Writing a Query Letter for Essays

Document Sample
Writing a Query Letter for Essays Powered By Docstoc
					Master of Professional Writing 
Spring 2009 Course Summaries 


ALL EMPHASES: Counts toward major units of all emphases 

990: Thesis Preparation (Catalogue Title: Directed Research) (3 units) 

Students in their next­to­last semester take 3 units of 990 to prepare their final project 
with faculty direction. 

Instructors:  Madelyn Cain, Syd Field, Judith Freeman, Amy Gerstler, Coleman Hough, 
Dinah Lenney, MG Lord, Gina Nahai, Gabrielle Pina, John Rechy, Aram Saroyan, Jason 
Squire, Rita Williams, Lee Wochner 


994: Professional Writing Project (3 units) 

Students in their last semester take 3 units of 994 to complete their final project with 
faculty direction.  If the final project is not complete by the due date, students must take 
an additional 3 units of 994 each semester until the project is complete. 

Instructors:  Madelyn Cain, Syd Field, Judith Freeman, Amy Gerstler, Coleman Hough, 
Dinah Lenney, MG Lord, Gina Nahai, Gabrielle Pina, Aram Saroyan, Jason Squire, Rita 
Williams, Lee Wochner 



INTERNSHIP: Counts toward appropriate units 


990: Internship (Catalogue Title: Directed Research) (1 unit) 

For those students interning for credit.  Prior approval required.




                                                                                                1 
EITHER MAJOR OR ELECTIVE: Can count towards major OR elective units 

910: The Literary Marketplace: Artistic and Financial Approaches to Sustaining 
Yourself as a Working Writer 

The goal of this class is to convey to you a realistic understanding of the business of 
writing, and to give you the tools with which to navigate that world. I will lecture on a 
number of topics that pertain to creating and sustaining a literary career.  Lectures will be 
bolstered by outside reading.  Students will be expected to give presentations on the 
readings that we will cover in class.  I will also invite agents, editors, booksellers and 
book festival organizers to address the class. You will be expected to work on, and 
produce a good query letter, as well as an effective synopsis of your book, or of a book 
that you would like to adapt.  We will spend some time developing these and, if they’re 
ready, you will have a chance to pitch them to our guest lecturers.  You will also present 
on the career path of a contemporary writer (of your own choosing.... or as assigned by 
the instructor).  While this class is most directly applicable to writers in nonfiction, 
fiction and screenwriting, poets and playwrights also have much to learn from these 
areas. 

Topics that we will cover will include: How to go about finding an agent and what to 
expect of him or her; How to write an effective query letter and a good synopsis for 
Fiction/Non­Fiction; How to find the right publisher for your book; What happens after 
you have sold your book; What role does an editor play in your career; Your publishing 
contract; How to market your book; Self­publishing, Vanity Presses, Print­on­demand; 
Writers’ Conferences/Networking/Teaching. 

Instructor: Gina Nahai 


950: Structural and Functional Writing for the Marketplace (Catalogue Title: 
Technical Writing) 

This course is for writing students in all genres, as well as students in other disciplines 
who are required to write in their professions. Class instruction emphasizes practical 
skills and knowledge that will maximize success in the marketplace; the class format 
promotes writing habits—discipline, organization, and attention to detail—that will 
enhance careers. Topics highlight professional writing requirements of the current 
marketplace: functional writing, critical thinking, grammar and punctuation, document 
development, and editing. The course is fast­paced and has a significant workload. Short 
exercises are assigned each week; tests and in­class exercises are given periodically 
throughout the semester. Specific writing projects (grant proposals, brochures, 
PowerPoint demonstrations, press releases and résumés) give students professional 
writing samples and provide an opportunity to apply class lessons to documents that are 
widely used in the marketplace. The course has a lecture format with some discussion. 
Individual consultations are scheduled to discuss projects and writing needs. Good class 
attendance is essential. 

Instructor: Barbara Pawley




                                                                                            2 
999: Writers & Their Influences (Catalogue Title: Special Topics) 

The etymology of the word influence is: “the exertion of force from a distance.” 
Influence is the power or capacity of causing an effect in indirect or intangible ways. 
Andre Malraux posits that every young writer’s heart “is a graveyard in which are 
inscribed the names of a few thousand dead artists but whose only actual denizens are a 
few mighty, often antagonistic giants.”  Malraux’s utterance is at the crux of Harold 
Bloom’s classic text “The Anxiety of Influence,” and we’ll look at both definitions. 
We’ll also read Jonathan Lethem’s reply to Bloom, an essay entitled “The Ecstasy of 
Influence,” as well as T.S. Eliot’s essay “Tradition and the Individual Talent.” Weekly 
exercises will give us the opportunity to explore our own examples/occasions. 

This seminar/workshop will be a consideration of influence through both creative and 
critical responses and writing exercises. The goals of the class are to generate and to 
revise new writing and to consider each text on its own terms. Each student will write and 
revise one short piece (20­25 pages) off of an "influence." (We are considering poetry, 
fiction, nonfiction, plays and one screenplay, and students may write in any of these 
genres). 

Writers (and their influences) that we’ll consider will include: Charles Darwin and 
Elizabeth Bishop (Darwin’s writing influenced Bishop’s poetic practice);  Samuel 
Beckett and Harold Pinter (we’ll read/view Beckett’s PLAY and Pinter’s BETRAYAL); 
Flannery O’Connor and Helena Maria Viramontes (O’Connor’s short stories and 
Viramontes’ short stories); Isaac Babel and Denis Johnson (interconnected stories);  Paul 
Celan and Heather McHugh (translation); John Gay and Bertolt Brecht (we’ll read and 
view Gay’s THE BEGGAR’s OPERA; as well as Brecht’s 3 PENNY OPERA; Jane 
Campion and Charles Perrault (Campion’s screenplay THE PIANO and Perrault’s 
fairytale BLUEBEARD; and Hunter S. Thompson and Sandra Tsing Loh (“gonzo” 
journalism). 

Most of the readings will be hand­outs. Students will be encouraged to attend out­of­class 
events: one play (BEGGAR’s OPERA, @ USC), two off­campus readings 
(DARWIN/BISHOP at the Natural History Museum; Heather McHugh at LACMA) 
and/or one on­campus reading (HM Viramontes at USC). 

Instructor: Brighde Mullins 


999: Integrating Performance Technique as Narrative Strategy (Catalogue Title: 
Special Topics) 

What happens when a writer attempts to render the verisimilitude of a murderer’s 
thoughts?  He may undertake research ­­ serial killer profiles, abnormal psyche texts and 
such.  He may even have met someone in his peer group whose hostility inspires him. 
But if he has not undertaken the right kind of research, he may come up with a dry cliché 
with little to no true power.  He may even become blocked altogether, and hop on to the 
next shallow project because he can’t write characters strong enough to carry a narrative. 
The problem here is two­fold—both his interior and exterior research remains 
insufficient.  In this course, we’ll explore the way in which the series of exercises 
Konstantin Stanislavsky developed for the actor to solve this particular problem apply 
just as well for the written word.

                                                                                           3 
Instructor: Rita Williams 



999: Real Stories: The Nonfiction Narrative (Catalogue title: Special Topics) 

From the personal essay to the memoir to the think piece to the nonfiction novel, writers 
often tell stories based on fact.  How does the nonfiction writer’s approach differ from the 
fiction writer’s?  This course explores the various ways writers tell true stories.  The class 
will also consider how the techniques of fiction can be successfully applied in works of 
nonfiction.  The student will learn to distinguish between the different approaches 
possible and the reasons one approach may prove more rewarding than another. 
Assignments will explore specific techniques in detail, so that the student will acquire a 
professional’s understanding of how the various nonfiction genres are practiced. 

Instructor: Aram Saroyan




                                                                                             4 
FICTION 


940: Techniques of Fiction Writing: Exploring the Possibilities of Perception & 
Language (Catalogue Title: Literature and Approaches to Writing the Novel) 

The nuts and bolts of fiction writing will be addressed issue by issue, tool by tool, 
through lecture and in­class exercises.  Some of the issues which will be covered in detail 
include: story, scene, character and point of view, dialogue and conflict, landscape, the 
senses and the art of the sentence. 

Instructor: Janet Fitch 


990: Film and Approaches to Writing the Novel (Catalogue Title: Directed Research) 

John Rechy will be offering a special, one­unit five­session version of this course on 
campus for the advanced fiction student.  Prior program approval required. 

From a writer's point of view, students view classic films by Bergman, Buñuel, Wilder, 
and others, with the intent of transforming images into imagery (visual effects into 
narrative effects).  Prior program approval required.  Graded Credit/No Credit. 

Instructor: John Rechy 


960: Fiction Workshop 

Students prepare material and analyze materials in the fiction workshop format.  In the 
process, students concentrate on plot and story development, structure, point of view, 
movement, and creating a useful outline.  Other aspects include concentration on the 
power of the sentence, the dramatic scene as the double root of great literary fiction, 
dialogue, dramatic action, gesture, and characterization. 

Instructors: Judith Freeman, Gina Nahai, Gabrielle Pina 


999: Science as Culture: Drosophila (Fruit Flies) on the Laboratory Wall (Catalogue 
Title: Special Topics) 

On one level, this course will be an introduction to science writing.   Students will learn 
some nuts­and­bolts concepts related to pitching a science article as well as how to 
construct a finished assignment.  In the last decade, novelists and playwrights have 
increasingly looked to the history of science for their material.  We will examine some 
results of their efforts with an eye toward broadening our approaches to storytelling. 
During the term, students will complete a writing exercise, a query letter and a magazine­ 
length science article­­one that not only contains accurate facts but also reflects the 
stylistic and technical insights gained from the reading assignments. 

Instructor: M.G. Lord


                                                                                           5 
NONFICTION 


925: Writing the Non­Fiction Book (Catalogue Title: Advanced Non­Fiction Writing) 

925:  Writing the Nonfiction Book 

This course is for anyone wishing to write a nonfiction book. All nonfiction books are 
sold via a book proposal. In this course students will find the unique focus of their book, 
identify their competition, define their market, prepare a promotion al plan, write a 
précis, develop chapter outlines, create an author’s biography, polish one (or two) 
chapters, compose a short verbal pitch, draft a query letter, and learn how to find agents, 
research, and interview. 

Each week, students will workshop their chapter (s).  By the end of the semester students 
will have a completed and revised book proposal.  The chapter outlines, along with the 
completed chapters, serve as the foundation for the student’s book. 

Instructor: Madelyn Cain (Inglese) 


999: Memoir (Catalogue Title: Special Topics) 

The best first person narratives are as much about "the who" as "the what"; as in who's 
telling the story and why. Over the course of the semester we’ll read a sampling from the 
genre ­­ several books, as well as excerpts and stand­alone essays ­­ which students will 
be expected to discuss together in class. Additionally, I'll assign each student a memoir I 
think has some sort of direct relationship to his or her work, having to do with structure, 
content, or voice. Meanwhile, students will be writing in and out of class with a view 
towards developing both approach and material. You'll discover that regardless of how 
sensational or ordinary the recollected events, its reflection and self­discovery that makes 
a memoir jump off the page. Your goal as a writer is to dig deep and get personal with a 
view towards honing your unique literary voice as well as your reasons for telling your 
story. Each student will be expected to workshop at least two pieces during the semester, 
and should finish the course with two self­contained essays; or two chapters, for those 
working on a book­length project. 

Instructor: Dinah Lenney (Mills) 


999: Life is on the Record: Literary Nonfiction in Print and On­line (Catalogue Title: 
Special Topics) 

From the regular, newsy dispatches of Janet Flanner, writing as Genêt from Paris, to the 
time­lapse diaries of Joan Didion in late­sixties Hawaii and Donald Richie in pre­bubble 
Japan, this class will look at pacing, coherence, originality, style, and above all voice, and 
apply these writerly virtues to the thrillingly immediate medium of the Web. The Web is 
a place of experimentation, with no threshold to entry and as such is the ideal scratch 
paper for a workshop. Documenting their own lives and observations, the students will 
chart internal and external geographies, considering factors like physical location as a 
means of establishing psychological perspective (edges, shores, and margins featuring in 
the reading material). The class will focus on the transformation of fleeting experience
                                                                                             6 
into literary work, and give students an opportunity to attempt several modes of writing, 
off and on­line, to find a medium where they can be compelling, fresh, and seductive. 

Instructor: Dana Goodyear 


999: Science as Culture: Drosophila (Fruit Flies) on the Laboratory Wall (Catalogue 
Title: Special Topics) 

On one level, this course will be an introduction to science writing.   Students will learn 
some nuts­and­bolts concepts related to pitching a science article as well as how to 
construct a finished assignment.  In the last decade, novelists and playwrights have 
increasingly looked to the history of science for their material.  We will examine some 
results of their efforts with an eye toward broadening our approaches to storytelling. 
During the term, students will complete a writing exercise, a query letter and a magazine­ 
length science article­­one that not only contains accurate facts but also reflects the 
stylistic and technical insights gained from the reading assignments. 

Instructor: M.G. Lord




                                                                                             7 
SCREENPLAY/TELEVISION 


999: Screenplay Writing B (Catalogue Title: Special Topics) 

In this advanced screenwriting class, students rigorously pursue the craft of professional 
screenwriting in the context of the American motion picture industry.  Some will be 
completing the second half of a screenplay begun in a prior class; others will be 
completing the first half of a new, original screenplay (after completing a beat­sheet). 
The emphasis is on careful writing, cinematic thinking, and economy of language, all 
analyzed under the open scrutiny of a workshop environment.  Pages are due in three­ 
week cycles, as students learn how to give and take constructive suggestions while 
solving a wide range of writing issues brought to the table within the assignments. Taken 
twice, the student will have completed an advanced full­length screenplay suitable for re­ 
writing. 

Instructor: Syd Field 


999: Short Film (Catalogue Title: Special Topics) 

The short film is a poem, a prayer, a point, a portrait.  The purpose of this course is to 
investigate the form, transforming your ideas into wildly imaginative narratives and non­ 
narratives. 

Through guided writing exercises and creating an elaborate, detailed writer's notebook, 
you will access the square footage of your imagination and recognize patterns and themes 
of your life.  We will screen short films in and out of class.  By course's end, you will 
have written 5 polished short scripts to launch you as you begin establishing relationships 
with directors, producers and actors.  Come to this class with a thick empty notebook 
prepared to fill it with a palette of ideas and details you will refer to for the rest of your 
writing life. 

Instructor: Coleman Hough 


460: Adaptation for Stage & Screen (Catalogue Title: Playwright’s Workshop) 

This course is an exploration of dramatic adaption and how adapting works for stage or 
screen best serves source material by honoring­ rather than mimicking­ that source 
material.  We will explore through close readings and/or viewing of existing adaptations 
and their sources. Is adaptation all about reshaping the source material's inherent structure 
to "suit" the stage or screen? Not necessarily. Is a "faithful" adaptation faithful because it 
mirrors its source material's plot? Emphatically, no. These and other questions will be 
addressed. Students will be required to write a short (15­20 pp) dramatic adaptation by 
the end of the semester. A choice of short stories and/or narrative poems to adapt will be 
provided to students. 

Instructor: Phyllis Nagy



                                                                                             8 
PLAYWRITING 


460: Adaptation for Stage & Screen (Catalogue Title: Playwright’s Workshop) 

This course is an exploration of dramatic adaption and how adapting works for stage or 
screen best serves source material by honoring­ rather than mimicking­ that source 
material.  We will explore through close readings and/or viewing of existing adaptations 
and their sources. Is adaptation all about reshaping the source material's inherent structure 
to "suit" the stage or screen? Not necessarily. Is a "faithful" adaptation faithful because it 
mirrors its source material's plot? Emphatically, no. These and other questions will be 
addressed. Students will be required to write a short (15­20 pp) dramatic adaptation by 
the end of the semester. A choice of short stories and/or narrative poems to adapt will be 
provided to students. 

Instructor: Phyllis Nagy




                                                                                             9 
POETRY 


970: Principles of Poetic Techniques 

This class will focus on the use and/or re­invention of certain classic poetic forms and the 
invention of new forms by non­formalist, i.e. free verse, poets. Special attention will be 
paid to how the use of these forms frees the poets to insert and to generate seemingly 
random elements which, through juxtaposition and the other alchemical devices of the 
poem, yield startling new meanings. Attention will also be paid to the use of non­poetic 
forms in making poems; including the poem as a personal letter, the poem as a cover 
letter, and even the poem as a graduation address. The readings in the class will be used 
to provide assignments that will hopefully give students the sort of structural constraints 
that can so often obviate any kind of writer's block and free a writer to make discoveries 
that would otherwise have been impossible. Class time will be divided close to evenly 
between discussion of readings and workshopping of student poems; erring probably on 
the side of workshopping. Poets discussed will include John Ashbery, Ted Berrigan, 
Noelle Kocot, Lewis Warsh, Chelsey Minnis, Eileen Myles, Dean Young and others. 

Instructor: Anthony McCann 


980: Advanced Poetry Workshop: The Delights of Scrutiny: Close Readings 

Hopefully, there will not be any actual eating of manuscripts in this class, but rather 
thoughtful consumption and constructive exploration of each other’s work and the course 
texts.  Students from all literary disciplines are welcome and encouraged to attend, 
to contribute their thoughts and expertise to the inter­texual mix. 

Each student will have their work (poems) read and discussed multiple times during the 
term. The workshop will emphasize close readings of students’ poems, published poetry 
and essays on poetic craft and other literary issues. Essays we’ll read will include critic 
Helen Vendler’s thoughts on how to explicate and describe a poem, examples of close 
readings by various published poets, writing on humor in poetry, obsession in poetry, 
prose poetry and other topics. Various writing exercises will be suggested to help get 
creative juices flowing. 

Some of the published poems we will read inhabit the interesting borderlands between 
poetry and prose. The goal is for this to be a poetry and prose writer friendly poetry 
workshop, in which all students are encouraged to stretch their writing and ideas about 
what poetry is and can do, and students from different writing genres can each benefit 
from this opportunity for cross pollination in terms of ideas, compositional strategies, 
techniques, and viewpoints. 

Instructor: Amy Gerstler 




                                                                                  As of 10/24/08




                                                                                            10 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Writing a Query Letter for Essays document sample