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					                   GENDER EVALUATION METHODOLOGY REPORT
                               January 1st, 2004

                 DEVELOP THE USE OF ICT SKILLS AMONG THE WOMEN

                      Mary Kajumba / Women of Uganda Network – WOUGNET


Country background:

In 1962 Uganda was declared independent. MILTON OBOTE was the first prime minister; the
Kabaka MUTESA OF BUGANDA head of state. In 1966, the Obote regime declared the
constitution suspended, the monarchy of Buganda abolished. The Kabaka's palace was taken
by force. In 1969, Obote published the COMMON MAN'S CHARTER, which drew on Tanzania's
Arusha Declaration of 1967.
In 1971, General IDI AMIN staged a coup d'etat, beginning a dictatorship and a reign of terror that
would last until 1979, targeting political opponents as well as ethnic minorities. The country's
Asian community fled the country, the country's economy deteriorated. Amin tried to balance
these effects by his foreign policy, leaning on Islamic aid donor countries such as Saudi Arabia
and Libya; the country's relations to the west were strained.

In 1978, Ugandan forces occupied stretches of Tanzanian territory; in 1979, Tanzanian forces
together with those of the Ugandan National Liberation Front (UNLF) defeated the Ugandan
forces and took the capital Kampala. Idi Amin went into exile, to Saudi Arabia.
Parliamentary democracy was reintroduced, and Milton Obote returned to power. But political
stability did not return, as Uganda went through a period of civil wars. In 1986, Obote was
ousted by the forces of YOWERI MUSEVENI. Museveni brought stability to the country; only in the
northern border regions, fighting continues until today. In the recent civil wars, CHILDREN
SOLDIERS have become a worrying reality. Uganda's population is predominately rural, and its
density is highest in the southern regions.

Uganda's economy recovered in recent years, to such an extent that Uganda is regarded black
Africa's model economy. In recent years, the AIDS epidemics has taken on dramatic proportions
in Uganda In 1993, the KINGDOM OF BUGANDA was restored.


Economy:
Agricultural products supply nearly all of Uganda's foreign exchange earnings, with coffee alone
(of which Uganda is Africa's leading producer) accounting for about 65% of the country's
exports in 1995-96. Exports of hides, skins, vegetables, fruits, cut flowers, and fish are growing,
and cotton, tea, and tobacco continue to be mainstays.
Most industry is related to agriculture. The industrial sector is being rehabilitated to resume
production of building and construction materials, such as cement, reinforcing rods, corrugated
roofing sheets, and paint. Domestically produced consumer goods include plastics, soap, cork,
beer, and soft drinks.
Justification of the project:
1.To what extent have the website and mailing list been used as tools for information exchange
   and dissemination among women‟s organisation in Uganda?
2.To what extent have women used ICTs to address issues collectively?
3.Has there been increased participation and awareness of ICTs among women organisations
   in Uganda?



Background of the project:
Women of Uganda Network (WOUGNET) is a non-governmental organisation established in May
2000 by several women's organisations in Uganda to develop the use of information and
                                                                                          1
communication technologies (ICTs) among women as tools to share information and address
issues collectively. We define ICTs to include email, the web, radio, television and print media.
However, WOUGNET‟s emphasis is directed towards email and the web, and how these
technologies can be integrated with the traditional means of information exchange and
dissemination for maximum outreach.

WOUGNET‟s vision is to improve the living conditions of Ugandan women by enhancing their
capacities and opportunities to exchange and share information, and to collaborate. Currently,
WOUGNET operates primarily online and most members are based in Kampala, where it is
relatively easier to gain Internet access in comparison to other places in Uganda. However,
there are a few members who are based in rural areas or otherwise lack Internet access.
Typically, such members have colleagues or other contacts who do have internet access and
who are able to serve as “information conduits”. In addition, members can interact with
WOUGNET by alternative means such as by telephone, fax, post, or at the WOUGNET office.
In October 2002, WOUGNET was selected as one of Gender Evaluation Methodology (GEM)
testers in Africa, and participated in a GEM training workshop in Zanzibar that was held from
November 19 – 23, 2002. GEM is a gender analysis tool produced by APC Women's Networking
Support Programme (WNSP) for practitioners who share a commitment to gender equality and
women's empowerment in ICTs. GEM provides a means for determining whether ICTs are really
improving women's lives and gender relations as well as promoting positive change at the
individual, institutional, community and broader social levels. GEM was created in 2001 and will
be field tested and refined during 2002-2003. Including WOUGNET, the GEM Africa testers are
AMARC Africa, African Women's Development and Communications Network (FEMNET),
Fantsuam Foundation, SANGONeT, Women'sNet, Isis-Women's International Cross-Cultural
Exchange (Isis-WICCE) and Zimbabwe Women's Resource Center and Network (ZWRCN).
Membership in WOUGNET involves participation in the WOUGNET online space comprising the
WOUGNET website and mailing lists. The number of women's organisations that are WOUGNET
members has increased from eighteen by year-end 2000 to forty-one presently. Fig.1 shows the
trends for subscription to the WOUGNET mailing list and the monthly electronic WOUGNET Update
Newsletter by year-end 2000-2002 and by June 2003.




Project profile:




                                                                                        2
                                  GEM TESTING PROFILE WOUGNET
Name of Initiative         Women of Uganda Network-WOUGNET

Project Holder/s or lead   WOUGNET
organisation
Objectives of the          Overall Objective: To develop the use of Information and Communication
Project:              Technologies – ICTs among women as a tool to share information and address
- Overall Objectives: issues collectively.

- Specific Objective       Specific
(s):                       - To provide a space to share news, information and activities on women related
                           issues in Uganda.
                           - To conduct training on how to use email, mailing lists and websites for
                           improved productivity, advocacy, research, etc.
                           - In partnership or solely to operate information hubs to exchange information
                           and access points to provide connectivity to organisations without computers
                           and/or connectivity.
                           - To Solicit donated equipment and technical support for members
                           - To develop a team of internet trainers
                           - To conduct research on the status of ICT usage and application by women in
                           Uganda

Expected Outputs:          - WOUGNET website and mailing lists to support information sharing and
                           dissemination.
                           - Increase in rate of new users of available WOUGNET services.
                           - New communication services availed that increase information sharing and
                           dissemination via the Internet and via integration with traditional technologies
                           - Increased awareness about the potential of ICTs as viable tools for
                           information exchange and dissemination that produces results.


Project Components         - Administer electronic mailing lists for women and women organisation to
/Activities                exchange and disseminate information. Information posted has included
                           conferences and workshops being conducted, requests for information on
                           current developments in various fields gender, agriculture, technology, health,
                           e.t.c. as well as postings volunteers for various activities who post their intent to
                           volunteer on the list.

                           - Maintain a website to profile members and their activities as well as links to
                           resources of interest to members and general public.
                           Produce a monthly e-newsletter with information on members’ activities,
                           upcoming events, funding opportunities, etc.

                           - Technical support programs to address computer/IT-related queries and to
                           develop websites for members.

                           - Identifying and soliciting training and conferences/networking opportunities
                           for WOUGNET members.
 Target Audience           Individual Women and Women organisation in Uganda
 Duration of the            On-going
 Project:
 GEM Testing               Dorothy Okello, Coordinator, Email: dokello@wougnet.org
 Contact                   Mary Kajumba, GEM Program Officer,Email: mkajumba@wougnet.org
 Person/Details
 General Evaluation        To What extent have ICTs been used as a tool to disseminate and address issue
 Goals                     by Women organisations in Uganda.


                                                                                                       3
  Specific Gender     Has there been increased participation and awareness of ICT usage as relevant
  Goals               tool for information exchange and dissemination among individual women
                      and women organisation in Uganda.
  Gender/ICTs Issues Lack of information access by individual women and women organisations in
  to be addressed in Uganda
  the evaluation
  How has the        Indicators to be used for the Evaluation
  information provided
  by the WOUGNET            Actual policy changes in issues women advocate around i.e. ICT, Gender,
  website and mailing           Land bill e.t.c.
  list contributed to the   Coalitions formed as a result of the network i.e. women movement
  advocacy work of          Number of women posting to the list serve
  women’s organisation         Number of advocacy actions held by women organisations i.e.
                                rallies, debates online
                            Increased awareness of the project
                            Increased networking among women organisations in Uganda
                               Number of opportunities secured by member organisations through
                                the network i.e. training, equipment, funding,

  Methodologies used           1.Self Administered Questionnaires (SAQ)
  in Evaluation                2.Focus Group Discussion
                               3.Mailing list interviews
                               4.Website statistics (User logfiles)

  Timeline of the            9 months
  Evaluation Process




Figure 1: Subscription trends for WOUGNET mailing lists

      350
      300
      250
      200
                                                                           WOUGNET mailing list
      150                                                                  WOUGNET Newsletter
      100
       50
        0
               2000             2001         2002         2003




WOUGNET     is using GEM to evaluate the WOUGNET website and mailing lists. The general
objective is to assess the extent to which ICTs have been used as tools for information sharing
and dissemination as well as tools for addressing issues by women and women organisations in
Uganda. Specifically, the evaluation project will seek to:
Assess the relevance of information availed to WOUGNET members – largely women and
   women's organisations in Uganda.
Identify information needs and information gaps with existing WOUGNET programs.
Assess the effectiveness of the WOUGNET website and mailing lists in information sharing and
   dissemination.

Expected outcome:

As a result of the WOUGNET GEM evaluation, it is expected that there will be increased utility of
the WOUGNET website and mailing lists to support information sharing and dissemination. Both

                                                                                                  4
in terms of an increase in the rate of new users of available WOUGNET services as well as in
terms of the development of new programs. Furthermore, it is expected that new communication
services developed will not only increase information sharing and dissemination via the internet
but also via integration with traditional methodologies, including radio and print. Overall, it is
expected that the evaluation results will serve to increase awareness about the potential of ICTs
as viable tools for information exchange and dissemination as well as to highlight the challenges
women and women organisations in Uganda face in making full use of the internet.

Evaluation process:

GEM Team
Upon selection as GEM tester, a WOUGNET GEM team was established. Prior to establishment
of the team, a call had been placed on the WOUGNET mailing list calling for applications for a
WOUGNET GEM Officer position. The WOUGNET GEM team is comprised of the GEM,
Information, and Program officers as well as the WOUGNET Coordinator.

       NO          NAME                         TITLE

  1.        DOROTHY OKELLO       COORDINATOR

  2.        MARY VIOLET KAJUMBA PROGRAMME OFFICER -GEM

  3.        MILTON AINERUHANGA PROGRAMME OFFICER

  4.        HADIJAH NAMUMBYA     INFORMATION OFFICER


The first task of the WOUGNET GEM team was to refine the GEM Evaluation Action Plan. This
was submitted to the GEM Africa coordinator in January 2003. The core components of the
action plan were:

a)Developing, pre-testing and refining the evaluation questionnaire
b)Conducting the survey – online and offline
c)Analysing the WOUGNET website statistics for the period June 2002 – June 2003
d)Conducting a focus group discussion to gather additional information relevant to the
   evaluation
e)Writing and disseminating a report on the evaluation


Methodology
See Appendix A - Questionnaire
The GEM team selected the following tools to be used in the evaluation process:

Self Administered Questionnaire
Website Statistics
Focus Group Discussion

The WOUGNET evaluation questionnaire was developed through a series of online and face-to-
face discussions among the GEM team. The questionnaire included structured and open-ended
questions and addressed the awareness and participation in WOUGNET activities. In particular,
the questions addressed usage and relevancy of information sourced via the WOUGNET mailing
lists and WOUGNET website. In addition, questions were asked regarding the challenges in
accessing and using WOUGNET services. In addition, recommendations were sought for
WOUGNET to improve service delivery and to promote the use of ICTs among members as a way
of information sharing and dissemination.

A final review of the evaluation questionnaire was completed in mid-May 2003, and the
distribution commenced on May 23, 2003. Print copies were distributed to 50 member
organisations through postage or hand delivery. In addition, an online version of the


                                                                                         5
questionnaire was posted to the WOUGNET website1 and mailing list. A deadline of June 2003
was given, however, this was later changed to end of July due to the slow-rate of return of
completed questionnaires. A copy of the evaluation questionnaire is provided in Annex 1. Thirty-
one responses were received to the questionnaire, and all respondents were thanked for their
participation.

A second component of the evaluation was the analysis of the WOUGNET website statistics.
The objective was to assess the WOUGNET website itself and how effective it is as a means for
information sharing and dissemination. The analysis followed the methodology described in the
Website Evaluation toolkit developed by the Urban Development Forum2. Included in the
website evaluation was an analysis of the visitors log-file data for the WOUGNET website over
the period June 2002 to June 2003. The website is monitored using AWStats program3.
AWStats is an open source log file analyzer that distinguishes between visits by robots and by
“human” visitors.

The third component of the evaluation process is the focus group discussion that is scheduled
for September 2003.


Evaluation Limitations:

The evaluation encountered a number of limitations which must be taken into consideration in
the review and analysis of the evaluation results.

a) Limited number of replies:
The primary limitation is the limited number of replies, thirty-one in total. In addition to the 50
print copies of the questionnaire delivered to organisation and affiliate members, the
questionnaire was posted to the WOUGNET website and announced in the June and July
newsletters as well as posted to the WOUGNET mailing list. At the time, the number of
subscribers for the mailing list were over 200. It should be noted that there are three categories
for WOUGNET membership: organisation for women organisations in Uganda, affiliate for non-
women organisations but organisations that either have some women programs or have an
interest in ICT for development, and thirdly individual members.

There were 50 organisation/affiliate members at the time of distribution, and indeed all would
have received both the online and print versions of the questionnaire. For these alone, the
response rate is 24 out of 50, representing a response rate of 48%. However, the overall
response rate based on the mailing list subscription is only 16%.

The response rate would seem to indicate the print distribution method was more effective, but it
is difficult to say who among the 50 would have responded even if they had not received the
print version.

b. Budget constraints:

As a result of these limitations, while the evaluation results cannot be perceived as a
representative sample of WOUGNET members, it is expected that we can still draw valuable
insights into the extent to which ICTs have been used as tools for information sharing and
dissemination. Furthermore, it is expected that the results will still provide valuable information
for the development and/or refinement of WOUGNET programs.

Data Summary and analyses:



1
2
3


                                                                                          6
Of the thirty-one respondents, twenty-six were from organisations based in Uganda, two from
organisations based in other African countries, two from organisations based in North America,
and one from an organisation based in Europe. Of the Ugandan-based organisations, sixteen
were women organisations, six were from organisations with programs addressing women‟s
interests and four were from organisations with community or national development goals.

In terms of gender, twenty-five of the respondents were women representing 81% and six of the
respondents were men. While the overwhelming majority of respondents from the women
organisations based in Uganda were women, the balance of women and men respondents was
fairly even among organisations with programs addressing women‟s interests or organisations
with community/national/global development goals.

Overall, the organisational mandate and development goals of the thirty-one organisations of
the respondents address a variety of issues including women entrepreneurship and economic
empowerment, health, education, violence against women and children, women and children in
armed conflict, women‟s leadership, capacity building and evaluation, religion, social and
cultural development. In addition, a number of the organisations are involved in promoting and
supporting the use of ICTs for social justice and economic development.

1.Computer equipment and training:

Because WOUGNET operates primarily online, the evaluation sought to gain insight on the
question of computer equipment and training among respondents. Of the twenty-eight
respondents to the question about the ratio of computers to organisation members/staff, two did
not have any computers at their organisations. Of the organisations with computers, ten
organisations had a computer for each person, a further eleven had between two to six people
per computer, while five organisations had a ratio of ten or more people per computer.

For twenty-three (74%) of the respondents, at least one staff member in their organisation had
received ICT training. However, only two (9%) of the respondents were from organisations in
which all staff members had received ICT training. One respondent did note that the term “ICT
training” should have been clarified.

2.WOUGNET programs: benefits and challenges:

WOUGNET membership      is defined as participation in the WOUGNET online space comprised of
the WOUGNET website    and mailing lists, but how is this membership perceived. Of the thirty
respondents to the question of whether they are WOUGNET members, while twenty-eight
answered in the affirmative, one did not know.

Respondents were further asked whether they were (a) aware of and (b) participating in a
variety of WOUGNET programs. Of thirty-one respondents, twenty-seven (87%) were aware of
the WOUGNET mailing list and of the monthly electronic WOUGNET Update Newsletter. Twenty
respondents were subscribed to the WOUGNET mailing list, and eleven to the WOUGNET Update
Newsletter. Note that subscribers on the mailing list do receive the newsletter.

By comparison, only twenty-four (77%) were aware of the WOUGNET website. Since the
WOUGNET Update Newsletter has as its primary mission to highlight new information on the
WOUGNET website, it is interesting to find out why the awareness about the website is lower than
awareness about the mailing lists.

Respondents were further asked about their awareness and participation in a number of
WOUGNET activities. Their responses are captured in Fig. 2.




                                                                                       7
Figure 2: Awareness and participation in WOUGNET programs

                16
                14
                12
                10
                 8
                 6
                 4                                                                     Aware
                 2                                                                     Participate
                 0




                                                                          ICT Policy
                                 TechTips
                     WebDesign




                                                   IARW




                                                                 FOSSFA
                                                          ISUG
                                            WSRP




The WOUGNET programs are:
Web Design – a program to develop websites for members, free of charge
TechTips – a program to address queries and topical issues regarding computers and IT in
    general
WSRP – the WorldSpace Satellite Radio Program to loan a WorldSpace radio to members for a
    period of up to three months
IARW – the online conference “Information Access for Rural Women” hosted by WOUGNET in
    June 2002
ISUG – the online forum “An Information Society for Uganda” hosted by WOUGNET in April 2003
FOSSFA – the knowledge database for the Free Software and Open Source Foundation in
    Africa for which information has been provided on the WOUGNET mailing list and there is a
    form online for those interested to submit their contacts
ICT Policy – similar to the FOSSFA activity but in this case addressing ICT policy training and
    campaigns in Africa.

In general, except in the case of ICT Policy, less than 50% of the respondents are aware of the
various activities. The participation levels are even lower. Interestingly, the online conferences
have registered the most participation. Understanding why the participation levels are the way
they are certainly deserves further investigation. Another question regards the lack of
awareness about FOSSFA, and that of the eight (26%) of respondents aware of FOSSFA, none
were participating in the program. Free Software and Open Source solutions are widely
regarded as being very important for developing countries and for NGOs, so it is important to
understand this apparent lack of interest. The over-arching question would be why are some
programs better known than others while the same medium is used to provide information about
the programs.

Attention was then focused on the usage and relevancy of the WOUGNET website and mailing
lists.

3. WOUGNET website and mailing lists

a)Access to website and mailing lists:

Fig. 3 presents the frequency noted by respondents of how often they read and disseminate
postings via the WOUGNET mailing lists as well as how often they access the WOUGNET website.
In the case of access to the mailing lists, note that the number is higher than that of respondents
subscribed to the WOUGNET mailing list. This is because it includes those subscribed to the
WOUGNET Update Newsletter.

                                                                                                     8
Figure 3: Frequency of accessing WOUGNET website and mailing lists



        16
        14
        12
        10
                                                                                                         Access list
         8
                                                                                                         Post to list
         6
                                                                                                         Visit website
         4
         2
         0
               Never              Rarely         Sometime          Frequently      Daily




Fig. 3 indicates that while a good percentage (87%) of the respondents are reading the
WOUGNET postings, a fair percentage (57%) are disseminating information via the lists or
visiting the website (63%) at least sometime.


Fig. 4 presents the actual number of postings to the WOUGNET mailing list – broken down by
gender. Because the Coordinator makes the majority of postings, these numbers are presented
separately. In general, the number of postings by the Coordinator and by men has remained
about the same or decreased over the period, however one notes an increase of postings by
women during 2003 as compared to 2002.

Figure 4: Number of postings to the WOUGNET mailing list by gender

              90
              80
              70
              60
              50
              40                                                                           Women
              30                                                                           Men
              20
              10                                                                           Coordinator
               0
                   Jun- Jul- Aug- Sep- Oct- Nov- Dec- Jan- Feb- Mar- Apr- M Jun-
                    02 02 02 02 02 02 02 03 03 03 03 ay- 03
                                                                          03



With respect to the WOUGNET website, Fig. 5 presents the total number of site visitors per month
from June 2002 – June 2003 as measured by AWStats. The .ug (Uganda) domain consistently
ranked among the Top 25 sources of site visitors. From the figure, we note a general increase in
the number of site visitors. While the dip in number of visitors during December 2002 is to be
expected due to the holiday season, it is not immediately clear why the dip in March 2003.




                                                                                                   9
Figure 5: Visitors to WOUGNET website over period June 2002 - June 2003

  8000
  7000
  6000
  5000
  4000
  3000
  2000
  1000
     0
         Jun-02 Jul-02 Aug-02 Sep-02 Oct-02 Nov-02 Dec-02 Jan-03 Feb-03 Mar-03 Apr-03 May-03 Jun-03



b)Type of information:
Respondents were asked about the type of information they received via the mailing list. In
general, twenty-three (74%) respondents noted that the information received has been about
conferences, workshops, gender, ICT, funding and scholarship opportunities, advocacy issues
such as land, ICT policy and human rights, activities of network members and events in the
women movement worldwide.
The respondents‟ feedback correlates well with a sample of actual postings to the WOUGNET
mailing list. Table 1 is a summary of the different types of messages posted to the list for the
months May 2003 – June 2003. The numbers indicate how many of the messages were posted
by women and how many by men.
Table 1: Breakdown of postings to WOUGNET mailing list, May – June 2003
     Type of message                                         Women                          Men
     Information about projects and events                       45                                   8
     Job posting                                                 9                                    -
     Newsletters (or articles from a newsletter)                 21                                   1
     Information requests                                        8                                    -
     Tech Tips                                                   6                                    1
     Miscellaneous (responses to requests, calls for further     36                                   6
     information, administrative messages, etc.)
     Awards and scholarships                                     12                                    -
     Peace, war, violence against women                          4                                     5
     Education                                                   3                                     2
     ICT issues                                                  7                                     -
     Total postings                                             151                                   23

Fifteen (48%) respondents provided a similar listing of type of information was obtained in
response to the question about the type of information accessed via the WOUGNET website. An
additional respondent noted that they had not previously visited the website, but that one of the
board members would be visiting the website to search for information about open source
software.
Each month, a report is made of the Top Ten pages visited on the WOUGNET website. Between
200 - 400 pages were visited each month over the period June 2002 to June 2003. The Top Ten
report also includes a list of all organisation profiles visited during a given month. This report is
posted to the WOUGNET mailing list. The Top Ten list excludes the home page, which is always
the most visited page each month. Table 2 presents the list of pages that have featured in the
Top Ten report and their frequency. The pages are listed by different categories used on the
WOUGNET website. In general, we note that the frequency of most-visited categories tallies well
with feedback respondents. Overall, the most frequently visited pages are “Women
Organisations in Uganda”, “Documents on Women‟s Issues in Uganda”, and “Project News and
Events”.
Table 2: Frequency of pages featured in monthly Top Ten report
      Page featured in Top Ten listing                                                       Frequency

                                                                                                      10
     Women in Uganda
     Women Organisations in Uganda                                                        13
     http://www.wougnet.org/wo_dir.html
     Documents on Women’s Issues in Uganda                                                13
     http://www.wougnet.org/documents.html
     Women in Parliament                                                                   9
     http://www.wougnet.org/parliament.html

     ICT Policy
     WSIS Gender Caucus (home page)                                                        6
     http://www.wougnet.org/WSIS/wsisgc.html
     WSIS Gender Caucus: Integrating Gender perspectives into the WSIS                     3
     http://www.wougnet.org/WSIS/globalpartnership.html
     Free Software and Open Source in Africa                                               3
     http://www.wougnet.org/ICTpolicy/opensource.html

     Project News & Events
     Project News & Events                                                                13
     http://www.wougnet.org/Events/projectnews03.html
     Events: Online Conference – Information Access for Rural Women                        1
     http://www.wougnet.org/Events/iarw.html
     Events: Conference Discussion Messages – Information Access for Rural Women           1
     http://www.wougnet.org/Events/iarwdiscuss.html

     Links & Resources
     Links: ICT-related organisations                                                     12
     http://www.wougnet.org/Links/ictresources.html
     Links: Women & Gender                                                                12
     http://www.wougnet.org/Links/women…/html
     Links: African & International Women Organisations                                   10
     http://www.wougnet.org/Links/africa_int.html
     Links: Education                                                                     10
     http://www.wougnet.org/Links/education.html
     Links: Development                                                                    8
     http://www.wougnet.org/Links/development.html
     Links: Agriculture                                                                    4
     http://www.wougnet.org/Links/agriculture.html
     Links: Human Rights                                                                   3
     http://www.wougnet.org/Links/rights.html
     Links: Business                                                                       1
     http://www.wougnet.org/Links/business.html
     Links: HIV/AIDS (Established May 2003)                                                1
     http://www.wougnet.org/Links/hivaids.html
     CD-ROM – Rural Women in Africa: Ideas for Earning Money                               1
     http://www.wougnet.org/News/cdupdate.html
     Selected List of Fellowship, Scholarship, Grant and Other Training Opportunities      1
     http://www.wougnet.org/Links/education.html#GRANTS



c)Relevancy of information:
Of twenty-five respondents to the question as to whether they were satisfied with the content on
the website and mailing list, twenty-one (84%) noted they were satisfied and four (16%) noted
that there were not satisfied. Probing further, Fig. 6 presents the relevancy of information posted
to the lists as noted by twenty-six respondents.

Figure 6: Relevancy of information posted to mailing list (26 respondents)
                                                                                          11
       14
       12
       10
        8
        6
        4
        2
        0
             Not useful     Fairly useful    Useful       Very useful



Only 38% find the information very useful, while 50% find it useful, 7% find it fairly useful and
3% not useful. In response to the question about the type of information that should be posted
to the website and mailing list, five respondents noted the following:
Information should be grouped according to common interests
Provide information on women, adolescents and children‟s health
Provide information about job opportunities
Provide information about debatable parliamentary issues in Uganda
Provide information in local languages on tips for using ICTs in business
Regarding the WOUGNET website, there are a number of forms via which site visitors can
register their interest in various areas:

Add Link: http://www.wougnet.org/addlink.html
Business organisation Form: http://www.wougnet.org/Forms/bizform.html
Free Software and Open Source in Africa – FOSSFA (Established November 2002):
   http://www.wougnet.org/ICTpolicy/opensource.html
IARW Conference Registrations (May - June 2002): http://www.wougnet.org/Events/iarw.html
ICT Policy Training/Campaigns (Established November 2002):
   http://www.wougnet.org/ICTpolicy/ictpolicy.html
ISUG Forum Registrations (March - May 2003): http://www.wougnet.org/WSIS/ug/isug.html
Uganda National ICT Directory (Established May 2003):
   http://www.wougnet.org/ICTpolicy/nationalictdir.html
Women organisation Form: http://www.wougnet.org/Forms/orgform.html
WSIS Gender Caucus (WGC) Registration: http://www.wougnet.org/Forms/wsisform.html

The number of submissions for the various areas can be used as an indicator of relevancy. Note
that submission via the WOUGNET website is not limited to WOUGNET members, and so these
figures are not necessarily representative of WOUGNET members. This is clearly evident when
the case of FOSSFA is considered, while it registers a relatively large number of submissions
from the website, in fact only 26% of respondents indicated that they were aware of FOSSFA.

Fig. 7 is a breakdown by gender of the web submissions over the period June 2002 – June
2003. A „gender‟ field was not added to most forms until December 2002 and so the category
“N/S” indicates that gender is not specified or not clear simply from the name. Following the
website evaluation, all forms now have a gender field.
It is interesting to note that while more men have submitted forms for „Free Software and Open
Source in Africa‟, conversely, more women have submitted forms for „ICT Policy
Training/Campaigns‟. Also, the majority of registrations for the WSIS Gender Caucus are from
women. It should also be noted that site visitors have the option to request either the „Business
organisation‟ or „Women organisation‟ forms by email. Such requests have not been counted
here, as it is not clear whether the request was generated directly from the website.




                                                                                        12
Figure 7: Breakdown by gender of submissions from WOUGNET website


  80

  70

  60

  50

  40

  30

  20

  10

   0
          Add Link Business FOSSFA                          IARW   ICT Policy   ISUG      ICT    Women   WGC
                                                                                       Directory  Org.

                                                              Women     Men     N/S


d)Information sharing mechanisms:
Respondents were asked about how information is shared within their organisations and with
other organisations. Fig. 8 shows the various options as noted by twenty-nine (94%)
respondents, and it should be noted that some organisations use a variety of options identified.
Figure 8: Means by which organisations share information
                                                   ns
                                                io
                                             at
                                          ic
                                       bl

                                      io
                                    Pu

                                    ad
                                  R
                               gs
                            tin
                          ee
                        M

                       rs
                     te
                  et
               sl
          ew


             l
          ai
         N

       Em




                                                        0    5           10            15        20        25



4. Benefits of access to the WOUGNET website and mailing lists:


                                                                                                                13
Respondents have realized a variety of benefits from accessing the WOUGNET website and
mailing lists. Fig. 9 presents the number of
affirmative responses to five major areas: communication, networking, advocacy, outreach,
participation, and awareness. Furthermore, respondents noted the following benefits:
Being updated on a variety of issues and being able to share this information with partners
Increased awareness and participation in ICT related activities
Obtained a variety of information: training opportunities, workshops and conferences, funding
     opportunities
Even while out of Uganda, have learnt about what is happening in Uganda in education,
     government, health and ICT
Opportunity to learn from each other
Been contacted as a result of having their information available on WOUGNET website
Been able to get contacts for other organisations of potential interest
Ease of communication within Uganda and to worldwide audience
Networking with other organisations to avoid duplication of efforts
Advocacy to change the situation of the majority poor women and to promote ICTs for rural
     areas
Fast response to available opportunities
Networking has helped to find local qualified applicants and agencies in areas of interest
Communication has helped teach new tricks on the market.

Figure 9: Major areas WOUGNET mailing lists and website have been of benefit


                     18
                     16
                     14
                     12
                     10
                      8
                      6
                      4
                      2
                      0
                                                                                             Awareness
                                                                  Outreach
                                          Networking

                                                       Advocacy




                                                                                                         Other
                                                                             Participation
                          Communication




Lessons Learn:

5. Challenges accessing/using WOUGNET website and mailing lists:

Of twenty-two respondents, twelve (54%) noted challenges with accessing the WOUGNET
website and mailing lists. Challenges noted include:
organisation lacks computers and/or internet access, and options such as internet cafes are
    very expensive
Information dissemination is limited because not all members of organisation/network have
    internet access
Too much information, not all of which is relevant to organisation‟s needs
Difficulty repackaging information to suit needs of organisation‟s target audience
Some information is too technical
Time constraints due to the need to travel 50 km in order to access internet services
How to make use of the information provided and follow-up on the various opportunities
    identified

                                                                                                                 14
6. Recommendations for WOUGNET:

Respondents were asked for recommendations on how WOUGNET can improve service delivery
and how WOUGNET can promote the use of ICTs among members. Respondents called for ICT
awareness and training sessions, greater networking among members, consideration of other
modes of information sharing/dissemination – targeting rural access in particular, and support in
acquiring ICT equipment and internet services. The following recommendations were made:
Provide more information about donor agencies that assist CBOs/NGOs to acquire ICT
   equipment and training.
Diversify the mechanisms used to dissemination information. In particular, consider
   mechanisms to reach out to women with no access to the internet.
Provide information that is relevant to the nature of work of a given organisation.
Facilitate networking with like-minded organisations
Procure computers and other ICT equipment for use by members
Provide ICT training for members and grassroots organisations
Conduct awareness training sessions to encourage more women to utilize WOUGNET services
   to share information about their activities as well as for networking and advocacy
Encourage members to regularly update their profiles on the WOUGNET website
Facilitate closer networking among members and more interaction with WOUGNET staff
Continue to provide techtips to prevent members being conned by people who use the internet
   to take advantage of NGOs especially women organisations.
Solicit funding to facilitate rural-based organisations acquire internet access at their respective
   locations
Make use of the D-groups platform
Send reminders to NGOs to post their news on the WOUGNET website and mailing list
Physically follow-up with members to track new developments and changes in contact
   information.
Promote the use of local language, either by encouraging members to post in local languages
   or by translating information to local languages.
Provide advice on cheap internet services.

Respondents were invited to provide any additional comments. In general the comments noted
that WOUGNET had contributed to the visibility of Ugandan women‟s issues and had promoted
the women‟s cause in Uganda. Information provided has been repackaged for further
dissemination by alternative means such as radio and print publications. The need for more
local content and information in local languages was emphasized. In addition, it was noted that
while WOUGNET is very beneficial to all its members, active participation is limited to a few and
therefore more work is needed to enable more members to participate actively.

Way Forward:

- Process of change does not happen in leaps and bound.
- Poverty is an issue
- If they need they respond

ICT Policy of Uganda:

The development of rual communications is of great importance to UCC. Operators have been
required, directly through the licence rollout obligations, to attend to rural communication
development. UCC has set up and manages the Rural Communication Development Funds
(RCDF). The fund, while limited, will be used to leverage investment in rural communications
through competitive private sector bidding.



The Commission also hopes to encourage:

                                                                                           15
           -Policy conductive to rural telecommunications development.
           -Technology choices appropriate for rural areas;
           -Models for serving rural and isolated communities;
           -Financial tools for rural telecommunications development and expansion.

Mission of the Policy:

The mission of the policy is “to support the development of communications infrastructure in
rural Uganda and ensure that people in rural areas have reasonable and affordable access to
communications services”.

National Operators:

Different categories of licenses have been identified in the sector under the current licensing
regime. The first category is that of National Operators. One national operator, Uganda Post
Limited (UPL) has been licensed to provide postal services in Uganda. Further detail of the
postal half of the sector can be found on the postal service page.

On the telecommunications side, two national operators have been lincesed, Uganda Telecom
Limited (UTL) and MTN Uganda Limited. These are licensed to provide the full range of
communications services

The mission of the policy is “to support the development of communications infrastructure in
rural Uganda and ensure that people in rural areas have reasonable and affordable access to
communication services”

Objectives of the policy:
- Bring access to basic communication to all sub country level in Uganda or to every community,
which as a population of at least 5,000 in habitants, by the year 2005.
- Ensure effective utilization of the rural communication development fund (RCDF) for rural
communication development.
- Promote information and communication technologies (ICT) use in Uganda.
- Promote communication in rural areas as a profitable business.


Conclusion:

In conclusion, the preliminary results obtained so far from the survey indicated that a number of
organisations are aware and participate in the mailing list and website though a limited number
access the website (Appendix ‘B’-list of organisation). Majority access the mailing lists and women do
more posting to the list as shown by the figures in the above graphs. There is a general
increase in the number of website visitors.
Statistics show that less than 50% are aware of the WOUGNET various activities and there is still
low participation. Respondents also indicate that the mailing list and website have been
beneficial in their work though some have had challenges like lack of computer, to much
information being posted, time constraint e.t.c.




                                                                                             16
Appendix ‘A’ - Questionnaire


a) WOUGNET Evaluation Questionnaire

INTRODUCTION:
Women of Uganda Network (WOUGNET) would like to evaluate the impact of Email and Web
technologies on women’s organisations in promoting Information Sharing and Outreach. This is intended
to evaluate users of the WOUGNET mailing list and website. The outcome of the evaluation will help
WOUGNET design programmes and activities that will be beneficial to the users.
Please spare 10 minutes and answer this questionnaire.

ORGANISATION’S BACKGROUND

1.a) Name of the Organisation:
    ………………………………………………………………………………………….
    b) Mission of the Organisation
    …………………………………………………………………………………………
    ………………………………………………………………………………………….
    c) Name of person responding
    …………………………………………………………………………………………..
    d) Position held in the organisation
    ………………………………………………………………………………………….

   e) Number of staff in your organisation who have received ICT training
   …………………………………………………………………………………………..
   f) What is the ratio of computers to members in your organisation?
   ………………………………………………………………………………………….

   g) Is your Organisation subscribed to WOUGNET? YES/NO
   h) If yes, when did it become a member of the Network?
   …………………………………………………………………………………………..

WOUGNET ACTIVITIES/SERVICES

2.Place a tick in the column of WOUGNET activities/services that you are aware of and/or participate(d)
    in.

 Activity/Service                                  Aware of activity    Participate in activity
 WOUGNET mailing list
 WOUGNET Update Newsletter
 WOUGNET website
 organisation profile on WOUGNET website
 WebDesign program
 TechTips program
 WorldSpace Satellite Radio Program
 Conference: Information Access for Rural Women
 Forum: An Information Society for Uganda
 Database: Free Software and Open Source in Africa
 ICT Policy Campaigns and Training in Africa




                                                                                                  17
WOUGNET WEBSITE/MAILING LIST

3 (i) Mailing List
a)How often do you read messages from the WOUGNET mailing list?

    _ Rarely              _    Sometimes               _    Frequently              _    Daily

b)What type of information do you receive via the mailing list?
………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

c)How relevant is the information to your program?

    _ Not useful          _    Fairly useful           _    Useful             _   Very useful

d)Does your organisation disseminate information via the WOUGNET mailing list?

    _ Rarely              _    Sometimes               _    Frequently              _    Daily

e)What type of information do you disseminate?
………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

f)How do you share information in your organisation as well as other organisations?
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

3.(ii) Website

a)Do you access the WOUGNET website?

    _ Rarely              _    Sometimes               _    Frequently              _    Daily

b)If you do access the WOUGNET website, what type of information do you access
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

RELEVANCE OF CONTENT

4.Are some members of your organisation subscribed to WOUGNET mailing list? YES/NO

a)If yes, how have they benefited?
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

b)What major areas have the mailing list and website helped your organisation and how?
i) Communication ………………………………………………………………………..
ii) Networking ……………………………………………………………………………
iii) Advocacy ……………………………………………………………………………..
iv) Outreach ………………………………………………………………………………
v) Participation ……………………………………………………………………………
vi) Awareness ……………………………………………………………………………..
vii) Other …………………………………………………………………………………

c)Are you satisfied with content on the website and the mailing list? YES/NO

d)If no, what type of information should be posted on the mailing list and website
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
……………………………………………………………………………………………….

                                                                                                 18
CHALLENGES ACCESSING/USING WOUGNET SERVICES

5.a) Do you experience any challenges in accessing WOUGNET services? YES/NO

 b) What are these challenges?
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR WOUGNET

6 a) Recommend action(s) for WOUGNET to improve service delivery and to promote use of ICTs
among membership organisations as a way of information sharing and dissemination.
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 b) Any other comment(s)?
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

You can return the questionnaire using any of the convenient means to you as follows:

By Postage: WOUGNET, P.O Box 4411, Kampala.
By Fax: (041) 234924
By Email: info@wougnet.org
Drop off: Room 13, Plot 59 Nkurumah Road (NDA building)




                                                                                        19
Appendix ‘B’- list of organisations:

WOUGNET organisations

NAME OF ORGANISATION                                                    PLACE
1. Akina Mama wa Afrika-Uganda (AMwA-U)                                 Kampala
2. ALFA Women's Groups                                                  Kampala
3. The Association of Uganda Women Lawyers - FIDA (U)                   Kampala
4. Association of Uganda Women Medical Doctors (AUWMD)                  Kampala
5. Council for Economic Empowerment for Women in Africa - Uganda (CEEWA-Kampala
UGANDA)
6. Crisis Pregnancy & Counseling Center (CPCC)                                    Kampala
7. Disabled Women in Development (DIWODE-Uganda)                                  Kampala
8. Eastern African Sub-regional Support Initiative for the Advancement of Women   Kampala
(EASSI)
9. Forum for African Women Educationalists - Uganda (FAWEU)                       Kampala
10. Forum for Women in Democracy (FOWODE)                                         Kampala
11. Gender Advisory Board Africa Region Secretariat                               Kampala
12. Hope After Rape (HAR)                                                          Kampala
13. Isis-Women's International Cross Cultural Exchange (Isis-WICCE)               Kampala
14. Kassanda Development Initiative (KADI)                                        Mityana
15. Kyakabadiima Women's Group                                                    Kampala
16. Law and Advocacy for Women in Uganda (LAW-U)                                  Kampala
17. Lungujja Women's Association (L.W.A)                                          Kampala
18. The Mifumi Project                                                            Tororo
19. Nakaseke Women's Development Association (NAWODA)-                            Luwero
20. Nakazadde Ward Women Development Association (NAWDA)                          Kampala
21. Namalemba Bugweri Association (NABA) –                                        Jinja
22. National Association of Women organisations in Uganda (NAWOU)                 Kampala
23. National Community of Women Living with HIV/AIDS in Uganda (NACWOLA)          Kampala
24. Ntulume Village Women's Development Association (NVIWODA)                     Kampala
25. Rurama Women's Handicraft Society (RWHS)                                      Fort Portal
26. Safe Motherhood Initiative in Uganda (SMIU)                                   Kampala
27. Slum Aid Project (SAP) -                                                      Kampala
28. Uganda Gender Resource Center (UGRC)                                          Kampala
29. Uganda Media Women's Association (UMWA)                                       Kampala
30. Uganda Muslim Women Vision (UMWV)                                             Kampala
31. Uganda Private Midwives Association (UPMA)                                    Kampala
32. Uganda Women Entrepreneurs Association (UWEAL)                                Kampala
33. Uganda Women's Network (UWONET)                                               Kampala
34. Uganda Women Tree Planting Movement (UWTPM)                                   Kampala
35. Uganda Women Writers Association (FEMRITE)                                    Kampala
36. Women and Children's Crisis Center (WCC)                                      Kampala
37. Women Engineers, Technicians and Scientists in Uganda (WETSU)                 Kampala
38. Women in Law and Development in Africa - Uganda Chapter (WiLDAF- U)           Kampala
39 Women's Organisation for Development and Conflict Resolution (WODREC)          Kampala
40. Agency for Sustainable Development Initiatives (ASDI)                         Apac
41. Child Development Foundation (CDF)                                            Mbale
AFFILIATE MEMBERS
42. Computers for Africa (CFA) - USA                                              USA
43. Potential Resource Centre (PRC)
44. Rapha Outreach Ministries (ROM)                                               Mbale
45. Development Training and Research Center (DETREC)                             Lira
46. Uganda Community Based Association for Child Welfare (UCOBAC)                 Kampala




                                                                                        20

				
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