Law Enforcement Career Options by mup65344

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									 LAW ENFORCEMENT CONTINGENCY
            TRAINING
      120-HOUR CURRICULUM

COMPETENCIES AND LEARNING OBJECTIVES




Prepared for the Curriculum Advisory Committee to the
          Law Enforcement Standards Board

          By the Training and Standards Bureau
            Wisconsin Department of Justice
                        June 2007
June 2007   ii
                                         TABLE OF CONTENTS
UNIT I: POLICING IN AMERICA (1 Hour) ................................................................... 1
 D. ETHICS (30 MINUTES) .......................................................................................... 1
 G. AGENCY POLICY (30 minutes) ............................................................................ 1
UNIT II: THE LEGAL CONTEXT (23 Hours) ............................................................... 2
 A. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (13)................................................................................ 2
 B. CRIMES (6) ............................................................................................................... 5
 C. JUVENILE LAW (4) ................................................................................................. 7
UNIT III: TACTICAL SKILLS (40 hours) ...................................................................... 9
 A. USE OF FORCE CONCEPTS (1) (SEE DAAT AND FIREARMS) .................. 9
 B. DAAT (19).................................................................................................................. 9
 C. FIREARMS (15) ..................................................................................................... 11
 D. DEADLY FORCE DECISION MAKING (1) (SEE DAAT AND FIREARMS) . 13
 E. TACTICAL RESPONSE (2) .................................................................................. 13
 F. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS (2) ............................................................................ 14
UNIT IV: RELATIONAL SKILLS (12 hours) .............................................................. 16
 B. PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION (12) ....................................................... 16
UNIT V: PATROL PROCEDURES (32 hours) ......................................................... 17
 A. TRAFFIC LAW ENFORCEMENT (4) .................................................................. 17
 D. EVOC (EMERGENCY VEHICLE OPERATION AND CONTROL) (16) ........ 18
 E. VEHICLE CONTACTS (12) .................................................................................. 20
SCENARIO EVALUATION (12 Hours) ....................................................................... 22




                                                               iii                                              June 2007
      UNIT I: POLICING IN AMERICA (1 Hour)
D. ETHICS (30 MINUTES)

In this course, students will explore belief systems, social pressures, moral
problems, decision-making and the consequences of decisions. In addition,
ethics will be integrated throughout the academy training in all topic areas.

Competencies and Learning Objectives

3. Describe how professionalism, ethics, a nd moral standards relate to law
   enforcement career .

   3.3. Integrate the professional and legal standards of law enforcement into
        your career plan.

4. Practice a code of behavior that embodies ethical principles and professional
   obligations of law enforcement.

   4.1. Identify key components of the Law Enforcement Code of Ethics.

G. AGENCY POLICY (30 minutes)

In this course, students will learn the requirements under Wisconsin law for
written law enforcement agency policies and procedures, and will learn why
written policies and procedures are important to them in performing their job
tasks properly.

Competencies and Learning Objectives

1. Identify the law enforcement policies required by Wisconsin Statutes .

   1.1. Identify the subjects/issues which require a mandatory policy according
        to Wisconsin statutes.

   1.2. Locate the Wisconsin statutes that refer to mandatory law enforcement
        policies.




                                        1                               June 2007
   UNIT II: THE LEGAL CONTEXT (23 Hours)

A. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (13)

This course covers the structure of the criminal justice system, including criminal
procedure. Students will learn the legal bases for law enforcement action such
as arrest, use of force, and search and seizure, as well as the limits on law
enforcement activity.

Competencies and Learning Objectives

2. Identify situations where constitutional rules are applicable.

   2.1. Describe the purposes of the 4 th amendment and possible sanctions for
        violating it.

   2.2. Describe the purposes of the 5 th amendment and possible sanctions for
        violating it.

   2.3. Describe the purposes of the 6 th amendment and possible sanctions for
        violating it.

   2.4. Describe the purposes of the 8 th amendment and possible sanctions for
        violating it.

   2.5. Describe the purposes of the 14 th amendment and possible sanctions
        for violating it.

   2.6. Describe the Exclusionary Rule Fruit of the Poisonous Tree Doctrines
        and their ramifications.

3. Identify situations where an officer may use reasonable suspicion to contact a
   subject.

   3.1. Review the facts of the landmark case, Terry V. Ohio.

   3.2. Define reasonable suspicion as it relates to the “stop” of a person.

   3.3. Define reasonable suspicion as it relates to the “stop” of a vehicle.

   3.4. Identify the limits on subject identification, stop duration and subject
        movement.

   3.5. Describe the justification and scope of a frisk conducted subsequent to a
        Terry stop.



June 2007                                2
4. Identify the elements of a lawful arrest.

   4.1. Define probable cause as it relates to the arrest of a person.

   4.2. Develop probable cause for violations based on simulated situations.

   4.3. Differentiate between a frisk of a person stopped under Terry and a
        search of a person incident to arrest.

   4.4. Describe the requirements and procedure for making an arrest with and
        without a warrant.

   4.5. Identify the extent to which force may be used when conducting an
        arrest.

   4.6. Describe the jurisdiction of a peace officer and where an arrest may
        occur.

   4.7. Describe fresh pursuit and its effect on an officer’s jurisdiction.

   4.8. Explain the authority to use force to make arrests with or without a
        warrant.

5. Identify search-related activities where the 4th amendment is not applicable.

   5.1. Analyze information gathering opportunities where the 4th amendment
        does not apply (dog sniffs, fly-overs, looking for VIN numbers, inspection
        of prison cells, abandoned property).

   5.2. Compare “open fields” to curtilage where the 4 th amendment does apply.

   5.3. Compare “open view” to “plain view” and how it relates to search and
        seizure law.

6. Identify the requirements that pertain to search warrants.

   6.1. Describe the level of proof required to obtain a search warrant.

   6.2. Describe the procedure for obtaining and executing a search warrant.

   6.3. Describe forcible entry and no-knock issues as they relate to search
        warrants.

   6.4. Explain the scope of a search with a warrant and when it must be
        terminated.

   6.5. Ensure that items located during searches are properly seized.




                                          3                                   June 2007
   6.6. Describe items that may be temporarily seized for officer and public
        safety.

   6.7. Define contraband and the requirements for its seizure.

   6.8. Describe items that may be seized pursuant to a valid warrant.

7. Analyze situations where an officer may conduct a search without a warrant.

   7.1. Explain when a valid consent search can be made and what can be
        searched.

   7.2. Describe the automobile exception to the warrant requirement, aka the
        Carroll Doctrine, and describe the permissible scope of a search under
        this doctrine.

   7.3. Describe the inventory exception to the warrant requirement.

   7.4. Describe the authority and limitations of a search incident to arrest as it
        relates to searches of persons, vehicles and residences.

   7.5. Describe the authority to make a warrant-less entry to a residence
        based on exigent circumstances.

8. Compare the requirements for conducting routine searches with those for
   searching disabled persons and strip searches.

   8.1. Describe the requirements for conducting a search of a physically
        disabled person (Wis. Stats 968.256).

   8.2. Describe a strip search and the requirements for conducting a strip
        search (Wis. Stats. 968.255).

9. Identify the requirements of the laws governing confessions and statements.

   9.1. Review the facts of the Miranda decision.

   9.2. Explain the 5th amendment right to remain silent and the 6 th amendment
        right to counsel.

   9.3. Describe custody and questioning as it relates to Miranda rights.

   9.4. Describe situations where Miranda rights do not apply.

   9.5. Identify the methods in which a defendant can invoke the Miranda
        privilege.

   9.6. Describe the Edwards rule and the limitations on further questioning
        after a suspect requests to speak to a lawyer.


June 2007                                4
   9.7. Differentiate between the Miranda rule and the 6 th amendment right to
        counsel.

   9.8. Describe the Miranda rule as it relates to juveniles.

   9.9. Describe the requirement that all police obtained statements of a
        defendant must be voluntarily given.

   9.10. Define voluntary and coercion as they relate to statements and the
         potential consequences for obtaining involuntary statements.

10. Analyze the various requirements that evidence must meet before it can be
    admitted in court.

   10.1. Review the purpose for the Exclusionary Rule.

   10.2. Review the requirements of the Exclusionary Rule and the Fruit of the
         Poisonous Doctrines.

   10.3. List the exceptions that may allow unlawfully obtained evidence to be
         admitted in court, including Good Faith, Attenuation, Inevitable
         Discovery and Independent Source exceptions.

   10.4. Explain the requirements for show-ups and line-ups.

   10.5. Rank the reliability of different sources of information.

   10.6. Describe hearsay and the reasons it is not normally admissible in court.

   10.7. Review the basic exceptions to the hearsay rule including dying
         declarations, present sense impressions and excited utterances.

B. CRIMES (6)

In this course, students will learn the classifications of crimes and other violations
into felonies, misdemeanors, and ordinance violations, and will learn the
elements of crimes listed in the criminal code.

Competencies and Learning Objectives

2. Analyze facts, circumstances, and situations and determine which, if any,
   crimes against persons have been committed.

   2.1. Identify the common elements of homicide (Chapter 940).

   2.2. Identify the elements of battery (940.19).

   2.3. Identify the elements of sexual assault (940.225).


                                          5                                June 2007
   2.4. Identify the elements of sexual assault of a child (948.02).

   2.5. Identify the elements of physical abuse of a child (948.03).

   2.6. Name the crimes against persons that have occurred in simulated
        cases.

   2.7. Identify the specific criminal statutes and applicable subparagraphs that
        were violated in simulated cases.
3. Analyze facts, circumstances, and situations and determine which, if any,
   crimes against property have been committed.

   3.1. Identify the elements of criminal damage to property (943.01).

   3.2. Identify the elements of burglary (943.10).

   3.3. Identify the elements of theft (943.20).

   3.4. Identify the elements of operating a vehicle without the owner's consent
        (943.23).

   3.5. Identify the elements of robbery (943.32).
   3.6. Identify the elements of retail theft (943.50).

   3.7. Name the crimes against property that have occurred in simulated
        cases.
   3.8. Identify the specific criminal statutes and applicable subparagraphs that
        were violated in simulated cases.
4. Analyze facts, circumstances, and situations and determine which, if any,
   crimes involving drugs, alcohol or other criminal activity have been
   committed.

   4.1. Identify the elements of underage drinking (125.07)

   4.2. Identify the types, classifications, and characteristics of controlled
        substances.

   4.3. Identify the elements of possession of a controlled substance
        [961.41(3g)].

   4.4. Identify the elements of possession of drug paraphernalia (961.573).

   4.5. Identify the elements of endangering safety by use of a dangerous
        weapon (941.20).

   4.6. Identify the elements of resisting or obstructing an officer (946.41).

   4.7. Identify the elements of disorderly conduct (947.01).


June 2007                                 6
   4.8. Identify the elements of unlawful use of a telephone (947.012).

   4.9. Name the drug, alcohol or other crimes that have occurred in simulated
        cases.

   4.10. Identify the specific criminal statutes and applicable subparagraphs that
         were violated in simulated cases.


C. JUVENILE LAW (4)

In this course, students will learn the laws and procedures that affect juveniles,
including those related to taking a juvenile into custody.

Competencies and Learning Objectives

2. Describe the handling of cases of children in need of protection or services.

   2.1. Identify the criteria for a child to be in need of protection and services.

   2.2. Identify the criteria to take a child into custody.
   2.3. Identify the duties of an officer when taking a newborn into custody
        under Wis. Stat. 48.195.

   2.4. Describe the responsibilities for holding a child in custody and releasing
        a child from custody.

3. Describe the handling of cases of juveniles in need of protection or services
   or alleged to be delinquent.

   3.1. Identify the cases where jurisdiction is exercised over juveniles alleged
        to be in need of protection and services.

   3.2. Identify the cases where jurisdiction is exercised over juveniles alleged
        to be delinquent.

   3.3. Identify the cases where jurisdiction is exercised over juveniles alleged
        to have violated civil laws or ordinances, including alcohol violations.

   3.4. Identify the cases where jurisdiction is exercised over juveniles alleged
        to have traffic, boating, snowmobile, or all-terrain vehicle violations.
   3.5. Describe the conditions under which a juvenile is charged in adult court.

   3.6. Identify the criteria to take a juvenile into custody.

   3.7. Describe the responsibilities for holding a juvenile in custody and
        releasing a juvenile from custody.

   3.8. Identify the potential venues for juvenile cases.


                                          7                                June 2007
4. Identify constitutional law issues that are relevant to juveniles.

   4.1. Identify the rights, privileges, duties, and powers of a parent.
   4.2. Identify standards for juvenile confessions and waiver of rights.

   4.3. Describe standards for school and home searches.




June 2007                                 8
      UNIT III: TACTICAL SKILLS (40 hours)
A. USE OF FORCE CONCEPTS (1) (SEE DAAT AND FIREARMS)

B. DAAT (19)

In this course, students will learn the basis for and limits to use of force by
Wisconsin officers. Students will learn specific techniques for intervention
included in the Wisconsin system of Defense and Arrest Tactics.

Competencies and Learning Objectives

1. Examine the basis for use of force by officers and the limits on that use of
   force, including Constitutional, statutory, administrative rule and policy.

   1.1 Identify the situations in which use of force is legitimate.

   1.2 Identify the limits that the constitution, Wisconsin law, agency policies
       and your own training place on the use of force.

2. Apply the concepts contained within the Incident Response and Disturbance
   Resolution models.

   2.1 Identify and describe the Incident Response concept and its application
       to law enforcement.

   2.2 Identify and describe the Disturbance Resolution concept and its
       application to law enforcement.

3. Explain the six modes within Intervention Options, and the circumstances
   under which each mode is justified and appropriate.

   3.1 Identify the concept of “presence” and the circumstances under whic h it
       is appropriate.

   3.2 Identify the concept of “dialogue” and the circumstances under which it is
       appropriate.

   3.3 Identify the concept of “empty hand control” and the circumstances
       under which it is appropriate.

   3.4 Identify the concept of “control device” and the circumstances under
       which it is appropriate.




                                           9                               June 2007
   3.5 Identify the concept of “intermediate weapon” and the circumstances
       under which it is appropriate.

   3.6 Identify the concept of “deadly force” and the circumstances under which
       it is appropriate.

   3.7 Apply the intervention option concepts in a simulated environment.

4. Apply the techniques present in the Wisconsin DAAT system, including the
   tactical use of communication skills as appropriate.

   4.1 Demonstrate the use of presence in a simulated environment.

   4.2 Demonstrate the ability to use dialogue in a simulated environment.

   4.3 Demonstrate the ability to use empty hand control techniques in a
       simulated environment.

   4.4 Demonstrate the ability to use control devices in a simulated
       environment.

   4.5 Demonstrate the ability to use the intermediate weapon (baton) in a
       simulated environment.

   4.6 Demonstrate the ability to use deadly force decision-making in a
       simulated environment.

   4.7 Demonstrate weapon control techniques in a simulated environment.

   4.8 Describe the follow-through considerations that apply to arresting
       subjects.

   4.9   Apply the follow-through considerations concepts in a simulated
         environment.

   4.10 Handcuff and remove handcuffs from subjects in a simulated
        environment.

   4.11 Frisk and search subjects in a simulated environment.




June 2007                              10
C. FIREARMS (15)

In this course, students will learn to care for and maintain their primary duty
handguns. They will learn to shoot quickly and accurately, including under low -
light conditions, while moving and from behind cover. Students will learn
necessary weapon-handling skills.

Competencies and Learning Objectives

1. Identify the issues that are associated with deadly force decision-making and
   the use of deadly force.

   1.1 Identify and describe the legal and policy issues involving the use of
       deadly force.

   1.2 Define deadly force and explain justified use of deadly force within the
       defensive and arrest tactics Intervention Options.

   1.3 Define imminent threat and the criteria that need to be met in order for a
       threat to be imminent.

   1.4 Assess whether alternatives to shooting are appropriate when
       encountering a potentially life threatening situation.

   1.5 Identify the target requirements that must be met in order to use deadly
       force.

2. Exhibit good weapon-handling skills.

   2.1 Comply with general firearms safety rules.

   2.2 Comply with general range safety rules.

   2.3 Store firearms in a safe manner when not on duty.

   2.4 Secure a firearm other than one’s own.

3. Maintain the duty weapon and its associated equipment.

   3.1 Identify and describe the role that ballistics play in the performance of
       the duty weapon.

   3.2 Identify various types of firearms and the major functional parts of these
       firearms.

   3.3 Identify nomenclature and functions of ammunition.



                                        11                              June 2007
   3.4 Identify the various types of semi-automatic pistols and their design and
       functional differences.

   3.5 Field-strip the duty weapon.

   3.6 Clean and lubricate the duty weapon.

   3.7 Perform a function check of the duty weapon.

   3.8 Maintain duty belt, holster and magazine pouches.

4. Fire the duty weapon accurately in a variety of conditions and environments.

   4.1 Demonstrate proficiency in basic marksmanship in a variety of tactical
       situations.

   4.2 Employ the correct technique for drawing the weapon and for recovering
       the weapon to the holster.

   4.3 Identify and describe the “ready” positions that an officer may employ
       with a drawn weapon and the uses for these positions.

   4.4 Load, reload, and unload the weapon.

   4.5 Identify various types of weapon malfunctions and the causes of these
       malfunctions.

   4.6 Demonstrate clearing malfunctions.

   4.7 Identify “cover” and how to use “cover.”

   4.8 Identify and describe the various shooting positions and the advantages
       and disadvantages of each position.

   4.9 Demonstrate shooting using various shooting positions.

   4.10 Identify the issues involved when multiple adversaries are to be
        engaged.

   4.11 Identify the issues involved when close combat shooting occurs.

   4.12 Identify the issues involved when using unsupported shooting
        techniques.

   4.13 Identify the issues involved when shooting in low light levels.



June 2007                               12
5. Take appropriate actions after combat shooting.

   5.1 Assess threat to determine if it has been neutralized.

   5.2 Complete post-shooting legal procedures.

   5.3 Prepare to testify in court related to a shooting incident.

6. Demonstrate familiarity with the operation of long guns.

   6.1. Identify the various types of shotguns and their design and functional
        differences.

   6.2. Identify the various types of rifles and their design and functional
        differences.

   6.3. Identify the various parts of long guns.

   6.4. Identify the purposes and types of long gun ammunition.

   6.5. Demonstrate the safe handling of long guns.

   6.6. Load, reload and unload a long gun.

   6.7. Demonstrate shooting a long gun.

   6.8. Identify various types of weapon malfunctions and the causes of these
        malfunctions.

   6.9. Demonstrate clearing a malfunction.

D. DEADLY FORCE DECISION MAKING (1) (SEE DAAT AND FIREARMS)

E. TACTICAL RESPONSE (2)

In this course, students will learn the basics of room clearing, tactical movement,
use of cover and concealment, and their application to emergency situations.

Competencies and Learning Objectives

1. Understand and apply the principles of room clearing.

   1.1. Demonstrate "slicing the pie" (metering).

   1.2. Define "safe wall" and "problem area."



                                        13                               June 2007
   1.3. Describe methods for two or more officers to safely enter a room,
        including the "criss-cross" and "buttonhook" techniques.

   1.4. Demonstrate these techniques in a simulated environment.

2. Understand and apply the principles of tactical use of light.

   2.1. Describe the hazards of backlighting and how to avoid backlighting
        oneself or other officers.

   2.2. Describe how light can be used to disorient an adversary.

   2.3. Identify when it is desirable to use a flashlight and when flashlight use
        should be avoided.

3. Understand the concepts of cover and concealment and their uses and
   limitations in tactical situations.

   3.1. Define cover.

   3.2. Define concealment.

   3.3. In a simulated situation, identify available cover and concealment.

4. Employ appropriate techniques for tactical movement.

   4.1. Describe techniques used in tactical movement (e.g., moving from cover
        to cover, invisible deployment, noise discipline, etc.).

   4.2. Explain the advantages of using tactical movement techniques.

   4.3. In a simulated environment, demonstrate tactical movement techniques.

F. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS (2)

In this course, students will learn the basics of responding to situations in which
hazardous materials may be present.

Competencies and Learning Objectives

1. Recognize and respond appropriately to the presence of hazardous materials,
   including substances used in weapons of mass destruction.

   1.1. Identify general types of hazardous materials and their effects.




June 2007                                14
1.2. Identify the potential outcomes associated with an emergency created
     when hazardous substances are present.

1.3. Identify categories of weapons of mass destruction (Biological, Nuclear,
     Incendiary, Chemical, and Explosive).

1.4. Explain the role of domestic and international terrorism, including the
     rationale behind its use, typical targets, and its potential impact on the
     public.

1.5. Identify the six clues to the presence of hazardous materials.

1.6. Describe proper law enforcement response to an incident involving
     hazardous materials and/or weapons of mass destruction, including initial
     response, isolation and containment procedures, and crime scene
     preservation.




                                      15                                June 2007
    UNIT IV: RELATIONAL SKILLS (12 hours)
B. PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION (12)

In this course, students will learn the role of communication in law enforcement
and will develop and apply specific communication skills and the strategies in a
variety of simulated situations. Professional communication will be integrated
and reinforced throughout the academy; students will be expected to apply
professional communication skills appropriately in all simulations, regardless of
curriculum area.

Competencies and Learning Objectives

1. Apply knowledge of the communication process.

   1.1 Describe the Basic Communication Model.

   1.2 Demonstrate proficiency in general communication skills.

   1.3 Exhibit a professional presence.

   1.4 Demonstrate understanding of relationship of officer roles and
       communication.

   1.5 Explain the relationship of communication and the goals of law
       enforcement.

   1.6 Demonstrate the relationship of communication and the goal of law
       enforcement.

   1.7 Articulate police action taken.

2. Apply communication techniques.

   2.1 Distinguish among the various types of contacts.

   2.2 Integrate communication strategy with type of contact.

   2.3 Explain typical barriers to communication.

   2.4 Apply strategies and tactics to overcome various types of barriers.

   2.5 Demonstrate knowledge of the appropriate strategies towards resolution.




June 2007                                16
   2.6 Apply the appropriate strategies toward resolution.

   2.7 Identify the steps to take in conducting a death notification.

3. Integrate verbal and physical intervention skills.

   3.1 Describe knowledge of using verbalization with physical intervention
       tactics.

   3.2 Employ communication skills as appropriate within the Unified Tactics
       model.

   3.3 Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of debriefing.



  UNIT V: PATROL PROCEDURES (32 hours)

A. TRAFFIC LAW ENFORCEMENT (4)

In this course, students will become familiar with Wisconsin's traffic laws and
ordinances, including those related to operator licensing and vehicle registration
and equipment. Students will learn to enforce these laws, including learning to
properly complete Wisconsin Uniform Traffic Citations and (as needed) to direct
and control traffic effectively.

Competencies and Learning Objectives

1. Enforce Wisconsin traffic laws.

   1.1 Identify the primary goals of traffic law enforcement and the Wisconsin
       Motor Vehicle Laws.

   1.2 Identify elements of common traffic offenses including the rules of the
       road and those relating to operator licensing, vehicle registration, and
       vehicle equipment.

   1.3 Identify the legal authority for those instances where an officer may
       remove, store or impound a vehicle from public or private property.

3. Issue traffic citations, ranging from warnings to arrest.




                                         17                             June 2007
   3.1 Identify basic components of driver's licenses and identification cards and
       review indicators of a possible altered / driver's license or identification
       card.

   3.2 Demonstrate familiarity with Wisconsin motor vehicle laws.

   3.3 Demonstrate familiarity with the State of Wisconsin Uniform Sta te Traffic
       Deposit Schedule.

   3.4 Fill out a uniform traffic citation.

   3.5 Issue a uniform traffic citation.

   3.6 Explain the disposition of a uniform traffic citation.

   3.7 Identify and describe issues involved in making a traffic arrest.

   3.8 Demonstrate making a traffic arrest.


D. EVOC (EMERGENCY VEHICLE OPERATION AND CONTROL) (16)

In this course, students will learn the legal context for law enforcement driving,
including basic patrol operation, emergency vehicle response, and pursuit
driving. They will practice strategies and techniques for normal and emergency
operation and pursuit driving.

Competencies and Learning Objectives

1. Inspect and place a patrol vehicle into service at the beginning of a shift.

   1.1 Identify the parts of the patrol vehicle and the associated equipment that
       need to be inspected prior to placing a patrol vehicle in operation.

   1.2 Conduct the driver preparation steps that need to be taken prior to
       placing a patrol vehicle into operation.

2. Apply proper driving strategies and techniques for basic patrol operation of a
   vehicle.

   2.1 Identify driving strategies used in basic patrolling.

   2.2 Identify techniques for steering, backing, cornering and braking.

   2.3 Identify the role that multi-tasking, weather, road conditions, night driving
       and fatigue play in normal patrol driving.




June 2007                                     18
   2.4 Identify methods to maintain control of the vehicle in situations of rapid
       air loss in a tire (tire blow-out) and running off road recovery.

   2.5 Demonstrate driving techniques in simulated conditions.

3. Describe the legal and policy considerations surrounding law enforcement
   driving, including normal patrol operation, emergency response, and pursuit
   driving.

   3.1 Distinguish among the various types of law enforcement driving.

   3.2 Identify how the disturbance resolution model applies to emergency
       vehicle operation.

   3.3 Identify and interpret the laws related to officer non-emergency and
       emergency driving.

4. Describe safety factors and vehicle dynamics involved in emergency driving,
   and apply proper emergency driving techniques.

   4.1 Identify the effects of increased speed on steering, braking, and
       cornering.

   4.2 Describe possible citizen responses to emergency lights and sirens.

   4.3 Identify route selection issues that effect emergency driving.

   4.4 Identify radio use issues that influence emergency driving.

   4.5 Demonstrate emergency driving techniques in simulated conditions.

5. Identify and describe the legal, policy, and safety considerations in initiating,
   conducting, and terminating pursuits, including options to stop subject
   vehicles.

   5.1 Define pursuit as it relates to law enforcement.

   5.2 Identify legal and policy issues related to pursuits.

   5.3 Describe the responsibilities and requirements of pursuit driving.

   5.4 Identify the conditions that warrant termination of a pursuit.

   5.5 Describe induce-to-stop methods.

   5.6 Demonstrate induce-to-stop methods in simulated conditions.



                                         19                                June 2007
   5.7 Describe when force-to-stop methods would be appropriate.

   5.8 Describe force to stop methods and the criteria for use.

   5.9 Document and debrief a simulated pursuit.

E. VEHICLE CONTACTS (12)

In this course, students will learn the legal bases for making vehicle contacts,
how to conduct a threat assessment to help determine the appropriate type of
contact, and how to conduct different types of vehicle contacts.

Competencies and Learning Objectives

1. Identify and describe the legal basis for making vehicle contacts, including the
   legal basis for and limits to a search of the vehicle.

   1.1 Identify the situations where a vehicle contact is warranted: enforcing
       motor vehicle laws, arresting criminals, investigative (Terry stops, and
       giving assistance.

   1.2 Identify situations where a search of a vehicle is warranted.

   1.3 Identify the limitations on searching a vehicle.

   1.4 Review the process for conducting a search of a vehicle.

2. Conduct an appropriate threat assessment prior to and during a vehicle
   contact.

   2.1 Identify and describe the various threat assessment opportunities
       applicable to a vehicle contact.

   2.2 Identify officer/subject factors when making a vehicle contact.

   2.3 Identify the role that environment plays in making a vehicle contact.

3. Demonstrate the proper procedure for making an approach, non-approach,
   and high-risk vehicle contact.

   3.1 Identify the steps in conducting an approach contact.

   3.2 Demonstrate the steps in conducting an approach contact.

   3.3 Identify the steps in conducting a non-approach contact.

   3.4 Demonstrate the steps in conducting a non-approach contact.



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3.5 Identify situations in which a high-risk contact is warranted.

3.6 Identify the steps to follow in conducting a high-risk contact.

3.7 Demonstrate the steps to follow in conducting a high-risk contact.

3.8 Identify and describe management of non-cooperative subjects.




                                     21                               June 2007
SCENARIO EVALUATION (12 Hours)
During the final two days of the academy, 12 hours of scenario-based evaluation
are to be conducted. The evaluation consists of a minimum of 3 scenarios to be
presented to students. Presented below are some of the primary considerations
and issues that relate to the scenario evaluation.

   A minimum of 3 scenarios per recruit, which includes one deadly force
    scenario and one lower level use of force sce nario.

   If a student is unsuccessful in a use of force or deadly force scenario, the
    student will be given remediation immediately and then allowed to re-do the
    scenario. However, the student will still be graded as failing for the scenario.

   Report writing requirements will be left up to each individual academy to
    decide.

   Each scenario that has been drafted has a set of desired outcomes that
    recruits are expected to demonstrate in order to pass.

   The scenarios are classified in two separate categories. The first category,
    use of force, includes deadly force and lower levels of force. If a recruit is
    unsuccessful on one of the two required scenarios, the recruit will be given a
    third scenario to perform (i.e. the third scenario should be the same type of
    scenario as the scenario that was performed unsuccessfully). If performance
    in the third scenario is successful, the recruit will pass. If not, the recruit will
    fail. The second category consists of non-force scenarios (minimum of two).
    Recruits will be required to successfully perform both of these scenarios in
    order to pass.

                    Types of scenarios to be performed
Each recruit should be exposed to scenarios from a minimum of four of the
sections listed below.

   Armed individual
   Domestic situation
   Arrest warrant
   Bar scene/crowd control
   Major crime scene/evidence preservation
   Person in crisis
   OMVWI situation
   Civil dispute




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