Sample Romeo Character Analysis Thesis Statement - PowerPoint

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					Response-to-Literature
       Essays
        Prepared
            By
      Mrs. Terry Do
Responding to Literature in
      Everyday Life
• You probably respond to literature in
  everyday life more often than you
  realize. You may have told a friend
  that a book is funny, boring, scary,
  etc. You may also have silently
  identified yourself with a character,
  or shared your views about a book
  with your teachers or friends.
• Responses to literature also appear in
  written form in everyday life. For example,
  your morning newspaper may contain a
  review of a new novel or collection of
  poetry. On-line, Web sites may be devoted
  to sharing readers’ responses to a
  particular author’s works or to a genre of
  literature.
• You, however, have to write responses to
  the books you read for your teachers.
What is response to literature?

   A response to literature is a reader’s
    reaction to any aspect of a literary work.
   When you analyze the effectiveness of an
    advertisement, the persuasiveness of a
    speech, the realism of a movie script, or
    the clarity of another type of writing, you
    are responding to literature.
What is a Response-to-literature
Essay?
   A response-to-literature essay is an essay that
    discusses what is of value in a book, short story,
    essay, article, or poem.
   A response might retell the plot of an exciting
    story, explain why a poem is beautiful, or show
    disappointment with a writer’s latest play.
   In a response-to-literature essay, you express
    the what, how, and why behind a piece of
    literature’s effect on you as a reader.
What should an effective response-to-
literature essay do?
 It should analyze the content of a
  literary work, its related ideas, or the
  work’s effect on the reader.
 It should demonstrate a
  comprehensive grasp of the
  significant ideas of literary works.
 It should focus on a single aspect of
  the work or gives an overall view of it.
What should an effective response-to-
literature essay do?
   It should rely on evidence from the literary works
    to support you opinions or viewpoint.
   It should demonstrate your awareness of the
    author’s use of stylistic devices and an
    appreciation of the effects created.
   It should identify and assess the impact of
    perceived ambiguities, nuances, and complexities
    within the text.
   It should use a logical organization to convey
    ideas clearly.
Effective responses to literature

   show that you understand the important ideas
    of the literary works you read;
   support your ideas with accurate and detailed
    references to literary works;
   acknowledge the effects the author achieves
    with stylistic devices;
   and critique the works’ ambiguities, nuance,
    and complexities.
Example: from “Hamlet” by T.S. Eliot

   “Hamlet, like the sonnets, is full of some stuff
    that the writer could not drag to light,
    contemplate, or manipulate into art. And
    when we search for this feeling, we find it, as
    in the sonnets, very difficult to localize.”
The characteristics of a
response-to-literature essay
A strong, interesting focus on
 the significant ideas in a poem,
 story, essay, or other piece of
 literature
Accurate, detailed references to
 the text or other works for each
 main idea
The characteristics of a
response to literature essay
 References to personal and literary
  allusions, quotations, and other
  examples
 An effective and logical
  organization that groups related
  details
 A conclusion or an evaluation that
  sums up your response
Types of Responses to
Literature
   Literary interpretations show
    how literary elements combine to
    create a general effect in a work
    of literature.
    Types of Responses to
    Literature
 Critical reviews present an
  evaluation of a piece of writing,
  citing evidence in the work to
  support the reviewer’s opinions.
 For example: the sample book
  review on Austin’s Pride and
  Prejudice (handout).
Types of Responses to
Literature
 Character studies analyze the
  actions, beliefs, behaviors, or
  motivations of one character in a
  literary work.
 Example: Austen’s Sense and
  Sensibility
Example on character analysis
     • On Sense and Sensibility by H.
       Hitchings
       – “The „sense‟ and „sensibility‟ of the
         title are of course represented by the
         two Dashwood sisters. Marianne is
         the embodiment of sensibility, Elinor
         of sense. … Marianne‟s highly
         evolved sensibility is reflected in the
         attention she pays to that most
         British of concerns, the weather. …By
         contrast, the practical Elinor finds
         this „passion for dead leaves‟
         bizarre.”
Types of Responses to
Literature
   Comparisons of works of
    literature compare two or more
    works of literature.
   There are a few ways of
    comparisons of works of literature:
Comparisons of works of
literature
    These may discuss two works
     by one author, such as Jane
     Austin’s Pride and Prejudice and
     Sense and Sensibility, or Charles
     Dickens’s Great Expectations and
     David Copperfield),
Comparisons of works of
literature
    Or it may compare the works
     of two writers, such as the
     Bronté sisters.
Comparisons of works of
literature
    Or examine one literary
     element in several pieces of
     literature, such as poverty,
     romance, French Revolution,
     guilty conscience (by Chris
     Howell), etc.
On Charles Dickens     by D. Pinching



 “As such, Great Expectations had
  expectations of its own when it
  appeared between December 1860
  and August 1861. With its tale of
  an orphaned boy it harked back to
  former success such as Oliver Twist
  and David Copperfield. …”
Let’s go to p. 916    (P.H. Platinum)



 We are starting our writing workshop
  by
   Choosing a topic
   prewriting your thesis statement
   Finding details to support your
    thesis
Prewriting - Choosing Your Topic
   Respond to the selected books from
    10th grade reading list and focus on the
    character(s), the plot, the descriptive
    writing, or issues raised.
Prewriting - Choosing Your Topic

   Write down the names of characters in the
    book about whom you have the most to
    say.
   Review your list, and choose as your topic
    a character that you find most intriguing.
Now let’s practice
Read Edgar Allan Poe’s
 short story “The Tell-Tale
 Heart” on p. 45-47 in World
 Literature.
Prewriting - Narrowing Your
Topic
 To present an effective response that
  is clear to your readers, narrow your
  focus by finding a single point to
  address.
 Make sure you have enough details
  to fuel your writing.
Now let’s practice
 You are to respond to Poe’s “The
  Tell-Tale Heart” by writing a 3-
  paragraph essay.
 Your introduction and conclusion
  paragraphs should contain 3-5
  sentences each, and the body
  paragraph should have 5-8
  sentences.
 Please follow the given rubric.
Prewriting - Considering Your
Purpose
   Whether you are responding to the
    work of a well-known writer, providing
    an interpretation of a piece of
    literature that you have discovered, or
    writing for credit at school, include
    language and details that support
    your purpose.
Prewriting - Considering Your
Purpose
   To praise: include concrete details to back
    up your enthusiasm for the work.
   To analyze: support your interpretation with
    evidence from the text.
   To show a personal response: make the
    connection between your ideas, opinions, or
    experience and the writing you are
    addressing.
Prewriting - Gathering Details
   Find Details to Support Your Position
     Gather details from the literature, such
      as examples, excerpts, and direct
      quotations.
     Identify the main ideas you want to
      convey, and then return to the literature
      with a research goal: to find the proof.
     Prepare a series of index cards with
      each main point written across the top.
      Underneath, put your notes on the
      details you gathered to support the point.
    Louise Cowan on how to read a classic
   “one should read a classic with pencil in hand.
    Such a work is so dense and complex as to
    require its readers to participate in the unfolding
    of its thought. The very act of underlining and
    annotating serves to engage the reader in a
    conversation with the text. And afterwards, when
    the linear experience of reading is complete, one
    can easily scan back over the marked pages –
    and thereby fix their pertinent ideas firmly in the
    mind. This retrospection, in fact, is a necessity if
    one is to grasp these writings in any depth. …”
      Gathering details about literary
      elements
 Character
     When you analyze a character, find
      evidence that shows the character’s actions,
      beliefs, and motivations.
     Note other details, including the ways other
      characters respond to the character you
      discuss and any change you see.
     For example: the young murderer’s
      character and his motivation for murder.
     Let’s see another example
    Example on character analysis
   On Sense and Sensibility by H. Hitchings
    – “The „sense‟ and „sensibility‟ of the title are of
      course represented by the two Dashwood
      sisters. Marianne is the embodiment of
      sensibility, Elinor of sense. … Marianne‟s
      highly evolved sensibility is reflected in the
      attention she pays to that most British of
      concerns, the weather. …By contrast, the
      practical Elinor finds this „passion for dead
      leaves‟ bizarre.”
   Gathering details about literary
   elements
 Setting
   To provide an interpretation of the setting,
    find words that describe time and place
    and note the mood or atmosphere the
    setting generates.
   Let’s see the following example:
       A Tale of Two Cities by     C.
                 Dickens
 It was the best of times, it was the
  worst of times, it was the age of
  wisdom, it was the age of foolishness,
  it was the epoch of belief, it was the
  epoch of incredulity, it was the
  season of Light, it was the season of
  Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it
  was the winter of despair, we had
  everything before us, we had nothing
   A Tale of Two Cities by        C.
                Dickens
 beforeus, we were all going direct to
 Heaven, we were all going direct the
 other way … It was the year of Our
 Lord one thousand seven hundred
 and seventy-five.
  Gathering details about literary
  elements
 Diction
   Locate examples of word choice by
    considering the vocabulary level and
    formality of the language.
   Also, evaluate the connotation or
    emotional meanings of the writer’s
    words.
   Read the following example.
       Great Expectation by Dickens
   “To five little stone lozenges, each about a foot
    and a half long, which were arranged in a neat
    row beside their grave, and were sacred to the
    memory of five little brothers of mine – who
    gave up trying to get a living exceedingly early
    in that universal struggle – I am indebted for a
    belief I religiously entertained that they had all
    been born on their backs with their hands in
    their trousers-pockets, and had never taken
    them out in this state of existence.” (Chapter 1)
       Great Expectation by Dickens
   “My sister, Mrs. Joe Gargery, was more than
    twenty years older than I, and had established a
    great reputation with herself and the neighbours
    because she had brought me up „by hand.‟
    Having at that time to find out for myself what
    the expression meant, and knowing her to have
    a hard and heavy hand, and to be much in the
    habit of laying it upon her husband as well as
    upon me, I supposed that Joe Gargery and I
    were both brought up by hand.” (Chapter 2)
  Gathering details about literary
  elements
 Sound Devices
   When analyzing poetry, address rhyme,
    rhythm, and repetition. Note examples of
    figurative language – such as simile or
    metaphor – that create meaning.
   For example …
Sound Devices examples
 Robert Frost‟s “The Road Not Taken”
  (using symbols)
 Alfred, Lord Tennyson‟s “The Deserted
  House” (using metaphor ) and “The Oak”
  (using simile)
 Edgar Allan Poe‟s “The Bell” (employing
  sounds)
 Robert Browning‟s “The Pied Piper of
  Hamelin” (rhyme and rhythm).
Let’s look at some samples
 Please read the student models given to
  you (Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar).
 Review the characteristics of an insightful
  response to literature.
 The quotation from the play helps to
  illustrate the character’s personality.
 The student follows a consistent point-by-
  point organization.
 The student restated his thesis as well as
  provided a new insight.
Your written assignment:

    Write a response to literature essay on
     the book you have been reading:
      It can be a critical book review as shown on
       p. 287 in your grammar book.
      It can be a character analysis as shown in
       the given Student Model.
Your written assignment:

    Your essay must have five paragraphs
     logically arranged in the three sections:
      Introduction: with thesis statement
      Body: three body paragraphs to support
       thesis, lead by the topic sentences.
      Conclusion: restate thesis
Your written assignment:

  Essay must be typed.
  Follow all MLA requirements.
  The due date for this essay is Sept. 13,
   2006
  No   late work is going to be
     accepted.
Drafting – Developing a
  Thesis Statement
• Your draft should have a
 clear statement of the
 main idea, or thesis, you
 intend to develop.
        What Is a Thesis
         Statement?
• A thesis statement is a one-sentence long
  statement in which the writer addresses the
  major points of his/her paper, in the order in
  which he/she will address them.
• A thesis statement includes the writer’s opinion
  regarding the subject, as well as clearly outlines
  for the reader what the paper will be about.
• A thesis statement never mentions the paper
  itself (for example, “this paper will discuss…”).
• A thesis statement never mentions the writer (for
  example, “in this paper I will talk about…”).
• A thesis statement never talks to the reader (for
  example, “you can see by this example…”).
Drafting – Developing a
  Thesis Statement
• Review your prewriting notes,
  looking for a single idea that
  brings together the ideas
  you’ve generated and the
  support you’ve gathered.
         Draft a Thesis
          Statement
• The thesis statement is the main
  message of your essay, which you will
  support with various kinds of details.
• To come up with a thesis statement,
  review your notes, and answer the
  following:
  – Out of all that I have learned, the most
   important point I would like to make about
   the book I read is ______________.
Drafting – Developing a
  Thesis Statement
• Write this as a single
  sentence. Use this sentence,
  your thesis statement, to
  direct the writing of your
  response to literature.
Sample Thesis Statements
 Daphne du Maurier’s “The Birds”
  presents a gripping series of events
  to illustrate the unpredictability of
  nature.
 In “One Ordinary Day, With
  Peanuts,” by Shirley Jackson, the
  main character is motivated by a
  wish to be kind to strangers.
Sample Thesis Statements
 Even though it was written more
  than two thousand years ago,
  Homer’s epic the Odyssey presents
  a hero that today’s audiences can
  respect.
Sample Thesis Statements
 The characters of Fitzgerald Darcy
  and Elizabeth Bennet not only show
  Miss Austen’s skill in creating realistic
  and captivating characters, but they
  symbolize the characteristics of pride
  and prejudice often found in early
  nineteenth century British society.
Sample Thesis Statements
 The secret to success in the Christian
  life lies in the total commitment to
  the service of God.
 Drafting - Organizing
 to Support Your Ideas
• Presenting your ideas in an
  organized way helps you guide
  your readers in following your
  thoughts and ideas.
• Follow the following
  organization:
 Drafting - Organizing
 to Support Your Ideas
• Introduction
  – After an inspired lead that grabs your
    audience’s attention and links to your
    main idea, your introduction should meet
    three more expectations:
    • Identify the title and author of the work.
    • Offer a brief summary of the work you are
      discussing.
    • State your thesis.
Let’s look at an example
 Open your grammar book to p. 287.
 Read the introduction.
 Do you think the opening sentence is
  grabbing your attention?
 Did she link to her main idea?
 Did she give a very brief summary?
 What is her thesis statement?
Let’s look at an example
 Look the Student Model “Response to
  the Tragedy of Julius Caesar”
 Read the introduction.
 Do you think the opening sentence is
  grabbing your attention?
 Did he link to his main idea?
 Did he give a very brief summary?
 What is his thesis statement?
Note
 Your response to literature should be
  evaluative or analytical, so avoid
  devoting too much attention to your
  summary.
 The length and level of this summary
  should be appropriate to your intended
  audience’s needs.
 Drafting - Organizing
 to Support Your Ideas
• Body Paragraphs
  – Your development of a thesis is the main
    part of your essay.
  – To build your thesis, offer several
    supporting ideas.
  – Introduce each key idea in a new
    paragraph, and then use the details that
    you have gathered from the selection to
    support each idea.
Let’s look at an example
 Open your grammar book to p. 287
  again.
 Read each body paragraph.
 Did she develop her thesis with each
  of the body paragraphs?
 Did she provide supporting ideas?
 Did she address each new idea in a
  different paragraph?
Let’s look at an example
 Look the Student Model “Response to
  the Tragedy of Julius Caesar” again.
 Read each body paragraph.
 Did he develop his thesis with each of
  the body paragraphs?
 Did he provide supporting ideas?
 Did he address each new idea in a
  different paragraph?
 Drafting - Organizing to
   Support Your Ideas
• Conclusion
  – Your conclusion should restate your main
    ideas or make a final point.
  – You can also present something new,
    such as your recommendation or opinion.
Let’s look at an example
 Open your grammar book to p. 287
  again.
 Read the conclusion paragraph.
 Did she restate her thesis?
 Did she present new insight?
 Did she provide quotations? Is the
  quotation effective?
Let’s look at an example
 Look the Student Model “Response to
  the Tragedy of Julius Caesar” again.
 Read the conclusion paragraph.
 Did he restate his thesis?
 Did he present new insight?
 Did he provide quotations?
   Drafting - Providing
       Elaboration
• Since writing is not as interactive as
  conversation, you need to help your
  reader know what you mean by
  providing elaboration to develop
  your points.
• Instead of asking readers to trust
  your analysis, include specific
  examples from the text that
  illustrate your ideas.
  Drafting - Providing
      Elaboration
• Include References to Support Your
  Thesis
  – Include citations from the literary
    work to support the points you are
    making. These can include quotations
    of a character’s dialogue, an example
    of a specific literary element, or an
    excerpt from the work.
Consider these specific suggestions:

 Quotations
   Include quotations to illustrate a
    character’s attitude, a writer’s word
    choice, or an essay’s argument.
        e.g. character’s attitude: Darcy, “She is
         tolerable, but she is not handsome
         enough to tempt me.” (Austen Pride and
         Prejudice)
Consider these specific suggestions:

 More Quotations
     writer’s word choice: “I had never thought
      of being ashamed of my hands before; but
      I began to consider them a very indifferent
      pair. Her contempt for me was so strong,
      that it became infectious, and I caught it.”
      (Dickens Great Expectation)
Consider these specific suggestions:

 Examples
   Insert an example of a specific literary
    element to enhance your analysis of a
    writer’s style.
   e.g. Poe’s repetitions in “The Raven” and
    “The Bells”.
Consider these specific suggestions:

 Paraphrases
     To develop a writer’s theme, discuss the
      conflict, analyze the character, or restate
      key ideas from the literature in your own
      words.
 Let’s look at an example by Andrea

 Poe … produces rhythms and patterns that
  make the motion of the poem faster. To do
  this, Poe uses sets of three words that
  sound similar. For example, in the second
  stanza, Poe plays off the ending –ember
  with “remember/December/ember” and the
  ending –orrow with
  “morrow/borrow/sorrow.” To extend the
  movement of the rhythm, Poe also
  intertwines the rhymes of
  “floor/Lenore/evermore” to pull the stanza
  together. Throughout the poem, Poe
  provides this type of triple rhyme.
Revising Your Introduction and
Conclusion
   Are your opening and closing paragraphs
    frame your analysis?
   Do they present the main message of your
    response?
   Does your closing paragraph match your
    opening paragraph?
   If your answer is no to any of the above
    questions, you need to revise to clarify your
    draft.
Revising Your Sentences
   Review Sentence Clarity
       When you are adding quotations from literature to
        your own writing, the resulting sentences may be
        unclear.
       To be sure your points are clear, review each
        sentence in your draft.
       Make sure that each one is grammatically correct.
       A strategy for doing this is to circle all the
        subjects and verbs.
Revising Your Sentences
   Revision Strategies
       Circling Subjects and Verbs
         To evaluate the sentences in your draft, circle
           the subjects and verbs in each sentence.
         Be sure that the subjects and verbs in each
           sentence agree.
         Be especially wary of sentences whose
           subjects and verbs are separated by modifiers,
           phrases, or clauses.
For example
 Separated by a Phrase:
   The celebration, usually attended by
    thousands, attracts intense media
    coverage.


 Separated by a clause:
   The revelers, who have been here
    since dawn, remain peaceful despite
    their number.
Grammar
 Grammar p. 11-18 for commas.
 Grammar p. 41, 47-51 for fragments
  and run-on sentences.
Revising Your Sentences
   Revision Strategies
       Avoid generating confusion about who or
        what is being discussed.
       Read your draft, and make sure that each
        sentence has a clear subject.
       You may choose to replace pronouns with
        nouns to make the subjects of sentences more
        obvious.
       Let’s read and do p. 76-77 in grammar.
 Let’s Look at a Sample –
 introduction and conclusion
 Introduction
   “In all tales, … characters at odds share some
     personality traits. However, significant
     character traits often put them at odds.”

 Conclusion
   “In the end, the similarities of two people do not amount
    to a hill of beans in this world because all we see are the
    differences – the discrepancies, the conflict, the two
    noble, warrior Romans on opposite sides of the
    battlefield.”
Let’s Look at a Sample
 Do you think the conclusion matches
  the introduction?
Let’s Look at a Sample
 Revised conclusion
   “In the end, the obvious similarities of
    these characters are not as important
    as their differences.”
 Let’s Look at a Sample – subject
 clarity
 Nonmodel                  Model
   “Cassius,                 “Cassius, however,
    however, is                is opposed to
    opposed to him,            Caesar, not only
    not only politically       politically but also
    but also                   personally, and is
    personally, and is         one of Caesar’s
    one of Julius’ least       least favorite people
    favorite people…”          …”
Revising Your Paragraphs
   Review Topical Paragraphs
       The topical, or body, paragraphs of your essay should
        state, develop, and support a key idea.
       Ultimately, they should contribute to your thesis
        statement.
       Each topical paragraph has a topic sentence that states an
        idea.
       Other sentences in the paragraph should expand,
        elaborate, highlight all the topic sentences in your draft,
        and then be sure that each idea is well supported.
           Rubric for Self-Assessment
Criteria                                               Rating Scale
                                                       Not very        Very

How well have I covered the significant ideas of the   1   2   3   4     5
piece?
Is my reaction well supported with accurate and        1   2   3   4     5
detailed references to the text and other works?
Have I used personal and literary allusions,           1   2   3   4     5
quotations, and other examples effectively?
How logical is the organization?                       1   2   3   4     5

How effectively does the conclusion sum up my          1   2   3   4     5
response?
      Have Fun
           With
Your Response-to-Literature
           essay

				
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