cxsvc=7&cxcat=46

Risk-Based Strategy Changes Focus of Flood Prevention
http://enr.ecnext.com/coms2/article_inen081203FloodPrevent

Hahn rebukes Port disaster plan (California)
http://www.dailybreeze.com/news/ci_11132238?source=rss

Councilor calls Hub evacuation plan 'a joke' (Massachusetts)
http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2008/12/02/councilor_calls_hub_evacu
ation_plan_a_joke/

Officials: Texas should have storm recovery plans
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ap/tx/6145726.html

Coastal Jackson Co. hires new emergency director (Mississippi)
http://www.sunherald.com/218/story/996845.html

ARC wants your input on evacuation plan (Georgia)
http://www.ajc.com/services/content/metro/stories/2008/12/05/arc_evacuation_survey.html?cxtyp
e=rss&cxsvc=7&cxcat=13

Texas gov requests $300M for Ike temporary housing
http://www.charlotteobserver.com/nation/story/395866.html

Economic Crisis Forces Twin Cities Red Cross Layoffs (Minnesota)
http://www.myfoxtwincities.com/myfox/pages/News/Detail?contentId=7995184&version=1&locale
=EN-US&layoutCode=TSTY&pageId=3.2.1
   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 5
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


Preparedness most effective in quakes (Tennessee)
http://www.tennessean.com/article/20081210/OPINION01/812100396/1008

RESILIENCY ADVOCATE CALLS FOR INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENTS
http://www.hstoday.us/content/view/6404/149/



Modest Gains against Ever-Present Bioterrorism Threat
An Attack Could Be Hard to Predict With Current Tools

By Spencer S. Hsu
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, August 3, 2008; A10

In the past seven years, the federal government has spent more than $57 billion to shore up the
nation's bioterrorism defenses, stockpiling drugs, ringing more than 30 American cities in a
network of detectors and boosting preparedness at hospitals.

The result: modest gains, at best, toward preventing another attack similar to the one in 2001, in
which anthrax bacteria killed five people and sickened 17, experts and government officials
agree.

"The threat of bioterrorism has not subsided," while the challenge of predicting or preventing a
major biological attack remains "daunting," Robert Hooks, the Homeland Security Department's
deputy assistant secretary for weapons of mass destruction and biodefense, told a House panel
two weeks ago.

"The potential for something to happen is much greater now than it was in 2001, simply because
of developments of technology and education," D.A. Henderson, who was principal science
adviser for public health preparedness to then-Health and Human Services secretary Tommy G.
Thompson, said in an interview.

The government has not developed a general-use anthrax vaccine. A new generation of sensors
that would sniff out threats more quickly has been delayed. A coordinated plan to respond to a
widespread outbreak still doesn't exist. And the rapid increase in the number of researchers
registered to work with biological agents, now 15,000 people, has come without enough
oversight.

"We may be putting dangerous pathogens in the hands of people who would deliberately cause
harm. We may also be putting them in the hands of people who may inadvertently or
unintentionally take steps to put large numbers of people at risk," said Elisa D. Harris, senior
research scholar at the Center for International and Security Studies at the University of
Maryland.

One cause is the government's difficulty organizing itself. Since 2003, for instance, management
of both the stockpile of medications that would be used in a disaster and the National Disaster
Medical System, the federal government's disaster health-care responders, has been shifted from
HHS to DHS and back.

A significant bright spot, many agree, is the dramatic improvement in government preparations to
respond to threats such as smallpox, botulism, plague and other biological agents. The Strategic
   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 6
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

National Stockpile, an emergency cache of critical pharmaceuticals that can be sent within 12
hours to counter outbreaks, has been greatly expanded, said Michael T. Osterholm, director of
the University of Minnesota's Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy.

The stockpile, details of which are classified, has 60 million treatment courses of antibiotics for
anthrax and pneumonic plague, according to a senior federal official with responsibility for
bioterrorism response. About 300 million doses of smallpox vaccine can also be shipped.

"If smallpox returned today, we could contain it and minimize the danger very quickly. I could not
have said that in 2001," Osterholm said. The anthrax attack "was a very important event in the
world of bioterrorism preparedness," he added. "It did finally wake people up to what bioterrorism
could do in this country and in the world."

The Bush administration has dedicated $57 billion for bioweapons, prevention and defense
through fiscal 2009, according to the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation. That includes
a $9 billion increase next year for research and development of countermeasures such as
vaccines.

The administration has tried to get its primary vaccine program, BioShield, back on track. The
HHS in 2006 killed the two-year-old program's largest component, an $877.5 million contract to
develop a new anthrax vaccine and last year canceled a project to develop radiation exposure
drugs.

Officials say that the government is retooling efforts to encourage drug companies to invest in
BioShield projects, and that the effort is paying off in new antitoxins for anthrax and botulism.
Science is also being advanced by a dramatic expansion of federally funded university research,
up from a handful of laboratories a decade ago to 400 today.

Still, the nation has seen few breakthroughs such as an anthrax vaccine that could safely
inoculate Americans and end what many scientists consider a top-tier threat. Some analysts
worry that the U.S. research effort is increasing the risk of abuse by a malevolent or unwitting
insider, whether or not bioweapons expert Bruce E. Ivins turns out to among them.

The White House last fall refocused its years-long effort to meet the "big three" of bioterrorism
preparedness needs: medical stockpiling, biosurveillance and mass casualty response.

On Oct. 18, the president signed a new homeland security directive to chart a fresh strategy for
public health and medical preparedness, which included creating a panel at the U.S. Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention to review biosurveillance efforts.

Early detection is critical because the impact of a bioweapons attack can spiral out of control in
the hours or days it takes to discover it. Administration defenders have praised BioWatch, a five-
year-old, $400 million effort to install sensors in more than 30 U.S. cities to detect the airborne
release of biological warfare agents such as anthrax spores, plague bacteria and smallpox virus.

All 50 states now can receive urgent disease reports around-the-clock and conduct year-round
surveillance for diseases such as influenza, according to the senior federal bioterrorism official.
The number of state and local public health laboratories that can detect biological agents has
increased from 83 to 110, and the number that can respond to chemical agents has climbed from
zero to 47, said the official, speaking on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of
the FBI's anthrax investigation.


   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 7
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Critics say big gaps remain. BioWatch remains of limited use, because it takes 10 to 34 hours for
samples taken by the machines to be analyzed. A new generation of sensors that can detect
lethal agents within four to six hours was scheduled for pilot deployment in 2008 but now is not
expected until 2010 or 2011.

Meanwhile, cities such as New York are pressing the federal government to spend tens of
millions of dollars more on interim technology. Other analysts say it makes more sense to spend
money to improve data collection and reporting by hospitals and clinics.

"There are a lot of fabulous new tools out there that could be turned to biosurveillance, but
government hasn't figured out how to marshal them, who should control them or what to do," said
Tara O'Toole, director of the Center for Biosecurity at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

Washington also has sent more than $8 billion in grants to hospitals and public health agencies
since 2002. The money reached more than 80 percent of 5,000 U.S. hospitals and funded 9,500
exercises in 2006 alone.

But the nation still lacks plans and an organized structure to respond to a massive disease
outbreak with thousands of victims. "The system still isn't there," Osterholm said. Hospitals strain
every day with overcrowded emergency rooms, while this summer's outbreak from salmonella
infection underscores the challenges facing public health experts to trace outbreaks of even food-
borne illness, he said.

It will do little good for the federal government to distribute stockpiled medications if health-care
workers aren't there to dispense them, Osterholm said, or for the federal biosensor alarm system
to ring if hospitals lack beds, nurses and tracking systems to manage patients.

"If we know the system is not going to work with everyone having a hospital bed, a nurse and all
the modern medicines they need, then we better damned well prepare for that," he said.

At Congress's direction, DHS this year is developing a new National Biosurveillance Integration
Center to coordinate federal efforts, but faces "big challenges" to being operational next month,
Hooks said. Only six of 11 federal agencies have agreed to participate, and only one has
completed a funding and staffing plan.

Henderson said such developments show that Washington is better prepared than it was in 2001
but is enmeshed in dangerous bureaucratic habits.

"There's a kind of complacency," he said. "You don't have the motivation now as they did right
after 9/11 and the anthrax attack, and so, they can look at it now and say, 'Well, nothing has
happened. We don't have to worry about it.' And they can sleep at night."




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 8
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Mississippi Groups Sue HUD, Objecting to Use of Katrina Aid for Port

By Spencer S. Hsu
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, December 11, 2008; A07

Mississippi civil rights and housing groups sued the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development yesterday to stop the distribution of nearly $600 million in Hurricane Katrina relief
aid to expand the Port of Gulfport, as sought by Gov. Haley Barbour (R).

Filed in federal court in the District, the lawsuit alleges that the money is part of $5.5 billion
approved by Congress for Mississippi after the August 2005 storm -- emergency relief that was
supposed to pay largely for affordable housing. But HUD granted waivers allowing the state to
use 21 percent of the money for low-income housing, instead of 50 percent as required for
Katrina aid channeled through the Community Development Block Grant program, plaintiffs
charged.

The filing escalates a long-simmering fight in Mississippi over how much Katrina relief money
should go to help house poorer residents and how much should go to boost employment and
economic development. The Gulfport port project has become a symbol for both sides.

The port lost about 700,000 square feet of storage facilities and other infrastructure in the storm,
and regional leaders have long hoped for a port expansion that would position the area to benefit
from the long-term growth of Gulf Coast shipping. But opponents say low-income families are
losing out to business interests, and they contend that the port's storm losses were partially
covered by insurance and other federal aid and that its growth should be funded by bonds and
other sources.

"Though the storm did not intentionally discriminate, the damage did reveal the impact of
decades-long discrimination against poor, African American people who were already living in
substandard housing," said Derrick Johnson, president of Mississippi's NAACP chapter, a plaintiff
in the case along with the Gulf Coast Fair Housing Center and four individuals. "For the first time
in our state's history, we have the resources to right this wrong."

HUD spokesman Brian Sullivan said agency lawyers have not seen the lawsuit and had no
comment.

In a January letter to Barbour, then-HUD Secretary Alphonso R. Jackson wrote that he shared
concerns that the port expansion "does indeed divert emergency federal funding from other more
pressing recovery needs, most notably affordable housing."

Congress, however, "allows me little discretion," Jackson wrote. He approved the funding shift
before resigning in April.

Barbour's office released a statement saying the port project is part of the state's recovery
program that was vetted by Congress. "It's always been in the plan," Barbour said. "Restoration
of the Port of Gulfport is critical to recovery of the Gulf Coast from the worst natural disaster in
American history."




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 9
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Homeland Security, Defense and National Security
September 11 defendants ask to plead guilty
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20081208/us_nm/us_guantanamo_hearings_pleas

U.S. Is Losing Global Cyberwar, Commission Says
http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/content/dec2008/db2008127_817606.htm

Terror protection under one roof (California)
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/metro/20081209-9999-1m9homeland.html

Suspicious letters sent to at least 6 governors
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28120804/

Pentagon faulted for not preparing for roadside bomb threat
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081209/wl_mideast_afp/usmilitaryiraqmrap_081209180156

State offers anti-agroterrorism training (Pennsylvania)
http://www.eveningsun.com/localnews/ci_11118939

DHS and FBI brief U.S. building owners on Mumbai attacks
http://deepbackground.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2008/12/03/1697873.aspx

CONFLUENCE OF EVIL: THE SMUGGLING-TERRORISM NEXUS
http://www.hstoday.us/content/view/6239/92/

FBI INTELLIGENCE ASSESSMENT WARNS OF INFRASTRUCTURE THREAT FROM
COPPER THEFTS
http://www.hstoday.us/content/view/6307/149/

Malls boost security as shopping season starts
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-12-04-mallsecurity_N.htm

Advisory panel supports DHS on information sharing
http://www.fcw.com/online/news/154550-1.html?topic=homeland_security

ABC to air 'Homeland Security' series
http://www.upi.com/Entertainment_News/2008/12/04/ABC_to_air_Homeland_Security_series/UPI
-80181228430757/

Homeland Security chief praises Bush
http://www.app.com/article/20081204/NEWS/81204037/1001/rss

More problems for major post-9/11 security program
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-
bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2008/12/04/national/w113957S38.DTL&feed=rss.business

Decoy fails to deploy, but missile test called 'success'
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/12/05/us.missile.test/index.html

Commentary: WMD terrorism fears are overblown
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/12/05/bergen.wmd/index.html

Mumbai attacks refocus U.S. cities
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-12-05-mumbaisecurity_N.htm
    Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 10
  opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                  organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


New York's top cop warns of copycat Mumbai attacks
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/12/06/ny.security/index.html

MAKE HSIN MORE RESPONSIVE, IG SAYS
http://www.hstoday.us/content/view/6339/128/

Border official accused of hiring illegal workers (Massachusetts)
http://www.cfnews13.com/News/National/2008/12/5/border_official_accused_of_hiring_illegal_wo
rkers.html

Concerns voiced over new border-crossing rules
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=41567&sid=60

Gates stresses nuclear responsibility at Air Force base
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=41540&sid=60

Drone lands in ND in preparation for border patrol
http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=D94U6UA00&show_article=1

Audit finds DHS weak in balance sheet reporting
http://www.fcw.com/online/news/154586-1.html?topic=homeland_security

Report: Administration has mixed record on clearances
http://www.fcw.com/online/news/154585-1.html?topic=homeland_security

No exit
http://www.fcw.com/print/22_38/features/154559-1.html?topic=homeland_security

Social networking sites concern cyber-security experts
http://www.physorg.com/news148139711.html

Study urges dual track US nuclear weapons policy
http://www.physorg.com/news148132530.html

Military to try Air Force officer accused of theft
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-
bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2008/12/10/national/a155731S78.DTL&type=science

Fly through airport security this holiday season
http://www.usatoday.com/travel/flights/2008-12-11-holiday-security-tips_N.htm




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 11
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you‟re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

December 10, 2008

Relatives of 9/11 Victims Add a Passionate Layer to Guantánamo Debate
By WILLIAM GLABERSON

GUANTÁNAMO BAY, Cuba — After the detainees charged with the plotting of the Sept. 11
attacks discussed confessing this week, something unusual was heard here: a vigorous public
defense of Guantánamo.

“Guantánamo Bay has gotten a bad rap,” said Alice Hoagland, whose son was killed in the 2001
attack.


Hamilton Peterson, whose father was killed that day, said the procedures of the much-criticized
military commission tribunal seemed plenty fair. “The entire day,” he said, “was giving these
defendants their due.”


The routine here has long included officials making their case for the detentions and trials at the
Guantánamo naval base in muted bureaucratese about “fair and open” proceedings. They were
outmatched by human rights groups and defense lawyers, with their inflammatory accusations
about torture and secret evidence.


This week, the Pentagon brought victims‟ families for the first time as observers. The half-dozen
family members who spoke to reporters gave the Pentagon the counterpoint it had been lacking.


They also provided a sample of the emotional crosscurrents swirling around President-elect
Barack Obama over Guantánamo. He has said he will close the detention camp. But its critics
worry he may not carry through. He has said the military commission system has failed. But its
critics worry that he may continue it, particularly with the Sept. 11 case now at a pivotal stage.


For each side in the seven-year struggle over Guantánamo, this is the definitive moment in an
argument that is a surrogate for other arguments about America‟s definition of justice and its role
in the world.


This week, that meant the victims‟ families were in the thick of an old debate, suddenly
turbocharged. Some of them called for Mr. Obama to keep Guantánamo open. Others said the
military tribunal here should be permitted to finish its work.


The unaccustomed rebuttal unsettled the Bush administration‟s critics here. Defense lawyers and
human rights monitors said the Pentagon was using the victims‟ family members and had
handpicked those invited.



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Officials insisted the family members had been selected randomly. But the chief military defense
lawyer here, Col. Peter R. Masciola, said he wondered “what the government is trying to make
you believe by only bringing the victims they want to bring.”

Thomas A. Durkin, a defense lawyer from Chicago who represents one of those accused of
plotting the Sept. 11 attacks, said the display of the victims‟ relatives was an effort to make it
politically risky for Mr. Obama to close the military commissions by making it appear that
abandoning the military commissions would be abandoning the victims too.

“This show trial is nothing more today than an effort to blackmail him politically,” Mr. Durkin said.


Pentagon officials have a track record of trying to line up pro-Bush-administration observers. In
June, the Pentagon withdrew an invitation it had extended to another relative of a Sept. 11 victim,
Debra Burlingame, after news organizations learned that she had been invited without any other
victims‟ representatives. Ms. Burlingame had written that detainees‟ lawyers “subvert the truth
and transform the Constitution into a lethal weapon.”


This week‟s appearance by the victims‟ family members came at an awkward juncture for the
Pentagon. Its public position is that it stands ready to carry out Mr. Obama‟s orders on
Guantánamo once he becomes president. But some military officials have been working behind
the scenes to convince transition officials that the military commissions may be useful in fighting
terrorism.

Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, who is to remain in the new administration, muddied the
current debate about Guantánamo by saying last week that closing the detention camp was a
priority but adding, “I think some legislation probably is needed as part of it.”


The Pentagon has long argued that to close Guantánamo and transfer some detainees to the
United States, Congress should pass legislation declaring that the government has the authority
to hold detainees indefinitely in the United States even if they are not convicted of any charges.


Civil liberties groups and other critics of the Bush administration have been on alert for any sign
that the Obama administration would consider asking for an indefinite detention law. That, in the
view of some of critics, would be a first retreat by Mr. Obama on Guantánamo. An Obama call for
indefinite detention, they say, could be one short step from continuing the military commissions.


The public debate here has always been a concentrated version of the debate in Washington
about detention. This week, there was more at stake because everyone seemed to think it might
be their last chance.



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For the victims‟ families it was their first chance at that last word. Jim Samuel of Brick, N.J., went
to the courtroom here to see the men who proudly said they planned the World Trade Center
attack. “My son was on the 92nd floor,” he said.

There were some things this week for which there was no rebuttal.




Justices to Decide Legality of Indefinite Detention
Case of Qatari National, Held Without Formal Charges, Is Test of Executive Power Asserted by
Bush

By Robert Barnes
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, December 6, 2008; A02

The Supreme Court said yesterday it will decide whether the president may order the indefinite
detention of suspects living lawfully in the United States, one of the broadest claims of executive
power the Bush administration has asserted in the nation's anti-terrorism efforts.

The court said it will review the case of Ali Saleh Kahlah al-Marri, a Qatari national studying in
Illinois when he was seized in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks and held in a Navy brig
for more than five years without formal charges.

The case will present President-elect Barack Obama with an immediate decision on whether to
endorse President Bush's aggressive use of executive power or to strike a new path in how the
country confronts those suspected of planning additional al-Qaeda attacks.

The Supreme Court has ruled against the Bush administration four times on cases that involve
the assertion of executive power with limited judicial review. Most recently, the court ruled 5 to 4
that terrorism suspects held at the naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, have the right to
challenge their detention in federal court.

While Marri is the only person seized on U.S. soil and currently held as an enemy combatant --
the administration says he was part of a sleeper al-Qaeda cell intent on mass murder and
disrupting the banking system -- the larger question of the president's powers might be the most
significant the court has yet considered.

"The constitutional scope of the administration's unilateral detention powers," said Robert
Chesney, a national security expert at the Wake Forest University law school, "is the question
we've all been waiting for an answer to."

In a splintered decision this summer, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit in Richmond
ruled that the president had the power to detain Marri under the 2001 Authorization for Use of
Military Force enacted by Congress after the Sept. 11 attacks. But a separate majority also said
Marri had the right to challenge his designation as an enemy combatant before a district court in
South Carolina, where he is currently being held.

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The Bush administration had urged the Supreme Court to allow that process to go forward before
taking Marri's case.

But lawyers for Marri had urged the justices to take the case now, saying the administration's
reading of the military force authorization is "clearly not what Congress intended," in the words of
Marri's lawyer, Jonathan Hafetz of the American Civil Liberties Union.

"The president has deviated from the principles on which the United States and its Constitution
were founded: that individuals cannot be imprisoned for suspected wrongdoing without being
charged with a crime and tried before a jury," he said in a statement.

But Solicitor General Gregory G. Garre, in a brief to the court, said it was "absurd" to assert that
the president was doing anything other than what Congress had given him power to do to prevent
"another September 11."

"All signs point to the conclusion that Congress intended to authorize detention of al Qaeda
agents who, like petitioner, come to this country to commit hostile or war-like acts," Garre wrote.
"And a contrary conclusion would severely undermine the military's ability to protect the nation
against further al Qaeda attack at home."

The court said it would consider whether the law authorizes -- and if so, whether the Constitution
allows -- "the seizure and indefinite military detention of a person lawfully residing in the United
States, without criminal charge or trial" based on government assertions of al-Qaeda contacts.

Marri was a graduate student in Peoria, Ill., when he was arrested in December 2001. He was
charged a year later with lying to the FBI and using a false name and a stolen Social Security
number to apply for bank accounts in Macomb, Ill., for a fictitious business.

But just before his trial in June 2003, Bush ordered the attorney general to turn him over to the
military, and he has been held in isolation in the Navy brig in Charleston, S.C., since.

The government says Marri trained at an al-Qaeda camp and met Osama bin Laden and Khalid
Sheik Mohammed in the summer of 2001, and officials have said that the FBI came to think he
was al-Qaeda's senior operative in the United States. A government affidavit filed with the court
quoted a defense intelligence official saying that "Al-Marri offered to be an al Qaeda martyr."

Marri is the last of three designated enemy combatants held in the United States since 2001. His
case is most similar to that of Jose Padilla, a U.S. citizen originally accused of attempting to
explode a radiological "dirty bomb" in the United States. Padilla was transferred to civilian custody
to face terrorism charges before the Supreme Court could take up the issue of the military's
power to detain him.

Al-Marri v. Pucciarelli probably will be heard in March, after Obama takes office with his new team
at the Justice Department. Although Obama has strongly opposed Bush on the claims of
executive power he has made in fighting terrorism, his views on Marri and enemy combatants
held inside the country are unclear. Obama has promised to abolish military commissions
underway at Guantanamo Bay and has said that accused terrorists should be tried in civilian
courts or military courts-martial.

A spokeswoman for Obama's national security team yesterday declined to comment. "President-
elect Obama will make decisions about how to handle detainees as president when his full


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national security and legal teams are in place. There is one president at a time, and we intend to
respect that," Brooke Anderson said.

Obama's options include backing the administration's current position of broad detention
authority. He -- or the Bush administration -- could also short-circuit the court's examination by
attempting to charge Marri in federal court or by deporting him to his native country.

But Chesney, the law professor, said it was unclear whether the statements relied upon by the
government to detain Marri would be admissible as evidence in federal court.

Obama also, of course, has the option of reversing the administration's interpretation of the law
once he takes office.

A prominent group of former judges and Justice Department lawyers, along with retired military
officers, filed briefs backing Marri's position. They include Maj. Gen. Antonio M. Taguba, who led
the Army's first official investigation into abuse at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

The ruling supporting Bush is "a grave threat to the civil liberties of American citizens," said the
brief submitted by the group, which also included former attorney general Janet Reno and former
federal judge Abner Mikva, a longtime Obama mentor.

Additionally, liberal civil rights groups who have been hostile to Bush and friendly to Obama
cheered the court's decision to take the case, and made it clear that they expect the Obama
administration to see the policy differently.

"Conflicts like this one are among the best reasons to look forward to a new administration," said
Kathryn Kolbert, president of the liberal People for the American Way.




Plans of Attack

By Richard A. Clarke
Sunday, December 7, 2008; B01

Ten young men land a small boat at a quay in a city of 18 million people. Within minutes of setting
ashore, they are throwing grenades and raking crowds with automatic weapons fire. Days later,
almost 200 people are dead, more are wounded, the financial capital of a nation of a billion
people has ground to a halt, and the world is riveted.

To most of the world, the Mumbai massacre seems inexplicable and random, like the periodic
devastation caused by typhoons or tornadoes, or simply pointless, just killing for killing's sake.
But the attack was neither random nor pointless. The carnage in Mumbai was goal-oriented, an
attempt to advance an overall strategy that is being ruthlessly pursued by the Islamist radical
network.

That network of groups is approaching 2009 with a specific agenda. So, too, is the incoming
leadership of the network's chief enemy, the United States. To understand how the two sides
think, imagine two hypothetical meetings in which each side plots its terrorism agenda for 2009.

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***

Rawalpindi is a military city, home to Pakistan's senior

officers and retired military men. That would seem to make it an unlikely place for the world's
most wanted terrorists, the people whom U.S. officials call "high-value targets," to meet. But
Rawalpindi is where the ringleader of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, Khalid Sheikh Mohammad, hid,
precisely because no one would think of looking for him there. Perhaps the leaders of al-Qaeda,
the Taliban movement that is again on the march in Afghanistan and some Pakistani terrorist
groups obsessed with Kashmir would also come together there -- say, in a safe house owned by
a sympathetic retired Pakistani leader of the country's powerful and shadowy military intelligence
agency, the Inter-Services Intelligence Directorate (ISI).

A half-dozen bearded and robed men are sitting on rugs in a circle. As the titular leader of the
movement, Osama bin Laden opens the meeting. After praising God, he thanks the former ISI
general for hosting the group. "I recall well how you often met with me in Afghanistan during the
war against the godless Soviets," bin Laden says. "I remember how you helped us set up our
training camps there in the 1990s, and how you provided us with safe haven here in Pakistan
when we left Afghanistan after our 'planes operation' brought down the towers in 2001." He
pauses to sip his tea. "It looked bad for us at the end of 2001. But now, thanks to God and thanks
to the help of our friends in Pakistan, we are exactly where we wanted to be: draining the
Americans' blood in the mountains of Afghanistan, walking the road toward reestablishing a
government of the faithful there, a new caliphate. That will be the first of many caliphates, of
many truly pious governments, that will rule all the nations of Islam. And one day, long after we
are gone, they will, God willing, unite into a single caliphate to rule over all the world."

But the leader of the Taliban is shaking his head in disagreement. "Does the commander of the
faithful disagree that this is God's plan?" bin Laden asks the Afghan cleric.

Mullah Muhammad Omar glares at his erstwhile ally with his only eye. "Unlike you, I cannot know
God's plan," he snaps. "What I do know is this: I used to rule the Emirate of Afghanistan, and
now, because you brought the Americans to my country after your planes plot, I am in exile. Yes,
I am comfortable enough, in a villa under ISI protection in Quetta, but other Pakistani military
officers are making things difficult for us. My forces are preparing to liberate our homeland from
the American stooge, Hamid Karzai, but sometimes, when the Americans insist, the Pakistani
military harasses us. And Pakistan still won't stop the Americans from raining missiles on us from
their 'planes without men,' killing my lieutenants."

The only young man in the circle, Hakimullah Mehsud, a leader of a Pakistani group also known
as the Taliban, wags a finger in the air. "If the Pakistani military do not stop this harassment, we
will cut off the Americans' supply lines," he declares. "All of the Americans' things in Afghanistan
come through our country." Growing more agitated, the young Pakistani leaps to his feet. "If the
Pakistani military keeps it up, we will wage jihad right here and take over the country! Then we
will have the nuclear bomb!"

"Sit down," commands Ayman al-Zawahiri, al-Qaeda's No. 2. "Soon, the Pakistani army will leave
the Afghan border. Thanks be to God, to Hafiz Muhammad Sayeed and to Lashkar-i-Taiba."
Zawahiri nods his head in thanks to the red-bearded Sayeed, the head of the organization behind
the Pakistani terrorist group Lashkar-i-Taiba (Army of the Pious). "No one in India believes that
you in Lashkar could have pulled off the Mumbai attack without help from Pakistani intelligence.
So the enraged Indian public will demand that their government respond. And once India begins
to move its troops toward the Pakistani frontier, the Pakistani army will abandon the Afghan


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border, leaving us free to operate, to cut the Americans' supply lines, to reinforce our brothers
who are killing the Americans inside Afghanistan."

Zawahiri throws his short, squat body back into a mound of pillows and smiles at bin Laden. "Our
tactics are forcing the Americans to rain down airstrikes on Afghan villages," says the Egyptian
physician turned terrorist. "This is already causing the government in Kabul to demand a
timetable for American withdrawal. This spring, we will step up our attacks, before the Americans
can shift their forces from Iraq back to Afghanistan. After the snow melts, we will overrun the
Americans' bases. This new American house Negro, Barack, will be forced to negotiate a peace
with our brothers in the Taliban. Then the Americans will leave, and we will have created the
caliphate we dream of."

A long pause follows. Bin Laden breaks it, speaking softly, looking at the rug beneath him. "I fear
this Barack is not as weak as you think, doctor. Already, many of the faithful are ready to forgive
the Americans their sins just because they have chosen him as their leader. It is a setback for
us." Bin Laden raises his head, and a wry smile passes briefly over his face. "But . . . his
economy is badly ill. If it gets much worse, he will have to bring all of his troops home. So . . . we
may have to increase their pain level. We have done that before."

***

On the ground level of the West Wing of the White House, a dozen men and women trickle into
the wood-paneled Situation Room. They balance thick briefing books and cups of hot coffee from
the White House Mess next door. The meeting's chairman, a member of the National Security
Council staff, brings to order this gathering of the Counterterrorism Security Group, the committee
that coordinates U.S. counterterrorism efforts. Behind and above his chair is the seal of the
president of the United States.

"All right, let's get going," the NSC man intones. "President Obama wants a high-level game plan
for counterterrorism efforts in 2009. First, we need the intelligence picture." The NSC staffer turns
to the woman sitting to his left, who works in the National Counterterrorism Center.

"Well, as we said in the recent National Intelligence Estimate on terrorism, we had a break for a
while after we smashed the al-Qaeda sanctuary in Afghanistan after 9/11," she begins. "But now
al-Qaeda has reconstituted itself in the Pakistani tribal areas, right along the border with
Afghanistan. The Pakistani army tries every once in a while to rein them in, but essentially,
they're just too weak to gain control of the Wild West border areas. Al-Qaeda is busy training
terrorists up there, including Europeans and Asians, people who could slip into the United States
without arousing suspicion. And al-Qaeda is also developing another sanctuary in Somalia, where
their local allies have been taking over Somali cities. It's not a soothing picture. We could see al-
Qaeda attacks in 2009 on the Arabian Peninsula, in Europe, even here at home. But of course,
we have no actionable intelligence pointing to a specific plot."

The intelligence officer pauses. "We are also getting reports that al-Qaeda has created joint
fighting units with the Taliban, which are attacking U.S. bases in Afghanistan from their sanctuary
inside Pakistan."

Sighing, the NSC man turns to the Navy admiral on his right for a report from the military. The
white-suited officer signals a colonel sitting behind him to project a PowerPoint slide onto the
large flat screen at the end of the room. "As you can see from Chart One," the admiral says, "we
will reinforce Afghanistan with one brigade from the 82nd Airborne in the first quarter of '09. What
we do after that depends on how fast we can get more brigades out of Iraq and over to the
Afghan front."
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The colonel clicks a button. "Chart Two," the admiral says. "We anticipate a major Taliban
offensive in April, once the brutal winter weather passes. Which is good for us, because once we
get them out in the open, we can pound 'em with airpower."

Another click from the colonel. "Chart Three," the admiral continues. "But to 'win' in Afghanistan,
we need the State Department to step up to the plate. We need reconstruction, economic
development, governance efforts. State also needs to persuade the Pakistanis to clean up the
border area and keep our supply lines into Afghanistan secure."

The State Department representative, a career Foreign Service officer, takes her cue. "That's not
going to be easy," she warns. "We were making some decent progress with the Pakistanis last
year, even getting them to start a rapprochement with the Indians. But after Mumbai, all of that is
at risk. If the Indians overreact, we could really be off to the races. We need our new president to
use his pretty considerable appeal in South Asia, not just to stop these hotheads from going to
war, but to actually broker a deal between India and Pakistan. He also needs to persuade the
NATO allies to keep their forces in Afghanistan, maybe increase their numbers a little and allow
them to fight. And of course, he has to win the battle of ideas by reestablishing America's support
for democracy, human rights and international law."

The NSC man looks at the ceiling tiles. "And what would you have the president do on the
second day?"

***

Seven years after 9/11, the United States has neither eliminated the threat from al-Qaeda nor
secured Afghanistan, where bin Laden's terrorists were once headquartered. To accomplish
these two tasks, we must now eliminate the new terrorist safe haven in Pakistan. But that will
require effective action from a weak and riven Pakistani government. It might also depend upon
dealing with the long-standing India-Pakistan rivalry. On balance, al-Qaeda's agenda for 2009
looks to be the easier one.




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Campus Safety and Security
Pacific University is First to Integrate Facebook and Twitter into e2Campus Emergency
Notification System (Oregon)
http://www.e2campus.com/PR081203-Pacific_Facebook_Twitter.htm

Kansas leaders excited to have national biosafety facility on K-State Campus
http://kstatecollegian.com/1.1048685

Auditor rips Education Dept. (Pennsylvania)
http://www.philly.com/philly/hp/news_update/20081204_Auditor_rips_Education_Dept_.html

Pennsylvania teen charged with plotting to kill school enemies
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/12/09/school.plot/index.html

Storms Damage Haralson County School (Georgia)
http://www.cbs46.com/news/18242519/detail.html




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Special Needs
For additional articles on this topic feel free to visit:
http://www.eadassociates.com/news.html or
http://www.nod.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=Page.viewPage&pageId=1564

Illinois Posts Disaster Preparedness Guide for Senior Citizens and People with Disabilities
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/568113

Upgrading from a cardboard box for the homeless
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-edar10-2008dec10,0,5253031.story

Collars for a Cause-Paws to Save PetsSM Dog Collars Benefit Pets Affected by Natural Disasters
http://www.prweb.com/releases/2008/12/prweb1707034.htm




December 5, 2008
Many Children Lack Stability Long After Storm
By SHAILA DEWAN


BATON ROUGE, La. — Last January, at the age of 15, Jermaine Howard stopped going to
school. Attendance seemed pointless: Jermaine, living with his father and brother in the evacuee
trailer park known as Renaissance Village since Hurricane Katrina in 2005, had not managed to
earn a single credit in more than two years.


Not that anyone took much notice. After Jermaine flunked out of seventh grade, the East Baton
Rouge School District allowed him to skip eighth grade altogether and begin high school. After
three semesters of erratic attendance, he left Baton Rouge in early spring of this year and moved
in with another family in a suburb of New Orleans, where he found a job at a Dairy Queen.


A shy, artistic boy with a new mustache, Jermaine is one of tens of thousands of youngsters who
lost not just all of their belongings to Hurricane Katrina, but a chunk of childhood itself.


After more than three years of nomadic uncertainty, many of the children of Hurricane Katrina are
behind in school, acting out and suffering from extraordinarily high rates of illness and mental
health problems. Their parents, many still anxious or depressed themselves, are struggling to
keep the lights on and the refrigerator stocked.


For some, like Kearra Keys, 16, who was expelled from her Baton Rouge school for fighting and
is now on a waiting list for a G.E.D. program, what was lost may be irretrievable. For others, like
Roy Hilton, who stands a head taller than his third-grade classmates, recovery may lie in the
neighborhood school near the New Orleans duplex where his family has finally found a home.
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The families profiled in this series were among the last to leave Renaissance Village when the
Federal Emergency Management Agency closed it in May. The government was trying to nudge
the poorest, least-educated and sickest evacuees toward self-sufficiency — or at least toward
agencies other than FEMA.


More than 30,000 former trailer residents landed in apartments paid for by the federal
government until March 2009, a small fraction are in the hands of private charities or government
housing programs for the disabled, and thousands more simply traded in their trailers for other
temporary quarters. Case managers promised by FEMA to help these families find permanent
homes have yet to start work in Louisiana.


Many of the adults are at least partly victims of their own poor choices. But the children are
another matter. For them, the experts prescribe the one thing that has been hardest to obtain:
stability. Their parents sometimes work against that goal.


Jermaine‟s father, Joseph Griffin, has had trouble holding on to steady work and said he did not
see much value in his son‟s attending school this semester because he had already missed so
much class. “If he doesn‟t get no credits for it, what sense does it make for him to sit up in there?”
Mr. Griffin said. “I was going to try to get him a job.”


The health problems of Hurricane Katrina children are daunting. When the Children‟s Health
Fund, whose mobile health clinics have provided the only doctors and psychologists available to
many of these families, reviewed the charts of children seen this year, researchers with the
Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University found that 41 percent under age 4 had
iron-deficiency anemia — twice the rate for children in New York City‟s homeless shelters.
Anemia, often attributable to poor nutrition, is associated with developmental problems and
academic underachievement.


Forty-two percent of the children, who lived in trailers laced with dangerous levels of
formaldehyde, had allergic rhinitis or an upper respiratory infection, the study found.


More than half of those ages 6 to 11 had a behavior or learning problem, yet in the East Baton
Rouge School District children can wait for as long as two years to be tested for learning
disabilities.




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“Not only has their health not improved since the storm,” the study said, “over time it has declined
to an alarming level.”


Medical care, counseling and child care are hard to find. In that respect, LaTonya London has
been lucky. Her youngest children, born while the family lived at Renaissance Village, have two of
the 16 Early Head Start slots — down from 200 right after the storm — reserved for evacuees of
Hurricane Katrina in Baton Rouge. The baby, Edbony, was born with no forearms. Darren, 2, was
two months premature and suffers from asthma and delayed speech.


The eldest of Ms. London‟s five children, Darrell, 7, has developed behavior problems so serious
that he has already been suspended several times from first grade, causing Ms. London to
abandon plans to start vocational training, she said. In response, she has resumed counseling
sessions for Darrell at the mobile clinic.


Dr. Irwin Redlener, the director of the Children‟s Health Fund, notes that there is as yet no
comprehensive method of tracking these children, who are supposed to be the subject of a long-
term study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


The key to giving these children a future, doctors and educators have long said, is providing them
with a sense of stability — a home that seems permanent, a school where they can put down
roots. The recommendation is underscored by the gains made by those families that have found
a toehold.


After months of looking, Laura Hilton, who is functionally illiterate, finally found an apartment in
New Orleans for her and her two sons, George, 17, and Roy, 11, that was within walking distance
of Roy‟s school. Laura‟s husband was murdered in New Orleans after the storm, and at the trailer
park the Hilton children attended school only fitfully. Roy was known for being both endearing and
utterly ungovernable.


Now Roy, who is at least three grades behind and needs special education, tutoring and
counseling, can hardly be persuaded to leave school when the last bell rings. He helps teachers
on their work days and shows up for Saturday detention even when he has not misbehaved. He
fights less, and recently volunteered to sit in the principal‟s office at recess to keep from getting
into trouble and losing his field-trip privileges.




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“When he first came in, I was like, „Why me?‟ ” Wanda Brooks, the principal at the James Weldon
Johnson Elementary School, said. “As a school, you‟re frustrated — why didn‟t somebody look at
this when he was 10?” But then she got to know Roy.


“They begin to talk to you, and you begin to realize what the child went through,” Ms. Brooks said.
“He has not gotten over his dad‟s death.”


Roy has received special attention from a male role model, Edward Williams, the football coach at
Johnson. On a recent morning, Mr. Williams went into Roy‟s classroom to find him sulking at his
desk while the other children practiced a dance routine.


Drawing Roy aside, Mr. Williams told him: “You got to get up and move around. You got to try.”


Moments later, Roy was dancing.


But life outside the trailers has not been a relief for every child. With its white tent that served as a
community center, Renaissance Village reeked of impermanence, though for many young
children who lived there it was almost the only home they had known.


Since the park closed, Adrian Love and her father, Alton, have moved into a Baton Rouge
apartment (her mother, a crack user, lives in New Orleans). Mr. Love, who has not been able to
hold a job since the storm, does not allow Adrian, 9, to play outside much, instead writing out
long-division problems for her in a notebook after dinner.


On Adrian‟s first report card this year, she got straight A‟s. But she sees her friends from
Renaissance Village only rarely. “I wish I still lived there,” she said.


Despite her wistfulness, Adrian projects a poise that makes her seem resilient.


Children who had no serious problems before the storm are likely to recover well, said Toni
Bankston, who until recently was the director of mental health at the Baton Rouge Children‟s
Health Project. But, she estimated, only about 60 percent fall into that category.


Ms. Bankston has particularly grave concerns about the children who have fallen so far behind in
school that there is little chance of their catching up. “What you‟re looking at is our future juvenile
justice, our prison population,” she said.



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In October, Jermaine Howard returned to Baton Rouge and moved into the one-bedroom
apartment occupied by his father, brother and grandmother. With the help of Sister Judith Brun, a
nun who has been working with evacuees since the storm, he enrolled in ninth grade at
Broadmoor High School.


That process alone provided a snapshot of the chaos of Jermaine‟s life. From several plastic
baggies and a dented metal canister, the family could barely amass the documents needed to
prove his address.


School administrators balked when they discovered that he had previously been registered under
his father‟s last name, Griffin, not the name on his birth certificate. Jermaine, with tears in his
eyes, was forced to explain that his mother was in prison. He was told to pay a visit to the
ominous-sounding Board of Hearings. Then came the kicker: because he had already missed so
much, he would receive no credit for this semester.


“Nice to see y‟all,” the school guidance counselor said by way of welcome. “Just too bad it wasn‟t
about three months ago.”




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Hazard Research and News
Military jet crash in San Diego kills 2 on ground (California)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081208/ap_on_re_us/military_jet_crash

San Diego man mourns loss of family, forgives Marine pilot in jet crash
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-jetcrash10-2008dec10,0,1786682.story

FDA details year's progress on food protection plan
http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/biosecurity/food-biosec/news/dec0208fda-br.html

It's time to take Delta plan seriously (California)
http://www.dailydemocrat.com/ci_11126637?source=most_emailed

Engineers Work to Make Historic Buildings Safer During Strong Earthquakes (California)
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081204133649.htm

A TIME OF TORNADOES
http://www.hstoday.us/content/view/6241/92/

Scientists Have A New Scientific Tool For Hurricane Research
http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Scientists_Have_A_New_Scientific_Tool_For_Hurricane_Rese
arch_999.html

Great Indian Ocean earthquake of 2004 set off tremors in San Andreas fault
http://www.physorg.com/news148136737.html

Study designed to measure ice storm severity
http://www.usatoday.com/weather/news/2008-12-08-oklahoma-ice-storm-damage-index_N.htm

Rare Snow Blankets South Louisiana
http://www.wdsu.com/news/18252159/detail.html




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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Public Safety Communications, Interoperability, 3-1-1 and 9-1-1 News
Adoption of Multiband Radio Technology Advocated to Improve and Enhance First Responder
Communications
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/568823

Dallas Fire-Rescue to test changes in 911 medical emergency response (Texas)
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/localnews/stories/DN-
dfrpilot_02met.ART.State.Edition1.299d197.html

E911 Technology Expanded to Rhode Island Communities
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/569937




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Other
New rules ease ban on guns in national parks
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28072607/

Milwaukee neighborhoods could print own money (Wisconsin)
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-talk_moneydec03,0,2902061.story

L.A.'s police chief says he still has plenty to prove (California)
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-bratton7-2008dec07,0,634627.story

Inspector urges Baca to cancel 'The Academy' (California)
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-academy6-2008dec06,0,7412401.story

Rescue robots are put through their paces
http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20026856.400-rescue-robots-are-put-through-their-
paces.html

Leading for Results: Brief but powerful lessons from Katrina and Iraq
http://www.homeland1.com/managers-supervisors/articles/441497-Leading-for-Results-Brief-but-
powerful-lessons-from-Katrina-and-Iraq

The GPS as dashboard snitch
http://features.csmonitor.com/innovation/2008/12/09/the-gps-as-dashboard-snitch/

California running out of money
http://news.yahoo.com/s/csm/20081210/ts_csm/abellyup

Doctors call emergency care „national disgrace‟
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28148474/

Cal Fire slashing $10 million from SoCal budget
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/metro/20081210-1737-bn10fire2.html

City uproots fire pits amid salvaging efforts (California)
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/metro/20081211-9999-1m11pits.html




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                            International News Stories

Mumbai India Terrorist Attack
Mumbai police to use truth serum on 'baby-faced' terrorist Azam Amir Kasab
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/asia/article5280084.ece

Were the Mumbai Terrorists Fueled by Coke?
http://news.yahoo.com/s/time/20081204/wl_time/08599186404900

Rice urges tough Pakistan action
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7764108.stm

Authorities: Mumbai attackers had help
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/asiapcf/12/04/mumbai.investigation/index.html

All local hotels issued alert after Mumbai attacks
http://ph.news.yahoo.com/cna/20081202/tap-705-all-local-hotels-issued-alert-mu-231650b.html

Police: Man arrested in Mumbai probe is cop
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28079726/

India, Pakistan keep a lid on tensions
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-indiapakistan6-2008dec06,0,2879208.story

Bollywood hero Khan to tackle Islam, terrorism in new movie
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081206/ennew_afp/entertainmentbollywoodindiamalaysiaislamfilm
_081206132037

In her own words, nanny's brave escape in Mumbai
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/asiapcf/12/04/nanny.mumbai.interview/index.html

Pakistan police losing terrorism fight
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28057057/

McCain suggests Indo-Pak coordination to combat terror
http://www.rediff.com/news/2008/dec/03mumterror-mccain-for-indo-pak-coordination-to-combat-
terror.htm

The siege is over, but the terror remains
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-mumbai6-2008dec06,0,7882623.story

India, Indonesia favour joint fight against global terror
http://www.hindu.com/2008/12/02/stories/2008120260171300.htm

Indian minister denies calling Pakistani president
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-
bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2008/12/05/international/i003314S89.DTL&type=science

India Vows „All Actions‟ to Prevent Further Terrorist Attacks
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=ajYORNrddAWM&refer=worldwide




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Pakistan: We're ready for war with India
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/pakistan/3688288/Pakistan-Were-ready-for-war-
with-India.html

Google Earth accused of aiding terrorists
http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/tech_and_web/the_web/article5311241.ece

Botched Mumbai Arrest Highlights India's Intel Failures
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1865554,00.html

Forgive Mumbai attackers, victims' relative says
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/12/04/mumbai.synchronicity/index.html

New Delhi airport gets security scare
http://edition.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/asiapcf/12/04/india.threat/index.html

After Mumbai, Can the US Cool India-Pakistan Tension?
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1863908,00.html

India's top law official admits Mumbai 'lapses'
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/asiapcf/12/05/mumbai.investigation.failures/index.html

Pakistan raids camp over Mumbai attacks
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/asiapcf/12/08/pakistan.india.mumbai.arrests/index.html

Pakistan militant group builds web of Western recruits
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-militants8-2008dec08,0,3556399.story

India attacks haven't led to more violence
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2008-12-07-india_N.htm

What Did Kashmir Have to Do with the Mumbai Attacks?
http://news.yahoo.com/s/time/20081208/wl_time/08599186488000

Zardari to India: 'Pause and take a breath'
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/asiapcf/12/09/pakistan.india/index.html

In outcry over siege, two Indias emerge
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28121518/

India gives info tying Mumbai gunmen to Pakistan
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081209/ap_on_re_as/as_india_shooting

Pakistan arrests extremist leader, again
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28152940/

India Unveils Security Overhaul
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1865807,00.html




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Mistrust of India Forges Sense of Unity in Pakistan

By Candace Rondeaux
Washington Post Foreign Service
Saturday, December 6, 2008; A08

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan, Dec. 5 -- Fateh Khan doesn't know much about the fight against
terrorism. He doesn't know much about the attacks that killed more than 170 people in Mumbai
last week, either. But if there is one thing the Pakistani taxi driver feels sure about, it's that after
three wars, India -- not terrorism -- remains the No. 1 threat to his country.

"Every Pakistani is clear that India is the enemy state," Khan said. "Pakistan has always tried to
live at peace with India. But India has not tried for peace."

As more details emerge about alleged Pakistani links to the three-day siege in India's financial
capital last week, a rare national unity is coalescing in Pakistan, centered on its old enemy.
Although debate continues about how to manage attacks on politicians and government
institutions by armed Pakistani groups, the Indian accusations against Pakistan after the Mumbai
attacks have reminded many of India's 60-year role as the primary security threat here.

From Taliban commanders in the northwest to liberal businessmen in Islamabad, the capital,
Pakistanis have this week been rallying around the flag. Tensions with India have prompted
pledges of support for the government even from the Taliban, the growing insurgent force based
on the tribal agencies of the country's North-West Frontier Province.

This week, several leaders of armed Islamist groups in that region vowed to lay down their arms
against the government and stand with Pakistan's military in the event of a clash with India -- a
turnaround for groups that in the past six years have killed more than 1,200 Pakistani troops.

"We may have a dispute with the Pakistan government, but we would set aside our differences if
our homeland was threatened by outside powers," said Maulvi Nazir, head of a powerful
Pakistani Taliban splinter group in the tribal area of South Waziristan. "We would raise a force of
15,000 tribal Taliban to fight on the side of Pakistan's armed forces. We would infiltrate 500
suicide bombers into India to cause havoc there."

That promise of assistance has not gone unnoticed in Islamabad.

In a briefing with reporters after the Mumbai attacks, several top officials of Pakistan's Inter-
Services Intelligence agency, or ISI, said they welcomed the offers of support from Nazir and
Taliban leaders such as Baitullah Mehsud.

Only a year ago, Mehsud, who reportedly commands thousands of foot soldiers in his native
South Waziristan, was Pakistan's most wanted man. Days after the assassination of former
Pakistani prime minister Benazir Bhutto, Mehsud's name surfaced as the possible perpetrator of
the Dec. 27 bomb attack that killed her.

Rahimullah Yusufzai, a Pakistani journalist based in the northwestern city of Peshawar, said the
current mood among insurgent leaders such as Nazir and others in the region is sharply anti-
Indian and pro-Pakistani. But Yusufzai cautioned that an opportunistic impulse lies beneath the
groups' recent avowals of support for the government against India.



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"Right now, these are only statements. They are offering support, but they are also saying that in
return for their support the military must stop its operations in the tribal areas, in Swat and other
places," Yusufzai said. "They are trying to seize the moment and say, 'Look we're not anti-state,
not anti-Pakistan.' But the government has to be careful. It should not respond by pulling out
troops."

Many ordinary people in northwestern cities such as Peshawar are wary of expressions of
national unity and more inclined to empathize with India's position, Yusufzai said. Hundreds of
civilians have been killed and wounded in insurgent attacks this year, and the mounting violence
has sensitized the population to the government's failure to rein in terrorists within Pakistan.

"There is a feeling that these jihadi groups need to be cut down to size," Yusufzai said. "People
here have seen up close the results of their activities, so they are probably more inclined to
believe some of the Indian accusations."

On Friday evening, a car bomb exploded in Peshawar, killing at least 20 people and injuring
scores more, the Associated Press reported. Neither the motive nor the identity of the
perpetrators was clear, but provincial government chief Haider Khan Hoti said "external forces"
could be to blame -- a comment understood in Pakistan to mean India, the AP said.

Before the Mumbai attacks, Pakistan was already deeply divided over how to deal simultaneously
with the internal threats posed by extremist groups and the external pressures from countries
such as India and the United States. Since the attacks, that fracture has given rise to a heated
public debate.

In a column Friday in the popular English-language newspaper Dawn, Pakistani defense analyst
and author Ayesha Siddiqa noted the Pakistani Taliban's apparent overnight transformation from
pariah to patriot amid the public furor over the events in Mumbai. "And hadn't we been informed
earlier that all these 'patriotic' warriors were in fact murdering Pakistan's people and its brave
soldiers?" Siddiqa wrote.

"We could cry ourselves hoarse about a foreign conspiracy to finish Pakistan, but it would not
change the fact that Pakistan faces the threat of being internationally ostracized unless it begins
to look inwards," Siddiqa added.

Since its founding in 1947, Pakistan has been ruled by a succession of military generals,
wavering all the while between war and tense detente with India. Civilian governments have
historically been short-lived and widely seen as ineffectual against threats to national security,
particularly from India. But after the resignation this year of President Pervez Musharraf, the
country's former army chief, expectations were high that the civilian government elected in
February would reverse that perception.

Nearly four months after Musharraf stepped down, those hopes remain largely unfulfilled.
Overwhelmed by economic crisis and the continuing insurgent threat, the new government has
failed to mend the country's divisions and bring the military establishment to heel, experts say.
Many of the militant groups propped up by the military in the 1980s and '90s have expanded their
reach, and some still enjoy support from rogue elements within the military, according to U.S.
military officials and intelligence experts.

Samina Ahmed, country director for the International Crisis Group in Pakistan, said the chasm
between Pakistan's military and its civilian government undercuts the possibility of stability in the
region as a whole. Pointing to several failed attempts by the civilian government this year to gain

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control of intelligence operations, Ahmed said conflict with India will remain imminent until the
clash between the military and civilian cultures is resolved in Pakistan.

"What you see is a house divided, in which the military is hostile, and there's been a pushback
from the civilian government, as well," Ahmed said.

After decades of diplomatic brinkmanship with India, many ordinary Pakistanis are skeptical of
India's assertions of a Pakistani tie to the massacre in Mumbai. Yet many also appear to agree
that another armed conflict with Pakistan's nuclear rival in the region should be the last option on
the table.

"Whatever happened in [Mumbai] is a problem for the whole world. It's not just a problem for
Pakistan or India," said Mohammed Ejaz, an Islamabad clothes vendor. "This should not reopen
old wounds or hostilities, because any conflict would engulf the whole region."




December 7, 2008
Mumbai Attacks Politicize Long-Isolated Elite
By SOMINI SENGUPTA


MUMBAI, India — Last Wednesday, an extraordinary public interest lawsuit was filed in this city‟s
highest court. It charged that the government had lagged in its constitutional duty to protect its
citizens‟ right to life, and it pressed the state to modernize and upgrade its security forces.


The lawsuit was striking mainly for the people behind it: investment bankers, corporate lawyers
and representatives of some of India‟s largest companies, which have their headquarters here in
the country‟s financial capital, also known as Bombay. The Bombay Chamber of Commerce and
Industry, the city‟s largest business association, joined as a petitioner. It was the first time it had
lent its name to litigation in the public interest.


The three-day siege of Mumbai, which ended a week ago, was a watershed for India‟s
prosperous classes. It prompted many of those who live in their own private Indias, largely
insulated from the country‟s dysfunction, to demand a vital public service: safety.


Since the attacks, which killed 163 people, plus nine gunmen, there has been an outpouring of
anger from unlikely quarters. On Wednesday, tens of thousands of urban, English-speaking, tank-
top-wearing citizens stormed the Gateway of India, a famed waterfront monument, venting anger
at their elected leaders. There were similar protests in the capital, New Delhi, and the southern
technology hubs, Bangalore and Hyderabad. All were organized spontaneously, with word spread
through text messages and Facebook pages.
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On Saturday, young people affiliated with a new political party, called Loksatta, or people‟s
power, gathered at the Gateway, calling for a variety of reforms, including banning criminals from
running for political office. (Virtually every political party has convicts and suspects among its
elected officials.)


Social networking sites were ablaze with memorials and citizens‟ action groups, including one
that advocated refraining from voting altogether as an act of civil disobedience. Never mind that in
India, voter turnout among the rich is far lower than among the poor.


Another group advocated not paying taxes, as though that would improve the quality of public
services. An e-mail campaign began Saturday called “I Am Clean,” urging citizens not to bribe
police officers or drive through red lights.


And there were countless condemnations of how democracy had failed in this, the world‟s largest
democracy. Those condemnations led Vir Sanghvi, a columnist writing in the financial newspaper
Mint, to remind his readers of 1975, when Prime Minister Indira Gandhi imposed emergency rule.
Mr. Sanghvi wrote, “I am beginning to hear the same kind of middle-class murmurs and whines
about the ineffectual nature of democracy and the need for authoritarian government.”


Perhaps the most striking development was the lawsuit because it represented a rare example of
corporate India‟s confronting the government outright rather than making back-room deals.


“It says in a nutshell, „Enough is enough,‟ ” said Cyrus Guzder, who owns a logistics company.
“More precisely, it tells us that citizens of all levels in the country believe their government has let
them down and believe that it now needs to be held accountable.”


In India‟s city of gold, the distinction between public and private can be bewildering. For members
of the working class, who often cannot afford housing, public sidewalks become living rooms. In
the morning, commuters from gated communities in the suburbs pass children brushing their
teeth at the edge of the street. Women are forced to relieve themselves on the railway tracks,
usually in the dark, for the sake of modesty. The poor sometimes sleep on highway medians, and
it is not unheard of for drunken drivers to mow them down.


Mumbai has been roiled by government neglect for years. Its commuter trains are so
overcrowded that 4,000 riders die every year on average, some pushed from trains in the fierce
competition to get on and off. Monsoons in 2005 killed more than 400 people in Mumbai in one

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day alone; so clogged were the city‟s ancient drains, so crowded its river plains with unauthorized
construction that water had nowhere to go.


Rahul Bose, an actor, suggested setting aside such problems for the moment. In a plea published
last week in The Hindustan Times, he laid out the desperation of this glistening, corroding place.
“We overlook for now your neglect of the city,” he wrote. “Its floods, its traffic, its filth, its pollution.
Just deliver to us a world-standard antiterrorism plan.”


None of the previous terrorist attacks, even in Mumbai, had so struck the cream of Bombay
society. Bombs have been planted on commuter trains in the past, but few people who regularly
dine at the Taj Mahal Palace & Tower hotel, one of the worst-hit sites, travel by train. “It has
touched a raw nerve,” said Amit Chandra, who runs a prominent investment firm. “People have
lost friends. Everyone would visit these places.” In any event, public anger could not have come
at a worse time for incumbent politicians, who were at their most contrite last week. National
elections are due next spring, and security is likely to be one of the top issues in the vote,
particularly among the urban middle class. It remains to be seen whether outrage will prompt
them to turn out to vote in higher numbers or whether politicians will be compelled to pay greater
attention to them than in the past.


“There‟s a revulsion against the political class I have never seen before,” said Gerson D‟Cunha, a
former advertising executive whose civic group, A.G.N.I., presses for better governing. “The
middle class that is laid back, lethargic, indolent, they‟ve been galvanized.”


For how long? That is a question on everyone‟s lips. At a memorial service on Thursday evening
for a slain alumnus of the elite St. Xavier‟s College here, a placard asked: “One month from now,
will you care?”


“It‟s helplessness, what do we do?” said Probir Roy, the owner of a technology company and an
alumnus of St. Xavier‟s. “All the various stakeholders — the police, politicians — you can‟t count
on them anyway. Now what do you do?”


Tops, a private security agency, has plenty to do. It is consulting schools, malls and “high net
individuals” on how to protect themselves better. Security was a growth industry in India even
before the latest attacks. Tops‟s global chairman, Rahul Nanda, said the company employed
73,000 security guards today, compared with about 15,000 three years ago.



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Mumbai is not the only place suffering from official neglect. Public services have deteriorated
across India, all the more so in the countryside. Government schools are notoriously
mismanaged. Doctors do not show up to work on public health projects. Corruption is endemic. In
some of India‟s booming cities, private developers drill for their own water and generate electricity
for their own buildings.


Political interference often gets in the way of the woefully understaffed and poorly paid police
force. Courts and commissions have called for law enforcement to be liberated from political
control. Politicians have balked.


The three-day standoff with terrorists was neither the deadliest that India has seen, nor the most
protracted; there have been other extended convulsions of violence, including mass killings of
Sikhs in Delhi in 1984 and of Muslims in Gujarat in 2002.


Yet, the recent attacks, which Indian police say were the work of a Pakistan-based terrorist group
called Lashkar-e-Taiba, were profoundly different. Two of the four main targets were luxury hotels
frequented by the city‟s wealthy elite: the Taj, facing the Gateway of India, and the twin Oberoi
and Trident hotels, a few miles west on Nariman Point. They were the elite‟s watering holes and
business dinner destinations. And to lose them, said Alex Kuruvilla, who runs the Condé Nast
publications in India, is like losing a limb.


“It‟s like what I imagine an amputee would feel,” he said. “It‟s so much part of our lives.”


Last Wednesday, on the night of the candlelight vigil, Mr. Kuruvilla‟s driver made a wrong turn. A
traffic policeman virtually pounced on the driver and then let him go with a bribe of 20 rupees,
less than 50 cents. Mr. Kuruvilla is not optimistic about swift change. “Our cynicism is justified,”
he said.


Ashok Pawar, a police constable from the police station nearest the Taj, entered the hotel the
night the siege began. It was full of gunfire and smoke. He could not breathe, and he did not
know his way around. “It was my first time inside the Taj,” he said. “How can a poor man go
there?”


In The Indian Express newspaper on Friday, a columnist named Vinay Sitapati wrote a pointed
open letter to “South Bombay,” shorthand for the city‟s most wealthy enclave. The column first
berated the rich for lecturing at Davos and failing in Hindi exams. “You refer to your part of the

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city simply as „town,‟ ” he wrote, and then he begged: “Vote in person. But vote in spirit, too: use
your clout to demand better politicians, not pliant ones.”


“In your hour of need today,” he added, “it is India that needs your help.”




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Somali Coastal Piracy
Hunting pirates (Video)
http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/world/2008/12/07/robertson.oman.nato.pirates.cnn

Europe tracks pirates, rebels from an unlikely place
http://www.physorg.com/news147587557.html

Suspected pirates rescued in Gulf of Aden
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/africa/12/04/yemen.pirates/index.html

Pirates on seized freighter shared with hostages
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28057982/

UN extends anti-piracy measures
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/7761528.stm

Cargo ship outruns pirates off Tanzania
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/africa/12/07/tanzania.pirates.boat.outrun/index.html

EU to begin Somali pirate patrols
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/7770490.stm

U.S. proposes pursuing pirates in Somalia, U.N. sources say
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/12/10/united.nations.us.pirates/index.html

Cruise ship evacuated due to Somali pirate threat
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081209/ap_on_re_eu/piracy




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Civil Preparedness, Security and Humanitarian Affairs
UK police DNA bank a 'human rights violation'
http://edition.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/europe/12/04/uk.dna.database/index.html

Iraq approves U.S. security pact
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/iraq/2008-12-04-us-iraq-pact_N.htm

Protesters break into secure area at UK airport
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081208/ap_on_bi_ge/eu_britian_airport_protest

Malaysia bans hillside developments after landslide: report
http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Malaysia_bans_hillside_developments_after_landslide_report_
999.html

Eastern Caribbean to get early warning weather system
http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Eastern_Caribbean_to_get_early_warning_weather_system_99
9.html

Armenians remember devastating quake as consequences linger
http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Armenians_remember_devastating_quake_as_consequences_l
inger_999.html

Canadian Red Cross promotes readiness for anything this winter
http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/index.cfm?sid=198060&sc=98

MEXICO PLANTING OWN 'GREEN WALL' ALONG BORDER
http://www.statesman.com/news/content/news/stories/world/12/07/1207mexgreenwall.html

Emergency workers go on strike (South Africa)
http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?from=rss_South%20Africa&set_id=1&click_id=13&art_id=vn20081
209055117867C788796

U.N.: North Koreans face food shortages
http://blogs.usatoday.com/ondeadline/2008/12/un-north-korean.html

U.S. citizen allegedly tortured in United Arab Emirates
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-detain4-2008dec04,0,4217198.story

£6 bunker bed and no breakfast (Switzerland)
http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article2003935.ece

US Government donates $100,000 for flood relief (Sri Lanka)
http://www.dailynews.lk/2008/12/05/news17.asp

Disaster readiness talks with Seoul, Beijing slated
http://search.japantimes.co.jp/rss/nn20081205b3.html

EXPERT CITES SMART TUNNEL, PRAISES KL AS WELL-PREPARED FOR DISASTERS
(Malaysia)
http://malaysia.news.yahoo.com/bnm/20081202/tts-disaster-kl-993ba14.html

Mayor orders intensified security vs terror attack (Philippines)
http://www.mindanaotimes.com.ph/story.php?id=23062

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UNWTO: Revitalizing Tourism and Confronting Crises
http://www.hospitalitynet.org/news/154000320/4038878.search?query=emergency+preparedness

Rudd appoints Australian national security adviser
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=10546623

Very important to engage terrorists, says expert
http://www.rediff.com/news/2008/dec/03mumterror-very-important-to-engage-terrorists.htm

Aid chief warns of famine in Ethiopia
http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Aid_chief_warns_of_famine_in_Ethiopia_999.html

Two devastated towns come together at US-China economic talks
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081205/sc_afp/financeeconomychinausmeetoffbeat_0812051712
36;_ylt=AmmEKCIFTKwzA2aSuf9bnmzPOrgF

Few improvements requested in Bruce Power CNSC 'B' Report Card (Canada)
http://www.kincardinenews.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=1326268

Police arrest 2 terror suspects in northern Italy
http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/12/02/europe/EU-Italy-Terror-Arrests.php

Ger Police Arrest More Than 40 at Neo-Nazi March (Germany)
http://www.javno.com/en/world/clanak.php?id=211826

Civil Contingencies NOS
http://www.skillsforjustice.com/template01.asp?PageID=594

Feeding A World In Crisis
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=97905044

Regional Cooperation Needed on Caribbean Natural Disasters
http://newsblaze.com/story/20081204094119tsop.nb/topstory.html

Belgium: Alleged Islamic Extremists Detained
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1865840,00.html




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Hazard Research and News
Car bomb kills 2 U.S. soldiers in Iraq; other bombs kill 20
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/meast/12/04/iraq.main/index.html

Why Greece Is Wracked By Riots
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1864982,00.html

Clashes break out as strike shuts down Greece
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081210/ap_on_re_eu/eu_greece_riots

Hong Kong reports bird flu outbreak
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28139486/

Is Hong Kong's Bird Flu Vaccine Failing?
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1865487,00.html

Zimbabwe: More than 15,000 have cholera
http://edition.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/africa/12/10/zimbabwe.epidemic.cholera.spread/index.html

Zimbabwe 'asks for cholera help'
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/7763397.stm

Refugees create South Africa cholera emergency
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/africa/12/11/zimbabwe.south.africa/index.html

Sumatra fault primed for more mega-quakes
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28053389/

Bangladesh, N Korea most hit by disasters in 2007
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081204/sc_afp/unhealthwarmingdisasters_081204123243;_ylt=Aj
pGcU94WKqOPtbOltQQGn7POrgF

Nepalese Hit By Floods And Rising Food Prices
http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/WO0812/S00121.htm

Chlorine leak at Siberian chemical factory: report
http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Chlorine_leak_at_Siberian_chemical_factory_report_999.html

Witnesses: Greek cops kill teen; riots erupt in 2 cities
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2008-12-06-greece-riot_N.htm

Greek Riots Show No Signs of Abating
http://news.yahoo.com/s/time/20081209/wl_time/08599186532600

Greek government defends handling of riots
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081210/ap_on_re_eu/eu_greece_riots

Spanish businessman murdered in ETA shooting
http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/12/03/europe/EU-Spain-Basque-Attack.php

Schools become latest targets in violence-plagued Ciudad Juarez (Mexico)
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/latinamerica/la-fg-schoolfear4-
2008dec04,0,6016721.story

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Cruise ship strikes ice, stranded on Antarctic coast
http://www.cnn.com/2008/TRAVEL/12/04/stranded.ship.antarctica/index.html

UN is told that Earth needs an asteroid shield
http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2008/dec/07/space-technology-asteroid-shield

Court jails tanker officers over SKorea's worst oil spill
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081210/sc_afp/skoreahkindiaoilshippingaccidentenvironment_081
210172516;_ylt=An4WA3Kr9G1UxinFYYXAa3XPOrgF

At least 55 killed in Iraq restaurant bombing
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28173545/




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International Affairs
'Bombs for peace' after slaughter in Bosnia
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/europe/11/20/sbm.bosnia.holbrooke/index.html

Jewish settlers clash with Israeli troops
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28049089/

Israel's military on alert for settler violence
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081205/ap_on_re_mi_ea/ml_israel_settlers

Canadian leader suspends Parliament to stay in power
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/americas/12/04/canada.crisis/index.html

Georgian PM fires defense, foreign ministers
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/europe/12/05/georgia.ministers.sacked/index.html

Rights group berates West over Somalia failure
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/africa/12/08/somalia.downward.spiral/index.html

Commander sees 'tough fight' in Afghan war
http://www.usatoday.com/news/military/2008-12-07-afghantroops_N.htm?loc=interstitialskip

UN chief welcomes outcome of Burundi peace summit
http://www.terradaily.com/reports/UN_chief_welcomes_outcome_of_Burundi_peace_summit_999
.html

Could the Internet have stopped Hitler?
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28111671/

White House disputes NYT editorial
http://news.yahoo.com/s/politico/20081208/pl_politico/16297

Plot to kill Afghan governor foiled, U.S. says
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/asiapcf/12/08/afghanistan.assassination.plot/index.html

Congo peace talks open with U.N. plea
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/africa/12/08/congo.talks/index.html

How the Taliban Hopes to Choke U.S. Afghanistan Mission
http://news.yahoo.com/s/time/20081209/wl_time/08599186522300

US Special Forces mistakenly kill 6 Afghan police
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081210/ap_on_re_as/as_afghanistan

US envoy says N. Korea nuclear talks hit stalemate
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081210/ap_on_re_as/as_koreas_nuclear

Russia to send warship through Panama Canal
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081203/ap_on_re_eu/eu_russia_panama

Darfur genocide continues: ICC prosecutor
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081203/ts_afp/warcrimessudanconflictdarfuriccun


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Bolivian unrest ruled 'massacre'
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/7764001.stm

Lebanon's Aoun in Damascus visit
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/7762508.stm

They killed their neighbors: genocide's foot soldiers
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/europe/11/25/sbm.perpetrators/index.html

IDF preparing options for Iran strike (Israel)
http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?cid=1227702421218&pagename=JPost%2FJPArticle%2FS
howFull

Gaza Crossing Partially Opened Today
http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/WO0812/S00145.htm

World Bank warns Gaza banks may collapse
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2008-12-06-gaza-banks_N.htm

Bush defends Iraq war
http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2008-12-05-bush-speech_N.htm

US preparing for troop buildup in Afghanistan
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081205/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/us_afghanistan

Afghanistan will get worse, McCain warns
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28097538/

Suspected Taliban militants destroy supply trucks
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-pakistan8-2008dec08,0,2335333.story

Religious Violence Rages in Nigeria
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1864801,00.html

As Georgia Recedes, NATO Eases Stance on Russia
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1864774,00.html

NATO: Albania and Croatia to join by April
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081203/ap_on_re_eu/eu_nato_balkan_members;_ylt=AscsxRyf4n
a0fJnulVuL3NZ0bBAF

Ghana Goes to the Polls: Showing Africa How Democracy Works
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1864675,00.html

Thai Opposition Says It Can Form Government
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1864857,00.html

SKorea braces for provocation by NKorea: defence ministry
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5jFTNpunF9H6SwJg0iZOAxxQXYO9w

Kenya PM says foreign troops must go to Zimbabwe
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081207/ap_on_re_af/af_kenya_zimbabwe

China Protests Dalai Lama Meeting in France
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1864890,00.html
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SOFT POWER AND COUNTERTERRORISM
http://www.hstoday.us/content/view/6332/149/

Dangers of radical nationalism a European issue, says gov't official
http://www.budapesttimes.hu/content/view/10210/159/

Zimbabwe 'needs new leadership'
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/7770169.stm

And now for a world government
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/7a03e5b6-c541-11dd-b516-
000077b07658,Authorised=false.html?_i_location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ft.com%2Fcms%2Fs%
2F0%2F7a03e5b6-c541-11dd-b516-000077b07658.html&_i_referer=

Former Finland leader accepts Nobel Peace Prize
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/europe/12/10/nobel.peace.prize/index.html




Israeli Wall Fuels Migration
Palestinians With Economic, Social Services Ties to Jewish State Are Integrating Neighborhoods
That Won't Be Blocked by Barrier

By Linda Gradstein
Special to The Washington Post
Wednesday, December 10, 2008; A18

JERUSALEM -- Samih Bashir, a Palestinian lawyer, plans to move early next year to a large
house with two living rooms, three bathrooms and a big backyard where his four children can
play. It is in a Jerusalem neighborhood called French Hill -- a part of the city that Israel says will
never become part of a Palestinian state. Bashir worries that his current neighborhood, Beit
Hanina, would end up under Palestinian control if the two sides ever reach a peace deal.

In some ways, the move is a psychological one. There is no legal difference between Beit Hanina
and French Hill. Both are parts of East Jerusalem that Israel occupied during the 1967 Arab-
Israeli war and soon unilaterally annexed, a status not recognized by the international community.
But French Hill is a predominantly Jewish neighborhood, and Beit Hanina is overwhelmingly Arab.

"They're talking about giving this area back to the Palestinians, and then we would be stuck
here," Bashir, who holds Israeli citizenship, said of Beit Hanina. "My wife works in the Jerusalem
municipality as a social worker. How would she get to her job if this area becomes Palestinian?"

Many of the 250,000 Palestinians who are residents of East Jerusalem, but who are not Israeli
citizens, are equally concerned about losing access to Israeli services such as medical care and
social security if their neighborhoods became part of a Palestinian state. A growing number are
moving into mainly Jewish neighborhoods such as French Hill or Pisgat Zeev -- areas that
Palestinian officials consider to be illegal Israeli settlements.

Jamal Natshe, a Palestinian real estate agent, said thousands of families from East Jerusalem,
the West Bank and even Jordan have moved into mainly Jewish areas in the past two years. He

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said their main concern is the 25-foot-high concrete wall that Israeli authorities have built to
separate the parts of the city under their control from Palestinian areas. Outside of urban areas,
the barrier generally consists of fencing, barbed wire and roads used by Israeli security forces.
Israel says the barrier is a security measure designed to prevent attacks; Palestinians say its
construction amounts to a unilateral seizure of about 8 percent of the West Bank.

Crossing points are meant to ease access for Palestinians with permits to enter Israel, including
the 250,000 Palestinians who have Israeli-issued identity cards that indicate they have the right to
reside in Jerusalem.

Natshe said that some Palestinians are moving because they do not want to lose the Israeli
benefits. "If Israel proves that someone is living outside Jerusalem, they would lose their ID,"
Natshe said. "This is a threat to many families because of the economic situation. They rely on
the Israeli system."

Palestinian officials say they want Palestinians to move into mainly Jewish neighborhoods.

"We encourage people to buy in the settlements because we think this is all Palestine," said
Hatem Abdul Qader, a member of the Palestinian parliament from Jerusalem. "People are in a
panic over losing their ID cards. They are afraid of being isolated by the wall. If people can
maintain their existence in Jerusalem and in Palestine through living in the settlements, I hope
whoever can afford it will do that."

Abdul Qader said more than 30,000 families would like to move. One of the goals of the wall was
to maintain a Jewish majority in Jerusalem, but Abdul Qader said the barrier is now encouraging
Palestinians to move into mainly Jewish areas.

Natshe said many of these families would prefer to move to predominantly Arab neighborhoods
such as Beit Hanina, with 26,000 residents, or Shuafat, with 36,000, both of which are on the
Israeli side of the barrier, except for a portion of Shuafat. But there is virtually no housing
available in these areas. Prices have become so high that it is cheaper to rent or buy in
neighboring Pisgat Zeev, where a three-bedroom apartment can be rented for about $1,000 a
month. A similar apartment in Beit Hanina is at least $1,400.

Natshe estimates there are at least 300 Arab families among the 42,000 residents of Pisgat Zeev.
Yusuf Majlatun, a Palestinian contractor, moved in seven years ago with his wife and three sons.

Majlatun said there is at least one Palestinian family in all of the buildings on his street. He said
he has correct, but not friendly, relations with his neighbors. Soon after he moved in, he invited
several neighbors to spend an evening drinking arak, a licorice-flavored liqueur. They drank and
talked until 2 a.m., he said, but never invited him in return.

Another time, his downstairs neighbor who is an observant Jew accidentally turned out the light in
her living room just as she was about to sit down to Friday night Shabbat dinner. Observant Jews
do not turn lights on or off on the Sabbath, in obedience to religious law barring the creation or
extinguishing of any flame. She knocked on Majlatun's door and asked for help. He entered her
apartment and flicked the light switch for her.

"It's better here than in Beit Hanina," he said. "When you walk through the streets, you hear
Arabic, Russian and Hebrew. There are fanatics everywhere, but most of the people here respect
each other."


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Yet tensions are growing in Pisgat Zeev. Last spring, dozens of Jewish youths attacked two
young Palestinians at the nearby mall, seriously wounding one of them. On a recent evening at
the three-story mall, many of the customers were Arabs. Some of the other shoppers said they
were not happy with the ongoing demographic changes.

"The whole mall is full of Arabs, and I find it disgusting," said a woman browsing in a bookstore
who would not give her name. "We live in the state of Israel, a Jewish state, and I don't want to
see them here. They are our enemies. They hate us, and they always will."

Pisgat Zeev, an area developed in the mid-1980s, attracts young couples, new immigrants and
observant Jewish families because it is one of the more affordable areas on the northern outskirts
of Jerusalem. Some residents said they did not want Palestinians in the neighborhood and would
not sell their homes to Palestinians. Some rabbis have also forbidden selling homes to
Palestinians.

In French Hill, an older neighborhood closer to the center of the city, fewer tensions are apparent.
It is a more affluent area than Pisgat Zeev, populated mostly by professionals. Bashir, the lawyer,
said five other Arab families own homes near the one he is renovating.

"The services there are better than here in Beit Hanina," said Bashir's wife, Tagreed. "The streets
are clean, there is regular garbage collection, and there are roads with no potholes."

Some Israelis who support a Palestinian state say they do not believe that Palestinians moving
into mainly Jewish areas of Jerusalem will help that cause. Daniel Seidemann, a lawyer who has
been an outspoken opponent of the Israeli barrier, said that since the end of the Crusades, Jews
and Arabs have preferred to live in separate neighborhoods. He said tensions in the city have
increased recently after East Jerusalem Palestinians drove bulldozers into crowds of Israelis in
three separate incidents. In one attack, three Israelis were killed.

In the mixed Arab-Jewish town of Acre, ethnic tensions led to five days of rioting when an Arab
man drove his car into a Jewish neighborhood on Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement when Jews
are forbidden from driving.

"This is a greater blurring of the distinctions between Jewish and Arab neighborhoods than
anything we've seen since 1967," he said. "Palestinians cannot allow themselves to be trapped
on the Palestinian side of the wall lest they be plummeted into poverty. They are culturally,
politically and religiously tied to the West Bank, but economically connected to Israel."




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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

      Global Warming/Climate Change News Articles (U.S. and
                         International)
Seawater holds key to future food
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7765109.stm

Could These Weird Ideas Save the Planet?
http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2008/12/04/climate-change-summit.html

Polluted Indonesian river to get major cleanup, says ADB
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081205/sc_afp/indonesiaenvironmentwater_081205030815

Time To Prepare For Climate Change Disasters, Now
http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/WO0812/S00093.htm

Climate change, drought to strain Colorado River
http://www.physorg.com/news147696479.html

UN climate chief: talk of delayed climate deal 'unhelpful'
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081205/sc_afp/unclimatewarmingunfccc_081205202704;_ylt=Alst
Y6qADkc66lnV63Cj29TPOrgF

2008 will be coolest year of the decade
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/dec/05/climate-change-weather

Report: USA ignoring climate change threat
http://blogs.usatoday.com/weather/2008/12/report-usa-igno.html

Would burying CO2 help in climate crisis?
http://www.usatoday.com/weather/climate/globalwarming/2008-12-06-poland-climate-
change_N.htm

No deal amid EU climate deadlock
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/7768758.stm

Dalai Lama urges government action on global warming
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081207/sc_afp/unclimatewarmingdalailama_081207191843;_ylt=
AkBwJKYpNQCk3YYrEVPk7b_POrgF

Going green can help save economy: Schwarzenegger
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081208/sc_afp/unclimatewarmingusschwarzenegger_081208151
441;_ylt=AkwRbIEJvd2pSYPFFi3V0vHPOrgF

Merkel to defend German jobs against climate deal
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081208/sc_afp/climatewarningeugermanymerkel_081208150341;
_ylt=AldwZ_WUMmzVP45Hs7QGB4vPOrgF

Call for no delay on climate deal
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7776661.stm

Sweden cleanest, S. Arabia dirtiest: climate index
http://www.physorg.com/news148131083.html



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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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EU failure could torpedo UN climate talks, warns climate guru
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081210/sc_afp/unclimatewarmingstern_081210172809;_ylt=ArfJ7
fzxPU6OYH0PhjKoP_jPOrgF

Not waving but drowning: Island states plead at UN talks
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081209/sc_afp/unclimatewarmingoceansislands_081209184515;_
ylt=Av78App65cNLvSrtgThS7xbPOrgF

Scientists try to mitigate climate change effects
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081209/ap_on_sc/eu_poland_climate_science;_ylt=ApMTjW_E1St
2JhMZFQPRpytvieAA

U.N. says climate change may uproot 6 million annually
http://www.reuters.com/article/environmentNews/idUSTRE4B773G20081208

The humanitarian cost of climate change
http://www.redcross.org.uk/news.asp?id=88923




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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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          Alternate Energy Research and Development News
Solar car completes 1st ever round-the-world trip
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081204/ap_on_bi_ge/eu_poland_solar_car

The cars of the future are here now
http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/science/12/03/future.car/index.html

Gigawatt-Scale PV Power Project Initiated In Jordan
http://www.solardaily.com/reports/Gigawatt_Scale_PV_Power_Project_Initiated_In_Jordan_999.h
tml

Meraki Announces Availability Of Solar Powered WiFi Device
http://www.solardaily.com/reports/Meraki_Announces_Availability_Of_Solar_Powered_WiFi_Devi
ce_999.html

Small Underwater Currents Could Be the Next Big Thing in Alternative Energy
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80beats/2008/12/03/small-underwater-currents-could-be-the-
next-big-thing-in-alternative-energy/

Solar plant could be savior to struggling Lancaster
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-outthere5-2008dec05,0,4265592.story

Synthetic e. coli could build a better biofuel: study
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081208/sc_afp/scienceusenergybiofuelresearch_081208224723;_
ylt=Akhej.UiEyENvpQZxRBwAJ7POrgF

Wind, water and sun beat biofuels, nuclear and coal for clean energy, researcher says
http://www.physorg.com/news148149704.html

Hot rocks: Africa's Rift Valley is geothermal gold mine
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081209/sc_afp/unclimatewarmingenergygeothermalafrica_081209
183940;_ylt=Ah3UQ7WaUJec3xu0SFHEiq7POrgF

The Dirty Side of Clean Coal
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=the-dirty-side-of-clean-coal

No Batteries Required: Future Devices Could Power Themselves
http://www.usnews.com/articles/science/technology/2008/12/09/no-batteries-required-future-
devices-could-power.html




December 5, 2008



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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
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Energy Goals a Moving Target for States
By KATE GALBRAITH and MATTHEW L. WALD


In hopes of slowing global warming and creating “green jobs,” Congress and the incoming
administration may soon impose a mandate that the nation get 10 or 15 percent of its electricity
from renewable sources within a few years.


Yet the experience of states that have adopted similar goals suggests that passing that
requirement could be a lot easier than achieving it. The record so far is decidedly mixed: some
states appear to be on track to meet energy targets, but others have fallen behind on the
aggressive goals they set several years ago.


The state goals have contributed to rapid growth of wind turbines and solar power stations in
some areas, notably the West, but that growth has come on a minuscule base. Nationwide, the
hard numbers provide a sobering counterpoint to the green-energy enthusiasm sweeping
Washington.


Al Gore is running advertisements claiming the nation could switch entirely to renewable power
within a decade. But most experts do not see how. Even with the fast growth of recent years, less
than 3 percent of the nation‟s electricity is coming from renewable sources, excepting dams.


“I think we are really overselling how quick, how easy and how complete the transition can be,”
said George Sterzinger, executive director of the Renewable Energy Policy Project, a Washington
advocacy group.


More than half the states have adopted formal green-energy goals. In many states the policies,
known as renewable portfolio standards, are too new to be evaluated. But so far the number of
successes and failures is “sort of a 50-50 kind of affair,” said Ryan Wiser, a scientist at Lawrence
Berkeley National Laboratory and co-author of a recent report on the targets.


Connecticut and Massachusetts have made their utilities pay for missing targets, and utilities in
Arizona and Nevada are lagging. California and New York appear almost certain to miss
deadlines that are looming in the next few years.


A few states have met their goals, or even exceeded them. One big success has been Texas,
which has capitalized on a wind power boom and already exceeded its 2015 goal. The state gets



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4.5 percent of its electricity from the turbines. New Mexico‟s big utilities are at 6 percent
renewable power, within striking distance of the state‟s 10 percent goal by 2011.


The structure and aggressiveness of the targets varies widely among states — some have been
able to meet their goals because they set relatively modest ones in the first place.


For instance, Maine set a goal of 30 percent renewable power by 2000 — an impressive-
sounding target that was essentially meaningless because the state was already getting close to
half its electricity from sources that counted against the goal, including dams. (A more recent law
requires development of new renewables in Maine.)


In those states that set aggressive goals and have had trouble meeting them, a big hurdle has
been building power lines that could transmit the electricity, Mr. Wiser said. Another has been the
utilities‟ inability to secure enough long-term contracts to buy renewable power.


While the country has no shortage of entrepreneurs hoping to build wind turbines and solar
arrays, they have been slowed by problems like finding suitable sites, overcoming local political
opposition and securing financing. In a few cases, including some in upstate New York,
allegations have been made that the developers bribed officials to win approval of their projects.


Many energy experts embrace renewable power standards as a policy mechanism to promote
green energy, but with a nationwide standard starting to seem likely once Barack Obama and the
new Congress take power, these experts are ratcheting down expectations of what can be
achieved in the near term.


In fact, as utilities seek to meet growing electricity demand, they still turn most often to fossil
fuels, rather than the sun or wind.


In New England, the trend is to build more plants that run on natural gas and oil, not wind, said
Gordon van Welie, chief executive of the entity that operates New England‟s power grid.


Similarly in California, John White, executive director of the Center for Energy Efficiency and
Renewable Technology in Sacramento, noted that since 2002, when state legislators passed a
renewables requirement, the state has installed 16 times as much capacity from natural gas
plants than from renewable energy.




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Indeed, California is the prime example of a state reaching high and falling short on renewable-
power goals. Big utilities there are supposed to get 20 percent of their electricity from renewable
sources by 2010, and most are expected to miss that deadline.


San Diego Gas & Electric gets a mere 6 percent of electricity from renewable sources, and the
state‟s other big utilities — Pacific Gas & Electric and Southern California Edison — are at 14 and
15.7 percent, which includes some dams. (The Edison number is a 2007 figure; the other two are
more recent.)


Fines for missing the targets can run to $25 million a year, but because of fine print in the
regulations, the San Diego utility and Pacific Gas & Electric said they did not expect to incur fines;
a representative for Southern California Edison said he was not sure.


The utilities cited a catalog of reasons for falling short. These include stop-and-start federal tax
incentives for renewable power, problems finding reliable suppliers among the many young and
fragile start-ups in the industry, and difficulty getting transmission lines built and obtaining permits
to build solar stations and wind farms.


“Not every part of the country is equally blessed in terms of having locations for renewables,” said
Debra L. Reed, president and chief executive of San Diego Gas & Electric, which is having
trouble getting new transmission lines built to an area with a lot of sunshine.


Moreover, for utilities, the effective goals keep changing. As customers‟ electricity use rises, so
does the amount of renewable-derived electricity the utilities must produce to meet their targets.
“When you‟re judged based on customer demand, you‟re always chasing a moving target,” said
Stuart R. Hemphill, vice president of Southern California Edison, which serves a fast-growing
population.


New York is another case study. The state gets 19 percent of its electricity from decades-old
hydroelectric plants, well above the national average. It wants to add another 5 percentage points
with other renewables by 2013, but transmission is a barrier, and the state has not secured nearly
enough renewable electricity to meet its goal.


Even in states that are making good progress toward their targets — like Texas, New Mexico and
Wisconsin, according to Mr. Wiser — efforts could be undermined by the still-unfolding credit
crisis. The squeeze is falling especially hard on renewable energy projects, because nearly all the

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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
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expenses for such plants are upfront capital costs financed by debt, with little in “pay as you go”
costs like fuel.


Small solar start-ups are being hit hard, but bigger companies face challenges, too. The
billionaire Texas oilman T. Boone Pickens wants to build a huge wind project in the panhandle of
Texas, but even he has been hampered by difficulty borrowing money.


The only mechanism the states have to force utilities into line is to fine them for not meeting the
targets, but such costs would ultimately be passed on to electricity customers or company
shareholders, neither of whom would look favorably on politicians who imposed such a burden in
tough times.


That may explain why most of the penalties issued to date have been modest. In 2006, the
payments totaled around $18 million for Massachusetts and $5.6 million for Connecticut, and
virtually nothing in any other state, according to Mr. Wiser‟s report.


Despite the difficulties, the power quotas have proved politically popular — so some states are
trying to raise their targets. California‟s governor, Arnold Schwarzenegger, is undeterred by the
state‟s difficulty meeting its present target; he signed an executive order recently raising
California‟s target to 33 percent of power from renewables by 2030. Minnesota and
Massachusetts have recently raised their quotas.


Experts said that without far more attention to the practical barriers, including the lack of lines to
carry power, those new goals will be as difficult to meet as the old ones.


A national standard, if the government decided to impose one, would put an even greater
premium on new power lines, because more electricity would need to be moved from parts of the
country with abundant wind and sunshine to the great cities where power is consumed.


Mr. Wiser said, “It comes down in a lot of ways to transmission, ultimately.”




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                                          Reports
GAO, Actions Taken to Implement the Post-Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act of 2006
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d0959r.pdf

Ready or Not? PROTECTING THE PUBLIC‟S HEALTH FROM DISEASES, DISASTERS,
AND BIOTERRORISM
http://healthyamericans.org/assets/files/bioterror-report-2008.pdf

The National Report Card on the State of Emergency Medicine
http://www.emreportcard.org/

Project on National Security Reform: Forging a New Shield
http://pnsr.org/data/files/pnsr_forging_a_new_shield_report.pdf

Eliminating Lifeguards on Lake Beaches at Pennsylvania State Parks, A Wise Decision?
http://www.auditorgen.state.pa.us/Department/Info/DCNRBeachesSpecialRpt051408.pdf

A Special Performance Audit of the Pennsylvania Department of Education Safe Schools
Initiative
http://www.auditorgen.state.pa.us/reports/performance/special/speEducation120308.pdf




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                                Additional Information
International Association of Emergency Managers Live Learning Center
http://www.softconference.com/iaem/

IAEM Membership Videos
http://www.iaem.com/video.asp

Emergency Information Infrastructure Virtual Forum
http://www.emforum.org/

Florida Division of Emergency Management External Affairs Website
http://www.floridadisaster.org/externalaffairs/

Florida Division of Emergency Management, Training and Exercise Website
http://www.floridadisaster.org/Preparedness/TrainingandExercise/index.htm

FEMA, National Advisory Council Website
http://www.fema.gov/about/nac/

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Leadership Journal
http://www.dhs.gov/journal/leadership/

United Nations, Office of the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Website
http://ochaonline.un.org/

United Nations Platform for Space-based Information for Disaster Management and Emergency
Response (UN-SPIDER)
http://www.unoosa.org/oosa/unspider/index.html

Principles of Emergency Management
http://www.iaem.com/publications/documents/EMPrinciples091107.pdf

Disaster Zone: Emergency Management in the Blogosphere (Eric Holdeman‟s Blog Site)
http://www.disaster-zone.com/

Southern Poverty Law Center, Intelligence Project Website
http://www.splcenter.org/intel/intpro.jsp

National Response Framework Website
http://www.fema.gov/emergency/nrf/mainindex.htm

Emergency Management Professional Organization for Women's Enrichment™ (EMPOWER)
Website
http://www.empower-women.com/mc/page.do

Association for Public Safety Communications Officials-International Website
http://www.apco911.org/

FX Networks: 30 Days
http://www.fxnetworks.com/shows/originals/30days/index.php

We can solve the Climate Crisis.org
http://www.wecansolveit.org/

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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


U.S. Geological Survey Website
http://www.usgs.gov/

A&E Television, the Cleaner
http://www.aetv.com/the-cleaner/index.jsp

National Hydrologic Warning Council's 2009 conference in Vail, Colorado
www.hydrologicwarning.org

International Association of Emergency Manager‟s Special Needs Committee Website
http://www.iaem.com/committees/SpecialNeeds/SpecialNeeds.htm

Disaster Resilient Universities (DRU) Repository
http://safetyservices.ucdavis.edu/emergency-management/dru-repository

Waiting for the Next Disaster Blog
http://waiting-for-the-next-disaster.blogspot.com/

Pandemic Preparedness: Enhancing Communications Response for Health Care and First
Responders
http://www.fcc.gov/pshs/summits/pandemic/

Emergency Alert System: Promoting an Effective Emergency Alert System on the Road to a Next
Generation EAS
http://www.fcc.gov/pshs/summits/eas/

Recommendations for Improving 9-1-1 Call Center Operations
http://www.fcc.gov/pshs/summits/911/improving911callcenterops2.html

Wal-Mart Way in Disaster Preparedness/Response: Policy Implications
http://www.semp.us/publications/biot_reader.php?BiotID=569

GovTwit Directory
http://newthinking.bearingpoint.com/2008/11/20/govtwit-directory/#state

Prepare Metro KC Website
http://www.preparemetrokc.org/

International Chamber of Commerce, Live Piracy Map 2008
http://www.icc-
ccs.org/index.php?option=com_fabrik&view=visualization&controller=visualization.googlemap&Ite
mid=89

Politics 4 All Website
http://www.politics4all.com/

Disease control: Contingency Plan for Exotic Animal Diseases (United Kingdom)
http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/diseases/control/contingency/exotic.htm

Wildland Fire Lessons Learned Center Website
http://www.wildfirelessons.net/Home.aspx

National Capital Region Homeland Security Program Website
http://www.ncrhomelandsecurity.org/
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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


IAEM-USA Members Asked to Review FEMA's Revised "CPG-101 Producing Emergency Plans:
A Guide for All-Hazard Emergency Operations Planning for State, Territorial, Local and Tribal
Governments"
http://www.iaem.com/committees/GovernmentAffairs/GovtAffairs.htm#FEMA121008

Special Needs Information Registry Website (Beta Site)
http://www.spinreg.org/

EXTENDED RANGE FORECAST OF ATLANTIC SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY AND U.S.
LANDFALL STRIKE PROBABILITY FOR 2009
http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu/Forecasts/2008/dec2008/dec2008.pdf

Battle lines around the world (Interactive Map)
http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/science/12/09/pip.interactive.map/index.html


Center for Homeland Defense and Security MET Seminar
The MET seminar focuses exclusively on enhancing the capacity of top government officials to
successfully address new Homeland Security challenges. For states, the target audience is the
Governor and his/her Homeland Security team, which is expected to consist of the Governor‟s
senior staff and the heads of each department and agency that has a role in Homeland Security.
The MET seminar is also available for major urban area senior Homeland Security leaders.

Complete details at:
http://www.chds.us/?met


In Memory: Dr. Alan Clive

Colleagues:

With a heavy heart I have to inform our community that after nearly a decade of fighting the odds,
Dr. Alan Clive passed away last Thursday. His legacy is long and impressive and I will submit a
formal obituary later but this is someone who lost his sight at 21 but continued to excel in life.
After a long career in advocacy, he worked for FEMA in the Civil Rights Office for over 23 years
before his illness forced his retirement (and he left his post kicking and screaming). He always
bragged that he had made it to nearly every state on a Presidential Disaster Declaration and
while wanting to visit the few he had missed was glad he might now do so only as a tourist in
good times.

Alan has made a difference in the lives of so many people through the work he did and the
personal relationships he established. The Alan Clive Service and Spirit Award at the National
Hurricane Conference will be awarded for the first time in 2009 with the word "Memorial" added.
Remember, this was established and then Alan flunked hospice care being sent home three
times! That was so Alan. Am honored to have co-chaired the Health Care/Special Needs
Committee with him for the past 13 years. He was my mentor.

Per his request, donations may be made in his memory to the organization making it possible for
his to "read" the newspapers everyday via audio recording:

THE METROPOLITAN WASHINGTON EAR, INC.
12061 Tech Rd, Silver Spring, MD 20904
(301) 681-6636 Fax--(301) 625-1986
information@washear.org
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Cards and flowers may be directed to his wife, Ann at:
9129 Saffron Lane
Silver Spring, MD 20910
301-589-1293

The funeral is today but a memorial service is planned for Wednesday, December 10th from 7-
10pm. I would invite anyone able to attend to do so for the family. This will be held at a dear
friend's home at 6032 Western Ave in Chevy Chase , MD 20815 and please RSVP to Alan's
daughter, Michelle, on her cell at 610-329-3526 or at mclive_bmc@yahoo.com.

Please share with others who knew Alan.

Elizabeth Davis
EAD & Associates, LLC
44 Court Street - Suite 812
Brooklyn, NY 11201
718-330-0034 (V/TTY)
718-330-0039 (Fax)
www.eadassociates.com
www.nemrc.net


Around the World Today 11/12/08

SCOTLAND: Two children with typhoid fever are being treated in the high dependency paediatric
unit at Ninewells Hospital, Dundee. It is understood the siblings have recently returned from a trip
overseas where it is believed they picked up the infection. Those who have been in close contact
with the children are being tested for the infection.

SUMATRA: Continued Risk - The subduction zone that brought us the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman
earthquake and tsunami is ripe for yet another large event, despite a sequence of quakes that
occurred in the Mentawai Islands area in 2007, according to a group of earthquake researchers
led by scientists from the Tectonics Observatory at the California Institute of Technology
(Caltech).

CHINA: Two people were confirmed dead and three others were injured in a 5.0-magnitude
earthquake that shook southwest China's Sichuan Province early on Wednesday, the local
government said on Thursday.

AUSTRALIA: South Australia - West coast communities in South Australia have reported flash
flooding and damaging winds. There is a severe thunderstorm warning for the West Coast,
Eastern Eyre Peninsula and Northwest Pastoral districts and a flood watch for the Pastoral and
Flinders Districts.

AUSTRALIA: Queensland - Severe thunderstorms have damaged homes and cut power to
almost 6000 properties across southeast Queensland. Four storm cells are moving across the
southeast.

SOUTH AFRICA: Firefighters who have spent the past three days battling blazes which killed
three people and severely damaged homes in Gordons Bay are expected to be mobilised for
another possible five days of hot, windy, wildfire-conducive conditions.




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 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.

								
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