Higher Education Jobs Employment Positions

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					Higher Education Employment Report
Second Quarter, 2010 / Published August 2010




Executive Summary



Higher education employment continues to follow historical sector patterns while overall U.S. employment,
which experienced significant losses throughout 2008 and into 2009, began to recover slightly in the first half
of 2010. From the first half of 2008 (the initial six-month period of the recession) to H1 2010, higher education
employment grew 4.2 percent while the total number of jobs in the U.S. declined 5.6 percent, or about 7.7 million
jobs. Data on job postings in academe, according to HigherEdJobs, suggest colleges and universities are
continuing to fine-tune the manner in which they staff positions to cope with the fluctuating economy.

As of the second quarter of 2010, analyses of Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data on higher education
employment as well as job posting trends with HigherEdJobs reveal:



   Higher education employment continues to                       Hiring and employment at community colleges
   follow historical patterns despite the fall-off in             continue to be robust according to trends with
   overall U.S. employment during the recession                   both HigherEdJobs and the U.S. Bureau of
   and now early signs of growth during the first                 Labor Statistics.
   half of 2010.
                                                                  The ratio of part-time to full-time postings in
   The number of jobs in higher education                         higher education may have peaked at the end of
   remained relatively stable and followed                        2009 to early 2010 and may now be moderating,
   historical patterns in Q2 2010. However, the                   or even declining.
   number of advertised job openings, which
   dramatically decreased during the recession,
   experienced significant growth during the
   second quarter and first half of 2010.

   Although the ratio of faculty to non-faculty job          John Ikenberry, Ph.D.
   postings shifted during the recession, it                 President and Co-Founder
   returned to more historical patterns starting in
                                                             HigherEdJobs
   Q1 2010 and continuing into Q2 2010.
                                                             328 Innovation Boulevard, Suite 300
                                                             State College, PA 16803

                                                             media@higheredjobs.com
                                                             814-861-3080 (ext.202)



Q2 2010 HIGHER EDUCATION EMPLOYMENT REPORT                                                                          1
About HigherEdJobs                                     About this Quarterly Report



HigherEdJobs is the leading source for jobs and        The HigherEdJobs Higher Education Employment
career information in academia. The company’s          Report, which is published quarterly, provides
website, www.higheredjobs.com, is visited two          summary information about employment within the
million times a month by 750,000 unique visitors.      higher education community. The goal of the report
During 2009, more than 2,600 colleges and              is to help academic leaders and policy makers better
universities posted over 55,000 faculty,               appreciate real-time trends we are experiencing with
administrative and executive job postings to           employment. Those seeking jobs will appreciate
HigherEdJobs.                                          these same data.

Founded in 1996, HigherEdJobs’ mission is to help      As background to some of the statistics we are
higher education candidates and employers              reporting here, we define Higher Education
connect with one another to find their dream job, or   Employment to include all types of employment at
employee, as quickly as possible with the least        four-year colleges and universities, as well as two-
amount of effort.                                      year community colleges and technical schools.

HigherEdJobs is published by Internet Employment       Over 1,000 colleges and universities are subscribed
Linkage, Inc. (IEL). IEL is headquartered in State     to the HigherEdJobs Unlimited Posting Plan, a
College, PA, and has an accounting and operations      relevant point for this report since these schools
office in Oak Park, IL.                                have no financial deterrent to posting their jobs.

                                                       This Higher Education Employment Report was
                                                       produced by HigherEdJobs with critical analysis and
                                                       expertise provided by Bruce Steinberg
                                                       (www.brucesteinberg.net), an independent
                                                       employment researcher. Steinberg evaluated
                                                       information from our data files at HigherEdJobs as
                                                       well as data published by the Bureau of Labor
                                                       Statistics (BLS) of the U.S. Department of Labor.




Q2 2010 HIGHER EDUCATION EMPLOYMENT REPORT                                                                    2
Finding: Higher education employment continues to follow
historical patterns despite the fall-off in overall U.S. employment
during the recession and now early signs of growth during the
first half of 2010.

Higher education employment continues to be
only marginally, if at all, affected by the overall
U.S. economy. In fact, the number of jobs in
higher education has continued to grow during
both the recession and the more recent, albeit
modest, recovery.

From the first half of 2008 (the initial six-month
period of the recession) to H1 2010, higher
education employment grew 4.2 percent, or about
68,000 jobs, while the total number of U.S. jobs
declined by 5.6 percent, or about 7.7 million jobs.

During June 2010, the number of jobs in higher
education was 2.5 percent higher than June 2009,
which was 2.3 percent higher than June 2008.
Since 2005, June's year-over-year growth has
ranged from 1.5 percent (2006) to 4.8 percent
(2008), a range of only 3.3 percentage points.

                                                                  In contrast, the year-over-year change in overall
    Year-over-year change in June (in percent)                    U.S. employment for June has ranged from growth
                                                                  of 1.8 percent in June 2006 to a decline of 4.8
   Year
             Higher education
                                       All jobs
                                                                  percent in June 2009, a range of 6.6 percentage
               employment                                         points, double that of higher education. This is
   2010             2.5                 -0.2                      surprising considering the overall employment
   2009             2.3                 -4.8                      market is approximately 90 times larger than
   2008             4.8                 -0.3
                                                                  higher education and, theoretically, should not be
                                                                  subject to big variations. This would suggest
   2007             2.3                  1.3
                                                                  higher education employment, at least for the
   2006             1.5                  1.8                      periods analyzed in this report, is more stable than
   2005             4.3                  1.6                      overall US employment.



The federal government does not define “higher education” per se. The term as used in this report is the combination of two
NAICS (North American Industry Classification System, the program that tracks jobs by sector) sectors: Junior Colleges (NAICS
611200), and Colleges and Universities (NAICS 611300). The data are reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) of the
U.S. Department of Labor.


The blue line in the chart signifies all jobs in higher education, according to an analysis by HigherEdJobs of Bureau of Labor
Statistics data. Note that the analysis shows a clear decrease in the number of jobs in higher education during the summer
months, a pattern consistent with nine-month employment contracts for many academic employees. The green line signifies all
U.S. jobs across the entire economy. Overall employment has been rescaled to better illustrate the recent decline starting in
2008.


Special note: The federal government’s 2010 Census significantly ramped-up in the first half of 2010 to hire approximately
600,000 temporary workers, most of whom were discharged at the end of this period. To control for this substantial inflow and
outflow of employees in the overall job trend line, the number of Census workers in H1 2010 was excluded from the above data.


Q2 2010 HIGHER EDUCATION EMPLOYMENT REPORT                                                                                       3
Finding: The number of jobs in higher education remained
relatively stable and followed historical patterns in Q2 2010.
However, the number of advertised job openings, which
dramatically decreased during the recession, experienced
significant growth during the second quarter and first half of
2010.

                               2006        2007       2008          2009




While the number of jobs in higher education has        A similar trend appears when analyzing the data
remained relatively stable and even continued to        on a sequential basis. The number of job postings
grow during the current recession, advertising for      in higher education was up 24.2 percent during Q2
open positions in higher education has been more        2010 compared to the previous three-month
volatile. Job postings in academia — as                 period. During Q2 2009, the sequential increase
manifested by the total number of postings from         was only 3.4 percent.
colleges and universities continually subscribed to
HigherEdJobs’ Unlimited Posting Plan — dropped
off at the end of 2008 and remained low                                Year-over-year change in H1 (in percent)
throughout most of 2009. By the end of 2009, the
                                                                      HigherEdJobs        Higher education
number of open positions in academia began to                Year
                                                                         postings           employment
                                                                                                                  All jobs
recover, continuing through the second quarter of
                                                             2010          35.8                  1.3               -1.5
2010.
                                                             2009          -35.9                 2.9               -4.2
During H1 2009, the number of job postings from              2008          7.3                   2.2                0.2
HigherEdJobs' continuing unlimited posting                   2007          8.6                   1.3                1.3
subscribers, no doubt affected by the recession,
fell 35.9 percent compared to the year before.
Then, during H1 2010, higher education job              The purple bars (June data highlighted in red for ease of
postings grew 35.8 percent. In comparison,              year-over-year comparisons) in the chart above signify
higher education employment observed year-to-           monthly job openings posted to HigherEdJobs by U.S.
year increases of 2.9 percent and 1.3 percent           colleges and universities that have continuously subscribed
during the first half of 2009 and 2010,                 to the company’s unlimited posting plan since at least
respectively.                                           January 1, 2005 (roughly equating to the retail sector’s
                                                        reporting of annual changes of “same-store sales”). Since
                                                        these schools pay a flat annual fee for unlimited recruitment
                                                        advertising on HigherEdJobs, they have no financial
                                                        deterrent to discourage them from posting their job
                                                        openings. As a result, changes in their postings can be seen
                                                        as proxy for hiring trends in higher education.


Q2 2010 HIGHER EDUCATION EMPLOYMENT REPORT                                                                                   4
Finding: Although the ratio of faculty to non-faculty job postings
shifted during the recession, it returned to more historical
patterns starting in Q1 2010 and continuing into Q2 2010.




   The blue bars in the
   chart show the monthly
   ratio of faculty to non-
   faculty job openings
   posted to HigherEdJobs.
   The red line signifies the
   trend line for the same
   data. The purple bars
   are presented for ease
   of year-over-year
   comparisons of March
   data.




The ratio of faculty to non-faculty jobs appears to    compared to the year before, it was still higher
follow a cyclical pattern — the ratio declines         than pre-recessionary levels. During Q1 2010, 43.6
during the first and second quarters. While the        percent of job postings were for faculty positions,
overall average is about 40 percent, it generally      less than the 53.7 percent ratio in Q1 2009, but
peaks in the fall semester likely due to               higher than the 41.0 percent ratio for Q1 2008. A
departments firming up their hiring plans for the      similar trend occurred in Q2 2010; the ratio was
subsequent fall semester, and then drops off           36.0 percent in Q2 2010, less than the 40.3
dramatically early in the calendar year. This          percent in Q2 2009, but only slightly greater than
pattern occurred every year from 2005 through          the 35.2 percent value in Q2 2008, indicating that
2008. More specifically, in the first half of the      the ratio is returning to historic, pre-recessionary
year, the Q1 ratio has historically been in a low-40   levels.
percent range while the Q2 ratio has been in a
mid-30 percent range.                                  The data suggest that as colleges and universities
                                                       dealt with financial constraints at the beginning of
However, the trend changed starting in the fourth      the recession, they concentrated recruitment
quarter of 2008, and by 2009, the decline in the       toward academic faculty positions and away from
ratio of faculty postings normally observed in the     administrative and support staff. Starting in Q1
first quarter of a calendar year did not occur. In     2010 and continuing into the second quarter,
fact, the percentage of new faculty positions          however, colleges and universities appear to have
added to HigherEdJobs during the first quarter of      returned to more historical recruitment and staffing
2009 (53.7 percent) increased 1.4 percentage           patterns. This does not imply institutions are now
points to well outside the "normal" range.             decreasing academic hiring, but are simply
                                                       bringing the staffing ratio of faculty to non-faculty
Although the ratio of faculty to non-faculty           back to regular, pre-recessionary, proportions.
postings was down during the first quarter of 2010

Q2 2010 HIGHER EDUCATION EMPLOYMENT REPORT                                                                     5
Finding: Hiring and employment at community colleges continue
to be robust according to trends with both HigherEdJobs and the
U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.




Job postings at community colleges, according to       the new, emerging economy. Community colleges
HigherEdJobs, as well as the number of jobs at         are often an initial venue and vital link for relatively
community colleges, according to the Bureau of         brief, but crucial, training programs and curricula to
Labor Statistics, continued to grow in Q2 2010.        retrain and re-educate workers. The increased job
                                                       postings at community colleges may be a
Although the percentage of community college job       manifestation of the growing demand for the
postings at HigherEdJobs appears to have               education and training they provide.
declined slightly (18.0. percent in Q2 2010 from
21.0 percent in Q2 2009), the actual number of
postings at community colleges grew 7.1 percent        Note: The green line in the chart above indicates jobs at
sequentially and 30.5 percent year-over-year in        Junior Colleges as categorized by the U.S. Bureau of Labor
Q2 2010.                                               Statistics despite most two-year institutions having changed
                                                       their name to include their designation as a community
As the labor force continues to face persistently      college. The red markers indicate second quarter data and
high unemployment rates thus far in 2010, it has       are presented for ease of year-over-year comparisons. The
been widely reported recently that the inability for   dashed blue line signifies the trend line for community
many unemployed to get a job is at least partially     college postings as a percentage of all job postings at
due to a lack of relevant skills and education in      HigherEdJobs.




Q2 2010 HIGHER EDUCATION EMPLOYMENT REPORT                                                                            6
                                                        The ratio of part-time to full-time job postings in
                                                        higher education was relatively flat during H1
                                                        2010 compared to the year before.

                                                        Last year, during H1 2009, the ratio of part-time to
                                                        full-time postings in higher education increased
                                                        dramatically from 8.7 percent to 12.0 percent
                                                        compared to the year before. This year, during
                                                        H1 2010, the ratio was essentially the same (12.1
                                                        percent), indicating the rate of growth may have
                                                        stalled. For the most recent month, June 2010,
                                                        the ratio of part-time postings (13.4 percent) was
Finding: The ratio of part-time                         down compared to June 2009 (14.7 percent),
to full-time postings in higher                         suggesting the ratio of part-time to full-time
                                                        postings in academia may have even peaked.
education may have peaked at
the end of 2009 to early 2010                           From the data presented, it appears higher
                                                        education institutions responded to financial
and may now be moderating,                              pressures by relying more on part-time
or even declining, as 2010                              employees starting in 2008.

progresses.                                             Before the recession, from 2004 to 2007
                                                        (inclusive), HigherEdJobs observed that
                                                        approximately 8 percent (varied between 7.9 and
                                                        8.4 percent) of its posted jobs were for part-time
                                                        positions. Note, this does not necessarily reflect
                                                        the overall percentage of full- and part-time
                                                        positions within academe; however, changes in
                                                        this percentage infer changes in the overall
                                                        balance of employment.




                                Average percentage of part-time postings
                2004     2005         2006       2007        2008          2009
                8.2       8.4          7.9        8.1         9.7          12.2
              H1 2004   H1 2005      H1 2006    H1 2007    H1 2008     H1 2009     H12010
                7.8       9.0          8.0        7.4         8.7          12.0      12.1



Q2 2010 HIGHER EDUCATION EMPLOYMENT REPORT                                                                     7
Higher Education Employment Report
Second Quarter, 2010 / Published August 2010




For more information, contact:

John Ikenberry, Ph.D.
President and Co-Founder

HigherEdJobs
328 Innovation Boulevard, Suite 300
State College, PA 16803

media@higheredjobs.com
814-861-3080 (ext. 202)




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