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									             THE ENVIRONMENT IN THE NEWS
                                Tuesday, 9 November 2004

             UNEP and the Executive Director in the News
              Reuters - Artic meltdown gathers speed
              Reuters - Fast Arctic Thaw Threatens People, Polar Bears
              UN News Centre - World must act now to forestall staggering threat from global
               warming – UN
              Irish Times - Accelerated Arctic thaw threatens livelihood of millions
              Scoop News - World Must Act Now On Global Warming Threat
              The Atlanta Journal - Desert closes in on Chinese farms;Nature, government
               faulted for Inner Mongolia's losses
              BBC Monitoring - Nepalese daily: Global warming causes Himalayan ice
               melting
              Renewable Energy News - Britain and Germany Engage Global Warming
                Cape Argus (Cape Town) - Drive Targets Indian Ocean Pollution
                Africa News - South Africa;Drive Targets Indian Ocean Pollution
                New York Jewish Times - New Worldwide Coral Reef Library Created
                COX NEWS SERVICE - China battling desert's sprawl
                Seattle News - Starbucks Recognized as Global Leader in Corporate
                 Social Responsibility Reporting
                U.S. Companies Help Drive Non-Financial Reporting to New Heights
                The Economist - Corporate storytelling; Non-financial reporting


             Other Environment-related News

                        CNN - Project seeks to restore wetlands Saddam drained
                        The Guardian - Climate change claims flawed, says study
                        Pittsburgh-Post Gazette - Climate change harsher in the Arctic, report says
                        The Times of India - Arctic Alert: Bush's Return Bad News For Global
                         Warming



             Environmental News from the UNEP Regions
                    ROAP
                    ROA

              Other UN News

                          UN Daily News of 8 November 2004
                          S.G‘s Spokesman Daily Press Briefing of 8 November 2004




              Co mmunicat ions and Public Informat ion, P.O. Bo x 30552, Nairobi, Keny a
Tel: (254-2) 623292/ 93, Fax: [254-2] 62 3927/623692, Email:cpiinfo@unep.org, http://www.unep.org
Reuters
Artic meltdown gathers speed
NORWA Y: November 9, 2004

OSLO - Gl obal warmi ng is heating the Arctic al most twice as fast as the rest of the planet in a thaw that
threatens millions of li velihoods and coul d wi pe out polar bears by 2100, an eight-nation report says.

The biggest survey to date of the Arctic climate, by 250 scientists, said the accelerating melt could be a
foretaste of wider d isruptions from a build-up of human emissions of heat-trapping gases in the earth's
atmosphere.
The "Arctic climate is now warming rapidly and much larger changes are projected," according to the Arctic
Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA), funded by the United States, Canada, Russia, Den mark, Iceland, Sweden,
Norway and Finland.

Arctic temperatures are rising at almost twice the global average and could leap 4 -7 Celsius (7-13 Fahrenheit)
by 2100, roughly twice the global average pro jected by U.N. reports. Siberia and Alaska have already warmed
by 2-3 C since the 1950s.

Possible benefits like more p roductive fisheries, easier access to oil and gas deposits or trans -Arctic shipping
routes would be outweighed by threats to indigenous peoples and the habitats of animals and plants.

Sea ice around the North Pole, for instance, could almost disappear in summer by the end of the century. The
extent of the ice has already shrunk by 15-20 percent in the past 30 years.

"Polar bears are unlikely to survive as a species if there is an almost comp lete loss of summer sea -ice cover,"
the report, released yesterday, said. On land, creatures like lemmings, caribou, reindeer and snowy owls are
being squeezed north into a narrower range.

FOSSIL FUELS BLAM ED

The report main ly blames the melt on gases from fossil fuels burnt in cars, factories and power plants. The
Arctic warms faster than the global average because dark ground and water, once exposed, traps more heat
than reflective snow and ice.

Klaus Toepfer, head of the U.N. Environ ment Programme, said the Arctic changes were an early warning.
"What happens there is of concern for everyone because Arctic warming and its consequences have world wide
implications," he said.

And the melting of g laciers is expected to raise world sea levels by about 10 cm (4 inches) by the end of the
century.

Many of the four million people in the Arctic are already suffering. Buildings fro m Russia to Canada have
collapsed because of subsidence linked to thawing permafrost that also destabilises oil pipelines, roads and
airports.

Indigenous hunters are falling through thinning ice and say that prey fro m seals to whales is harder to find.
Rising levels of ult ra-vio let radiat ion may cause cancers.

Changes under way in the Arctic "present serious challenges to human health and food security, and possibly
even (to) the survival of some cultures," the report says.

Farming could benefit in some areas, while mo re productive forests are moving north on to former tundra.
"There are not just negative consequences, there will be new opportunities too," said Paal Prestrud, vice -chair
of ACIA.

Scientists will meet in Iceland this week to discuss the report. Foreign ministers fro m A rct ic nations are due to
meet in Iceland on November 24 but diplo mats say they are deeply split with Washington least willing to make
drastic action.

President George W. Bush pulled the United States, the world's top polluter, out of the 126-nation Kyoto
protocol in 2001, arguing its curbs on greenhouse gas emissions were too costly and unfairly excluded
developing nations.




                                                                                                                     2
"Kyoto is only a first step," said Norweg ian Environ ment Minister Knut Hareide, a strong backer of Kyoto.
"The clear message from this report is that Kyoto is not enough. We must reduce emissions much mo re in
coming decades."

Story by Alister Doyle, Environ ment Correspondent

REUTERS NEWS SERVICE

________________________________________________________________________________

Reuters
Fast Arctic Thaw Threatens People, Polar Bears
NORWA Y: November 9, 2004

OSLO - Gl obal warmi ng is heating the Arctic al most twice as fast as the rest of the planet in a thaw that
threatens millions of li velihoods and coul d wi pe out polar bears by 2100, an eight-nation report sai d
yesterday.

The biggest survey to date of the Arctic climate, by 250 scientists, said the accelerating melt could be a
foretaste of wider d isruptions from a build-up of human emissions of heat-trapping gases in the earth's
atmosphere.
The "Arctic climate is now warming rapidly and much larger changes are projected," according to the Arctic
Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA), funded by the United States, Canada, Russia, Den mark, Iceland, Sweden,
Norway and Finland.

Arctic temperatures are rising at almost twice the global average and could leap 4 -7 Celsius (7-13 Fahrenheit)
by 2100, roughly twice the global average pro jected by U.N. reports. Siberia and Alaska have already warmed
by 2-3 C since the 1950s.

Possible benefits like more p roductive fisheries, easier access to oil and gas deposits or trans -Arctic shipping
routes would be outweighed by threats to indigenous peoples and the habitats of animals and plants.

Sea ice around the North Pole, for instance, could almost disappear in summer by the end of the century. The
extent of the ice has already shrunk by 15 percent to 20 percent in the past 30 years.

"Polar bears are unlikely to survive as a species if there is an almost comp lete loss of summer sea -ice cover,"
the report said. On land, creatures like lemmings, caribou, reindeer and snowy owls are being squeezed north
into a narrower range.

FOSSIL FUELS BLAM ED

The report main ly blames the melt on gases from fossil fuels burned in cars, factories and power plants. The
Arctic wa rms faster than the global average because dark ground and water, once exposed, traps more heat
than reflective snow and ice.

Klaus Toepfer, head of the U.N. Environ ment Program, said the Arctic changes were an early warn ing. "What
happens there is of concern for everyone because Arctic warming and its consequences have worldwide
implications," he said.

And the melting of g laciers is expected to raise world sea levels by about 10 cm (4 inches) by the end of the
century.

Many of the 4 million people in the Arctic are already suffering. Bu ild ings fro m Russia to Canada have
collapsed because of subsidence linked to thawing permafrost that also destabilizes oil pipelines, roads and
airports.

Indigenous hunters are falling through thinning ice and say that prey fro m seals to whales is harder to find.
Rising levels of ult ra-vio let radiat ion may cause cancers.

Changes under way in the Arctic "present serious challenges to human health and food security, and possibly
even (to) the survival of some cultures," the report says.




                                                                                                                     3
Farming could benefit in some areas, while mo re productive forests are moving north on to former tundra.
"There are not just negative consequences, there will be new opportunities too," said Paal Prestrud, vice -chair
of ACIA.

Scientists will meet in Iceland this week to discuss the report. Foreign ministers fro m Arct ic nations are due to
meet in Iceland on Nov. 24 but diplo mats say they are deeply split with Washington least willing to make
drastic action.

President Bush pulled the United States, the world's top polluter, out of the 126-nation Kyoto protocol in 2001,
arguing its curbs on greenhouse gas emissions were too costly and unfairly excluded developing nations.

"Kyoto is only a first step," said Norweg ian Environ ment Minister Knut Hareide, a strong backer of Kyoto.
"The clear message from this report is that Kyoto is not enough. We must reduce emissions much mo re in
coming decades."


Story by Alister Doyle, Environ ment Correspondent

REUTERS NEWS SERVICE

_________________________________________________________________________________________
UN News Centre
Worl d must act now to forestall staggering threat from global warmi ng – UN
                        8 November 2004 – The Arctic climate is warming rapid ly, much larger changes are in
                        store due to increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases fro m hu man activity and the
                        global impact such as rising sea levels will be ―staggering,‖ presenting one of the most
                        serious threats to humankind, the United Nat ions environment agency warned today.

                        ―With these facts before us, we need, more than ever before, a concerted and renewed
Fossil fuel releases    international efforts to combat the climate change problem,‖ Klaus Toepfer, Executive
causing global          Director of the UN Env iron ment Programme (UNEP) said in a statement citing a
warming                 newly released report by an international team of 300 scientists.

                        The Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA), an unprecedented four-year scientific
study, confirms earlier worrying research on global warming. Increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases
are projected to contribute to additional warming of 3 to 9 degrees over the next 100 years and developing
countries will suffer most.

―The Arctic region, the baro meter on global climate change, is like an environmental early warning system for
the world,‖ M r. Toepfer said. ―What happens there is of concern for everyone because Arctic warming and its
consequences have worldwide imp lications.‖

Among its many detailed findings the ACIA, co mmissioned by the Arctic Council, a h igh-level
intergovernmental foru m co mprising Canada, Den mark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden and the
United States, predicts that Arctic vegetation zones and animal species will be affected.

Retreating sea ice is expected to reduce the habitat for polar bears, walrus, ice -inhabiting seals and marine
birds, threatening some species with extinction. Such changes will also affect many indigenous communit ies
who depend on such animals, not only for food, but also as the basis for cultural and social identity.

Beyond the region, as Arctic glaciers melt and the permafrost thaws, developing countries with limited means
to adapt to environmental change will suffer most.

Mr. Toepfer praised Russia‘s recent decision to ratify the Kyoto Protocol on climate change as an important
step in the international fight to check global warming but warned: ―As the ACIA reveals the battle is far fro m
over.

―I want to congratulate the Arctic Council for their decision to commission the rep ort,‖ he added. ―We now
have a clear scientific consensus that the Arctic is warming and the resulting affects on global climate will be
serious.‖




                                                                                                                   4
The Irish Ti mes
November 9, 2004
Accelerated Arctic thaw threatens li velihood of millions

BODY:
The Arctic: Global warming is heating the Arctic almost twice as fast as the rest of the planet in a thaw that
threatens millions of livelihoods and could wipe out polar bears by 2100, an eight -nation report said yesterday.

And a separate report sugested that North American wildlife species ranging from butterflies to red fo x were
scrambling to adapt to rising temperatures and might not survive.

According to the Pew Center on Global Climate Change, North A merican species like the Edith's Checkerspot
butterfly, red fo x and Mexican jay were moving to colder northern climates that suit their habits.

With global temperatures expected to rise another 2.5 degrees to 10.4 degrees Fahrenheit (about 1 degree to
about 5 degrees Celsius) by 2100, "future global warming is likely to exceed the ability of many species to
migrate or adjust," said the Pew Center, cit ing the evidence of 40 scientific studies.

The Ed ith's Checkerspot butterfly has disappeared from many southern, low -elevation areas like Mexico,
fleeing to colder Canadian climes. The red fo x has also moved northward to clash with Arctic fo x populations,
in a trend spotted in many other birds, mammals, invertebrates and plants, said Pew.

The largest Arctic survey to date, carried out by 250 scientists, said the accelerating polar icecap melt could be
a foretaste of wider disruptions from a build-up of hu man emissions of heat-trapping gases in the earth's
atmosphere.

The "Arctic climate is now warming rapidly and much larger changes are projected", according to the Arctic
Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA), funded by the United States, Canada, Russia, Den mark, Iceland, Sweden,
Norway and Finland.

Arctic temperatures are rising at almost twice the global average and could leap 4 -7 degrees by 2100, roughly
twice the global average projected by UN reports. Siberia and Alaska have already warmed by 2 -3 degrees
since the 1950s.

Possible benefits such as more productive fisheries, easier access to oil and gas deposits or trans -Arctic
shipping routes would be outweighed by threats to indigenous peoples and the habitats of animals and plants.

Sea ice around the North Pole, for instance, could almost disappear in summer by the end of the century. The
extent of the ice has already shrunk by 15-20 per cent in the past 30 years.

"Polar bears are unlikely to survive as a species if there is an almost comp lete loss of summer sea -ice cover,"
the report said. On land, creatures such as lemmings, caribou, reindeer and snowy owls are being squeezed
north into a narrower range.

The report main ly blames the melt on gases from fossil fuels burnt in cars, factories and power plants. The
Arctic warms faster than the global average because dark ground and water, once exposed, traps more heat
than reflective snow and ice.

Mr Klaus Toepfer, head of the UN Environ ment Programme, said the Arctic changes were an early warning.

"What happens there is of concern for everyone because Arctic warming and its consequences have worldwide
implications," he said. The melt ing of glaciers is expected to raise wo rld sea levels by about 10 cm (4 inches)
by the end of the century.

Many of the four million people in the Arctic are already suffering. Buildings fro m Russia to Canada have
collapsed because of subsidence linked to thawing permafrost that also des tabilises oil pipelines, roads and
airports. - (Reuters)

LOAD-DATE: November 9, 2004




                                                                                                                    5
Scoop News
Worl d Must Act Now On Gl obal Warming Threat


World Must Act Now To Forestall Staggering Threat Fro m Global Warming – UN
The Arctic climate is warming rapidly, much larger changes are in store due to increasing concentrations of
greenhouse gases from human activ ity and the global impact such as rising sea levels will be ―staggering,‖
presenting one of the most serious threats to humankind, the United Nat ions environment agency warned
today.

―With these facts before us, we need, more than ever before, a concerted and renewed international efforts to
combat the climate change problem,‖ Klaus Toepfer, Executive Director of the UN Env iron ment Programme
(UNEP) said in a statement citing a newly released report by an international team of 300 scientists.

The Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA), an unprecedented four-year scientific study, confirms earlier
worry ing research on global warming. Increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases are projected to
contribute to additional warming of 3 to 9 degrees over the next 100 years and developing countries will suffer
most.

―The Arctic region, the baro meter on global climate change, is like an environmental early wa rning system for
the world,‖ M r. Toepfer said. ―What happens there is of concern for everyone because Arctic warming and its
consequences have worldwide imp lications.‖

Among its many detailed findings the ACIA, co mmissioned by the Arctic Council, a h igh -level
intergovernmental foru m co mprising Canada, Den mark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden and the
United States, predicts that Arctic vegetation zones and animal species will be affected.

Retreating sea ice is expected to reduce the habitat for polar bears, walrus, ice -inhabiting seals and marine
birds, threatening some species with extinction. Such changes will also affect many indigenous communit ies
who depend on such animals, not only for food, but also as the basis for cultural and social ident ity.

Beyond the region, as Arctic glaciers melt and the permafrost thaws, developing countries with limited means
to adapt to environmental change will suffer most.

Mr. Toepfer praised Russia‘s recent decision to ratify the Kyoto Protocol on climate chan ge as an important
step in the international fight to check global warming but warned: ―As the ACIA reveals the battle is far fro m
over.

―I want to congratulate the Arctic Council for their decision to commission the report,‖ he added. ―We now
have a clear scientific consensus that the Arctic is warming and the resulting affects on global climate will be
serious.‖
__________________________________________________________________________
The Atlanta Journal-Constituti on
November 7, 2004 Sunday Home Editi on
Desert closes in on Chinese farms;Nature, g overnment faulted for Inner Mong olia's losses


SOURCE: Co x International Correspondent

BODY:
Hanggin Qi, Ch ina --- A decade ago, the grass grew tall around Erdung Geshige's humble wooden house. Th e
grasslands stretched for miles, feed ing his goats and those of his neighbors. But after years of drought and
overgrazing, the grass disappeared and the sand crept closer.

By last year, sand dunes swallowed up Geshige's house. Half-buried, it is surrounded by a vast desert that
looks as if it's been there for all of time. Geshige now has to travel 25 miles to buy grass to feed his goats.




                                                                                                                   6
Neighbors have fled. But Geshige, an ethnic Mongolian, says he doesn't want to leave.

"If it rains, the grass will g row back," he said, unaware that in h is Chinese province of Inner Mongolia, 386
square miles of grassland turns to desert each year.
China is fighting a losing battle with sand --- a result in part of population growth, poorly managed land
policies, overgrazing of grasslands and groundwater pollution. Its deserts are growing by 1,160 square miles
annually and now cover 27 percent of China's land mass.

The consequences can be seen every spring. As the ground thaws and the Siberian wind kicks up, intense dust
storms blow into western China and beyond, obscuring the sun and turning the sky to mud. Fro m Beijing to
Seoul, South Korea, the dust has shut down airports and schools and forced residents to hide in their ho mes. It
has even been known to spread a haze across the United States.

Scientists are concerned that the dust storms, growing in scale and intensity, are uniting with increasing
amounts of airborne pollutants to create a toxic soup that is being blown around the world.

"The dust in a sandstorm far e xceeds the amount of matter in a hydrogen bomb," said Quan Hao, director of
the State Environ mental Protection Agency's sandstorm group. "Imagine millions of tons of particles in the air,
traveling so far."

An uphill fight

Desertification and other land degradation threaten China's biodiversity, agricultural productivity, water
quality and quantity, and the livelihoods of millions of people. The U.N. Environ ment Program estimates the
direct economic losses at $6.5 billion annually.

The Chinese government is spending huge amounts of money on the problem, feverishly planting trees and
grass to stop the encroaching desert.

But critics say it's a losing battle, with the plantings targeting areas already lost and much of the money grossly
misspent by corrupt local officials.

The State Forestry Admin istration has said it will spend $85 billion over the next 50 years to cover 180 million
acres of land with trees and other vegetation "to turn China into an ecologically friendly land," according to the
official Xinhua News Agency. In 2002 alone, 18 million acres of trees were planted, an area nearly the size of
South Carolina.

"The problem is so massive, and it appears to be growing despite all the money the government has spent,"
said Bruce Carrad, head of the environ ment and agriculture unit at the Asian Develop ment Ban k's Ch ina
office.

More effort should be spent on protecting at-risk farmlands and grasslands and ensuring the survival of trees
already planted, the experts say. Trying to make the deserts bloom is an expensive mistake, says Quan.

In some places, the environ ment has become so desolate that it has turned thousands into ecological refugees.
More than 800,000 farmers and herders have already moved voluntarily or been relocated. Carrad likens the
situation to the migration of farm families fro m A merica's Dust Bowl in the 1930s, captured in John
Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath."

The population of Inner Mongolia has soared in the last 55 years fro m 5.6 million to 32 million wh ile the
number of domesticated animals has grown even faster, putting immense pressure on the region's environment.

In recent years, northern China has suffered extreme drought, with rivers shrinking and water levels in some
places at their lowest in 50 years. China's unclear def init ion of land ownership, coupled with corruption and a
bureaucratic mess --- at least four different government ministries receive funds to deal with land degradation -
-- has allowed the problem to beco me more severe.

Corruption rampant

To many local officials, getting funds to plant trees is like hitting a jackpot. They plant a few trees for show,




                                                                                                                    7
then spend the rest buying cars, hosting banquets and building showy projects.

"The central government has spent a lot of money on planting trees, but the local governments focus only on
planting along the roadside so that visiting officials will see them," Quan said. "If they can't reach further in
the interior, they just forget about it."

A recent government audit found that agencies responsible for fighting desertificat ion had misappropriated
hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Meanwhile, the farmers and herders of the Hanggin Qi area (pop. 130,000), on the edge of the Kubuqi Desert,
are among the poorest in all of Ch ina.

In Xinjian Village, reachable only by several hours along bumpy paths and sand dunes, the average household
income of its 10 families is less than $100 a year.

Xin jian's village chief, Li San, gets by with about 20 goats and a few pigs, turkeys and chickens.

His main co mplaint is not about the lack of water or other material co mforts; what he'd most like to see
changed, he says, is the government's grassland policy.

The government uses an airplane to sow grass seeds at a cost of about $10 per mu , or about one -sixth of an
acre. But Li said less than 20 percent of seeds even sprout, while villagers wou ld have a higher success rate for
less money.

"If they could give that money to the people, that would be better," he said. "The villagers would be happy
with $5 a mu."

GRAPHIC: Map: Map pinpoints the town of Hanggin Qi; inset map depicts the area of detail in relation to the
entire country of Ch ina. / VERNON CARNE / Staff; Photo: Villager Horcha Bate (above) has to shovel sand
every day at the edge of his house to prevent it fro m being swallowed up by the desert. / LU TONGJING /
Special; Photo: Population growth, poor land management, overgrazed grasslands and groundwater pollution
are blamed for the loss of arable land in Inner Mongolia. Wang Bannu, 69, (left ) a resident of Hanggin Qi in
Inner Mongolia, holds the goiter that developed when she was young because of a lack of iodine in her diet.
Even today, many families in the village are unable to afford iodized salt. / LU TONGJING / Special

__________________________________________________ _______________________________________
BBC Worldwide Monitoring,
November 7, 2004, Sunday
Nepalese daily: Global warming causes Hi malayan ice melting
SOURCE: Rajdhani, Kath mandu, in Nepali 7 Nov 04

BODY:
Text of report by Abdullah Miya, published by Nepalese daily newspaper Rajdhani on 7 November

Kathmandu, 6 November: Rising temperatures are p laying havoc on the silver s mile of the peaceful mountains.
There is an uncommon phenomenon of ice melting in the Himalayan mountains in the north of Nepal. Let us
imagine what the mountains would look like if they stood without snow.

Concerned experts say that the global warming has had its effects on the ecology of the Himalayan reg ion. As
a result, the mountains are witnessing snow melting. According to a stu dy, there used to be thicker snow cover
on the Himalayas 30 years ago. Many peaks now have thinner snow cover.

The global temperatures that are rising at the rate of 0.6 degrees Celsius annually, have their increasing
impacts on the mountains, glacial lakes and glaciers of the Himalayan regions, experts conclude. Weather
experts warn that snow melting will not only degrade the beauty of the Himalayan mountains but also invite
environmental catastrophes in the future.

Senior scientist at the Weather Forecasting Division of the Depart ment of Hydrology and Meteorology
Rajendra Prasad Shrestha says that the phenomenon is going to have inevitable impacts on the settlements
below the Himalayas and the biological diversity there. "The effects of global warming ha ve started to show




                                                                                                                    8
on the high altitude areas of Nepal. As a result, the ice has started melting," says Shrestha.

This will have its impacts on tourism, river flow, agriculture and hydropower generation. According to another
weather scientist, Arun Bhakta Shrestha, Himalayan temperatures are rising at the rate of 0.7 degrees Celsius
every year. Because of the ice melt ing, glacial lakes are growing more usntable.

According to the United Nations Environ mental Programme (UNEP) and the International Centre fo r
Integrated Mountain Development (ICIM OD), there are 3,252 g laciers and 2,323 glacial lakes in Nepal.
According to geologist Pradip Ku mar, 26 of the glacial lakes are in danger of bursting.



LOAD-DATE: November 7, 2004
__________________________________________________________________________

Renewable Energy News
Britain and Germany Eng age Gl obal Warming

Berlin, Germany [Renewab leEnergyAccess.com] Britain and Germany are to take forward the fight against
global warming under a new partnership backed by leading industrialists businessmen and scientists. The t wo
countries, whose greenhouse gas reductions are among the biggest in the world, are well placed to spearhead
new in itiatives in areas such as environmentally-friendly energy, climate friendly financial markets, greener
cities and Arctic science.


"We have had an astounding meeting of minds between some of the leading scien tific, financial and industrial
experts of both countries."

- Klaus Toepfer, Executive Director of the Un ited Nations Environment Program
In an unprecedented show of leadership between the two nations, a range of innovative recommendations are
to be presented to Tony Blair, the Brit ish Prime M inister, aimed at delivering a lo w carbon, less energy
intensive world.

The importance of the conference, co ming just days after the Russian parliament's decision to ratify the Kyoto
Protocol, was further underlined by being opened in the British Embassy by Her Majesty Queen Elisabeth II
during her State Visit to Germany.

"We have had an astounding meeting of minds between some of the leading scientific, financial and industrial
experts of both countries," said Klaus Toepfer, the Executive Director of the Un ited Nations Environ ment
Program (UNEP) and chair of the conference Climate Change: Meeting the Challenge Together. "Support has
come fro m the highest level with the Queen opening the conference and Mister Blair requesting concrete
outcomes upon which the UK government can act."

Speakers included Margaret Beckett, the UK Secretary of State for Environ ment, Food and Rural Affairs,
Jurgen Tritten, the German Federal M inister for Environ ment, Nature Protection and Nuclear Safety and
Edelgard Bu lmahn, German Federal Min ister for Education and Research.

The recommendations will inform both the G8 and European Union presidencies which the Un ited Kingdom
assumes next year. Blair, who addressed the conference via a vid eo message, has stated that climate change,
along with Africa, is the UK's top priority.

"2004 has been an extraordinary year," Sir David King, UK Chief Scientific Advisor. "We have had some of
the worst weather-related natural d isasters on record, and we have also had the positive outcome of the Kyoto
Protocol with the Russians ratifying. This conference takes these issues forward and forges a new agenda for
climate action that will help lead us to a more stable and secure future in both the developed an d developing
world".

Some key areas of progress as pointed out by the conference.

Avi ation Fuel




                                                                                                                  9
Among the key findings and recommendations was a call for an end to the "anomaly" surrounding fuel for
ships and planes. The conference advised Blair that an emissions trading scheme or a carbon tax for aircraft
and ships might bring these two transport sectors in line with road, rail and other forms of t ransport.


Window of Opportunity
Some 16 t rillion US dollars worth of investment in new power plants and energy systems are likely to be made
in the coming years. It is vital that this substantial sum is directed to more energy efficient forms of generation
including cleaner coal, co mb ined heat and power plants and renewables such as wind, wave and solar power.
The delegates agreed that Britain and Germany should work to exp loit this current 'window o f opportunity" to
lead a cost effective fight against climate change. Germany and Britain, with a strong tradition in research,
development and deployment of new energy technologies, are well placed

Climate -Friendl y Finance
The conference recognized that the investment decisions of the finance sector could play a vital ro le in putting
the planet on a more climate friendly path but that "city institutions were n ot yet fully on board". Germany and
Britain, both with key financial centers such as the City of London and Frankfurt, could play a p ivotal role in
bringing European and global pension funds, actuaries and insurers on board. The two countries, whose
greenhouse gas reductions are scheduled to be below those agreed under the Kyoto Protocol, are well p laced to
champion new and deeper cuts in industrialized nations' emissions.

Targets and Green Ci ties
The UK's proposal of a 60 per cent reduction by 2050 and Germany's of a 40 per cent reduction in emissions
by 2020, are in line with scientific consensus on what is needed, delegates are advising Blair. London and
Berlin will also share experiences and plans to fight global warming which may beco me b lue prints for cities
and local authorities elsewhere. The German capital has reduced its greenhouse gas emissions by 15 per cent
since 1990 and plans to cut back by a further 40 per cent. London, which has a new Climate Change Agency,
plans to reduce by 20 per cent its emissions by 2010. Under the agreement, the two capitals will share
expertise and hold high level meetings on issues ranging fro m transport to energy efficient buildings in order
to both meet their respective targets.

Scientific Research
Delegates also recommended strengthening and broadening the two countries' world -beating scientific ties in
areas such as climate change impact in the Arctic. Under a new agreement German and British scientists are
likely to share research vessels and high-latitude, long range, aircraft. Scientific studies into how to manage
densely populated areas in a warming world, with London and Berlin as the first subjects, are also being
considered.

Awareness Campaigns
Europe-wide awareness campaigns are also part of the reco mmendations. Delegates called fo r witty and
thought provoking advertisements similar to those already launched in parts of Scandinavia to raise public
interest and action in combating global warming.

Cape Argus (Cape Town)

Dri ve Targets Indi an Ocean Polluti on

Several African countries have collaborated in a bid to rescue marine and coastal ecosystems on the Indian
Ocean side of the continent from further damage.

The Depart ment of Environ mental A ffairs and Tourism's West Indian Ocean Land Based Activities p roject
was launched on Robben Island on Friday.

At the launch it was revealed that 80% of coastal pollution along Africa orig inated inland.

The project is a joint effort by several coastal African countries, includ ing Ghana, Madagascar and the Ivory
Coast, and is intended to combat the corrosion of delicate marine environ ments as a result of land -based
activities.




                                                                                                                  10
Speaking at the event, Deputy Minister of Environ mental Affairs and Tourism Rejoice Mabudafhasi said the
goal of all those involved in protecting marine life fro m land-based activities was to ensure that it was done
while pro moting conservation and sustainable use of marine resources.

The project was aimed at "determining the extent and magnitude of pollution of coastal waters due to sewage,
industrial and river run-off", said Mabudafhasi.

"We need to continue our partnerships in taking responsibilities and make a contribution to the African process
for the protection, management and development of the coastal and marine environ ment."

In attendance were representatives of the department, the National Po rts Authority, The United Nations
Environment Programme (UNEP), marine and coastal management and the South African Marit ime Safety
Authority.

Representatives fro m other coastal municipalit ies, such as Buffalo City and the Nelson Mandela Metropole,
also attended the launch.

Dixon Waruinge of UNEP said the sharing of in formation between countries was vital.

   "We need to be able to say that we can quantify the reduction of stress on the ecosystem," he said .

   Fellow UNEP delegate, Anjan Datta, said the success of the project was important because about half the
   global population lived in coastal areas.

    He said that two-thirds of the world's gross domestic product, worth an annual $13 t rillion, was provided as
a result of coastal and marine environ ments.

__________________________________________________________________________
Africa News
November 8, 2004 Monday
HEADLINE: South Africa;Dri ve Targets Indi an Ocean Pollution



BODY:
Several African countries have collaborated in a bid to rescue marine and coastal ecosystems on the Indian
Ocean side of the continent from further damage.

The Depart ment of Environ mental A ffairs and Tourism's West Indian Ocean Land Based Activities project
was launched on Robben Island on Friday.

At the launch it was revealed that 80% of coastal pollution along Africa orig inated inland.

The project is a joint effort by several coastal African countries, includ ing Ghana, Madagascar and the Ivory
Coast, and is intended to combat the corrosion of delicate marine environ ments as a result of land -based
activities.

Speaking at the event, Deputy Minister of Environ mental Affairs and Tourism Rejoice Mabudafhasi said the
goal of all those involved in protecting marine life fro m land -based activities was to ensure that it was done
while pro moting conservation and sustainable use of marine resources.

The project was aimed at "determining the extent and magnitude of pollution of coastal waters due to sewage,
industrial and river run-off", said Mabudafhasi.

"We need to continue our partnerships in taking responsibilities and make a contribution to the African process
for the protection, management and development of the coastal and marine environ ment."

In attendance were representatives of the department, the National Po rts Authority, The United Nations
Environment Programme (UNEP), marine and coastal management and the South African Marit ime Safety
Authority.




                                                                                                                   11
Representatives fro m other coastal municipalit ies, such as Buffalo City and th e Nelson Mandela Metropole,
also attended the launch.

Dixon Waruinge of UNEP said the sharing of in formation between countries was vital.

"We need to be able to say that we can quantify the reduction of stress on the ecosystem," he said.

Fellow UNEP delegate, Anjan Datta, said the success of the project was important because about half the
global population lived in coastal areas.

He said that two-thirds of the world's gross domestic product, worth an annual $13 t rillion, was provided as a
result of coastal and marine environ ments.

LOAD-DATE: November 8, 2004

________________________________________________________________________ _________________

New York Jewish Ti mes

New Worl dwi de Coral Reef Li brary Created

By Rob Gutro
Goddard S pace Flight Center

A collection of 1,490 coral reef images has become the basis for a new Internet - based library fo r the
Millenniu m Coral Reef Project. It was created in a partnership with NASA, international agencies, universities
and other organizations to provide natural resource managers a comprehensive world data resource on coral
reefs and adjacent land areas.

The integrated Remote Sensing of Co ral Reefs and Millenniu m Coral Reef Mapping projects have many
partners including NASA, the Nat ional Oceanic and Atmospheric Admin istration, and the University of South
Florida (USF), which are p roviding funding, data or manpower.

The current knowledge about the total area and locations of coral reefs world wide is not adequate to see
changes that occur in them. "Remote sensing of coral reefs has been a rapidly developing research area," said
Julie A. Robinson, the scientist who managed the project for the Earth Observations Laboratory at the NASA
Johnson Space Center (JSC), Houston, Texas.

NASA has contributed funding and satellite data to the project, whose purpose is to develop global reef maps
as a base for future research. The project will also serve as a library for the coral reef remote sensing data.

Fro m 1999 to 2003, the Landsat 7 satellite took the 1,490 images of coral reefs to complete the required global
coverage. Landsat is managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

The images and data were assembled by the Institute for Marine Remote Sensing (IMaRS) at USF, St.
Petersburg, Fla. "There has been amazing cooperation at all levels to assemble this data together," said Frank
Muller-Karger, o f USF. The Landsat 7 Science Team specifically scheduled observations of many reef areas
for the first time.

The final map products are due for release in early 2005. Currently, the raw archive is availab le on the Internet
at http://seawifs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi/landsat.pl. The archive and online data interface were developed by the
SeaWiFS Project at NASA 's Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/ GSFC) in Greenbelt, Md.

"The archive is our first comp leted product and will immed iately provide data to improve local assessments of
reef resources around the world," Robinson said. "This data archive provides access to a reliable g lobal
satellite dataset for mapping coral reefs. It will serve as a source of data for projects around the world," said
Serge Andréfouët, who led data collection and mapping at USF and is now with the French Institut de
Recherche pour le Développement (IRD) in New Ca ledonia.

USF in collaboration with JSC is characterizing, mapping and estimating extent of shallow coral reef
ecosystems in the Caribbean-Atlantic, Pacific, Indo-Pacific and Red Sea using the Landsat images. The




                                                                                                                 12
archive highlights similarities and differences between reef structures at a scale never before considered by
traditional field studies.

Other partners include the United Nations Environ ment Programme's World Conservation Monitoring Centre
(UNEP-WCM C), and the World Fish Center's ReefBase Project.

"Current estimates of the extent, health and even the location of the world's coral reefs are co mpletely
inadequate to answer the key question about the how reefs and the fragile ecosystems that they support are
adapting to a changing environment. This newly released data set will help provide the baseline against which
future observations can be compared," said Gene Carl Feld man, SeaWiFS Project manager, NA SA/GSFC.

Related Links:

For an overview of NASA's collaborations, projects and products on global remote sensing of coral reefs, v isit:
http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/Reefs/

To directly access the Millenniu m Co ral Reefs Landsat archive, visit:
http://seawifs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi/landsat.pl

For more info rmation on the SeaWiFS Project at GSFC, visit : http://seawifs.gsfc.nasa.gov/

For more info rmation on the Institute for Marine Remote Sensing (IMaRS) M illenniu m Co ral Reef Mapping
Project at the Un iversity of South Flo rida, v isit: http://imars.usf.edu/corals/index.ht ml

___________________________________________________________________ ______________________

COX NEWS S ERVICE

China battling desert's sprawl

By Julie Chao

Published November 8, 2004

HANGGIN QI, Ch ina -- A decade ago, the grass grew tall around Erdung Geshige's wooden house. The
grasslands stretched for miles, feed ing his goats and those of his neighbors. But, over time, after years of
drought and overgrazing, the grass disappeared and the sand crept closer.

  By last year, sand dunes had swallowed up his house. Half-buried, it is surrounded by a vast desert that
looks as if it has been there for all of time. He now travels 25 miles to buy grass to feed his goats.

   Neighbors have fled. But Mr. Erdung, an ethnic Mongolian, says he doesn't want to leave. "If it rains, the
grass will grow back," he said, unaware that in Ch ina's Inner Mongolia province, 386 square miles of grassland
turn to desert each year.

  Ch ina is fighting a losing battle with sand -- a result in part of population growth, poorly managed land
policies, overgrazing of grasslands and groundwater pollution. Its deserts are growing by 1, 160 square miles
annually and cover 27 percent of the country's land surface.

  The consequences can be seen every spring.

  As the ground thaws and the Siberian wind kicks up, intense dust storms blow into western China and
beyond, obscuring the sun and turning the sky to mud. Fro m Beijing to Seoul, the dust has shut down airports
and schools and forced residents to hide in their houses. It even has been known to spread a haze across the
United States.

  Scientists are concerned that the dust storms, growing in scale and intensity, are binding with increasing
amounts of airborne pollutants to create a toxic soup that is being blown around the world.

   "The dust in a sandstorm far exceeds the amount of matter in a hydrogen bomb," said Quan Hao, d irec tor of
the State Environ mental Protection Agency's sandstorm research group. "Imagine millions of tons of particles
in the air, traveling so far."




                                                                                                                13
  Desertification and other land degradation threatens China's biodiversity, agricu ltural productivity, wat er
quality and quantity, and the livelihoods of millions of people. The United Nations Environment Program
estimates the direct economic losses at $6.5 b illion annually.

  The Ch inese government is spending huge amounts of money on the problem, feverishly planting trees and
grass to stop the encroaching desert.

  But critics say it's a losing battle, with the plantings targeting areas already lost to desert and much of the
money misspent by corrupt local officials.

  The State Forestry Administration has said it will spend $85 billion in the next 50 years to cover 180 million
acres of land with trees and other vegetation "to turn China into an ecologically -friendly land," said the official
Xinhua news agency. In 2002 alone, 18 million acres of trees were p lanted, an area nearly the size of South
Caro lina.

  "The problem is so massive, and it appears to be growing despite all the money the government has spent,"
said Bruce Carrad, head of the environ ment and agriculture unit at the Asian Develop ment Ba n k's Ch ina
office.

  More effort should be spent on protecting at-risk farms and grassland and ensuring survival of trees already
planted, specialists say. Trying to make the deserts bloom is an expensive mistake, Mr. Quan said.

   In some p laces, the environment has become so desolate that it has turned thousands into ecological
refugees. More than 800,000 farmers and herders have moved voluntarily or been relocated. Mr. Carrad likens
the situation to the migrat ion of farm families fro m A merica's Dust Bo wl in the 1930s, captured in John
Steinbeck's " Grapes of Wrath."

  The population of Inner Mongolia has soared in the past 55 years fro m 5.6 million to 32 million, while the
number of domesticated animals has grown even faster, putting immense pressure on the region's environment.
The booming international demand for cashmere has been a major factor in the rising number of goats.

   In recent years, northern China has suffered extreme drought, its rivers shrinking and water levels in some
places at their lowest in 50 years. China's unclear definit ion of landownership, coupled with corruption and a
bureaucratic mess -- at least four government ministries receive funds to deal with land degradation -- has
made the problem more severe.

  To many local officials, getting tree-planting funds is like hitting a jackpot. They plant a few trees for show,
then spend the rest buying cars, hosting banquets and building showy projects.

   "The central govern ment has spent a lot of money on planting trees, but the local governments focus only on
planting along the roadside so that visiting officials will see them," Mr. Quan said. "If they can't reach further
in the interio r, they just forget about it."

  A recent government audit found that agencies responsible for fighting desertification had misappropriated
hundreds of thousands of dollars by claiming nonexistent emp loyees and drafting phony projects.

  Meanwh ile, the farmers and herders of the Hanggin Qi area (population 130,000) on the edge of the Kubuqi
Desert are among the poorest in Ch ina.

   In Xin jian v illage, reachable only after traveling along bumpy paths and sand dunes, the average household
income of its 10 families is less than $100 a year.

   Xinjian chief Li San gets by with about 20 goats and a few pigs, turkeys and chickens. When the weather
allo ws, he also can grow corn and potatoes. His main co mp laint is not the lack of water or other material
comfo rts; what he'd most like to see changed, he said, is the government's grasslands policy.

   The govern ment uses airplanes to sow grass seeds at a cost of about $10 per mu, or about one -sixth of an
acre. But Mr. Li said less than 20 percent of the seeds even sprout, and villagers would have a higher success
rate while spending less.

  "If they could give that money to the people, that would be better," he said. "The villagers would be happy
with $5 a mu."




                                                                                                                    14
  Hanggin Qi officials insist that aircraft are necessary because much of the desert is so vast and remote. But
one official said the practice is just another opportunity for corruption.

  "They report the plane costs $10 a mu , but in reality it costs less," the official said, insisting on anonymity.
"They pocket the rest."

  Another factor is China's " Go West" campaign of the past several years, designed to encourage economic
development in provinces such as Inner Mongolia. It is meant to reduce the economic gap between the
impoverished interior and the booming east coast.

  In effect, it has sent polluting enterprises unwanted elsewhere in China to the west.

  "In recent years, some areas in western China placed undue and blind emphasis on developing ... projects
that are highly energy-consuming and highly polluting," said Li Zib in, an official in charge of the western
development campaign.

  In Inner Mongolia where water is more precious than oil, some factories have polluted the groundwater. One
grassland that had remained relatively unharmed by grazing started deteriorating after a paper-pu lp plant
moved in and created a giant lake of waste water, the Workers' Daily reported.

  "Industries that are expressly prohibited by the national government are creeping into Inner Mongolia, an
inherently vulnerable ecology that is facing another surge in pollution," the newspaper said.

___________________________________________________________________ ______________________

Seattle News
Starbucks Recognized as Gl obal Leader in Corporate Social Res ponsibility Reporti ng
Articles / dB News Seattle
Date: Monday, November 08, 2004 04:35:57



SEATTLE - Starbucks Coffee Co mpany is pleased to announce that its 2003 Corporate Social Responsibility
(CSR) Annual Report has been named one of the Top 50 CSR reports in the world in a new benchmark survey
recently released by SustainAbility. The results of the survey are included in SustainAbility's biannual report,
Risk & Opportunity: Best Practice in Non-Financial Reporting, which was released this week. Starbucks CSR
report ranked 42nd overall and nu mber seven out of eight for U.S.-based companies.

This year marks the first time Starbucks has submitted its CSR Annual Report to this benchmarking survey.
SustainAbility, a U.K.-based business consultancy on CSR and sustainable development, has conducted its
benchmark survey of corporate non-financial reporting in partnership with the United Nat ions Environ ment
Programme biannually for 10 years. This year, for the first time, Standard & Poor's jo ined the benchmarking
partnership to help explore the crucial lin ks between good sustainability reporting and good corpora te
governance.

SustainAbility's biannual publication, Risk & Opportunity: Best Practice in Non -Financial Reporting, includes
the premier g lobal ranking of outstanding CSR reports. An international co mmittee of experts ranked the top
reports based on SustainAbility's methodology which comp rises four distinct sections: context and
commit ment; management quality; economic, social, ethical, environ mental and mult i-d imensional
performance; and accessibility and assurance. In addition to ranking the best reports , SustainAbility's
publication also examines overall trends in corporate transparency and sustainability and looks at emerging
issues in CSR includ ing governance, risk and materiality.

"More than half of the Top 50 CSR reports we ranked were new to our su rvey," comments Mark Lee, Director,
SustainAbility. "It's great to see new entrants such as Starbucks talk about more than just their financial bottom
line and make a continued commit ment to excellence in CSR practices. We believe the increase in reporting
helps improve consumer and investor confidence."

"SustainAbility's ranking is the 'gold standard' of CSR reporting," said Sandra Taylo r, senior v ice president,
Corporate Social Responsibility for Starbucks. "It's an honor to have Starbucks efforts to provide transparency
on our social, environ mental and economic impacts recognized by the lead ing authority on CSR report ing. In




                                                                                                                      15
addition to receiving this public recognition of our effo rts, the benchmark report is a valuable tool that
provides best practices for CSR reporting that will help guide our future reports and our continued
commit ment to transparency and accountability."

Starbucks 2003 Report, tit led "Living Our Values," details the company's CSR p rograms, performance and
future goals to demonstrate how Starbucks provides social, environmental and economic benefits to the
communit ies in which it operates -- fro m coffee farms in developing countries to its retail operations in local
communit ies throughout the world. The Report is availab le online at www.starbucks.com/csrannualreport.

SustainAbility is a U.K.-headquartered consultancy on CSR and sustainable development with offices in San
Francisco, Washington, D.C., and Zurich. Risk & Opportunity: Best Practice in Non-Financial Report ing is
free to download at www.sustainability.com.

___________________________________________________________________ ______________________
U.S. Companies Hel p Dri ve Non-Fi nancial Reporting to New Heights
by DMReview.com Web Editorial Staff

Risk & Opportunity: Best Practice in Non-Financial Reporting, a new publicat ion fro m SustainAbility, the
United Nat ions Environ ment Program and Standard & Poor's, finds a significant improvement in corporate
efforts to build trust with shareholders, consumers and other stakeholders through voluntary disclosure of non -
financial perfo rmance.

The survey is SustainAbility and UNEP's sixth international rev iew of corporate environ mental and
sustainability reports, and their first with S&P. Over 350 reports were submitted and 50 were selected by an
international independent expert co mmittee for a fu ll analysis. The top three overall are Cooperative Financial
Services (UK), Novo Nordisk (Den mark) and BP (UK). The top three US co mpanies in the ranking are HP,
Ford Motor Co mpany and Bristol- Myers Squibb. General Motors, Chiquita, Baxter, Starbucks Co ffee
Co mpany, and GAP also placed in the Top 50. The dynamis m of the field is shown by the fact that 52% of the
Top 50 reporters are new entrants.

Partially in response to the accounting scandals of recent years, most companies have corporate governance at
the center of their reporting agenda. The best companies use their reports to fully explore their total social,
economic, and environmental (or 'triple bottom line') impact. The authors say the trend to more co mprehensive
disclosure is evidence of increasing interest in understanding all triple bottom line factors influencing the risks
and opportunities facing companies.

The research reveals that financial analysts, ratings agencies and insurance companies who rely on corporate
data to establish credit ratings and to evaluate the more qualitative aspects of company performance still find it
difficult to separate feel-good reporting fro m reliable data. In particular, Risk and Opportunity finds that
companies still need to do more to exp lain how non-financial performance impacts the financial bottom line.

Sustainability is a strategy consultancy and independent think-tank specializing in the business risks and
market opportunities related to corporate responsibility and sustainable development.

________________________________________________________________________________________

The Economist News papers Ltd.
November 6, 2004
HEADLINE: Corporate storytelling; Non-fi nancial reporting

BODY:


Non-financial accounting is now too serious to be left to amateurs

THERE was a time when co mpanies' social and environ mental reporting was not taken seriously. The efforts
of pioneers were often dis missed as cynical exercises in public relations designed to appease non -
governmental organisations (NGOs). In the 1990s, NGOs increasingly crit icised large corporations for their
uncaring attitude towards the environment and emp loyees in developing countries. Firms hoped that a few
carefully turned words about their emp loyment practices and CO2 emissions might serve to divert the NGOs'




                                                                                                                    16
wrath.

This not very attractive duckling now holds out the promise of turning into a surprisingly handsome swan.
"Non-financial reporting" has moved on fro m those early days. The British government wants to make it
compulsory for large quoted companies. And this week a new ranking of non -financial reports in a joint effort
by SustainAbility, a consultancy, the United Nations Environ ment Programme and Standard & Poor's, the top
credit-rat ing agency, shows how sophisticated they can be ()see page 78. BP's 50 -page fact-filled document
has an introduction by its chief executive, Lord Browne, in wh ich he says that the company's intention is "to
report on more than just our financial performance and tell a broader story as clearly as we can".

Story-telling is all very well, but unless it is relevant to a co mpany's performance it is best left to fiction
writers. There is growing evidence, however, that the stories which co mpanies are now telling in these reports
are of interest to a widening audience, and that they do have a real bearing on a firm's ability to raise capital
and recruit the best employees. This year's listing, significantly, was the first to be supported by Standard &
Poor's, which says that it now recognises "the growing importance of non -financial disclosure in the overall
assessment of a company's risk p rofile".

The big problem is that the genre's development so far has been haphazard. No one powerful o rganisation has
taken responsibility for its progress. This week's winning reports are as notable for their differences as for their
similarities. There is little agreement among the followers of best practice as to what best practice should be.
That makes it difficult to co mpare performance on environ mental and social issues across industries or across
time. There have been demands for harmonisation, but the most widely accepted attempt to satisfy this
demand, the Global Reporting In itiative (GRI), demonstrates the drawbacks of trying to impose the sort of
one-size-fits-all fo rmat that is appropriate for financial reporting.

To cover the very different social and environ mental impacts of co mpanies such as Rabobank and Rio Tinto, a
mining firm, the GRI consists of a long list of requests for informat ion which co mpanies can choose to answer
as they wish. BP, for examp le, declines to provide the requested geograp hical breakdown of the government
subsidies that it receives.

For non-financial reporting to become mo re of a swan and less of an ugly duckling, more discipline needs to
be brought to bear on its standards. For a start, non-financial reports should stick to measurable things. There is
still too much waffle about good intentions in even the best reports. Just because such reports are non -financial
does not mean that their message cannot be conveyed in figures. And they need to stick to things that are
material to the company's business. The report of British American Tobacco would have more credib ility if it
addressed more of the issues around smoking and health, whereas Co -operative Financial Serv ices' discussion
of animal rights and its CO2 emissions seems irrelevant.

There are plenty of things material to almost all businesses that are still not being reported in financial
accounts. One is intellectual property. Few businesses try to value it—less than two out of five, according to a
recent survey of Eu ropean companies—and even fewer report it when they do. Another is human resources,
which so many companies profess to be their " most valuable asset". Yet few of them say how much they invest
in train ing, or how many employees they lose in a year.

Finally, establishing credib ility for non-financial reports is crucial if co mpanies are genuine in their desire to
tell a broader story as clearly as they can. And that means not just boasting, but submitting to some form of
reliable audit. Accounting firms have been slow to move into this area, but the president of the Institute of
Chartered Accountants in England and Wales said recently that he thinks the profession should now take a
lead. It is an area sorely in need of leadership.

LOAD-DATE: November 5, 2004

_________________________________________________________________________________________

CNN
Scientists fight to save Iraq's marshes
Project seeks to restore wetlands Saddam drained
By Camille Feanny and Kiesha Porter
CNN
Friday, November 5, 2004 Posted: 4:09 PM EST (2109 GMT)




                                                                                                                       17
The drained marshes in southern Iraq were once abundant with wild life. Video

NEXT@CNN: Special report at 3 p.m. ET Saturday and at 5 p.m. ET Sunday



(CNN) -- So me have called it the Garden of Eden. At one time, the lush marshes of southern Iraq nourished a
thriving array of wildlife and half a million people known as the Marsh Arabs.

Today, the region is not the "Fertile Crescent" it once was.

Twelve years ago, Iraqi d ictator Saddam Hussein ordered the destruction of the marshe s in retaliation for an
uprising against his regime.

Satellite images and U.N. reports indicate that by 2002 about 7 percent of the wet lands remained. Experts
began to fear that they would be gone by 2008.

Today, researchers hope that what Saddam destroyed, science can help regenerate. They are seeking to reverse
the damage fro m years of damming and draining of the marshes.

Sitting at the confluence of four rivers, the vast Mesopotamian wetlands were once considered among the
world 's most important habitats. Sheltering migrating birds and spawning grounds for fisheries, they spanned
about 8,000 square miles.

"Sixty percent of the fish consumed in Iraq in 1990 was fro m the marshes," said Dr. A zzam Alwash, director
of the Eden Again project, one of the groups charged with rebuilding the wetlands.

Today, the marshes, which are crit ical for fisheries, have decreased by nearly 50 percent in some areas, said
Dr. Curtis Richardson, director of Duke Un iversity Wetland Center.

With funding fro m Japan, Italy, Canada and the United States, the program will launch an international
restoration effort. The Iraqi govern ment is running the project with cooperation fro m the U.N. Environment
Programme.

Scientists plan to use environmentally sound technologies to develop sanitation and water treatment systems,
restore the natural water cycle to the marshes and attempt to resurrect the ecology and local society in the
process.

Some progress has already been made.

Once Saddam was expelled fro m Baghdad, Marsh Arabs breached dams and canals to re-flood a large area of
the wetlands in 2003.

"Forty percent of the marshes are now inundated with water," Alwash said. "Some areas have recovered very
well, and other areas are doing very poorly."

But Richardson said the local population needs humanitarian aid before an ecological reserve can be
established.

"What is really desperately needed is health care for these people, clean drinking water, agricu ltural
stabilization, and then look at the marshes as a refugium and try to resto re certain areas," he said.

Ho me to the Marsh Arabs

Marsh Arabs had always lived on the fringes of society. They trace their ancestry to the Babylonians and
Sumerians.




                                                                                                                 18
Known as the Ma'adan, their culture is based on fishing and farming in the marshes. It has remained virtually
unchanged for millennia.

In 1991, after the United States launched Operation Desert Storm, Marsh Arabs staged an uprising against
Saddam. It failed and set the Iraqi dictator on a mission to destroy their culture and environ ment.

He built dams and canals to divert the water fro m the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, drain ing the wetlands, and
ordered the burning of the thick reed beds where Marsh Arabs built their co mmunit ies. The once -flooded land
became a salt-laden desert.

Without water and food, most of the remain ing Ma'adan left their ancestral ho mes.

"It was quite clear that no one would co me to their aid," Richardson said. "Saddam came back with tanks and
helicopters and killed thousands of people. It was after that he decided to drain the marshes."

According to U.N. records, the population of the Marsh Arabs has dwindled fro m about half a million in the
1950s to a fraction of that today.

Records show about 80,000 still live in the marshes, tens of thousands fled to refugee ca mps in Iran and more
than a 100,000 relocated to Iraqi cit ies.

The wildlife suffered as well.

Many rare species such as the African darter, along with other types of birds, fish and mammals, are either
threatened or gone. Date palm t rees, once abundant in the marshes, were cut down. Much of the land was
bombed, burned or drained, while some waterways were poisoned.

"Over the past 12 years, very few people raised this issue against Saddam and his government," Alwash said,
"until 2001 when the U.N. came up with its environ mental report documenting the exact method Saddam used
to dry the marshes. Before that, nobody was paying attention."

Nature in the balance

Scientists have said it could take many years and around $500 million to rebuild the marshes to s omething
close to their original condition.

Dams are major obstacles to restoring natural water flow to the wet lands, and several are not under Iraqi
control but lie in nations such as Turkey and Iran.

The situation is further comp licated by the insurgency that rages across Iraq and the oil reserves that may lie
beneath the marshes.

Some geologists said they believe the region could produce millions of barrels a year, which could lead to
drilling and oil development.

Scientists said those obstacles aside, they remain confident that they will be able to achieve their goals for
restoring the marshes.

They note with the continued protection and full cooperation of the Marsh Arabs, they are on target to finalize
the first phase of the restoration plan by June, although the entire project might not be completed for another
decade.

"When do [I] consider this job done?" Alwash asked. "When I can do a kayak trip fro m Baghdad all the way to
Chibaish passing through the restored marshes. Then I will consider myself done."

__________________________________________________________________________
The Guardi an




                                                                                                                   19
Climate change clai ms flawed, says study

Ti m Radford, science editor
Tues day November 9, 2004
The Guardi an

A team of scientists has condemned claims of climate catastrophe as "fatally flawed" in a report released
today.
The study appears on the same day that 300 climate scientists warn that winter temperatures in A laska, western
Canada and eastern Russia have ris en by up to 4 C in the past 50 years - and could warm by up to 7 C.

Martin Agerup, president of the Danish Academy for Future Studies and colleagues from Stockholm, Canada,
Iceland and Britain say in their report that predictions of "extreme impacts" base d on greenhouse emissions
emp loyed "faulty science, faulty logic and fau lty economics".

Predictions of changes in sea level of a met re in the next century were overestimates: sea -level rises were
likely to be only 10cm to 20cm in the next 100 years. Claims that climate change would lead to a rise in
malaria were not warranted.

Extreme weather was not on the increase but more likely to be part of a natural cycle, not yet understood by
climate scientists. The report says a warmer world would benefit fish stocks in the north Atlantic and reduce
the incidence of temperature-related deaths in vulnerable hu mans.

But the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment, to be presented in Reykjavik today, tells a different story.

The Arctic scientists predict that north polar summer ice may decline by at least 50% by the end of this
century. Some co mputer models predict almost the complete disappearance of ice.

This would have a devastating impact on indigenous populations, who use the ice for hunting and fishing.
Warming could also lead to a "substantial" melt ing of the Greenland ice sheet. If this were to disappear sea
levels would rise by about seven metres.

_________________________________________________________________________________________

Pittsburgh-Post Gazette
Climate chang e harsher i n the Arctic, report s ays
Tuesday, November 09, 2004
By Usha Lee McFarling, Los Angeles Times

The Arctic is experiencing some of the most rapid and severe warming on the planet, according to a new,
eight-nation report -- the most comprehensive assessment of Earth's fragile northern cap to date.

The report, a four-year effort involv ing hundreds of scientists, describes vast areas of melt ing ice, declining
species and fading indigenous cultures.

"It's affecting people up there now," said Robert Corell, the A merican oceanographer who led the project.
"And there are very serious consequences for people on the rest of the planet."

The report states that climate change is accelerat ing sharply, spurred by human production of greenhouse
gases, which have increased in the atmosphere by nearly 30 percent since the Industrial Revolution.

The 140-page report, released yesterday, chronicles the many changes that have resulted as the Arctic has
warmed in recent decades. Average temperatures there have risen nearly 2 degrees Fahrenheit in the past
century -- twice the global average -- while winter temperatures have risen nearly 4 degrees.

Parts of Alaska and Russia have seen average winter temperatures rise 11 degrees since the 1970s and are the
highest in 400 years, according to the report. The amount of ocean covered by ice over the past three years has
been the lowest ever recorded.




                                                                                                                    20
Among the most obvious changes are the melt ing of the massive Greenland ice cap and other Arctic glaciers
and the decimation of northern forests by foreign insect invasions. Some coastal villages are jeopardized by
erosion and rising seawater.

Many environmental groups hailed the Arctic report and said it was an urgent call for the Un ited States, which
has been reluctant to agree to international limits on greenhouse gas production, to join the efforts of other
nations.



_________________________________________________________________________________________

The Ti mes of Indi a

Arctic Alert: B ush's Return Bad News For Global Warming

NARAYANI GANES H



[ TUESDA Y, NOVEM BER 09, 2004 12:00:01 AM ]

Kevin Costner's Water World might have bombed at the box office, but the real stuff is all set to force -grab
world attention. The most comprehensive scientific report to date on global warming conducted by the Arctic
Council — co mprising eight nations with Arctic territories including the US — warns that the four-year
scientific assessment conducted by a team of 300 international researchers has bad news for all of us.

The return of George Bush for another term has only compounded matters. Who can forget his expunging
references to human-induced global warming in the US Env iron ment Agency's report on climate change? Will
the warning fro m the Arctic persuade Bush to take the Kyoto Protocol's advice to reduce emissions seriously?
Or will he go ahead with Arctic drilling in deference to the oil lobby?

The Arctic Climate Impact Assessment report says the Arctic will lose 50-60 per cent of its ice d istribution by
2100. In fact, one model predicts that the North Pole in su mmer will be co mpletely ice-free by 2070.
Projections made by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimates that if global greenhouse gas
emissions double their pre-industrial levels, melt ing ice will raise sea levels between 10 and 90 cm in this
century.

The most threatened country on Earth is the tiny Pacific island -nation of Tuvalu, with a population of 10,000.
Last year, the island's prime minister Saufatu Sapo'aga co mplained to the United Nations that Tuvalu could
disappear under water with in a few decades if something wasn't done to slow down global warming. He said
the global warming threat was "a slow and insidious form o f terro ris m against us". Should Tuvalu sue the US
and Australia, the two b iggest contributors to global warming and the only developed countries not to ratify the
Kyoto Protocol? Why should Tuvalu's inhabitants — who neither emit substantial amounts of polluting gases
nor consume much energy — pay with their disappearance for the omissions and emis sions of others?

Chris Layton, who heads Action for Global Climate Co mmun ity (A GCC), says rising temperatures this
century could threaten the survival of the human race. He could have qualified the statement by saying:
...threatening the survival of some before others. No wonder he describes climate change as a "far greater
threat to the world than international terrorism". What else is wanton pollution but another form of
unilateralis m?

The planet's temperature has risen by 0.6 degrees centigrade over the past 100 years. In the last 25 years, the
rate of increase in temperature has become greater than it was in the last century. Rising sea -levels will flood
low-ly ing countries like Bangladesh and the Maldives and threaten flood plains of rivers like the Nile,
Mekong, Yangtze and the Indus. Mass migration could turn out to be a major problem. Climate refugees could
spill over to countries like India and Australia, leading to grave psychological, polit ical and financial problems.

The global warming debate is s harply divided between two camps: One cautions us to scale down energy use
point to scientific evidence that shows that for the first time Planet Earth is facing a hu man in -duced large-
scale climate change. The other accuses conservationists of being eco -terrorists, creating panic at the cost of




                                                                                                                 21
growth and prosperity. They say there are plentiful resources to go around and climate change is no big deal.
The truth certainly lies closer to the greensayers, who argue in favour of restraint and planet -friendly p ractices.

Carbon dio xide levels in the world today are the highest in 440,000 years. With forest cover that absorbs
atmospheric carbon dio xide receding, carbon sinks are disappearing. Valuable permafrost cover is vanishing
with reced ing ice sheets and glaciers. Wildlife is moving to higher elevations in search of cooler climes.
Industrial s moke fro m North America drifts towards the Arctic, with soot deposits marring pristine ice
formations and warming them up. If global meltdowns are causing floods in many places, others suffer drought
and desertificat ion, throwing asunder cropping patterns and habitats. Warmer climes are more hospitable to
creatures that transmit co mmunicable diseases.

Apart fro m individual efforts to curb wastage, any effort against global warming should take on the contours of
a worldwide movement. Scientists and politicians need to generate awareness, and help evolve clean
technology by rewarding green practices — at the micro or macro levels, in the personal or commercial
spheres.

India and Ch ina along with Brazil and South Africa can play a leading ro le in steering development away fro m
exploitation and towards sustainability. To achieve this, however, countries like the US, UK and Australia will
have to work out a new system. In return for purchasing emission rights, the developing economies should be
given free and fair access to state-of-the-art clean technology that can be used in all new production processes
oursourced fro m the developed world. While the North is unable to replace o ld technology straightaway for
fear of stalling production and growth, the South has the advantage of starting on a clean slate, initiat ing
sustainable development models in new businesses.

Ult imately, in a process of reverse osmosis, the same clean proces ses can be re-exported to the West in a
phased manner, so that neither their economic growth is compro mised nor our own future growth potential.
Are you listening, Dubya?

_____________________________________________________________________________________ ____
                           ROAP Media Update – 09 Nov ember 2004
_____________________________________________________


                                            UN or UNEP i n the news

Worl d Must Act Now On Gl obal Warming Threat
Scoop.co.nz (press release), New Zealand, 9 November 2004 -The Arct ic climate is warming rapid ly, much
larger changes are in store due to increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases fro m hu man activity and the
global impact such as rising sea levels will be ―staggering,‖ presenting one of the most serious threats to
humankind, the United Nations environment agency warned today.
―With these facts before us, we need, more than ever before, a concerted and renewed international efforts to
combat the climate change problem,‖ Klaus Toepfer, Executive Director of the UN Env iron ment Programme
(UNEP) said in a statement citing a newly released report by an international team of 300 scientists.
http://www.scoop.co.nz/mason/stories/WO0411/S00092.htm
Arctic meltd own g athers speed
Stuff.co.n z, New Zealand, 09 November 2004 - OSLO: Global warming is heating the Arctic almost twice as
fast as the rest of the planet in a thaw that threatens millions of livelihoods and could wipe out polar bears by
2100, an eight-nation report says.
… Klaus Toepfer, head of the UN Environ ment Programme, said the Arctic changes were an early warning.
"What happens there is of concern for everyone because Arctic warming and its consequences have worldwide
implications," he said.
http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,3091275a7693,00.html

Scalding news from Arctic - Temperature rises twice as quickly as rest of earth
Calcutta Telegraph, India, 9 November 2004 –
http://www.telegraphindia.co m/1041109/asp/frontpage/story_3983057.asp

Japan to reject CITES regulation on shark trade
Japan Today, Japan, 9 November 2004 - TOKYO — The Japanese government has decided to reject an




                                                                                                                  22
international agreement to limit the trade in great white sharks that was reached last month at a wild life
conservation conference in Bangkok, government sources said Monday.
The government will also invoke the reservation clause on its acceptance of another agreement to ban
international trade in irrawaddy dolphins, the sources said. (Kyodo News)
http://www.japantoday.com/e/?content=news&cat=2&id=318168

Increasing rice prices seen as warning to Asia
Onlypunjab.com (press release), India, Publish Date : 11/ 8/2004 -Source : India-Econo my-Rice
Agricultural scientists say a 40 percent increase in international prices of rice this year fo llo wing production
shortfalls is a reminder that "Asia's ability to feed itself cannot be taken for granted".
Announcing this, the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) said after a meet ing in Tsukuba, Japan, that
an "international effort" has been launched to renew focus on the development of sustainable strategies to feed
half of the world's population that depends on rice.
The meet ing, World Rice Research Conference fro m Nov 4 -7, was organised as part of the United Nations
International Year of Rice 2004 fo r focusing on the food security of three billion rice eaters.
…The Philippines-based IRRI announced details a new environ mental agenda. It listed seven "key challenges"
to producing enough rice for the world and doing it sustainably. These are poverty and the environment, fa rm
chemicals and residues, land use and degradation, water use and quality, biodiversity, climate change and the
use of biotechnology.
http://www.onlypunjab.com/ fullstory1004-insight-Increasing+rice+prices+seen+as+warning+to+Asia-status-
21-newsID-16453.ht ml


                                          General Environment News
China battling desert's sprawl
Washington Times, DC, 8 November 2004 (By Ju lie Chao COX NEWS SERVICE) - HA NGGIN QI, China
— A decade ago, the grass grew tall around Erdung Geshige's wooden house. The grasslands stretched for
miles, feeding his goats and those of his neighbors. But, over time, after years of drought and overgrazing, the
grass disappeared and the sand crept closer.
…Ch ina is fighting a losing battle with sand — a result in part of population growth, poorly managed land
policies, overgrazing of grasslands and groundwater pollution. Its deserts are growing by 1,160 square miles
annually and cover 27 percent of the country's land surface.
http://www.washingtontimes.co m/world/20041107-110931-1980r.ht m

Poyang Lake Wetland Applies for Worl d Heri tage
(Xinhua News Agency November 4, 2004) - The wetland of China's largest freshwater lake, Poyang Lake in
eastern Jiangxi Province, has been applied for a world natural World Heritage, accord ing to a provincial
government source on Thursday.
Application was made formally to the Ch inese Ministry of Construction and the United Nations Educational,
Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). Th is will be the first wetland natural reserve to apply for
natural world heritage in Jiang xi.
http://www.china.org.cn/english/environment/111233.ht m

_________________________________________________________________________________________
                            REGIONAL OFFICE FOR AFRICA - NEWS UPDATE
                                                                                            09 November 2004
                                              UNEP in the news
Germany, UK partner to combat global warming
Nairobi, Kenya (PANA) - Britain and Germany are to collaborate in the fight against global warming under a
bold new partnership backed by leading industrialists, businessmen and scientists, the UN Environmental
Programme (UNEP) announced here Monday. The two countries, whose greenhouse gas reductions are amo ng
the biggest in the world, will spearhead new initiatives in areas such as environmentally -friendly energy,
climate friendly financial markets, greener cit ies and Arctic science. In an unprecedented show of leadership
between the two nations, a range of innovative recommendations are to be presented to Tony Blair, the British
Prime Minister, aimed at delivering a low carbon, less energy intensive world. The recommendations will also
be presented to both the G-8 and European Union presidencies, which the United Kingdom assumes next year.
Klaus Topfer, the UNEP Executive Director was upbeat that the collaboration between the two countries will
impact positively on the relentless fight against agents of global warming. "There is now no question that




                                                                                                                23
human-made climate change is a reality and that leadership is urgently needed to take the fight against its
devastating impacts forward. This leadership is now here and I sincerely believe this partnership is the trigger
needed to put Europe and the world onto a more stable, less carbon dependent, path," he said. Crispin Tickell,
a former British ambassador to the United Nations said it was becoming increasingly clear that the costs of
defeating climate change are far less than some critics have claimed and that the cost of inaction is likely to be
far h igher. http://www.panapress.com/newslat.asp?code=eng062145&dte=08/11/2004

Dri ve Targets Indi an Ocean Polluti on

Cape Argus (Cape To wn): Several African countries have collaborated in a b id to rescue marine and coastal
ecosystems on the Indian Ocean side of the continent from further damage. The Depart ment of Environmental
Affairs and Tourism's West Indian Ocean Land Based Activities project was launched on Robben Island on
Friday. At the launch it was revealed that 80% of coastal pollution along Africa orig inated inland. The project
is a joint effort by several coastal African countries, including Ghana, Madagascar and the Ivory Coast, and is
intended to combat the corrosion of delicate marine environments as a result of land -based activities. Speaking
at the event, Deputy Minister of Environ mental Affairs and Tourism Rejo ice Mabudafhasi said the goal of all
those involved in protecting marine life fro m land-based activities was to ensure that it was done while
promoting conservation and sustainable use of marine resources. The project was aimed at "determining the
extent and magnitude of pollution of coastal waters due to sewage, industrial and river run -off", said
Mabudafhasi. "We need to continue our partnerships in taking responsibilities and make a contribution to the
African process for the protection, management and development of the coastal and marine environ ment." In
attendance were representatives of the department, the National Ports Authority, The United Nations
Environment Programme (UNEP), marine and coastal management and the South African Marit ime Safety
Authority. Dixon Waru inge of UNEP said the sharing of information between countries was vital. "We need to
be able to say that we can quantify the reduction of stress on the ecosystem," he said. Fellow UNEP delegate,
Anjan Datta, said the success of the project was important because about half the global population lived in
coastal areas. He said that two-thirds of the world's gross domestic product, worth an annual $13 trillion, was
provided as a result of coastal and marine environments. http://allafrica.co m/stories/200411080959.ht ml

                                             General Environment News
Africa needs treaties on trans boundary water resources
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (PANA) - Treaties are needed at river basin level to provide a definition of how
transboundary water resources are shared and used, the African conference on Water for Food and Ecosystems
concluded here Saturday. Underlining the impo rtance of having common strategies for the development of
water resources at basin scale, the meeting also agreed that treaties could become the source of co -ordination,
co-operation and harmonizat ion. During the three-day gathering, delegates from 40 African countries worked
out the continent's input to the International Conference on Water and Ecosystems to be held at the end of
January 2005 in The Hague. Fro m The Hague, the next steps will be the 13 th session of the UN Co mmission
for Sustainable Development in New York and the fourth World Water Forum in Mexico City in 2006. At the
forthcoming meetings, nations will seek further consensus on implementation of policy measures that
accelerate the global agenda of allev iating poverty, providing food for all and ensuring the supply of safe
drinking water. Drawing fro m the experience of riparian countries taking part in the Nile Basin Init iative, the
delegates agreed that equity in water resources was not only about water itself, but also about the benefits and
values derived fro m its use. The meet ing reco mmended that poverty reduction should be targeted in water
resources management, and be part of the equitable sharing of benefits of water use. Water governance, the
meet ing reco mmended, should start from local institutions. Only when countries were engaged in practical
water management institutions with their stakeholders were they enabled and stronger to take partake in the
negotiations. In addition, the meeting emphasized that countries should have a strong political will to make
transboundary water arrangements work. Addressing the closing session of the conference, the Crown Prince
Willem Alexander of the Netherlands highlighted the involvement of local commun ities in the implementation
of water schemes and management of water resources, building on local knowledge and experiences.
http://www.panapress.com/newslat.asp?code=eng062051&dte=06/11/2004

France earmarks 12 millions Euros for water i n Africa
Paris, France (PANA) - France will release 12 million Euros (nearly 8 billion FCFA) to the Facility for the
promotion of access to water by the poor in Africa, d iplo matic sources revealed in Paris. According to the
deputy spokesperson at the French foreign min istry, Anne-Cécile di Borgo, the grant to be spread over five
years, will be France contribution to the programme of action of the New Partnership for Africa's Develop ment
(NEPAD), which identified water and sanitation as a priority. "Access to water and sanitation is also among
the major challenges that the international community pledged to resolve within the framework of the




                                                                                                               24
Millenniu m Objectives for Develop ment, whose aim is to reduce poverty by half between 2000 and 2015," di
Borgo told a news briefing. Statistics issued by the United Nations indicate that at least 1.5 billion people have
no access to clean and potable water. A majo rity of these live in Africa. The African Development Bank
(ADB) recently launched the African Facility in itiative for the access to potable water by the poorest cushions
of society. http://www.panapress.com/newslat.asp?code=eng061909&dte=06/11/2004

Ecol ogical Disaster Threatens 3 States

This Day (Lagos): Over one million people living in the wet land region co mprising several communities in
Jigawa, Bauchi and Yobe states are facing serious threats of displacement by ecological disaster in the next
few years if urgent measures are not taken by the affected states, and the federal government. Th is region
which forms the major courses of River Hadejia, Jama'are and Yobe as well as their confluencing flow into
Lake Chad through River Yobe has been described as the pride and joy of the North Eastern region. When
THISDA Y v isited the area, people were found adopting several measures against the various environmental
menaces that has been ravaging them over the years. Farmers, pastoralists and fishermen whose livelihood
come fro m the resources in the region are now facing the most difficult tasks of their lives as all these
resources are being threatened by typha grass, incessant flooding, quela birds and worse still potash influ x
invading arable lands thus making grazing and farming impossible. This problem according to the people
interview is caused by water from Rivers Hadejia and Jama'are that seasonally flooded its intricate network of
smaller rivers channels which experts say has formed an inland-delta-like flood plain on their journey down to
Lake Chad. http://allafrica.co m/stories/200411080261.ht ml


Halli burton returns stolen radioacti ve materi als to Nigeria
Lagos, Nigeria (PA NA) - In an attempt to persuade the Nigerian government to lift the ban imposed on it, US
oil services company Halliburton has finally returned two radioactive materials stolen from its custody and
taken to Germany and the US in 2002, the local press reported Monday. The report quoted company Vice-
President Remy Caulier as saying the materials were now in the custody of the Nigerian Nuclear Regulatory
Agency. Nigeria banned Halliburton fro m new contracts last September to force the comp any to return the
radioactive materials to the country. Caulier said the materials, used in hydrocarbon reservoir exploratory tests,
were stolen in transit between Warri and Port Harcourt in Nigeria's oil -producing Niger Delta reg ion.
According to him, the materials were found in Germany and were later taken to the Halliburton's headquarters
in Houston, US, where tests were conducted to ascertain their integrity. Meanwhile, the Halliburton official
has dissociated his company from a 180 million-dollar bribery scandal involving a Halliburton subsidiary on a
Nigerian Liquefied Natural Gas Project. The scandal is being investigated by the Nigerian parliament.
http://www.panapress.com/newslat.asp?code=eng062169&dte=08/11/2004

Otafiire Warns On Increasing Pollution

The Monitor (Kampala): The Minister for Water, Lands and Environ ment, Co l. Kahinda Otafiire, has warned
of increasing hazardous waste and pollution in developing countries. He said poor countries could not manage
large quantities of industrial waste since it requires large sums of money and resources. Otafiire said this
would lead to health complicat ions and environmental deterioration. Speaking at the 7th Conference of Parties
to the Basel Convention in Swit zerland recently, Otafiire said the process of management of waste is
expensive and negatively impacts on national economies. He called for an effective funding mechanism to be
instituted in developing countries to access money for eradicating hazardous waste. Otafiire proposed the
establishment of strategic partnerships with industries and governments for proper mana gement of pollution.
He said the private sector and business community are needed in the protection of mankind and the
environment. Resource mobilizat ion includes technology transfer, capacity building in detection, disposal and
management of wastes. He called for strengthened collaboration among member states on pollution.
http://allafrica.co m/stories/200411081591.ht ml

Maathai : Green Unto Death

The East African Standard (Nairobi): Nobel prize winner Prof Wangari Maathai, g lobally known for her love
for the environment, has declared that when she dies, she should not be interred in a wooden casket. Maathai
said that she would never rest in peace in her grave if her remains are put in a wooden coffin and asked fo r any
other material that would be environment friendly. Maathai has also been waging a campaign against use of
plastic and polythene bags and materials that are not biodegradable and end up choking and impoverishing the
soil. Meanwhile, the Nobel Peace A ward Co mmittee has been in the country filming a documentary on




                                                                                                               25
Maathai and her works in the country. Three groups fro m Germany, France and Norway have been
accompanying her, trailing and filming most of her activities. She is set to receive her award on December 10
when the documentary is also scheduled to be released. http://allafrica.co m/stories/200411080783.ht ml

                                 UN Daily News - 8 Novembe r 2004

For information media - not an official record
In the headlines:
• Situation in Côte d‘Ivoire remains tense as foreigners seek refuge in UN buildings
• Sudan: UN-appointed probe into possible genocide in Darfur gets underway
• UN envoy voices concern over violations of line marking southern Lebanon
• Annan and Iraq‘s UN envoy meet for discussions on Fallu jah, elect ions
• UN mission, Congolese national army launch joint action against rebels
• UN hands over mo re power to Kosovo government
• Malaysian expert appointed to senior post in UN economic affairs department
• UN watchdog urges better steps to keep nuclear material out of terrorist hands
• UN to seek over $1 billion for worldwide human itarian relief efforts
• More troops join UN stabilization mission in Haiti
• World must act now to forestall staggering threat from global warming – UN
• Ed ible insects are important source of protein, UN study shows
More stories inside
Situation in Côte d’Ivoire remains tense as foreigners seek refuge in UN buil dings
8 November - The situation in Côte d‘Ivoire continues to cause great concern, foreign nationals have
sought refuge in United Nat ions buildings and the atmosphere in t he commercial capital of Abidjan remains
very tense and volatile despite the restoration of relat ive calm fo llo wing several days of violence in the West
African country. The UN Operation in Côte d‘Ivoire (UNOCI) reported today that the mission was monitoring
the ceasefire agreement between Government and rebel forces, while unruly mobs were roaming some streets
in Abidjan and hate media broadcasts aimed at foreigners continued. It said some 800 foreign nationals had
sought refuge within UN co mpounds and sites and were being protected by UN peacekeepers.
Fighting flared last Thursday when the Govern ment violated the ceasefire by launching an attack in the Zone
of Confidence (ZOC) in the north of the country separating the combatants. On Saturday Govern ment ai rcraft
bombed French peacekeeping forces in the area, killing nine people and lead ing the French to destroy the
country‘s air force. Supporters of President Laurent Gbagbo then took to the streets of Abidjan in retaliation,
harassing and intimidating foreigners. The Security Council condemned the Govern ment attacks and
demanded the immed iate cessation of all military operations by all Ivorian parties and full co mpliance with the
ceasefire agreements.
UNOCI reported today that Govern ment forces had now withd rawn south from the ZOC. UN fo rces are
protecting many Govern ment officials as well as UN personnel and property and some UN troops have been
redeployed fro m the north to reinforce UNOCI positions in Abidjan.
―We welco me President Gbagbo‘s appeal for calm but note with concern the continuing ‗messages of hate‘
being broadcast over public radio and television as well as other local FM stations encouraging Ivorians to take
to the streets,‖ UNOCI spokesman Jean-Victor Nkolo said. Mr. Nkolo told UN Radio that the mission had now
raised to level four the security level throughout the country, mean ing that where conditions permit, non-
essential staff will be evacuated. There have so far been no evacuations. He called for a full and immed iate
cessation of all hostilities in order to put the peace process back on track since the ceasefire agreements that
ended the civil war ―remain the only solution out of this crisis.‖
Sudan: UN-appointed probe into possible genoci de in Darfur gets underway
8 November - A United Nations-appointed commission of inquiry has arrived in Sudan to determine
whether acts of genocide have occurred in the country‘s strife-torn Darfur region, which the
international organization has called the world‘s wo rst humanitarian crisis.
The five-member co mmission, established by Secretary-General Kofi Annan last month in accordance
with Security Council resolution 1564, p lans to be in the country until 21 November and will meet with
representatives of the Govern ment, international agencies and civil so ciety groups as well as travel to
Darfu r, a vast and impoverished region in western Sudan. About 1.45 million people are internally displaced
within Darfur, where Janjaweed militias are accused of killing and raping thousands of villagers after local
rebel groups took up arms against the Sudanese Government. Another 200,000 are liv ing as refugees in
neighbouring Chad. The Co mmission‘s mandate is to ―investigate reports of violations of international
humanitarian law and hu man rights law in Darfur by all parties, to determine also whether or not acts of
genocide have occurred and to identify the perpetrators of such violations with a view to ensuring that those
responsible are held accountable.‖ An independent body, it is supported by the Office o f the UN Hig h




                                                                                                               26
Co mmissioner for Hu man Rights, which is providing the secretariat, legal research team and investigative
team. It has three months to complete its work and report back to Mr. Annan. Its members include Antonio
Cassese, an Italian judge and professor who is the chairman; Mohammed Fayek of Egypt; Hina Jilani of
Pakistan; Dumisa Ntsebeza of South Africa and Therese Striggner-Scott of Ghana. Meanwhile, the UN
mission in Sudan reported that all major roads in South Darfur remain closed to UN movement. Fo llo wing
destruction of the Al Geer camp fro m 3 to 5 November and the forced relocation of its residents, humanitarian
agencies remain concerned about the protection of those who returned to Al Geer and those who dispersed to
Nyala town. The UN World Food Programme (WFP) says it has carried out food distribution to camps in
Nyala town and they have requested permission to distribute food to those dispersed from the now -destroyed
Al Geer camp.
UN envoy voices concern over vi olations of line marking
southern Lebanon
8 November - A United Nations envoy today expressed concern over repeated violations of the line marking
Israel‘s withdrawal fro m Lebanon after a drone was launched into Israeli airspace, and urged all sides to
respect the so-called Blue Line. The latest comments by Staffan de Mistura, the Personal Representative of
Secretary-General Kofi Annan for southern Lebanon, came after an unmanned aerial vehicle was launched at
approximately 10:30 a.m. yesterday fro m the Lebanese side of the Blue Line and into Israeli airspace. The
aircraft was reported to have flown over Israeli territory before re-entering southern Lebanon and landing in
the vicinity of Naqoura. Later the same day, two Israeli air vio lations, involving five jets, were recorded. There
were no reports of antiaircraft fire fro m the Lebanese side.
―All air violat ions of the Blue Line are an issue of concern,‖ Mr. de Mistura said in a statement issued from
Beirut. He also reiterated the UN‘s position that there should be no air vio lations fro m any side of the Blue
Line and called on all sides to fulfil their obligations to fully respect the marker.
Speaking to reporters after a meeting with Lebanese Foreign Minister Mah moud Hammoud, Mr. de M istura
said he called on the Govern ment to use its authority to control the territory.
He added that he was waiting for a report fro m the UN Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL), the peacekeeping
force confirming Israel‘s withdrawal fro m its northern neighbour, before comment ing further on the drone‘s
flight. ―You know our position regarding overflights and we will be reiterat ing it,‖ he said. The Un ited Nations
―has been saying constantly that overflights should not take place fro m any source. And we will continue
working along this issue both for the sake of the Blue Line and fo r the sake of the sovereignty of the countries
in the region.‖
Annan and Iraq’s UN envoy meet for discussions on Fallujah, elections
8 November - Secretary-General Kofi Annan and Iraq‘s Ambassador to the United Nations, Samir Shakir
Mahmood Su maidaie, met today in New York for talks on the situation in Fallujah as well as preparations for
elections next January. According to a readout of their meeting provided by Mr. Annan‘s spokesman, the two
―had a serious, yet friendly, discussion, with both agreeing on the importance of establishing a relationship
based on mutual understanding.‖ Asked earlier Monday if the Secretary-General had a reaction to the military
offensive in Fallu jah fo llo wing his warning last week about such a move, spokesman Fred Eckhard noted that
Mr. Annan had spoken about the topic over the weekend with US President George W. Bush in what was
essentially a courtesy call fo llowing the President‘s election victory. ―The President respects the Secretary-
General‘s position,‖ Mr. Eckhard said, adding that the Secretary-General had previously commented that
sometimes force is necessary. ―But [Mr. Annan] was merely warning that the use of force could destabilize the
country at a critical point in the preparation for the elections.‖ As for comments fro m the European Union‘s
foreign policy chief, Javier So lana, that January elections might not be possible, the spokesman said the timing
of elections was a call for the Iraqi Interim Govern ment to make.
UN mission, Congolese national army l aunch joint action
against rebels
8 November - In the largest such joint action to date, the United Nations peacekeeping mission in the
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) will support military operations by the national Congolese
army to protect the Walungu area in the eastern part of the country fro m rebel attacks.
A combined operational centre will be set up in Walungu, 80 kilo metres southwest of Bukavu in South
Kivu province, the UN Organization Mission in the DRC (M ONUC) has announced.
According to a joint commun iqué by MONUC and the Congolese armed forces, all combatants are urged to
voluntarily
-4-
UN News Centre • www.un.org/news
UN Daily News 8 November 2004
cease their activities and either jo in the national army or sign up for the demobilization an d reintegration
program. In
addition, all fo reign forces in the area are asked to go home.




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On a visit to a hospital Walungu in June, UN World Food Programme (WFP) Country Director Felix Bamezon
reported
seeing wards filled with emaciated babies and young children with distended stomachs, stick-like limbs and
hair that had
turned yellow.
―These children are slowly dying of starvation,‖ he said then. ―We cannot simp ly stand by and let it happen.‖
UN hands over more power to Kosovo g overnment
8 November - The top United Nations envoy for Kosovo has decided to hand over more power to the
province‘s government with the creation of new ministries dealing with energy, local self-govern ment, and
returns and communit ies, the UN mission there said today.
Søren Jessen-Petersen, chief of the UN Interim Ad ministration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK), was meet ing
with political leaders in Pristina to in form them of the decision, and to tell them of his endorsement of their
proposal to establish posts for a Deputy Prime Min ister and Deputy Ministers.
A statement released by UNM IK in Pristina said Mr. Jessen-Petersen stressed that the new and existing
competences of the
Provisional Institutions of Self Govern ment (PISG) must be exercised in a fu lly responsible and accountable
manner. He
also made it clear that a co mmit ment fro m the government to do so was ―an integral part of the transfer.‖
He reiterated that the transfer of co mpetences would have to be accompanied by comprehensive capacity -
building of the PISG, adding that imp roved government accountability and capacity would be an important
step forward in enabling Kosovo to meet the priority standards ahead of the planned mid -2005 review. During
his meet ing with political leaders, Mr. Jessen-Petersen was also to discuss the possibility of further transfer of
competencies, particularly in the area of the economy, after the fo rmation of the new government. The UN
envoy underscored that a strong partnership would continue in the non -transferred areas to ensure further full
engagement of the PISG.
Mal aysian expert appoi nted to senior post in UN economic
affairs department
8 November - A Malaysian expert in polit ical economics and development has been appointed to a senior post
in the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) to lead and coordinate statistical
demographic and macroeconomic data gathering and analysis.
Jomo Kwame Sundaram will be the Assistant Secretary-General on Economic Development, a new post
created this year as part of Secretary-General Kofi Annan‘s reform to support policy coherence and
management in the Depart ment. He will also serve as the senior adviser to Jose Antonio Ocampo, Under-
Secretary-General for Econo mic Affairs. Mr. Sundaram is currently a Vis iting Sen ior Research Fellow at the
Asia Research Institute at the National University of Singapore, and Professor in the Applied Economics
Depart ment at the University of Malaya in Kuala Lu mpur.
UN watchdog urges better steps to keep nuclear material out of terrorist hands
8 November - Declaring that the ―threat of nuclear terroris m is real and current,‖ the head of the
United Nat ions atomic watchdog today called for urgent international measures to prevent radioactive
matter fro m falling into the hands of terrorists, citing increased trafficking of nuclear or other
radioactive materials as a ―disturbing‖ sign.―The security of nuclear and other radioactive material has taken
on dramatically heightened significance in recent years,‖ International Ato mic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Director-General Mohamed ElBaradei told the Asia-Pacific Conference on Nuclear Safeguards and Security
meet ing in Sydney, Australia. ―The events of September 2001 (terro rist attack on the United States) propelled
the rapid and dramat ic re -evaluation of the risks of terroris m in all its forms – whether related to the security of
urban centres, sports arenas, industrial co mplexes, harbours and waterways, oil refineries, air and rail t ravel, o r
nuclear and radiological activ ities,‖ he said. ―Nuclear security should be urgently strengthened, without
wait ing for a ‗watershed‘ nuclear security event to provide the impetus for needed security upgrades.‖Mr.
ElBaradei said that ―perhaps the most disturbing lesson to emerge‖ fro m IAEA probes into recent nuclear
programmes in Iran and Libya was the existence of an extensive illicit market for the supply of nuclear items
which clearly thrived on demand. ―The relat ive ease with which a mu ltinational illicit network could be set up
and operated demonstrates clearly the inadequacy of the present export control system,‖ he added, noting that
60 incidents of trafficking were reported in 2003 and the total for this year will be even higher.
While the majority of these incidents did not involve nuclear material and most radioactive sources involved
were of limited concern, the number showed that measures to control and secure nuclear and other radioactive
materials need to be imp roved. ―They also show that measures to detect and respond to illicit trafficking are
essential,‖ Mr. ElBaradei said.
He called for better control of the sensitive parts of the nuclear fuel cycle, namely the production of enriched
uranium and the reprocessing of plutonium – essential elements in producing nuclear weapons.
UN to seek over $1 billion for worl dwi de humani tari an relief efforts




                                                                                                                    28
8 November - The United Nations will ask donors at a meet ing later this week in New York for mo re than $1
billion to address the world's ―forgotten emergencies‖ – crises spawned by conflict, natural d isasters or both.
Fro m Chechnya in the Russ ian Federation to the Great Lakes region of Africa to the Middle East, millions of
people world wide will benefit fro m the relief efforts organized under the 2005 Hu man itarian Appeal. The
funds will be used by various UN agencies to meet the health, sanitat ion, housing, education and food needs of
those living in the affected countries and areas, while paving the way for longer-term rehabilitation and
development after the crises have subsided.
More troops join UN stabilizati on mission in Haiti
8 November - More than 160 Moroccan soldiers arrived in Haiti yesterday to join the United Nat ions
Stabilization Mission (MINUSTAH), bringing the operation‘s uniformed strength to nearly 4,500 out
of an authorized total of almost 8,000 troops and civilian police. The mission was set up in April to maintain
security and foster a democratic polit ical transition in the strife-torn Caribbean country follo wing the departure
the previous month of President Jean-Bertrand
Aristide amid armed unrest. The 163 Moroccans will join a 200-strong Spanish battalion in joint operations in
Cap Haïtien in northern Haiti.
Worl d must act now to forestall staggering threat from global warmi ng – UN
8 November - The Arctic climate is warming rapid ly, much larger changes are in store due to
increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases from hu man activ ity and the global impact such as
rising sea levels will be ―staggering,‖ presenting one of the most serious threats to humankind, the
United Nat ions environment agency warned today. ―With these facts before us, we need, mo re than ever
before, a concerted and renewed international
efforts to combat the climate change problem,‖ Klaus Toepfer, Executive Director of the UN
Environment Programme (UNEP) said in a statement cit ing a newly released report b y an
international team of 300 scientists. The Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA), an unprecedented four-
year scientific study, confirms earlier worry ing research on global warming. Increasing concentrations of
greenhouse gases are projected to contribute to additional warming of 3 to 9 degrees over the next 100 years
and developing countries will suffer most. ―The Arctic region, the baro meter on global climate change, is like
an environmental early warn ing system for the world,‖ Mr. Toepfer said. ―What happens there is of concern
for everyone because Arctic warming and its consequences have world wide imp licat ions.‖
Among its many detailed findings the ACIA, co mmissioned by the Arctic Council, a h igh -level
intergovernmental foru m co mprising Canada, Den mark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden and the
United States, predicts that Arctic vegetation zones and animal species will be affected.
Retreating sea ice is expected to reduce the habitat for polar bears, walrus, ice -inhabiting seals and marine
birds, threatening some species with extinction. Such changes will also affect many indigenous communit ies
who depend on such animals, not only for food, but also as the basis for cultural and social identity. Beyond
the region, as Arctic glaciers melt and the permafrost thaws, developing countries with limited means to adapt
to environmental change will suffer most. Mr. Toepfer praised Russia‘s recent decision to ratify the Kyoto
Protocol on climate change as an important step in the international fight to check global warming but warned:
―As the ACIA reveals the battle is far fro m over. ―I want to congratulate the Arctic Council for their decision
to commission the report,‖ he added. ―We now have a clear scientific consensus that the Arctic is warming and
the resulting affects on global climate will be serious.‖
Edi ble i nsects are important source of protein, UN study shows
8 November - A new study released by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
today stresses that edible insects such as caterpillars and grubs should be considered an alternative
source of nutrition in effo rts to overcome food insecurity in central A frican countries.
―Edib le insects fro m fo rests are an important source of protein, and unlike those from agricu ltural land,
they are free of pesticides,‖ said Paul Vantomme, an FAO forestry expert, noting that caterpillars are
already an important food intake for many people in central Africa. More than 90 per cent of participants in a
survey in Botswana said they consumed caterpillars, with 85 percent in the Central African Republic and 70
percent in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) doing the same. Fo r every 100 grams of dried
caterpillars, there are about 53 grams of proteins, about 15 per cent of fat and about 17 pe r cent of
carbohydrates, according to the study. The insects are also believed to have a higher proportion of protein and
fat than beef and fish with a h igh energy value.Depending on the species, caterpillars are considered to be rich
in minerals such as potassium, calciu m, magnesium, zinc, phosphorus and iron, as well as various vitamins.
Research shows that 100 grams of insects provide more than 100 per cent of the daily requirements of the
respective minerals and vitamins.
―Due to their high nutrit ional value in some regions, flour made fro m caterpillars is mixed to prepare pulp
given to children to counter malnutrition,‖ said Mr. Vantomme. ―Contrary to what many may think,
caterpillars are not considered an emergency food, but are an integral part of d iet in many regions according to
seasonal availab ility. They are consumed as a delicacy.‖ Experts believe that the collection of edib le insects by




                                                                                                                 29
hand could prove to be a potential source of inco me fo r rural populations, especially wo men, because it
requires little capital income. ―The nutrit ional and economic value of ed ible insects is often neglected and we
should further encourage their collect ion and commercialization, given the benefits to the environment and
human health,‖ said Mr. Vanto mme, noting that insects were already widely o ffered in local v illage markets
and restaurants.
The study shows that trans -border trade in edib le insects is significant not only within Central African
countries, but also in Sudan and Nigeria. Dried caterpillars are also exported to France and Belgiu m.
UN rights envoy visits Cambodi a
8 November - A United Nations special envoy for human rights in Cambodia arrived today in the capital
Phnom Penh to investigate the situation and prepare recommendations for the next session o f the UN‘s top
human rights body. During his week-long visit, Peter Leuprecht, the Special Representative of the Secretary -
General, will meet with the King, govern ment leaders, including the Prime M inister, political leaders, non -
governmental organizations (NGOs), the media, members of the donor and diplo matic co mmun ities and
individuals who have suffered violat ions of their human rights. Mr. Leuprecht is expected to continue his
strong focus on land and natural resources, ―through the release of a report o n land concessions for economic
purposes, fro m a human rights perspective.‖
He will file a report of his visit to the Geneva-based UN Hu man Rights Co mmission in April 2005.
Music can make the worl d a more harmonious place, Annan says
8 November - Music can bring people together to make the world a more harmon ious place,
Secretary-General Kofi Annan said today as he hosted the latest in a series of talks on issues outside
the normal range of United Nat ions topics and on matters at the forefront of both the h umanities and
natural sciences. ―From the first lullaby sung to us as newborn babies, music provides the ‗soundtrack‘ of our
lives,‖ Mr. Annan said in introducing Prof. Leon Botstein, principal conductor of the American Sy mphony
Orchestra in New York, as the featured speaker on ―Why Music Matters.‖ ―So much so that I think many of us
take it for granted – just as we do the soundtrack of a film, which we often hear without listening to it. That is,
we enjoy the film without realizing how much the music conditions our reaction,‖ he added. Believing that
music both shapes and reflects society, the UN chief described the art of music as a gift fro m God, saying:
―Dancers follo w its beat; protesters use it to find their voice. It can pro mote ideals – like peace and solidarity –
but it can also prepare armies for battle. It is part of almost every important personal and collective mo ment.‖
The Secretary-General said in a world of diversity where often values clash, music ―leaps across language
barriers and unites people of quite different cultural backgrounds.‖
Previous lectures hosted by Mr. Annan dealt with such topics as human rights, cloning, Islam, globalization
and climate change.
Kuwaiti National Orchestra
performed at the UN
Afghans join chorus calling for release of three abducted UN workers
7 November - Pro minent Afghans are jo ining the international and grassroots chorus calling for the
release of three Un ited Nations workers abducted 10 days ago in Afghanistan.
The concern of family, friends and colleagues of Annetta Flanigan, Shqipe Hebibi and Angelito Nayan
―increases every day, every hour, every minute that goes by and they are still being kept away fro m
them,‖ UN spokesman Manoel de Almeida e Silva told the press today in the capital Kabul.
―People who claim to have control over our three colleagues have been telling the press that they are not in
good health,‖ he said. ―If that is the case, the best response for their need of medical attention is their
immed iate release.‖
He called on those responsible not to harm the three, who came to Afghanistan to help with the country's first -
ever presidential elect ion last month. Meanwhile, the Ch ief of Staff of the M inistry of Defence, General
Besmellah, issued a statement Saturday saying that the abduction depressed the entire nation and that such
action goes against Afghan culture, according to the UN spokesman. ―He noted that the three UN workers
came to help A fghan people to have fair elect ions after decades of war,‖ Mr. de Almeida e Silva said. Four
presidential candidates – Mr. Yonous Qanooni, Mr. Mohammed Mohaqeq, Mr. Abdul Rashid Dostum and Mr.
Ahmed Shah Ahmad zai - issued a statement ―strongly condemning the abduction as an inhuman act‖ and
asked for their release, the spokesman noted. A hotline established to receive informat ion or tips fro m the
public has been receiving a number of calls everyday, Mr. de A lmeida e Silva said. But he added that ―most of
the callers are doing so to say how sorry they are with this abduction, appeal for Lito, Annetta and Shqipe's
early release, and express their appreciation for the work of the United Nat ions in Afghanistan.‖
Conflict flares in Côte d' Ivoire prompti ng Security Council call for end to fighting
6 November - Meeting in an emergency session after French forces in Côte d'Ivoire were attacked and
the Ivorian Govern ment stepped up air strikes against rebel-held areas in the north, the United Nations
Security Council today called for an end to fighting in the West African country.
Ambassador John C. Danforth of the Un ited States, current President of the Council, read out a




                                                                                                                    30
statement on its behalf condemning the attacks, which reportedly killed eight French troops and one
US soldier while wounding some two dozen others.
―The Security Council demands the immed iate cessation of all military operations by all Ivorian part ies and
full co mpliance with the ceasefire agreement of 3 May 2003,‖ the US A mbassador said.
He confirmed that the French forces and the UN Operation in Côte d'Ivoire (UNOCI) – wh ich together have
been monitoring a ―Zone of Confidence‖ separating the divided country – are authorized ―to use all necessary
means‖ in discharging their mandates. UNOCI, the Council President pointed out, ―is authorized to prevent
any hostile action, in particular within the Zone of Confidence.‖ The Govern ment of Côte d'Ivoire and the
rebel Fo rces Nouvelles were called on to refrain fro m any vio lence against civilians and to cooperate fully with
UNOCI. ―The Security Council firmly reminds all parties of the need to guarantee the se curity and freedom of
movement of all UN personnel,‖ Mr. Danfo rth said. He said the Council will soon examine ―further actions,
including indiv idual measures to be taken.‖
Also responding to the crisis, Secretary-General Kofi Annan contacted the leaders of Côte d'Ivoire, France,
Nigeria and Ghana in an urgent round of telephone diplomacy.
―I think it is important that everyone remains calm,‖ M r. Annan told reporters after the emergency Council
session. ―I've been discussing these issues to find means to calm the situation.‖
He echoed the Council's call for an immediate end to hostilities. ―It is important that the President calms the
population so that they stop violent demonstrations,‖ he said.
―We don't want to see the situation aggravated,‖ the Secretary -General stressed, adding that this had been his
message to Ivorian President Laurent Gbagbo, who ―did tell me that he was going to end [the violence], so
we'll wait and see.‖
8 November 2004
Daily Press Briefing By The Office Of The Spokesman For The Secre tary-General

               AND THE SPOKES MAN FOR THE GENERAL ASSEMB LY PRESDIENT

         Following is a near-verbatim transcript of today‘s noon briefing by Fred Eckhard, Spokes man for the
Secretary-General, and Djibril Diallo, Spokesman fo r the General Assembly President.

         Spokesman for Secretary -General

         Good afternoon,

         **Côte d‘Ivoire

          We just spoke with the Mission in Côte d‘Ivoire, wh ich reports that unruly mobs are roaming some
streets in Abidjan. It says that the city is relatively quiet though, with most avenues deserted and people
staying home.

        Hate media b roadcasts aimed at fo reigners continue, and some 800 foreign nationals have sought
refuge within the compounds and sites of the UN mission in Abidjan, where they are being guarded by UN
peacekeepers. They are taking refuge in UN buildings because they are being harassed or are frightened by the
thugs who are roaming the streets.

          Spokesman Jean-Victor Nkolo responded to a question fro m UN radio about the peace process. He
said in order fo r it to be put back on track, the Linas Marcoussis and the Accra III Agreements remain the only
solution out of this crisis. He added that we need to reach a level where we will have a fu ll and immediate
cessation of all hostilities. Nkolo said, ―The first sign over the past 36 to 48 hours are quite pro mising, but it
remains to be seen whether this will actually take hold on the ground.‖

         **Security Council - Saturday

         The Security Council met on Saturday to receive a briefing on the deteriorating situation in Côte
d‘Ivoire. In closed consultations, Assistant Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations Hédi Annabi
informed Council members about the Ivorian Govern ment‘s attacks on Forces Nouvelles positions in the
country‘s north. He said that a government air raid took place in Bouaké, in which a French base was hit, with
eight French soldiers and one US civ ilian reported dead and 23 French soldiers injured.




                                                                                                                 31
          Following consultations, the Security Council adopted a presidential statement condemning that
attack, as well as the fatal air strikes in the north. The Council demanded the immed iate cessation of military
operations by all Ivorian part ies and full co mp liance with the May 2003 ceasefire ag reement. The Council also
confirmed that the French and UN forces are authorized to use all necessary means to carry out their mandate
fully. It also confirmed that the UN M ission, within its capabilit ies and areas of deployment, is authorized to
prevent any hostile action.

         The Secretary-General had attended the consultations and formal meeting. Afterward, he spoke to
reporters and said he had spoken twice that day with President Laurent Gbagbo, French President Jacques
Chirac and other leaders on the need to take all measures to calm the situation.

        Asked what steps he would reco mmend, the Secretary-General said it is impo rtant that the hostilit ies
stop immediately. He added that it is impo rtant that President Gbagbo calm the population so they stop violent
demonstrations in Abidjan. We put out the transcript of his comments over the weekend.

         **Security Council - Today

         There are no Security Council meet ings or consultations scheduled so far today. However, informal
discussions on Côte d‘Ivoire are taking place at the experts‘ level. Afghanistan and Côte d‘Ivoire are on the
Security Council agenda for to morrow.

         **Sudan

          The International Co mmission of Inquiry arrived in Khartoum late last night. Their task is to
investigate reports of violations of international hu manitarian law and hu man rights in Darfur by all part ies.
 Their mandate includes the determination of whether or not acts of genocide have occurred and the
identification of the perpetrators of such violations. They will travel to Darfur fro m 10 to 20 November.

      Meanwhile, the UN mission reports that all major roads in South Darfu r remain closed to UN
movement.

         Following the destruction of the El-Jeer camp on 3-5 November and the forced relocation of its
residents, humanitarian agencies remain concerned about the protection of those who returned to El -Jeer and
those who dispersed to Nyala town. The World Food Programme says it has carried out food distribution to
camps in Nyala and they have requested permission to distribute food to the dispersed IDPs fro m the now-
destroyed El-Jeer camp .

         **DRC

         The UN Mission in the Democrat ic Republic o f the Congo will be p roviding support to military
operations by the national Congolese army in the province of South Kivu, wh ich borders Rwanda. The jo int
operation, the first of its kind, will deploy troops in the area of Walungu, so me 80 kilo metres south-west of
Bukavu, to protect the population from attacks by rebel groups.

          According to a joint commun iqué by the UN and the Congolese armed forces, all co mbatants in the
area are urged to voluntarily cease their act ivities and either join the national army or sign up for the
demobilizat ion and reintegration programme. In addit ion, all foreign forces operating in the area are u rged to
go home.

         **Lebanon

          At approximately 10:30 am on Sunday, an unmanned aerial vehicle was launched fro m the Lebanese
side of the Blue Line and into Israeli airspace, constituting a Lebanese air violat ion of the Blue Line.




                                                                                                                    32
         The aircraft was reported to have flown over Israeli territory before re-entering southern Lebanon and
landing in the vicinity of Naqoura. Later the same day, two Israeli air v iolations, involving five jets, were
recorded. There were no reports of anti-aircraft fire fro m the Lebanese side.

         All air vio lations of the Blue Line are an issue of concern. The Personal Representative of the
Secretary-General, Staffan de Mistura, reiterated the United Nat ions‘ position that there should be no air
violations fro m any side of the Blue Line. He calls on all sides to fulfil their obligations to fully respect the
Blue Line.

         **Afghanistan

          The leaders and people of Afghanistan continue to express their disapproval of the abduction, 11 days
ago, of three UN staff members, the UN Mission in Afghanistan said.

         The Mission noted that the chief of staff of the Afghan Defence M inistry said that the abd uction goes
against Afghan culture. Four fo rmer presidential candidates issued a joint statement strongly condemning the
abduction as ―an inhuman act‖ and asking for the staff members‘ release. We have more details in today‘s
briefing notes from Kabul.

         **Kosovo

          The Secretary-General‘s Special Representative in Kosovo, Søren Jessen-Petersen, told political
leaders in the province that he had decided to create a number of new min istries. These will be in the area of
energy, local self-government, and returns and communit ies. He also informed them about his agreement with
their proposal to establish the posts of deputy prime minister and deputy ministers. And we have more on that
in a press release.

         **Appointment of ASG in DESA

         The Secretary-General today announced the appointment of Mr. Jo mo Kwame Sundaram of Malaysia
as his Assistant Secretary-General on Economic Develop ment in the Depart ment of Econo mic and Social
Affairs. This new post was created this year, as part of the Secretary-General‘s reform package, to support
policy coherence and management in the department. Mr. Sundaram‘s responsibilities will be to act as the
principal economic adviser to the Under-Secretary-General and to lead and coordinate statistical, demographic
and macroeconomic data gathering and analysis.

         Mr. Sundaram is currently Visit ing Senior Research Fellow at the Asia Research Institute at the
National University of Singapore and Professor in the Applied Economics Depart ment in the University of
Malaya in Kuala Lu mpur. And we have more in a biographical note on him upstairs.

         **Cambodia

          The Special Representative of the Secretary-General for human rights in Cambodia, Peter Leuprecht,
arrived in Phno m Penh today. According to a press release, the Special Representative is there to update
himself on the human rights situation in Cambodia and to prepare his reco mmendations for the next session of
the United Nations Co mmission on Human Rights. He will continue his strong focus on land and natural
resources, through the release of a report on land concessions for economic purposes fro m a hu man rights
perspective.

         **SG/ Lecture Series

         This afternoon, at 1:25 in the ECOSOC Chamber, the Secretary -General‘s Lecture Series will feature
Professor Leon Botstein, the President of Bard College Conservatory of Music and the principal conductor of
the American Sy mphony Orchestra. Pro fessor Botstein will speak on ―Why Music Matters‖. And the
presentation will be followed by a question-and-answer period.




                                                                                                                     33
         The Secretary-General hosts this lecture series on topics at the forefront of the humanit ies and natural
sciences, and he will introduce today‘s lecture with remarks on how music touches every aspect of our lives.
We have copies of his remarks availab le upstairs.

         **Haiti

        The UN Mission in Haiti has reported the arrival yesterday of 163 peacekeepers fro m Morocco. The
Moroccan troops travelled on a military vessel, and will be deployed in northern Hait i alongside the Spanish
contingent which arrived at the end of October.

         **World Chronicle Telev ision Programme

         Edward Mortimer, the UN Director of Co mmunicat ions, is the guest on an episode of World
Chronicle that will be shown today at 3:30 p.m. on in-house television channel 3 o r 31. He is part of a
discussion hosted by Tony Jenkins that focuses on UN actions in Iraq and what can be achieved in the future in
that country.

         **Press Conference Tomorro w

         Press conference tomorrow at 11 a.m. in this roo m. A mbassador Phillipe Djangoné-Bi of Côte
d‘Ivoire will be talking about the situation in his country.

         **Guest at Noon Tomorro w

        And then at noon, Alberto Motivans, a Research Officer o f the United Nations Educational, Scientific
and Cultural Organization, or UNESCO, will be jo ining us to brief on ―Education for All‖, The Global
Monitoring Report for 2005.

         **Marathon

          Lastly, a sports note. Sixteen members of the UN‘s Athletic Club ran in yesterday‘s marathon. On
the male side, Kevin Shelton-Smith of the Depart ment of Peacekeeping Operations ran the course just under 3
hours to finish 336th out of more than 36,000 runners. As for the wo men, Lesley Brough of the Depart ment of
Political Affairs finished the race in slightly over five hours. Our congratulations go to them and all the other
participants from the UN.

         That‘s all I have for you. Warren?

         Questions and Answers

          Question: Fred, as we all know, the Secretary-General last week warned that an invasion of Fallu jah
could alienate people and undermine the electoral process. What is his reaction to word today that that
invasion is now under way?

          Spokesman: He said, and I said for him at the time, that he did not want to comment on privileged
communicat ions. He did speak to President Bush over the weekend. It was a courtesy call primarily, at the
beginning, or anticipating the beginning of the President‘s second term. And there was some discussion of
Iraq. But I think the President respects the Secretary-General‘s position, and the Secretary-General, as he said,
I think, in co mments to you in the corridor, that sometimes force is necessary. But he was merely warn ing that
the use of force could destabilize the country at a crit ical point in the preparation for the elections.

         Question: This was a call being placed to the President or vice versa?

         Spokesman: Let me find out who called who m. Evelyn? [The latter said that the Secretary-General
had placed the call.]




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         Question: That was one question. The second one was, we had an interview with Solana today, who
said there was little prospect of the holding of a national electio n fo r some t ime because of the security
situation. Can you check if there is any UN reaction on that?

          Spokesman: No, we have pretty consistently said that that will be a call for the Iraqi interim
government to make. And on the technical side, on preparations for the elections, you heard fro m Carina
Pirelli on Friday, saying that basically everything was on track for elections by the end of January.

        Question: So, what provoked Solana to say that, and whether there have been consultations with this
person or not?

        Spokesman: You‘d have to ask him. I am not aware of any consultations between him and the
United Nat ions since Friday. Mark?

         Question: Have there been any discussions between Kofi Annan and various parties related to Ivory
Coast since Saturday, and if so, what is the UN, I mean, apart fro m calling for an end to the violence, has the
UN any ideas as to how to get around this crisis?

          Spokesman: He had a very busy weekend on the phone. I think most of his calls regard ing Côte
d‘Ivoire took p lace on Saturday, and I think in the corridor he gave you an indication of some of the people he
had spoken to. I believe that his main message is ―stop all military act ions‖, and, of course, that‘s the message
of the Security Council, as well. It‘s relat ively quiet today. We‘re concerned about the continuing roving of
bands of youths through Abidjan and the hate messages that continue on some Côte d‘Ivoire radio stations.
Neither of these things helps calm the situation. So, we would hope that the Govern ment could get both of
these things under control, as well as to cease its military operat ion that it launched last Thursday against the
north. We feel that there is no military solution to this problem between north and south. And the solution is
very clearly laid out in the Linas Marcoussis Agreement, reinforced by the Accra III Accord. Yes?

         Question: Fred, given the Secretary-General‘s concerns about escalation of violence in Iraq, what
was his reaction about the French retaliation in the Ivory Coast when it destroyed most of the Ivorian Air
Force?

         Spokesman: I don‘t see a lin k between what‘s going on Iraq and what went on in Ivory Coast. The
Secretary-General hasn‘t said anything publicly or to me about his feelings regarding the action taken by the
French, apart fro m his general concern about the situation in the country being very threatening. Yes,
Abdurrahim?

         Question: Fred, about the Security Council giv ing the French and UN forces the right to use any
means necessary in Côte d‘Ivoire, do you know if that would include either arresting Laurent Gbagbo or try to
eject him out of power?

         Spokesman: I don‘t think that‘s what the Security Council had in mind. You‘d have to ask them, but
that‘s not the kind of thing that I would anticipate the United Nations getting involved in. Yes?

        Question: Within the context o f the letter to the Un ited States and Great Britain, does the Secretary -
General have any remarks about the violence since the beginning of the invasion?

         Spokesman: No, I think I already had that question, and... (interrupted).

         Question: (Inaudible)... fro m the context of the letter to... (interrupted).

         Spokesman: No. I have nothing to say today on what‘s happening in Fallu jah. Mohammad?

         Question: Fred, what was the topic of today‘s meetings of Mr. Gillerman and the Secretary -General?

         Spokesman: I don‘t have a read out on that. I‘ll try to get one for you. Mr. Abbadi?




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         Question: Fred, on the abducted staff in Afghanistan, there are indications that the abductors or
kidnappers have reduced their demands from withdrawal of all kinds of troops to merely an exchange of
prisoners. Do you have any informat ion on that? And is the Secretary-General hopeful that they will be
released soon?

          Spokesman: No, we‘re not going to comment on the contacts between the Afghan Govern ment and
the hostage takers. We‘re grat ified by the strong public statements being made by political and relig ious
leaders in Afghanistan saying that they thoroughly disapprove of hostage taking; and we‘re hopeful that the
Afghan Govern ment‘s efforts to get them released will be fru itful. Bill?

         Question: Back on 28 June, Fred, the UN released a press statement relating to personnel issues in
the Office of Internal Oversight Services. And that release stated ―As regards the issues raised in a recent
resolution of the Staff Council concerning personnel matters in OIOS, the Secretary -General has instructed the
Depart ment of Management and OHRM to clear them up as quickly as possible. He trusts they would prove to
be without foundation.‖ Can you give us any update on whether that action was taken; whether those issues
have been cleared up?

        Spokesman: The action was taken, but I‘d have to check with the Depart ment of Management to see
where their review of those allegations stands, and I‘ll get back to you after the briefing. Richard?

          Question: It might have been a question I couldn‘t hear in this roo m or maybe you referred to it
earlier; what was the read out of the Gillerman, A mbassador fro m Israel...(interrupted).

         Spokesman: I said I d idn‘t have a read out but I‘ll try to get one for you.

         Question: And who requested the afternoon meeting? Was the Iraqi A mbassador the topic for that
one?

         Spokesman: I don‘t know, I‘ll find out and let you know after the briefing. [He confirmed that the
Iraqi A mbassador had asked for the meeting.]

        Question: And I know it happened last week when I wasn‘t here; but is there a specific day when the
High-Level Panel report will be issued in early December?

         Spokesman: 2 December is the date it will go the General Assembly and become public that same
day.

          Question: There used to be a Secretary-General reception every year in September for the press. Did
I miss it or has it been cancelled? I was not invited.

          Spokesman: The year before last, they started to lighten his programme and said that they no longer
accepted the automaticity of certain annual invitations that he gives or certain annual events that he hosts. And
so I don‘t believe there was s uch a reception last year. I‘d have to find out for you whether he plans to do one
this year.

         Question: Is it a trigger mechanism to...(interrupted)?

        Spokesman: I am sure he‘d love to have all of you at his home. But I‘ll have to see if that‘s gonna
happen this year.

         Thank you very much. Djib ril Diallo fo r the General Assembly.

         Spokesman for General Assembly President

         Good afternoon,




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         The General Assembly is considering four items today. The first item is agenda item 16 entitled
―Elections to fill vacancies in subsidiary organs and other elections, Election of seven members of the
Co mmittee for Programme and Coordination‖. This is pursuant to General Assembly decision 42/ 450 of 17
December 1987. And in that connection, four countries, or a number of countries, had their terms exp ire by 31
December 2004. Those were China, Ethiopia, Japan, Nigeria, the Republic of Korea, Tunisia and Uruguay.
Those States are also deemed to be elig ible for re-election.

          The President, in his introductory statement, listed another 27 countries who were members of the
Co mmittee as of 1 January 2005 and, therefore, are not elig ible for that elect ion. After consideration, seven
countries were elected. Th ree fro m Africa: A lgeria, Ghana and Kenya. Three fro m Asian States: China,
Japan and the Republic of Korea. One fro m Lat in A merica and the Caribbean: Jamaica. Another item that
was considered was the election to the Co mmittee on Conferences. Again, here the President follo wed
tradition of not having elections when the submissions by regional groups are the same as the number of
vacancies. And in that connection, the President appointed Austria, China, Egypt, Jamaica, Kenya, Nepal and
the United States as members of the Co mmittee on Conferences with effect fro m 1 January 2005.

         On the appointment of members of the Jo int Inspection Unit, the same procedure was fo llo wed, and
the following results were g iven by the President: For A frican States, the regional groups have endorsed
Senegal as the new member; fo r Eastern Europe, Hungary; for Western Europe, France and Turkey.

           There was an item called ―Imp lementation of the resolution of the United Nations‖. That item is not
going to be considered for this session. It‘s going to be deferred to the 60th session of the Assembly. Item four
has to do with cooperation between the United Nations and regional and other organizations. Two items, also,
I wanted to draw to your attention: One regarding the high level plenary meet ing of the General Assembly,
that is, as part of the 60th anniversary. There will be a closed meeting tomorrow of the open-ended informal
consultations of the plenary, and that closed meeting will address the modalit ies to format an organization of
the high level plenary meeting as part of the report of the Secretary-General. I gave you the references to that
report before. I repeat them -- it‘s A/59/ 545. That meeting will be held to morrow, Tuesday, at 10 a.m. in
Conference Room 1.

         Another meet ing, this time of the General Co mmittee, which is o pen to all delegations, will be held
on Wednesday, 10 November, at 10 a.m., and will hear a presentation by Mr. Jan Egeland, Under-Secretary-
General for Hu manitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator. The subject will be the strengthening of
the coordination of humanitarian assistance, including special economic assistance.

         Co mmittee work: Today the Second Committee will discuss strengthening the coordination of
humanitarian and disaster relief assistance of the United Nations, including special e conomic assistance.
 To morrow in the Second Co mmittee again, Professor Jeffrey Sachs has been invited to provide an update on
the work of the Millenniu m Project and an overview o f the report on the implementation of the Millenniu m
Develop ment Goals, as mentioned at his last address at the United Nations.

         Fourth Co mmittee, i.e., Special Political and Deco lonization Co mmittee, will take up agenda Item 76,
Report of the Special Co mmittee to Investigate Israeli Practices affect ing the Hu man Rights of the Pales tinian
People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories. This Co mmittee was established by a General Assembly
resolution in 1968.

         The Sixth Co mmittee d iscusses the report of the International Law Co mmission and the status of
protocols additional to the Geneva Convention of 1949, relating to the protection of victims.

         That‘s all I have for you. Any questions?

         If not, thank you.

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