Docstoc

Practicing Similes and Metaphors Worksheet - DOC

Document Sample
Practicing Similes and Metaphors Worksheet - DOC Powered By Docstoc
					                                                                                    James 1


                               Part One: Narrative
I. Description of Students_________________________________________________

         This 2008-2009 school year I have a fourth grade class at Midland Park
Elementary. This fourth grade class consists of nineteen students. There are eleven
females and eight males. Of these students eleven are Hispanic, six are African
American, and two are Caucasian. The ages of these students range from nine to eleven
years old. All students in the class qualify for free (sixteen students) or reduced lunch
(three students.) Eleven of the students live with their mother and father, seven live with
a single parent, and one lives with another family member. One student has an
Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for speech. Four students attend ESL several times
a week. There are no gifted students. There are also no students that have any physical
or mental disabilities/handicaps. One student has athletic induced asthma, but we do not
have an inhaler for him, otherwise there are no other medications to be administered at
this time for students in this class. Two students are diagnosed with ADHD, neither is
medicated, but one is awaiting medication at this time. Three students have allergies
related to animals, foods, or medications. None of the students in this class are repeaters
to fourth grade, but one student did repeat the first grade in the past. (The data tables for
all the information are attached.)
         This is a very diverse class who all learn differently. They will be exposed to
visual, auditory, and kinesthetic activities to accommodate the various learning styles.
There are a wide variety of strengths but also areas that need improvement. Their
strengths include the ability to work cooperatively together, spelling age-appropriate
words, and a strong foundation in science. Reading appears to be an area of great
concern, as students seem to have difficulty with comprehension and pronunciation of
words. Basic math skills also seem to be an area of concern. They continue to struggle
to perform basic math functions when they are asked to do so. In order to reach and
accommodate all students and improve their academic abilities, they will work
individually, cooperatively in groups, and in pairs. This year they will work to reinforce
basic skills as well as engaging in critical thinking activities and problem solving.
Blooms Taxonomy levels will be used on a daily basis as an instructional tool.

II. Long-Range Goals for the Year__________________________________________

Affective Goals:
    Students will be accountable for themselves and their actions.
    Students will apply their special gifts and talents when working in the classroom.
    Students will work cooperatively in groups gaining social/communication skills,
       respect for one another, and relationships with their peers.
    Students will feel safe to speak freely in the classroom environment.

Behavioral Goals:
    Students will show respect to each other when another student is reading,
      working, or speaking.
    Students will abide by the directions and rules given to them.
                                                                                 James 2


        Students will use appropriate manners in all areas of the school.

Academic Goals:

Language Arts
    Reading - Students will increase their reading fluency and comprehension
    Writing - Students will use the writing process to develop a five paragraph essay,
      including the parts of the 6 + 1 Traits.
    Writing - Students will write for a variety of purposes and audiences.
    Students will consistently read and write in all subject areas.
    Research - The student will use and access information from a variety of sources.

Math
    Students will accurately solve problems involving critical thinking skills;
     emphasizing place value, fractions, decimals, multiplication, and division.
    Students will create an understanding of data collection and graphing data using
     different types of graphs.
    Students will relate mathematical concepts to real world situations.

Science
     The student will demonstrate an understanding of scientific inquiry, including the
       processes, skills, and mathematical thinking necessary to conduct a simple
       scientific investigation.
     Life Science - The student will demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics
       and patterns of behavior that allow organisms to survive in their own distinct
       environments.
     Earth Science - The student will demonstrate an understanding of the properties,
       movements, and locations of objects in the solar system.
     Earth Science - The student will demonstrate an understanding of weather
       patterns and phenomena.
     Physical Science - The student will demonstrate an understanding of the
       properties of light and electricity.

Social Studies
    The student will demonstrate an understanding of the exploration and settlement
       of North America by Native Americans, Europeans, and African Americans and
       the interactions among these peoples.
    The student will demonstrate an understanding of the beginnings of America as a
       nation and the establishment of the new government.
    The student will demonstrate an understanding of the westward movement and its
       impact on the institution of slavery.
    The student will demonstrate an understanding of the Civil War and its impact on
       America.

Health
                                                                                   James 3


      The student will be able to find health information and products that promote
       personal hygiene and wellness.
      The student will be able to classify foods by their type, function, and nutritional
       content; explain the short and long-term benefits and risks of nutritional choices.
      The student will identify and develop safety strategies to avoid violence and
       injury to self or others.
      The student will be able to describe and demonstrate effective communication
       skills to build and maintain healthy relationships with parents, family, friends, and
       other adults

Fine Arts
    The students will regularly integrate the visual and performing arts in all subject
       areas.
    The students will gain appreciation and knowledge of the different areas of the
       arts.

III. Rationale ___________________________________________________________

        The goals and objectives that are included in this long-range plan are based on
the South Carolina 4th grade Curriculum Standards and the Charleston County School
District 4th grade academic calendar 2008-2009. Through out the school year this 4th
grade class will participate in multiple types of learning styles. They will experience
whole class activities, small group activities, and individual assignments. I will use
directed teaching during certain lessons to give background information or read from the
text book, but never longer than 5 – 8 minutes. I feel students learn best when they are
actively engaged in hands on learning.
        In the area of language arts I will be teaching reading, writing, and spelling.
Reading will be carried out in various ways. We will often read aloud as a whole class
from stories provided from the text book. Since there are several ESL students as a class
we will choral read (everyone reading aloud together) or echo read (I read a sentence, the
students read the same sentence.) This allows the ESL student practice time to read aloud
in a safe environment because they are not being singled out. I will stop the students and
ask them questions through out to test reading comprehension and keep my student
thinking. The students will complete activities for reading comprehension individually or
in small groups. Writing will be carried out using the 6 + 1 writing traits and the steps of
the writing process. Students will write daily. They will also experience writing on
different topics and for different types of audiences through out the year. In all subject
areas students will write and often share their answers and writings aloud to practice
fluency when reading. Spelling will be carried out through the use of word wall (a form
of upper level phonics lessons) and bi weekly vocabulary words.
        Mathematics will be taught through the use of Everyday Math. This is the math
program Charleston County School District has adopted for the year. Students will
complete a morning math message every morning practicing what they learned the day
before and scaffolding what they will learn today. I will introduce the math topic for the
day and work several examples with the whole class while talking through the steps of
how to complete the problems. Students will then be given a chance to work several
                                                                                      James 4


practice problems on their own as I circulate the room helping students whenever I am
needed. I will always relate the math they are learning to real world situations to
encourage students to learn the information. Everyday Math allows students to use
manipulatives often and play games with the information they have learned for practice.
Students will have math homework Monday – Thursday from the Everyday Math
Workbook. Students will receive extra math practice through a computer program called
Success Maker. They will be integrated into our daily classroom schedule, for some
more than others depending on their math abilities.
        Social Studies is a subject that I plan to really use creative approaches to allow
students to grasp the concepts. I will avoid using the text book as much as possible.
Instead I plan to use children‘s literature, role playing, technology such as the
Smartboard, and integrating the other aspects of the arts. I plan to relate the history of the
past to the present day so students begin to make those connections. We will also use
graphic organizers and lots of other hands on activities through out the school year to
make history become alive for the students.
        Science will be taught through an inquiry based, hands on approach using the
FOSS Science Kits that are provided by the Charleston County School District.
Everyday I will structure the lesson through the scientific process, where we will have a
question we want to answer and students will make their own hypothesis to the question.
There will often be a short period of direct instruction followed by some type of inquiry
based exploration by the students where they are usually trying to reach a specific result
or observe certain aspects. Students will write the results to their experiment or
observation in a way I have specified (charts or a paper I have given them to record their
results on.) Students will then form a conclusion to the days lesson. The students
thoughts, data, and predictions will be recorded in their science notebooks that are on
going throughout the school year. Through the use of the inquiry based, hands on
approach, and using the FOSS kits, students will experience and observe things they
never would have other wise or dreamed of seeing. Health instruction will be included in
the science curriculum. Students will learn about making healthy decisions from foods
they eat to keeping themselves and others free of injury. They will also learn about
communication and healthy relationships with friends and family members.
        Fine arts will be consistently integrated throughout all the subject areas. The
incorporation of art, music, dance, and drama will encourage students and reach some
students in specials ways, allowing them to understand and remember information they
may have never grasped other wise. I feel the fine arts are also a fun way to spruce up
lessons, keep students actively engaged, and a creative way to keep students learning.
        Through integrating the fine arts and using different teaching methods I will be
addressing the different modalities, and therefore appealing to all of my student‘s
different learning styles and needs. Also, as mentioned several times throughout, I plan
to use children‘s literature in every unit of study because I feel students can relate to these
stories and learn more by listening to a child their own age experience the things they are
learning about better than reading if from a text book, or listening to me talk about
something that isn‘t always real to them because they have no prior knowledge of certain
things to draw from when you use direct instruction. The children‘s literature coinciding
with the hands on, inquiry leaning, with the integration of arts I believe sets up a diverse
classroom allowing students of all types to be 100% successful. By teaching like this I
                                                                                    James 5


am allowing my students to have the opportunity to be successful and making a lasting
impact in their lives.

IV. Plan for Assessment___________________________________________________

         Assessment in my classroom will be both formal (traditional) and informal
(authentic) and it will happen on a consist basis throughout the school year. I feel it is
important to consistently assess students throughout the year because it allows me to see
where each student is, and holds myself accountable that I am getting the information
across to the students in everyway possible so that each one of them understands and
grasps the information.
         Formal assessment will usually occur at the end of each subject unit. I will have
the test for the subjects made up before I begin the unit, that way I can teach from the test
and I am sure to cover everything that the students need to know. The tests will have a
variety of types of questions, for example multiple choice, fill in the blank, matching,
short answer, using a picture or diagram, and working problems. Formal assessment will
always be completed individually by the students. There will never be more than two
formal assessments in the same week. An accommodation for the ESL students in my
class is that they will sit at a table with me while taking their test and I will read the
questions aloud to them. No other accommodations will be needed for the students in
this class. Formal assessments will begin to prepare students for the state wide
standardized test (P.A.S.S) at the end of the school year.
         Informal assessments will occur on a daily basis in my classroom. These will
mostly occur through informal checkpoints such as collecting a worksheet they were to
complete to see how the students did on it, or observing their science notebooks to make
sure everyone is following along and reaching the same conclusions. These checkpoints
will not be taken for a grade. At least once, usually more often, a grading period (every 9
weeks) students will be given a project, usually that is completed in pairs or a small
group that is graded by a rubric. Students will be given the rubric and we will talk about
it before the project begins so they know exactly what I‘m looking for.
         Students will have the opportunity to receive reading grades using technology on
a program called Accelerated Reader (AR). After students have completed a book at
home or during SSR, they may get on the computer and take an AR quiz. I can retrieve
the AR scores for each student and take them as a reading grade. Students will also get
practice for the end of year P.A.S.S. test by completing online practice questions every so
often and also paper and pencil practice test questions informally in the classroom. We
will discuss the questions when completed, with the right answer, and help students
figure out why that was the best answer to choose.
         My record-keeping system will be in a grade book and in an electronic grade book
program on the computer. I will always record students‘ formal assessment grades.
Rubrics will be kept in the students portfolios, and the grade will also be recorded in the
grade books. I will also have portfolios of students‘ work, such as their writing, in the
classroom that will be available for a parent, student, or administrative member to see at
any time. Students will meet with me on a biweekly basis to review the grades they have
received in the last two weeks, what they need to improve on, what things are going
great, and any other concerns they may want to speak with me about. I will meet with
                                                                                  James 6


parents at the end of every 9 weeks for parent/teacher conferences. Parents will receive a
weekly Friday folder with students‘ grades of the week in it and will be encouraged to
contact me as frequently as they wish.

V. Sources of Verification__________________________________________________

SC English Language Arts Curriculum Standards, 2007 (Fourth Grade)
SC Mathematics Curriculum Standards, 2007 (Fourth Grade)
SC Science Curriculum Standards, 2005 (Fourth Grade)
SC Social Studies Curriculum Standards, 2005 (Fourth Grade)
SC Health and Safety Education Curriculum Standards, 2000
SC Visual and Performing Arts Curriculum Standards, 2003
Midland Park Elementary School 4th Grade Instructional Calendar 2008-2009
Charleston Country School District Coherent Curriculum (Science, Social Studies,
Mathematics, and English Language Arts)
Scott Foresman, Building a Nation, Fourth Grade Social Studies
Macmillian/McGraw, South Carolina Science, Fourth Grade
Harcourt Trophies, Fourth Grade Reading Book
Everyday Mathematics, The University of Chicago School Mathematics Project, Grade 4

VI. Classroom Management Plan___________________________________________

This includes the classroom rules, consequences, routines, housekeeping details, and my
Parent Communication Plan. (See Attachment)

VII. Right to Revise______________________________________________________

These long-range plans are tentative and may change and be updated to meet the needs
and demands of my students.

VIII. List of Attachments_________________________________________________

Attachment A: Description of Students Data Table
Attachment B: Classroom Management Plan

                              Part Two: Schedule


Assessment                           Hands On Activity    
Technology    
                                     Guest Speaker    
Bring things from home              Children‘s Literature
                                                                                 James 7


I. Schedule of Instruction_________________________________________________



SCIENCE
Unit A: Weather
Duration: 3.5 weeks

Unit Objectives:
South Carolina Curriculum Standards Covered:

The student will be able to:
4-4.1 Summarize the processes of the water cycle (including evaporation, condensation,
       precipitation, and runoff).
4-4.2 Classify clouds according to their three basic types (cumulus, cirrus, and stratus)
       and summarize how clouds form.
4-4.3 Compare daily and seasonal changes in weather conditions (including wind speed
       and direction, precipitation, and temperature) and patterns.
4-4.4 Summarize the conditions and effects of severe weather phenomena (including
       thunderstorms, hurricanes, and tornadoes) and related safety concerns.)
4-4.5 Explain Carry out the procedures for data collecting and measuring weather
       conditions (including wind speed and directions, precipitation, and temperature)
       by using appropriate tools and instruments.
4-4.6 Predict weather from data collected through observation and measurements.


Week 1 (Feb. 23 – 26):
                                                
      Water Cycle
          o Trace the life of a raindrop activity
      Building weather stations
          o FOSS kit, lab books
      Weather forecasting
          o Use of weather stations, lab books, United Streaming video


Week 2 (March 2 – 6):
                                       
      Collecting weather data
          o Textbook pg. 232
          o Introduce all the tools needed to collect weather data
          o Make them – FOSS kit
          o Place them outside, check them daily as a class, keep running record in
              science notebooks
          o Smartboard and United Streaming video
                                                                                 James 8



Week 3 (March 9 – 13):
                               
      Creating a cloud
          o FOSS kit, textbook p.242-243, lab book p.90
      Classifying clouds
          o FOSS kit, textbook p. 242-243
      Severe storms
          o FOSS kit video, textbook p. 254-258

Week 4 (Monday - Wednesday) (March 16 – 20):

      Review
      Assessment

Early Finishers: worksheet activities, read a book, or work on any homework they have.



Unit B: Light
Duration: 2.5 weeks

Unit Objectives:
South Carolina Curriculum Standards Covered:

The student will be able to:
4-5.1 Summarize the basic properties of light (including brightness and colors).
4-5.2 Illustrate the fact that light, as a form of energy, is made up of many different
       colors.
4-5.3 Summarize how light travels and explain what happens when it strikes an object
       (including reflection, refraction, and absorption).
4-5.4 Compare how light behaves when it strikes transparent, translucent, and opaque
       materials.

Week 4 (Thursday – Friday) (March 16 – 20):
                                                                   
      Textbook p 288, 290 -294, FOSS kit, SmartBoard
      Summarize the basic properties of light (including brightness and colors)
      Construct and interpret diagrams, tables, and graphs made from recorded
       measurements and observations
      Compare how light behaves when it strikes transparent, translucent, and opaque
       materials.
      Summarize how light travels and explain what happens when it strikes an object
       (including reflections, refraction, and absorption).
                                                                                  James 9


      Light as a form of Energy; How light travels through different materials, Bending
       light, Can you see me now?

Week 5 (March 23 – 27):
                                   
      FOSS kit
      Summarize how light travels and explain what happens when it strikes an object
       (including reflections, refraction, and absorption).
      Summarize the basic properties of light (including brightness and colors)
      Illustrate the fact that light, as a form of energy, is made up of many different
       colors.
      Use appropriate instruments and tools (including a compass, anemometer,
       mirrors, and a prism) safely and accurately when conducting simple
       investigations.

Week 6 (March 30 – April 2):
                                         
      FOSS kit, textbook p. 292
      Illustrate the fact that light, as a form of energy, is made up of many different
       colors.
      Summarize how light travels and explain what happens when it strikes an object
       (including reflections, refraction, and absorption).
      Mirrors and Reflection; Mirror Maze; Mirror Drawings, Convex and Concave
       Mirrors.
      Assessment will be informal through experiments students have completed




MATH
Unit A: Fractions, Decimals, and Percents
Duration: 3 weeks

Unit Objectives:
South Carolina Curriculum Standards Covered:

The student will be able to:

4-2.3 Apply an algorithm to multiply whole numbers fluently.
4-2.8 Apply strategies and procedures to find equivalent forms of fractions.
4-2.10 Identify common the fraction/decimal equivalents. (1/2=.5, 1/4=.25, ¾=.75,
       1/3=.33, 2/3=.67, multiples of 1/10, and multiples of 1/100)

4-5.5 Generate strategies to determine the area of rectangles and triangles.
                                                                                James 10


4-6.1 Compare how data-collection methods impact survey results.
4-6.2 Interpret data tables, line graphs, bar graphs, and double bar graphs whose scales
      increments are greater than or equal to 1.
4-6.3 Organize data in tables, lines graphs, and bar graphs whose scale increments are
      greater than or equal to 1.
4-6.4 Distinguish between categorical and numerical data.
4-6.5 Match categorical and numerical data to appropriate graphs.
4-6.6 Predict on the basis of data whether events are likely, unlikely, certain,
      impossible, or equally likely to occur.

Week 1 (Feb. 23 – 26):
Everyday Math
                               
9.1   Fractions, Decimals, and Percents
9.2   Converting ―Easy‖ Fractions to Decimals and Percents (2 days)
9.3   Using a calculator to Convert Fractions to Decimals
9.4   Using a calculator to Rename Fractions as Percents

Week 2 (March 2 – 6):
Everyday Math
9.5   Conversions among Fractions, Decimals, and Percents (2 days)
9.6   Comparing the results of a survey
9.7   Comparing Population Data

Week 3 (March 9 – 13):
Everyday Math
9.8   Multiplication of Decimals
9.9   Division of Decimals
      Review
9.10 Progress Check 9 (Assessment) – Due to several ESL students math assessments
      stretch out into 2 days.

Early Finishers: worksheet activities, read a book, or work on any homework they have.


Unit B: Reflection, Symmetry, Patterns
Duration: 3 weeks

Unit Objectives:
South Carolina Curriculum Standards Covered:

The student will be able to:
4-3.1 Analyze numeric, nonnumeric, and repeating patterns involving all operations and
       decimal patterns through hundredths.
4-4.3 Predict the results of multiple transformations of the same type – translation,
       reflection, or rotation – on two-dimensional geometric shape.
4-4.5 Use transformation(s) to prove congruency.
                                                                                 James 11



Week 4 (March 16 – 20):
Everyday Math                    
10.1 Explorations with transparent Mirror
10.2 Finding lines of reflection
10.3 Properties of reflections
10.4 Line of symmetry
      (Extra Day for catch up)

Week 5 (March 23 – 27):
Everyday Math:
10.5 Frieze Patterns
10.6 Positive and negative numbers
      Review
10.7 Progress Check 10 (Assessment) - Due to several ESL students math assessments
      stretch out into 2 days.


Week 6 (March 30 – April 2):
Everyday Math
                                       
Project # 4 – Making a Quilt (pg. 959) - Graded by Rubric
    Introduction
    3 Work days
    Class presentations




ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
Unit A: Voice - Persuasive
Duration: 4 weeks

Unit Objectives:
South Carolina Curriculum Standards Covered:

The student will be able to:
4-1.1 Analyze the details that support the expression of the main idea in a given literary
       text.
4-1.3 Distinguish between first-person and third-person points of view.
4-1.4 Distinguish among devices of figurative language (including simile, metaphor,
       personification, and hyperbole) and sound devices (including onomatopoeia and
       alliteration).
4-1.6 Interpret the effect of the author‘s craft (for example, word choice, sentence
       structure, the use of figurative language, and the use of dialogue) on the meaning
       of literary texts).
                                                                                  James 12


4-1.8 Classify works of fiction (including fables, tall tales, and folktales) and works of
      nonfiction (including biographies and personal essays) by characteristics.
4-1.9 Recognize the characteristics of poetry (including stanza, rhyme, and repetition).

4-2.1 Summarize evidence that supports the central idea of a given information text.
4-2.5 Use headings, subheadings, print styles, white space, captions, and chapter
      headings to gain information.

4-3.2 Use base words and affixes to determine the meanings of words.

4-6.3 Organize information by classifying or sequencing.

Week 1 (Feb. 23 – 26):
Word Block words: another, I‘m, its, it‘s, let‘s that‘s, threw, through, very, with;
antifreeze, forecast, midnight, overpower, semifinal, supermarket, underweight

Guided Reading: The Gold Rush (Expository Nonfiction)
    Identify choice/sentence structure
    Identify figurative language (similes, metaphors, hyperbole, alliteration,
      onomatopoeia)
    Explain figurative words
    Identify problem, solution, conflict,
    Derive meaning from text
    Identify word origins
    Categorize/classify ideas
    Paraphrase text
    Summarize and paraphrase main idea

Writing – 6 + 1 Traits: Voice - Persuasive
Topic for the next 4 weeks:
Should students in your school be required to wear school uniforms? Write an essay that
convinces the reader why or why not uniforms should or shouldn‘t be required in our
school.
Students should begin brainstorming with writing webs

Week 2 (March 2 – 6):
Word Block words: another, I‘m, its, it‘s, let‘s that‘s, threw, through, very, with;
antifreeze, forecast, midnight, overpower, semifinal, supermarket, underweight

Guided Reading: I Have Heard of a Land (Historical Fiction)
    Identify figurative language (similes, metaphors, hyperbole, alliteration,
      onomatopoeia)
    Identify word choice/sentence structure
                                                                                  James 13


      Explain figurative words
      Summarize texts
      Analyze details
      Derive meaning from text
      Summarize and paraphrase main idea
      Distinguish between fiction and nonfiction
      Identify word origins
      Analyze words using roots and affixes

Writing – 6 + 1 Traits: Voice - Persuasive
Continue with the school uniforms essay.
Students should begin and finish their rough drafts this week.

Week 3 (March 9 – 13):
Word Block words: another, I‘m, its, it‘s, let‘s that‘s, threw, through, very, with;
antifreeze, forecast, midnight, overpower, semifinal, supermarket, underweight

Guided Reading: Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox (Tall Tale)
    Identify figurative language (similes, metaphors, hyperbole, alliteration,
      onomatopoeia)
    Identify word choice/sentence structure
    Explain figurative words
    Summarize texts
    Analyze details
    Derive meaning from text
    Summarize and paraphrase main idea
    Distinguish between fiction and nonfiction
    Analyze words using roots and affixes

Writing – 6 + 1 Traits: Voice - Persuasive
Continue with the school uniforms essay.
Students should have a peer edit their rough draft and have a writing conference with me
before they begin working on their final drafts.

Week 4 (March 16 – 20):
Word Block words: another, I‘m, its, it‘s, let‘s that‘s, threw, through, very, with;
antifreeze, forecast, midnight, overpower, semifinal, supermarket, underweight

Guided Reading: Fly Traps, Plants That Bite Back (Informational Narrative)
    Identify figurative language (similes, metaphors, hyperbole, alliteration,
      onomatopoeia)
    Analyze character traits, motives, setting, plot
    Identify tone, problem, solution, conflict
                                                                                  James 14


      Derive meaning from text
      Identify word origins
      Analyze words using roots and affixes

Writing – 6 + 1 Traits: Voice - Persuasive
FINAL WEEK - Finish up with the school uniforms essay.
Students should begin and finish their final drafts to be turned in

.Unit B: Conventions – ‘How To’ Writings
Duration: 4 weeks

Unit Objectives:
South Carolina Curriculum Standards Covered:

The student will be able to:

4-1.3 Distinguish between first-person and third-person points of view.
4-1.5 Analyze the impact of characterization and conflict on plot.
4-1.6 Interpret the effect of the author‘s craft (for example, word choice, sentence
       structure, the use of figurative language, and the use of dialogue) on the meaning
       of literary texts).
4-1.9 Recognize the characteristics of poetry (including stanza, rhyme, and repetition).
4-1.10 Analyze cause-and-effect relationships in literacy texts.

4-2.1 Summarize evidence that supports the central idea of a given information text.

4-3.2 Use base words and affixes to determine the meanings of words.

4-6.1 Clarify and refine a research topic.
4-6.2 Use print sources (for examples books, magazines, charts, graphs, diagrams,
      dictionaries, encyclopedias, atlases, thesauri, newspapers and almanacs) and
      nonprint sources to access information.
4-6.3 Organize information by classifying or sequencing

Week 5 (March 23 – 27):
Word Block words: almost, also, always, probably, we‘re, where, wear, wouldn‘t, your,
you‘re

Guided Reading: The Down and Up Fall (Realistic Fiction)
    Identify figurative language (similes, metaphors, hyperbole, alliteration,
      onomatopoeia)
    Explain figurative words
    Summarize texts
    Analyze details
    Derive meaning from text
                                                                                  James 15


      Summarize and paraphrase main idea
      Distinguish between fiction and nonfiction
      Identify word origins
      Analyze words using roots and affixes

Writing – 6 + 1 Traits: Conventions – ‗How To‘ Writings
Topic for the next 4 weeks: Write a recipe for how to make a pb&j.
Students should begin brainstorming with writing webs and lists.


Week 6 (March 30 – April 2):
Word Block words: almost, also, always, probably, we‘re, where, wear, wouldn‘t, your,
you‘re

Guided Reading: Science Leveled Readers, S.S. Leveled Readers
    Identify author‘s purpose in text
    Analyze words using roots and affixes
    Select a topic for exploration
    Gather information from a variety of sources
    Use a variety of strategies to prepare and present selected information
    Categorize and classify ideas

** This week we will read, select a topic, gather information as a whole class and I will
present it to the class as an example of what they are to do the following 2 weeks.**

Writing – 6 + 1 Traits: Conventions – ‗How To‘ Writings
Topic for the next 4 weeks: Write a recipe for how to make a pb&j.
Students should begin writing their rough drafts.

Week 7 (April 13 – 17):
Word Block words: almost, also, always, probably, we‘re, where, wear, wouldn‘t, your,
you‘re

Guided Reading: Science Leveled Readers, S.S. Leveled Readers
    Identify author‘s purpose in text
    Analyze words using roots and affixes
    Select a topic for exploration
    Gather information from a variety of sources
    Use a variety of strategies to prepare and present selected information
    Categorize and classify ideas

**The pairs will read, select a topics, and begin to gather information together.**
                                                                                James 16


Writing – 6 + 1 Traits: Conventions – ‗How To‘ Writings
Topic for the next 4 weeks: Write a recipe for how to make a pb&j.
Students should have their rough draft peer edited and hold a writing conference with me
before they begin their final draft.

Week 8 (April 20 – 24):
Word Block words: almost, also, always, probably, we‘re, where, wear, wouldn‘t, your,
you‘re

Guided Reading: Science Leveled Readers, S.S. Leveled Readers
    Identify author‘s purpose in text
    Analyze words using roots and affixes
    Select a topic for exploration
    Gather information from a variety of sources
    Use a variety of strategies to prepare and present selected information
    Categorize and classify ideas

** FINAL WEEK - The pairs will finish gathering information and prepare their
presentations for Friday. Students will present on Friday.**

Writing – 6 + 1 Traits: Conventions – ‗How To‘ Writings
Topic for the next 4 weeks: Write a recipe for how to make a pb&j.
FINAL WEEK - Students should finish their final draft and turn it in to be graded.



HEALTH
Unit A: Nutritional Choices
Duration: 3 weeks

Unit Objectives:
South Carolina Curriculum Standards Covered:

The student will be able to:
Standard 1: Comprehend health promotion and disease prevention concepts
Standard 2: Access valid health information, products, and services.
Standard 3: Demonstrate the ability to practice behaviors that enhance health and reduce
risks.

Week 1 (Feb. 23 – 26):                          
      SmartBoard ALL week
      Introduce the food pyramid
      Practice placing food where they belong
                                                                               James 17


      Functions of each groups of food
      How much of each group you should have a day


Week 2 (March 2 – 6):
                                               
      Food labels – locating information on the labels
           o Bring in food labels
      Which things should you consider on the labels when deciding what to eat
      Observe the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the suggest intake of the food
       on the food pyramid and the items located on the food labels
           o SmartBoard


Week 3 (March 9 – 13):
                                         
      Relationships between food intake, physical activity, and your health (guest
       speaker local nurse )
      Explain the relationship between food selection and oral health
      Explore what a ‗good‘ food does for you as it goes through your body
       (Smartboard)
      Explore what a ‗bad‘ food does for you as it goes through your body (Smartboard)
      Review
      Assessment – Have students create a balanced healthy diet for two complete days
       – including breakfast, lunch, dinner, and two different snacks a day.

Early Finishers: worksheet activities, read a book, or work on any homework they have.


Unit B: Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs
Duration: 3 weeks

Unit Objectives:
South Carolina Curriculum Standards Covered:

The student will be able to:
Standard 1: Comprehend health promotion and disease prevention concepts.
Standard 4: Analyze the influence of personal beliefs, culture, mass media, technology,
and other factors on health.
Standard 5: Use interpersonal communication skills to enhance health.
                                                                                James 18


Week 4 (March 16 – 20):
Alcohol                           
 Identify short- and long-term effects and common health problems resulting from use
   of Alcohol
 Describe the impact of Alcohol use/abuse on the individual, on family health, and on
   society.
 Recognize the influences of culture and mass media on behaviors related to Alcohol
   use.
 Recognize the influences of peers and family on behaviors related to Alcohol use.

   Demonstrate strategies and skills to refuse alcohol use.

Week 5 (March 23 – 27):
Tobacco                           
 Identify short- and long-term effects and common health problems resulting from use
   of Tobacco
 Describe the impact of Tobacco use/abuse on the individual, on family health, and on
   society.
 Recognize the influences of culture and mass media on behaviors related to Tobacco
   use.
 Recognize the influences of peers and family on behaviors related to Tobacco use.

   Demonstrate strategies and skills to refuse Tobacco use.

Week 6 (March 30 – April 2):
Other Drugs                                     
 Identify short- and long-term effects and common health problems resulting from use
   of Other Drugs.
 Describe the impact of Other Drug use/abuse on the individual, on family health, and
   on society.
 Recognize the influences of culture and mass media on behaviors related to Other
   Drug use.
 Recognize the influences of peers and family on behaviors related to Other Drug use.

   Demonstrate strategies and skills to refuse Other Drug use.

Informal Assessment – Have police officer from Charleston County Police Dept. be a
guest speaker and assess students on their participation of facts and knowledge of what
you covered with them!
                                                                                James 19


SOCIAL STUDIES
Unit A: The Young US
Duration: 6 weeks

Unit Objectives:
South Carolina Curriculum Standards Covered:

The student will be able to:
4-5.1 Summarize the major expeditions and explorations that played a role in westward
       expansion—including those of Daniel Boone, Lewis and Clark, and Zebulon
       Pike—and compare the geographic features of areas explored. (G, H)
4-5.2 Explain the motives for the exploration in the West and the push for westward
       expansion, including the concept of manifest destiny, economic opportunities in
       trade, and the availability of rich land. (G, E, H)
4-5.3 Summarize the events that led to key territorial acquisitions—including the
       Louisiana Purchase, the Florida Purchase, the Northwest Territory treaty, the
       annexation of Texas, and the Mexican Cession—as well as the motives for these
       acquisitions and the location and geographic features of the lands acquired. (G, E,
       H)
4-5.4 Explain how territorial expansion and related land policies affected Native
       Americans, including their resistance to Americans‘ taking over the land,
       breaking treaties, and massacring the Native American people; the Indian
       Removal Act of 1830; and the Seminole Wars. (H, G, E)
4-5.5 Use a map to illustrate patterns of migration and trade during the period of
       westward expansion, including the Santa Fe and the Oregon trails. (G , E, H)
4-5.6 Compare the experiences of different groups who migrated and settled in the
       West, including their reasons for migrating, their experiences on the trails and at
       their destinations, the cooperation and conflict between and among the different
       groups, and the nature of their daily lives. (H, G, E)
4-5.7 Explain how specific legislation and events affected the institution of slavery in
       the territories, including the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Missouri
       Compromise, the annexation of Texas, the Compromise of 1850, the Kansas-
       Nebraska Act, and the Dred Scott decision. (H, G)

4-6.1 Compare the industrial North and the agricultural South prior to the Civil War,
      including the specific nature of the economy of each region, the geographic
      characteristics and boundaries of each region, and the basic way of life in each
      region. (G , E, H)
4-6.2 Summarize the roles and accomplishments of the leaders of the abolitionist
      movement and the Underground Railroad before and during the Civil War,
      including those of Harriet Tubman, John Brown, Frederick Douglass, Harriet
      Beecher Stowe, Sojourner Truth, and William Lloyd Garrison. (H, P)
                                                                                  James 20


Week 1 (Feb. 23 – 26):                  
      Introduce vocabulary
      Expeditions and Explorations (summarize Louisiana Purchase, Lewis and Clark,
       Daniel Boone, Zebulon Pike)
      Have students map routes taken by each and compare areas explored on graphic
       organizer
      Read excerpts from the explorers diaries. Have students describe one scene a
       member of the expedition might have witnessed.
      Motives behind exploration in the west

Week 2 (March 2 – 6):
      Introduce vocabulary
      Summarize the events that led to key territorial acquisitions
           o (Louisiana Purchase, the Florida Purchase, the Northwest Territory treaty,
              the annexation of Texas, and the Mexican Cession – and the motives)
      Explain how territorial expansion and related land policies effected the Native
       Americans
           o (Including their resistance to Americans‘ taking over the land, breaking
              treaties, and massacring the Native American people; the Indian Removal
              Act of 1830; and the Seminole Wars)



Week 3 (March 9 – 13):
       Introduce vocabulary
                               
       Illustrate the patterns of migration and trade during the period of westward
        expansion
            o Smartboard
            o Individual maps
            o Student workbook p.102
       Compare the experiences of different groups who migrated and settled in the
        West.
            o Graphic organizers
            o Student workbook p.105

Week 4 (March 16 – 20):
      Introduce vocabulary
      Explain how specific legislation and events affected the institution of slavery in
       the territories. (p. 416-420 and 476-482 in book)
           o Workbook pages 97, 111-112

Week 5 (March 23 – 27):

  
                                 
       Textbook, children‘s literature
                                                                              James 21


      Summarize the roles and accomplishments of the leaders of the abolitionist
       movement
      Summarize the Underground Railroad before and during the Civil War (role
       playing)
      Compare the industrial North and the Agricultural South

Week 6 (March 30 – April 2):
Review
Assessment (due to several ESL students the assessments on average take 2 days to
complete).

Early Finishers: worksheet activities, read a book, or work on any homework they have.


II. Materials and Resources________________________________________________

Science:
Delta FOSS kit
Teachers Guide
Macmillian/McGraw, South Carolina Science, Fourth Grade
Visual Literacy
Lab Book
www.unitedstreaming.com
Library books (Children‘s Literature)
SmartBoard
Science notebooks
Activity supplies as specified in week by week breakdown

Mathematics:
Everyday Mathematics, The University of Chicago School Mathematics Project, Grade 4
Everyday math student workbook
Calculators
Quilt project supplies
Quilt project example

English Language Arts:
Harcourt Trophies, Fourth Grade Reading Book
Activity pages to coincide with readings
Word wall words printed and backed in construction paper
Month – by – month word Phonics
Nifty Thrifty Fifty
Writing folders

Health:
Smartboard
Health activity worksheets
                                                                 James 22


Guest speakers
Internet

Social Studies:
Scott Foresman, Building a Nation, Fourth Grade Social Studies
Student workbook
Smartboard
Related activity worksheets
Children‘s Literature

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:1007
posted:11/19/2010
language:English
pages:22
Description: Practicing Similes and Metaphors + Worksheet document sample