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Writing a Research Paper for Middle School

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Writing a Research Paper for Middle School Powered By Docstoc
					 Connecting Research and
Writing Across the Curriculum
  Department of Curriculum, Instruction,
        and School Leadership

             August 21, 2007
        District-Wide Professional
               Development

         Johnny E. Brown, Ph.D.
             Superintendent
          Training Outline
Purpose of the Training
Desired Outcomes of the Training
Elements of Effective Research
Writing Strategies for Effective Research
Integrating Research and Writing
Ideas for Research and Writing Across the
Curriculum
Campus-Wide Implementation Activities
District-Wide Monitoring Expectations
     Purpose of the Training

This training is designed to assist teachers
in all content areas to help students learn
how to research information on a subject
that has been agreed upon, evaluate the
information, organize it, and write a paper
or develop a project resulting from the
research.
        Desired Outcomes
The achievement level of students in
PAISD will be improved in the area of
research.
Students will know how to work
independently and collaboratively to select
a subject, find information, make an
outline, and successfully write a research
paper or complete a research project with
a writing component, on an approved topic
of interest.
Elements of Effective Research
I. Choose Topic
2. Find Information
3. State Thesis
4. Make Tentative Outline
5. Organize Notes
6. Write First Draft
7. Revise Outline and Draft
8. Type Final Paper
            Handout
A Research Guide for Students




How to Write an A+ Research Paper
       Writing Strategies for Effective
                  Research
1. Choose a Topic
   –    Relevant to content area
   –    Focus on a specific topic
   –    Obtain teacher approval or use suggested content-related topic
   –    Read assignment sheet carefully to check required standards and
        expectations

2. Find Information
   –    Almanacs, Atlases
   –    Encyclopedias, Dictionaries
   –    Magazines, Newspapers, Interviews
   –    Surf the Net
   –    Libraries – Public or Online Public Access Catalog
   –    Other
   –    Be sure to Read and Evaluate Information for Relevance and Facts
   –    Jot down bibliographical information, including dates
3. State Thesis
  –   Belief, Opinion, Purpose for writing.


4. Make Tentative Outline
  –   Most important step in writing a good paper
  –   Helps writer think through the topic
  –   Helps logical flow from one point to the other


5. Organize Notes
  –   Arrange gathered information according to the outline
  –   Don’t include information that is not clearly understood
  –   Write information in writer’s own words to avoid plagiarism
  –   Document all quotes, borrowed ideas, etc.
  –   Use different colored highlighters to mark special references
  –   Use note cards, paper, or word processor to cut and paste
6. Write First Draft
  – Put notes in order according to outline and begin writing
  – Quote directly and indicate source
  – Summarize, paraphrase in writer’s own words to avoid
    plagiarism


7. Revise and Edit
  – Read for content errors; Double check facts and figures
  – Arrange and rearrange ideas; Reorganize outline if necessary
  – Get someone else to read and critique
  – Check paper against the assignment sheet
  – Proofread for spelling, punctuation, missing or duplicated
     words, run-on sentences, fragments, etc.
  – Do a Spell Check
8. Type Final Paper
  –   Complete the paper 2 to 3 days before it is due
  –   Read and reread
  –   Print on good quality paper
  –   Be sure paper is clean, tidy, neat, attractive
    Ideas for Research and
 Writing Across the Curriculum
Class Content
Photographs, Paintings
Concerts / Movies / Plays
Sporting Events
Human Interest Stories
Students’ Experiences / Curiosities
Relate Current Events to Previous Events
Teacher’s Suggestions / Brainstorming
              Handout
     Renaissance Period (Rebirth)
             1450-1600



An example of an activity that can be used in
 various subject areas for writing across the
                 curriculum
    Campus-Wide Implementation Activities
    Keep a Daily Journal

 Free Writing: Friendships, Games, Toys, Pets,
 Cheers, Marching or Dance Routines, etc.
 Class/Personal Schedules
 Class/Homework Assignments
 Notes/Questions about Lessons
 Thoughts for the Day/Vocabulary Words/Content
  Information/Ideas for Future Papers
 Practice Writing Sentences/Music Notation or Rhythms
  /Science Formulas/Social Studies Facts/Work Math
  Problems Extemporaneous Assignments
Campus-Wide Implementation Activities
Write Lyrics to Rhythms/Create Word Problems
Write News Releases/Editorials
Write Performance/Game Reviews/Create Brochures
Write Letters/Resumes/Current Event Reports
Write Scripts for Halftime Performances
Write Essays to Accompany Scholarship or College
   Applications/Answers to Essay Questions
Write Narratives/Poetry/Science Lab Reports
Write Grocery Lists/Orders for Supplies or Materials
Write Complete Sentences to Ask or Answer Questions
Write Interpretations of Editorial Cartoons
Faculty: Work in Professional Learning Communities
 Campus-Wide Implementation
         Activities
Department leaders, site-based committee
members, and the principal must confer to
determine a workable plan for that campus
by establishing which and when students
will receive research writing assignments.
This will avoid the possibility of students’
papers and/or projects being due in every
class at the same time--unless it is a
school-wide project.
    District-Wide Monitoring
          Expectations

At all levels – Elementary, Middle
School, and High School monitors will
expect to see written evidence that
students are conducting some kind of
teacher-approved research in all
content and elective courses.
      District-Wide Monitoring
     Expectations- Elementary

Monitors will expect to see one whole-class
paper from pre-kindergarten through first grade.
Monitors will expect to see a one-page research
paper written on a predetermined topic by
second and third graders each semester.
Monitors will expect that fourth and fifth graders
will write at least one research paper and /or
complete at least one research project, with a
writing component, on a teacher-approved topic
of interest each semester.
   District-Wide Monitoring
 Expectations – Middle School
Monitors will expect to see written
evidence that students are developing
research skills, which may include written
and verbal communication.
In all classes, monitors will expect
students to write at least one age-
appropriate research paper or complete a
research project with a writing component
each semester.
    District-Wide Monitoring
   Expectations – High School
Monitors will expect to see written
evidence that students are developing
research skills, which may include written
and verbal communication.
In all classes, monitors will expect
students to write at least one research
paper or complete a research project with
a writing component each semester.
       Desired Outcomes
The achievement level in students in
PAISD will be improved in the area of
research.
Students will know how to work
independently and collaboratively to select
a subject, find information, make an
outline, and successfully write a research
paper or complete a research project with
a writing component on an approved topic
of interest.

				
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