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How Do I Write a Formal Complaint Letter

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					Information
Making a complaint
∙   You may photocopy this information booklet
∙   You may quote from this information booklet if you
    acknowledge the source
∙   Skill information booklets are available in standard print,
    large print, Braille, audio and disk formats
∙   Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy. However,
    Skill cannot guarantee factual content

Skill: National Bureau for Students with Disabilities
Chief Executive: Benet Middleton
Unit 3, Floor 3, Radisson Court, 219 Long Lane, London SE1 4PR
Email: skill@skill.org.uk       Website: www.skill.org.uk
Tel: 020 7450 0620              Fax: 020 7450 0650

Information Service:
Open Tuesdays 11.30am-1.30pm and Thursdays 1.30pm-3.30pm
Tel: 0800 328 5050 or Textphone: 0800 068 2422
Email: info@skill.org.uk

Skill is a company limited by guarantee (2397897) and a
registered charity (801971), also registered in Scotland
(SC039212)
Making a Complaint
Contents                                          Page
Introduction                                           1
1 Tips to remember                                     2
2 Internal complaints                                  3
3 Learning and Skills Council (LSC)                    5
4 The Office of the Independent Adjudicator            6
5 Examinations                                         8
6 Needs Assessments for Disabled Students’ Allowances 9
7 Local Government Departments                       10
8 Jobcentre Plus                                     12
9 Benefits                                           13
10 Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman        14
11 Employment                                        15
12 Disability Discrimination Act (1995)              16
13 Useful Publications                               18
14 Useful Organisations                              20

Introduction
Skill can tell you about the practical and financial support
available in post-16 education, training or when looking for work.
Most people can access and benefit from this support but
sometimes things go wrong and you receive poor or inadequate
service. This booklet explains the complaints process.

If you live in Scotland you may find Making a Complaint in
Scotland useful.

Always try to resolve your complaints informally first. If this is not
possible, then use the internal complaints procedures. If you are
not satisfied with the result of your complaint, you can then take it
further to an external organisation.

Contact details for all the organisations mentioned in this
booklet are listed in the Useful organisations section.
                                  1
1   Tips to remember
Try to resolve the problem informally by talking to relevant
people in your college, university or workplace, for example, your
tutor, disability co-ordinator, and your adviser or supervisor. If this
is not possible, ask for a copy of the complaints procedure.

Make sure you are clear about the stages you have to go
through in the complaints procedure and the timescale for each
stage.

Keep a written record of your experience, including names of
people you have dealt with and the dates of events.

Make photocopies of all relevant documents and any
information that you send in support of your complaint.

If you need general or legal advice about your complaint, there
are a number of organisations you can contact depending on the
nature of your complaint.
    Your local Citizens Advice Bureau
    The Equality and Human Rights Commission
    The Disability Law Service
    The Community Legal Service Direct, in England and Wales
    The Scottish Legal Aid Board, in Scotland
    a solicitor.

You might find it useful to use an advocate to act on your behalf.
An advocate can liaise with the relevant body or institution and
may be able to represent you if you take an appeal to court.
Some advocates will charge a fee but others are free of charge.
   You can contact the Advocacy Resource Exchange helpline
    to find out about advocates who may be able to help you.
   Some disability organisations offer advocacy services. For
    more information see Skill’s information booklet
                                  2
      Organisations offering advice or services to disabled
      students.
     If you are a young person you could ask your Connexions
      Personal Adviser to help you make a complaint.

Sometimes, getting your local MP involved can add strength to
your case.


2     Internal complaints
You should always try to resolve complaints informally. If you are
thinking about making a complaint you should speak to the
disability adviser or additional learning support (ALS) co-ordinator
at your institution or another person such as your:
    tutor or supervisor
    subject tutor, or
    a Students’ Union representative, such as the Welfare
     Adviser or Disabled Students’ Representative.

These people should be able to help you resolve your complaint
informally. If this is not possible they can tell you about the
internal complaints procedure and give you information on other
organisations that may be able to help you with your complaint.

You can also find out about the internal complaints procedure
from your student handbook, the college or university website or
directly from the college. They must make the complaints
procedure available to you in your preferred format.

It may also be helpful to put your complaint in a letter to:
    the principal, if you are studying a Further Education (FE)
     course
    the manager, if you are studying at a private training college


                                 3
   the head of department or the chancellor of the university, if
    you are studying a Higher Education (HE) course.

When you make a complaint, the institution must let you know
they have received your complaint by a certain time specified in
the complaints procedure.

If you are still not satisfied with the outcome of your
complaint you can take it to the:

Local Authority (LA) - if you are studying at a school Sixth form
or in adult or community education.

Learning and Skills Council (LSC) - if you are studying a
further education course or at an LSC funded training provider.

Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education
(OIA) - if you are studying a higher education course.

Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) disability
helpline - if your complaint is about disability discrimination.

External organisations do not normally consider complaints
unless they have been through the internal complaints
procedure.




                                 4
3   Learning and Skills Council (LSC)
In England, most further education courses are funded by the
Learning and Skills Council (LSC). If you live in another part of
the UK you should contact the relevant body for a copy of their
complaints procedure.

∙   Wales: Department of Children, Education, Lifelong Learning
    and Skills (DCELLS)
∙   Scotland: Scottish Funding Council
∙   Northern Ireland: Department for Employment and Learning.

In England, if you have not been able to resolve your complaint
with your college, you can send your complaint to the LSC. You
will need to contact the appropriate team within the LSC
depending on the type of education provider you are with or the
type of complaint you are making.

For complaints about Local education providers, contact the
local LSC.

For complaints about Specialist Colleges, contact the Learners
with Learning Difficulties (LLDD) Team in the Learning Group of
the National office.

For complaints about the poor administration of learner
support, such as EMA, contact the Learner Support Directorate
in the Learning Group.

Each team has a named contact for complaints. In the guidance,
this person is called the appropriate officer.

In most cases, you must make a complaint to the LSC no later
than 3 months after the decision or action that led to your
complaint, unless there is a good reason for the delay.

                                 5
The appropriate officer should confirm in writing that they have
received your complaint, within 5 days of receiving it. The letter
should include a copy of the ‘Procedure for dealing with
complaints about Learning Providers, funded by the Learning and
Skills Council’. The letter should tell you:

 whether or not the LSC is able to investigate your complaint
 what they need from you to continue with the complaint. For
  example, copies of any written evidence relating to the
  complaint, and evidence you have gone as far as possible with
  the education provider's complaints procedure
 the timescale for each stage of the complaints procedure.

If you are not satisfied with the way a local LSC, NES or LLDD
Team have dealt with your complaint against an education
provider, you should write to the Council Solicitor. However, the
Council Solicitor will only look at whether the complaint has been
properly dealt with.

Contact the Council Solicitor, Learning and Skills Council
National Office for more information.


4   The Office of the Independent Adjudicator
    for Higher Education (OIA)
If you have made a complaint to a Higher Education course
provider and you have gone as far as you can with the internal
complaints procedures, the course provider will give you a
Completion of Procedures Letter. You can only have your
complaint considered by the OIA when you have this letter.

The OIA runs an independent student complaints scheme that all
Higher Education institutions in England and Wales must follow.
This service is free to students.
                                6
The OIA will consider complaints about:
   a programme of study or research you are or were registered
    on
   a service provided to you by your higher education institution
   a final decision by your higher education institution’s
    disciplinary or appeal body
   a designated higher education institution programme
    validated or franchised by a higher education institution.

It will not consider complaints about:
       a matter of academic judgement
       a matter that is or has been the subject of court
         proceedings
       a student employment matter
       an institution which is not a higher education institution
       admission to a higher education institution.

If you want the OIA to consider your complaint you must
complete the Scheme Application Form.

Complaints are looked by a person called the Reviewer. If the
OIA can consider your complaint, the Reviewer will send a copy
of your complaint to your college or university for their comments.
A copy of what they say is then sent to you so that you can
comment. Sometimes the Reviewer will ask you or the college or
university for further evidence before they draft a decision. The
draft decision is then sent to you and the institution for comments
on any factual errors before producing a formal decision. OIA
decisions are usually based on written evidence given by you and
the institution without the need for face-to-face meetings.

The Reviewer will decide if your complaint is justified. If it is
completely or partly justified they can recommend that the college
or university take action - to do something better or stop doing


                                  7
something wrong. The Institution is expected to comply with the
formal decision and any recommendations.

For more information about taking a complaint to the OIA, contact
the OIA directly. If you take a complaint of disability
discrimination to the OIA then the time limit for taking legal action
is extended under the DDA.


5   Examinations

Internal exams
If you did not get the right exam arrangements or the disability-
related support that was set out in your needs assessment, you
can make a complaint to the institution. For more information go
to the internal complaints section on page 3.

External exams
Sometimes exams, such as A levels, are set by an external
examination awarding body, for example, AQA, Edexcel or City
and Guilds. If you have a complaint about the exams you took,
you should first make an appeal through your school or college to
the relevant examination awarding body. If this does not resolve
the situation, you can make an appeal directly to the awarding
body.

Since September 2007 examining bodies have had a duty under
the DDA to make reasonable adjustments to examinations so that
they are accessible to disabled students. Examining bodies must
follow the Code of Practice published by the former Disability
Rights Commission (now the EHRC) and the regulations and
guidance set by the Joint Council for General Qualifications
(JCQ) or Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA), which should be
in line with the Code. You can find out more in the Disability
Discrimination Act 1995 section on page 16.

                                 8
Professional or trade qualifications
Sometimes professional or trade organisations such as the Law
Society, the General Medical Council, or CORGI, design
qualifications that test people’s ability to meet the competencies
needed for that profession. If you have a complaint about the
professional exams you took, you should first make an appeal
through your institution to the professional or trade organisation
awarding the qualification. If this does not resolve the situation,
you can make an appeal directly to the organisation.

Professional and Trade organisation that set professional exams
have a duty under Part 2 of the DDA to make reasonable
adjustments. You can find out more in the Disability
Discrimination Act 1995 section on page 16.


6   Needs Assessments for Disabled Students’
    Allowances
If you think that your needs assessment report does not address
all your disability-related study needs, you can contact the
assessment centre and ask them how to appeal. If they are
unable to re-assess you or are not willing to change the
assessment report, you can ask your awarding authority for
further advice.

If your complaint is about an unsuccessful application for DSAs or
about maladministration (poor management) see the Local
Government Departments section on page 10.

If your complaint is about your college or university’s
implementation of your DSAs you should follow the institution’s
internal complaints procedure. See page 3 for more
information.

                                 9
7   Local Government Departments

Local Authority
If you are studying at a school sixth form or in adult and
community education and you have been through the internal
complaints procedure you can make a complaint to your Local
Authority (LA). If you live in Scotland you should contact your
Local Education Department. In Northern Ireland you should
contact your local Education and Library Board (ELB).

Awarding Authority
The awarding authority is the funding body for student support
like the Disabled Students' Allowances (DSAs). This is usually
the LA or Student Finance England, the LA in Wales, the Student
Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS) in Scotland and the ELB in
Northern Ireland.

If your DSAs application is unsuccessful you can ask your
awarding authority about its appeals procedure. If you are not
happy with the outcome of the appeal you can take your
complaint to the head of the Awards Department explaining why
you think you should receive the DSAs.

If your awarding authority is Student Finance England, you can
make your appeal to the Student Loans Company Limited. You
can make your appeal by writing to the Customer Assistance
department. They will acknowledge receipt of your complaint
within two working days and a team of investigators will look at
your complaint and respond within 10 working days. You can
find out more about making a complaint to the Student Loans
Company in the Leaflet How to Make a Complaint.

If your complaint is about your DSAs needs assessment, you
should make a complaint to the assessment centre you went to.


                                10
For more information see the Needs Assessments for Disabled
Students’ Allowances section on page 9.
If your complaint is about your college or university’s
implementation of your DSAs you should follow the institution’s
internal complaints procedure. See page 3 for more information.

Social Services
You can make a complaint to your social services department, or
social work department in Scotland, if they have agreed to fund
your personal care needs while you are studying but you think
your needs are not being met or you are unhappy with the
service you are getting. Each social services department has its
own procedure. You can get a copy of their complaints policy and
procedures by contacting the department directly.

Local Government Ombudsman
This is a free, independent and impartial service that investigates
complaints about the work of local government including,
education, social services and housing. The Ombudsman looks
at complaints that involve maladministration (poor management).

Maladministration happens when a local or national government
service or department has:
   taken too long to do something
   not followed its own rules or the law
   broken its promises
   treated you unfairly
   given you the wrong information
   not made a decision in the correct way.

You can make a complaint by filling in the complaints form in the
leaflet Complaint about the council? You can get a copy from
the Local Government Ombudsman. Send your completed form
to the Local Government Ombudsman for your area. They should
let you know they have received you letter within 5 working days.

                                11
If you live in Scotland you should contact the Scottish Public
Services Ombudsman. If you live in Wales you should contact the
Public Services Ombudsman for Wales.

8   Jobcentre Plus
The Jobseeker’s Charter sets out the standards you can expect
when dealing with Jobcentre Plus. It includes information on the
service you can expect, standards of service and your
responsibilities. It also explains how you can make a complaint.
You can find out more about Jobcentre Plus services for disabled
people in our information booklet Help for disabled Jobseekers
from Jobcentre Plus.

If you are unhappy with the service you have received you can
make a complaint by going to your local Jobcentre Plus and
speaking to your Disability Employment Adviser, your Personal
Adviser (if you are on New Deal) or their manager. They can tell
you about the complaints procedure and were to go next if you
are not satisfied with the result at each level of the complaints
procedure.

You can also make a complaint by filling in the feedback leaflet
Tell us what you think. This leaflet explains the complaints
procedure and where to go next.

If you disagree with the response from Jobcentre Plus you can
ask the Independent Case Examiner (ICE) to look at your
complaint. The ICE looks at complaints made by service users
about government agencies or businesses like Jobcentre Plus.

If you are on a Jobcentre Plus scheme such as the New Deal or
Work-based Learning for Adults, you should make a complaint to
the training institution where the course is held. For more
information see the Internal complaints section on page 3.
                                12
If you are not satisfied that the matter has been resolved you
should follow the Jobcentre Plus complaints procedures.


9     Benefits
When you apply for a benefit, the relevant agency should send
you a letter, known as the ‘decision letter’, that tells you whether
or not you will receive the benefit. If you disagree with a decision
that has been made, you should contact the relevant agency.
You should appeal to the:

     Jobcentre Plus - if you disagree with a decision about a
      working age benefits, such as Jobseekers Allowance,
      Income Support or Incapacity Benefit
     Local Authority - if you disagree with a decision about your
      Housing Benefit or Council Tax Benefit
     HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) - if you disagree with
      a decision about your Working Tax Credit or Child Tax
      Credit.

You have one month from receiving the initial decision letter
to ask for an appeal. If the letter does not give you enough
information, you can ask the relevant agency to explain the
reason for their decision. The time between your request and
receiving a response should be ignored when calculating the
one-month time limit on appeals.

You should make a complaint using the leaflet GL24: if you
think our decision is wrong. If you are appealing against a Tax
Credit decision, use the leaflet How to appeal against a tax
credit decision or award. You can find out how to get copies of
these leaflets in the Useful publications section of this booklet
on page 18.


                                 13
If you do not agree with the decision you can ask the agency to
review it. The decision letter should tell you if you have the right
to appeal to an independent tribunal. The tribunal members will
be experts in the area of your appeal but will be independent of
the agency that made the original decision.

If you disagree with the tribunal’s decision, you may be able to
appeal to the Social Security Commissioners. The
Commissioners are specialist judges who investigate appeals
against decisions of the Social Security and Child Support Appeal
tribunal. You can find out about making an appeal to the Social
Security Commissioners from the leaflet Notes for Applicants
and Appellants using form OSSC 1. You can find out how to
get a copy of this leaflet in the Useful publications section on
page 18.

The Benefits Enquiry Line can also tell you about the appeals
process.


10 Parliamentary and Health Service
   Ombudsman
This is a free independent and impartial service that investigates
complaints about government departments, agencies and some
public bodies.

You should always try to settle your complaint with the
department or agency involved. However, if this is not possible,
you can ask your MP to send your complaint to the Parliamentary
and Health Service Ombudsman. The Ombudsman can look into:

     failure to provide a service
     delay that could have been avoided
     faulty procedures, or failing to follow correct procedures
                                 14
       not telling you about any rights of appeal open to you
       unfairness, bias or prejudice
       giving advice which is misleading or inadequate
       refusing to answer reasonable questions
       rudeness and not apologising for mistakes
       mistakes in handling your claims
       not putting things right when something has gone wrong.

The Ombudsman can also work jointly with the Local
Government Ombudsman in suitable cases where complaints
may come under the legal control of more than one Ombudsman.

The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman helpline can
tell more about the service.


11 Employment
If you think you have been discriminated against at work or when
you apply for a job you can write a formal letter of complaint to
your employer.

If this is does not resolve your complaint you can ask the
Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS), or Labour
Relations Agency if you are in Northern Ireland, for advice. ACAS
can help you with your complaint by acting as a mediator
between you and your employer. A conciliation officer will try to
help settle the dispute so it does not have to go to an
employment tribunal.

If you are still not satisfied with your employer’s response,
you should contact the Employment Tribunal Service.




                                15
12 Disability Discrimination Act (1995)
The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) ensures that you are not
discriminated against as a disabled person because of your
impairment or medical condition. It is divided into different parts,
covering the duties that various bodies have towards disabled
people.

You can find out more about the DDA from Skill’s information
booklet Understanding the Disability Discrimination Act:
information for disabled students.

Part 2 makes it unlawful for an employer to discriminate against
you when you are applying for a job or are in employment. The
DDA covers all aspects of employment including, for example,
applying for a job and terms of employment. This section also
covers qualifications bodies.

Part 3 is about providers of goods, facilities and services, such as
private education and training providers. It says they must make
‘reasonable adjustments’ so that you can access the services
they provide.

Part 4 is about education and says that post-16 education
providers, such as colleges, universities and general qualification
bodies, must make ‘reasonable adjustments’. If you are studying
at a school sixth form your rights will be covered by the pre-16
section of part 4.

General Qualifications Bodies have duties under Part 4 of the
Act. If you have a complaint about a general qualifications body
you should first contact your school or college. If this is
unsuccessful, you can make a complaint to the Office of the
Qualifications and Examinations Regulator (Ofqual). You should
contact the Customer Relations team who will acknowledge

                                 16
receipt of your complaint within five working days and respond
within 10 working days.

If you think you have experienced disability discrimination you
can get legal advice from the Equality and Human Rights
Commission’s (EHRC) helpline. They can also arrange
conciliation between you and the college, if this is appropriate.

If you have completed the internal complaints procedure and you
are not satisfied with the result of your complaint, mediation
through a neutral third party may help you both reach an
agreement.
    If you are unable to resolve your complaint with your
     employer, you can ask the Advisory, Conciliation and
     Arbitration Service (ACAS) to act as mediator.
    For all other complaints you can ask the Disability
     Conciliation Service run by the EHRC to help reach an
     agreement that both sides accept.

If mediation is unsuccessful, you may decide to take legal action.
You can take complaints about employment to an Employment
Tribunal. You must register these complaints within 3 months of
the date the alleged discrimination took place. If you go to
mediation, the time limit for taking legal action is extended.

You can take all other complaints to the County Court in England,
Wales and Northern Ireland, or the Sheriff Court in Scotland.
Some complaints about private education and training providers
or other services can be resolved by the ‘small claims’ procedure.
You must lodge these complaints within six months of the date
the alleged discrimination took place.




                                 17
13 Useful Publications
Skill’s Information Booklets
Your can find out more about the support and services available
to you as a disabled student or jobseeker from our other
information booklets.
    Applying for Disabled Students’ Allowances
    Applying to Further Education
    Applying to Higher Education
    Funding Further Education for disabled students
    Funding Higher Education for disabled students
    Help for disabled jobseekers from the Jobcentre Plus
    Housing Benefit and Council Tax benefit for disabled
     students
    Organisations offering advice and services to disabled
     people
    Studying and claiming benefits as ‘incapable of work’
    Tax Credits for disabled students
    Understanding the Disability Discrimination Act: information
     for disabled students

As a disabled student or jobseeker you can request up to five
information booklets free of charge. There is a charge of £2.50
per booklet for additional booklets and to professionals. All
booklets can be downloaded as A4 sheets from our website at
www.skill.org.uk/page.aspx?c=10&p=106..

Access to assessment and qualifications
Published by City and Guilds
Website: www.city-and-guilds.co.uk

Regulations and guidance relating to candidates with
particular requirements
Published by the Joint Council for General Qualifications
Website: www.jcq.org.uk
                                18
Guidance on Assessment Arrangements for Candidates with
Disabilities and / or Additional Support Needs
Published by the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA)
Website: www.sqa.org.uk

How to appeal against a tax credit decision or award
Published by HM Revenue and Customs
Website: www.hmrc.gov.uk/leaflets/wtc_ap.pdf

Complaint about the council?
Published by the Local Government Ombudsman
Website: www.lgo.org.uk

How the Ombudsman will deal with your complaint
Published by the Local Government Ombudsman
Helpline: 0845 602 1983
Website: www.lgo.org.uk

How to make a complaint
Published by the Student Loans Company
Website:
www.studentfinancedirect.co.uk/pls/portal/docs/PAGE/SPIPG001
/SPIPS001/SPIPS008/COMPLAINTS%20LEAFLET_JAN08.PDF

Jobcentre Plus: Our Standards
Published by Jobcentre Plus
Website: www.jobcentreplus.gov.uk/jcp/Customers/
Leaflets_and_Guides/index.html

Tell us what you think
Published by Jobcentre Plus
Website: www.jobcentreplus.gov.uk/jcp/Customers/
Leaflets_and_Guides/index.html



                             19
If you think our decision is wrong
Published by the Department of Work and Pensions
Website: www.jobcentreplus.gov.uk/jcp/Customers/
Leaflets_and_Guides/Dev_011720.xml.html#general

Notes for Applicants and Appellants using Form OSSC 1
Published by the Social Security Commissioner
Website: www.osscsc.gov.uk/forms/documents/
OSSC1notesApril05.pdf


14 Useful Organisations
Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS)
Brandon House, 180 Borough High Street, London SE1 1LW
National Helpline: 08457 474 747
Textphone Helpline: 08456 061 600
Phone lines open Monday to Friday from 8am to 6pm
Website: www.acas.org.uk

Advocacy Resource Exchange (ARX) Advocacy Finder
Helpline: 08451 22 86 33 Open Monday to Friday from 2pm to
5pm
Email: helpline@advocacyresource.net
Website: www.advocacyresource.net
ARX Advocacy Finder project helps people find advocacy support
in their area.

Benefits Enquiry Line for people with disabilities, carers and
representatives
2nd Floor, Red Rose House, Lancaster Road, Preston
Lancashire PR1 1HB
Email: Bel-Customer-Services@dwp.gsi.gov.uk
England, Scotland, Wales
Helpline: 0800 88 22 00

                              20
Textphone: 0800 24 33 55
Open Monday to Friday from 8:30am to 6:30pm and Saturday
from 9am to 1pm
Northern Ireland
Helpline: 0800 220 674
Textphone: 0800 243 787
Open Monday to Friday from 9am to 5pm

Citizens Advice Bureaux (CAB)
Website: www.citizensadvice.org.uk
You can find the contact details of your local CAB on the national
website or in your local telephone directory. The national website
also links to CAB’s welfare benefits advice guide website at
www.adviceguide.org.uk

Community Legal Service Direct
Tel: 0845 345 4345
Textphone: 0845 609 6677
Website: www.clsdirect.org.uk
The Community Legal Service gives free legal advice to people
on low incomes or benefits about employment, benefits and tax
credits, housing and education.

Connexions Direct
Telephone: 0808 001 3219
Textphone: 08000 968 336
SMS text: 07766 413 219
Phone lines open 7 days a week from 8am to 2am
Website: www.connexions.gov.uk
Connexions provides young people with information and advice
about learning and work. Disabled people can use the service
until they are 25. Contact Connexions Direct for details of your
local service.



                                21
Council Solicitor, Learning and Skills Council National Office
Cheylesmore House, Quinton Road, Coventry CV1 2WT
Email: complaints@lsc.gov.uk

Department for Children, Education, Lifelong Learning and
Skills (DELLS)
Wales Assembly Government, Cathays Park, Cardiff CF10 3NQ
Telephone: 0845 010 3300
Email: education.training@wales.gsi.gov.uk
Website: new.wales.gov.uk/about/departments/dcells/?lang=en

Department for Employment and Learning (Northern Ireland)
Adelaide House, 39-49 Adelaide Street, Belfast BT2 8FD
Telephone: 028 9025 7777
Email: studentsupport@delni.gov.uk
Website: www.delni.gov.uk
For details of your local Education and Library Board, contact
DELNI or visit the website.

DIAL UK (National Association of Disablement Information
and Advice Lines)
St Catherine's, Tickhill Road, Doncaster DN4 8QN
Telephone: 01302 310 123
Textphone: 01302 310 123 please use voice announcer
Email: informationenquiries@dialuk.org.uk
Website: www.dialuk.info
Network of disability information and advice lines that give advice
on welfare benefits issues. The national office can give details of
your nearest local service.

Disability Alliance
Universal House, 88-94 Wentworth Street, London E1 7SA
Telephone: 020 7247 8776
Email: office.da@dial.pipex.com
Website: www.disabilityalliance.org

                                22
Disability Alliance provides information on benefits through
publications like the Disability Rights Handbook, their website and
factsheets.

Disability Law Service
39-45 Cavell Street, London E1 2BP
Telephone: 020 7791 9800
Textphone: 020 7791 9801
Phone lines open Monday to Friday from 10am to 1pm and from
2pm to 5pm
Email: advice@dls.org.uk
Website: www.dls.org.uk
A free legal advice service for disabled people and their families
and carers throughout Britain.

Education and Library Board
See Department for Employment and Learning (Northern
Ireland).

Employment Tribunal Service
Helpline: 08457 959 775
Website: www.employmenttribunals.gov.uk
Employment Tribunals are legal bodies that deal with
employment rights disputes between employers and employees.

Equality and Human Rights Commission Helpline
Website: www.equalityhumanrights.com
England
FREEPOST, MID 02164, Stratford upon Avon CV37 9BR
Telephone: 08457 622 633
Textphone: 08457 622 644
Email: englandhelpline2@equalityhumanrights.com
Scotland
Equality and Human Rights Commission Helpline Scotland
Freepost RRLL-GYLB-UJTA, The Optima Building
58 Robertson Street, Glasgow G2 8DU
                             23
Telephone: 0845 604 5510
Textphone: 0845 604 5520
Wales
Equality and Human Rights Commission Helpline Wales
Freepost RRLR-UEYB-UYZL, 1st Floor, 3 Callaghan Square
Cardiff CF10 5BT
Telephone: 0845 604 8810
Textphone: 0845 604 8820

Examinations Appeal Board(EAB)
83 Piccadilly, London W1J 8QA
Tel: 020 7509 5995
Website: www.theeab.org.uk
An independent body which investigates complaints about fair
and accurate marking of examinations set by awarding bodies. It
can report awarding bodies to the official regulator, Ofqual.

HM Revenue and Customs - Tax credits claim helpline
England, Scotland and Wales
Telephone: 0845 300 3900
Textphone: 0845 300 3909
Northern Ireland
Telephone: 0845 603 2000
Textphone: 0845 607 6078
Phonelines open 7 days a week from 8am to 8pm

Independent Case Examiner
PO Box 155, Chester CH99 9SA
Telephone: 0845 606 0777
Textphone: 0151 801 8888
Email: ice@ukgov.demon.co.uk
Website: www.ind-case-exam.org.uk

Jobcentre Plus
Telephone: 0800 055 6688
Textphone: 0800 023 4888 Website: www.jobcentreplus.gov.uk
                           24
Welsh Language telephone: 0800 012 1888
You can find the details of your local Jobcentre Plus office in your
local phonebook or by visiting the national website.

Law Centres Federation
293-299 Kentish Town Road, London NW5 2TJ
Telephone: 020 7428 4400
Email: info@lawcentres.org.uk
Website: www.lawcentres.org.uk
The Law Centres Federation can give contact details of local Law
Centres that give free advice about employment, housing, welfare
benefits and discrimination.

Learning and Skills Council (LSC)
Cheylesmore House, Quinton Road, Coventry CV1 2WT
Telephone: 0870 900 6800
Email: info@lsc.gov.uk
Website: www.lsc.gov.uk
The LSC funds FE colleges in England. For details of your local
LSC, contact the national office or visit the website.

Local Government Ombudsman
Helpline: 0845 602 1983
Email: www.lgo.org.uk

Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education
(OIA)
Fifth Floor, Thames Tower, Station Road, Reading RG1 1LX
Telephone: 0118 959 9813
Email: enquiries@oiahe.org.uk
Website: oiahe.org.uk

Office of the Qualifications and Examinations Regulator
(Ofqual)
Ofqual monitors awarding bodies to make sure the way they
operate is fair, consistent and follows regulations.
                                  25
Spring Place, Coventry Business Park, Herald Avenue, Coventry
CV5 6UB.
Telephone: 0300 303 3344
Email: info@ofqual.gov.uk
Website: www.ofqual.gov.uk/

Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman
Helpline: 0845 015 4033
Website: www.ombudsman.org.uk
Public Services Ombudsman for Wales
Phone: 01656 641150
Website: www.ombudsman-wales.org.uk
Investigates complaints about local government and National
Health Services organisations including GPs in Wales, the
National Assembly for Wales and many of the public bodies
which it funds, and housing associations in Wales.

Scottish Funding Council
Donaldson House, 97 Haymarket Terrace, Edinburgh EH12 5HD
Telephone: 0131 313 6500
Email: info@sfc.ac.uk
Website: www.sfc.ac.uk

Scottish Legal Aid Board
Helpline: 0845 122 8686 Open 7 days a week from 7am to 11pm
Website: www.slab.org.uk
The Board decides who can receive Legal Aid in Scotland. The
helpline can give you more information about Legal Aid and help
you find a Legal Aid Solicitor but cannot give legal advice.

Scottish Public Services Ombudsman
Phone: 0870 011 5378
Website: www.scottishombudsman.org.uk
Investigates complaints in Scotland about local and central
government, the National Health Service and housing
associations.
                                26
Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS)
Gyleview House, 3 Redheughs Rigg, Edinburgh EH12 9HH
Telephone: 0845 111 1711
Email: saas.geu@scotland.gsi.gov.uk
Website: www.saas.gov.uk

Student Finance England
Website: www.studentfinanceengland.co.uk
Central system for information on financial support and online
applications for grants, loans and Disabled Students’ Allowances
(DSAs) in England.

Student Loans Company Limited
Customer Assistance, 100 Bothwell Street, Glasgow G2 7JD
Email: customer_complaints@slc.co.uk
Website: www.slc.co.uk

Social Security Commissioners
3rd Floor, Procession House, 55 Ludgate Hill,
London EC4M 7JW
Telephone: 020 7029 9850
Textphone: 020 7029 9820
Email: osscsc@tribunals.gsi.gov.uk
Website: www.osscsc.gov.uk

Trades Union Congress (TUC)
Congress House, Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3LS
Tel: 020 7636 4030
Website: www.tuc.org.uk



                                                  October 2008



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