BASEBALL AMERiCA

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					BASEBALL AS AMERiCA
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March 31 — September 3, 2007

Cleveland’s grand slam summer
“Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball.”
Jacques Barzun, Historian

This exhibition was organized by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, Cooperstown, New York. The national tour of Baseball as America is sponsored by Ernst & Young.

Contact: Jamie Finley Director of Marketing 216-696-3634 finleyj@glsc.org

Baseball As America Swings into Great Lakes Science Center March 31 through September 3, 2007
More than 500 Artifacts from Cooperstown on Display
Cleveland, OH – (March 29, 2007) –The most significant exhibition of baseball artifacts and history ever assembled is coming to the Great Lakes Science Center from March 31 through September 3, 2007. Baseball As America was organized by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York. The national tour of Baseball As America is sponsored by Ernst & Young, LLP. The exhibit is supported locally by the Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Indians and the Cuyahoga County Commissioners. “Baseball is truly the American game, and Cleveland is truly a baseball town,” said Linda Abraham-Silver, president and executive director of the Great Lakes Science Center. “We’re delighted to be bringing this remarkable exhibition to our region, so that everyone in Northeast Ohio and the surrounding areas – families, fans and fun-seekers alike – can explore the history and cultural impact of our national pastime, as well as discover the science and technology that underlie the game.” “Baseball and America have grown up together,” noted Jane Forbes Clark, chairman of the board of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. “In fact, the game is such an integral part of our culture that we often take for granted its deep day-to-day significance in our lives. In bringing this exhibition to people across the country, it is our hope that we can learn more about ourselves as a people with shared values, as reflected in our national game.” Admission to the blockbuster exhibition is free to Great Lakes Science Center members. Exhibition entry is $14.50 for adult non-members and $10.50 for children, and includes museum exhibits admission. More than 500 artifacts in Baseball As America illuminate America’s fascination with the game and define its impact on today’s society. Baseball As America is presented in seven thematic sections:

Our National Spirit: Visitors get a glimpse of the sport’s beginnings and how it has evolved into our national pastime. This section also explores the connection between patriotic symbolism and baseball. Ideals & Injustices: America’s promise of equal opportunity and the denial of opportunity to many over the years are explored in this area. Rooting for the Team: Delve into the traditions of the game, including hot dogs, the seventh-inning stretch, team colors, Take Me Out to the Ball Game, scorecards, fan clubs, and many other aspects of the relationship between fans and the game. Enterprise & Opportunity: In this section, the visitor is introduced to the various ways baseball has become big business since its 19th century inception. Topics include player product endorsement, advertising, ballpark business, labor unions, and the teams as businesses. Sharing a Common Culture: This section explores baseball’s influence in all aspects of popular culture – music, literature, film, and consumer products. Invention & Ingenuity: The spirit of American innovation as well as technological advances brought to the game are divulged here. These include evolution of equipment, communications technology, and the physics of baseball. Weaving Myths: The larger-than-life stories of sports legends that fuel our fascination with this game are detailed in this section. Some baseball players and ballparks have become so iconic that they transcend sport itself and become part of America’s cultural consciousness. From the game’s most “sacred relic”—the Doubleday Ball from baseball’s mythic first game in 1839—to Babe Ruth’s bat with the 28 notches he carved to mark his home runs, Baseball As America provides something for everyone: children, adults, sports fans and students of popular culture. Baseball As America premiered in New York City in March 2002 at the American Museum of Natural History. It has also appeared at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, the Cincinnati Museum Center, the Florida International Museum in St. Petersburg, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, the Missouri Historical Society in St. Louis, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the Oakland Museum of California, the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, and the Minnesota Historical Society in St. Paul. For more information on the exhibition, visit www.baseballasamerica.org. Publication: Baseball As America The exhibition is accompanied by a major publication, Baseball As America, published by the National Geographic Society. The 320-page compendium includes 45 newly commissioned and 30 classic essays, literature, and commentaries from scholars,

humorists, and writers. Baseball As America is illustrated with images of objects in the exhibition, as well as historical photographs.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum preserves history, honors excellence, and connects generations. An independent, not-for-profit educational institution dedicated to fostering an appreciation of the historical development of baseball and its impact on our culture, the Hall of Fame was established in Cooperstown, New York, in 1939 as the definitive repository of The Game’s treasures. With more than 35,000 artifacts and 2.6 million documents, recordings and photographs, the Hall of Fame displays and interprets its vast collections for a global audience. The Hall of Fame also bestows the highest individual honor awarded to players of our national pastime by marking their achievements with a plaque in the Hall of Fame Gallery. For more information about the Hall of Fame, visit its web site at www.baseballhalloffame.org or call 888-HALL-OFFAME. The Great Lakes Science Center The Great Lakes Science Center is one of the nation’s leading science and technology centers, featuring more than 400 hands-on exhibits, themed traveling exhibits, daily demonstrations and the awe-inspiring OMNIMAX Theater. The Science Center is open daily 9:30AM to 5:30PM, with discounted parking for guests in the attached 500-car garage. For more information, contact the Science Center at (216) 694-2000 or visit www.GreatScience.com.

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Contact: Jamie Finley Director of Marketing 216-696-3634 finleyj@glsc.org

Baseball As America Swings into Great Lakes Science Center March 31 through September 3, 2007
OVERVIEW OF THE EXHIBIT Baseball As America is a celebration of America’s national treasure and pastime. This is the first major exhibition that highlights the relationship between baseball and American culture. Through the exploration of a broad range of themes – including immigration, nationalism, integration, technology and popular culture – the exhibit reveals how the game has reflected and sometimes shaped American society. With more than 500 artifacts on display, the exhibition is organized in seven thematic sections that allow visitors to experience and understand the role of baseball in American culture and history. Our National Spirit Baseball is so closely identified with American ideals and identity that it often serves as an expression of patriotism. In this section, visitors get a glimpse of baseball’s evolution and its connection to patriotic symbolism. Among many key iconic artifacts, the Doubleday Ball – considered most sacred by baseball fans – is featured in this section. The first artifact displayed in the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, the Doubleday Ball was used to bolster the claim of baseball’s legendary 1839 birth in Cooperstown, N.Y. The section also highlights the “Green Light” letter, written by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Landis, January 15, 1942, in which he encourages the commissioner to keep baseball going during World War II. Ideals and Injustices This section of the exhibit focuses on the promise of equal opportunity and also places a strong emphasis on the denial of opportunity to many Americans. Visitors get a glimpse of the game’s diversity through artifacts such as a 1902 photo card from the Chicago Star Ladies’ Baseball Club, a Brooklyn Dodgers jersey worn by Jackie Robinson, and an

Atlanta Braves jersey worn by Hank Aaron on April 8, 1974, the day he hit his 715th home run, eclipsing Babe Ruth's record. Rooting for the Team This section of the exhibit explores the relationship between fans and the game. Such baseball traditions as hot dogs, the seventh-inning stretch and team colors are explored. Artifacts include an early hot dog vending bucket, Jack Norworth’s original 1908 manuscript of the lyrics for “Take Me Out to the Ball Game,” and many examples of art created by fans who have a special connection with the game. Enterprise and Opportunity This section explores the evolution of baseball as a business, the development of memorabilia as an investment, and market-driven campaigns that transform athletes into celebrities. Visitors get a chance to see up-close the T206 Honus Wagner card, one of the game’s most prized baseball cards. Also displayed here are a ticket to an 1869 game played by the first openly paid professional team, the Cincinnati Red Stockings, a ball from the second baseball game to charge admission in August 1858, and the St. Louis Browns uniform worn by 3' 7" pinch-hitter Eddie Gaedel on August 19, 1951. Creating a Common Culture Baseball images, metaphors and references permeate virtually every aspect of American society. Baseball was part of popular culture as early as the 1860s, celebrated in song, story and art. This section of the exhibit presents the Norman Rockwell painting “The Three Umpires” among many other artifacts, including the New York Knights jersey and "Wonderboy" bat used by Robert Redford as Roy Hobbs in the movie The Natural and the Rockford Peaches costume worn by Geena Davis as Dottie Hinson in the movie A League of Their Own. Invention and Ingenuity In this section, visitors see the technological advances brought to the game over the years. Relics include the first catcher's mask invented by Harvard University team captain Fred Thayer and worn by Harvard catcher James Tyng in 1877; the first padded catcher's mitt invented and worn by minor league Kansas City Blues catcher Joe Gunson in 1888; record-setting home run bats used by Babe Ruth, Roger Maris, Mark McGwire, and Sammy Sosa; and a ca.1932 microphone used by Red Barber in his first job as a broadcaster at the University of Florida. Weaving Myths Baseball players often fulfill the roles of hero and cultural icon, displaying admirable traits that resonate over time. Illustrating this concept are such artifacts as the 1952 Mickey Mantle rookie baseball card, a bumper sticker urging fans to “Save Tiger Stadium,” sheet music to “Say Hey, Willie Mays,” “Shoeless Joe” Jackson’s spikes, the trophy presented to Lou Gehrig by his New York Yankees teammates on Lou Gehrig Day, July 4, 1939, and Andy Warhol’s Pop Art painting of Tom Seaver.

Baseball As America, the most significant exhibition of baseball artifacts and history ever assembled, was organized by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York. The national tour of Baseball As America is sponsored by Ernst & Young LLP. The exhibit is sponsored by the Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Indians and Cuyahoga County Commissioners at the Great Lakes Science Center. The Great Lakes Science Center is one of the nation’s leading science and technology centers, featuring more than 400 hands-on exhibits, themed traveling exhibits, daily demonstrations and the awe-inspiring OMNIMAX Theater. The Science Center is open daily 9:30AM to 5:30PM, with discounted parking for guests in the attached 500-car garage. For more information, contact the Science Center at (216) 694-2000 or visit www.GreatScience.com. ###

Contact: Jamie Finley Director of Marketing 216-696-3634 finleyj@glsc.org

Baseball As America Swings into Great Lakes Science Center March 31 through September 3, 2007
PARTIAL LIST OF ARTIFACTS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • The Doubleday Ball -- the game’s most “sacred” relic and the first artifact displayed in the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York Trophy given to Lou Gehrig at his Yankee Stadium farewell Jack Norworth’s original 1908 manuscript of the lyrics for “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” Single-season record-breaking home run bats used by Babe Ruth, Roger Maris, Sammy Sosa and Mark McGwire The world’s most valuable baseball card: a Honus Wagner T206 of 1909 Brooklyn Dodgers jersey worn by Jackie Robinson A ticket dated 7/4/39 to Lou Gehrig Day Mrs. Lou Gehrig’s charm bracelet A pair of spikes worn by the immortal Ty Cobb Norman Rockwell’s painting “GAME CALLED BECAUSE OF RAIN (TOUGH CALL),” 1949 A 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle rookie baseball card A Barnum & Bailey Elephant Baseball Team poster Yogi Berra’s glove with the ball he caught as the last pitch of Don Larsen’s victory in the only perfect game in World Series history Cap worn by the immortal Satchel Paige Eyeglasses worn by legendary broadcaster Harry Caray An early hot dog vending bucket, ca. 1910 The costume of the San Diego Chicken team mascot Sammy Sosa’s 62nd home-run ball from 1998 Baseball pitched by Cy Young in the first World Series in 1903 Rare photographs and possessions from baseball greats Jackie Robinson, Joe DiMaggio and other heroes “Wonderboy,” the bat used by Robert Redford in the 1984 baseball film The Natural A piece of the “Green Monster” left-field wall from Boston’s historic Fenway Park

Baseball As America, the most significant exhibition of baseball artifacts and history ever assembled, was organized by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York. The national tour of Baseball As America is sponsored by Ernst & Young, LLP. The exhibit is supported locally by the Cuyahoga County Commissioners, Cleveland Indians and Cleveland Clinic at the Great Lakes Science Center. The Great Lakes Science Center is one of the nation’s leading science and technology centers, featuring more than 400 hands-on exhibits, themed traveling exhibits, daily demonstrations and the awe-inspiring OMNIMAX Theater. The Science Center is open daily 9:30AM to 5:30PM, with discounted parking for guests in the attached 500-car garage. For more information, contact the Science Center at (216) 694-2000 or visit www.GreatScience.com.

###

Contact:

Jamie Finley Director of Marketing 216-696-3634 finleyj@glsc.org

Baseball As America Swings into Great Lakes Science Center March 31 through September 3, 2007
CLEVELAND-SPECIFIC ARTIFACTS 19th Century Cleveland Baseball: Cleveland Spiders jersey worn by Cy Young, c. 1898 Photo, Cleveland Spiders with Cy Young, c. 1895

Early Indians History: Glove used by Neal Ball for first unassisted triple play, 1909 Addie Joss Game trophy, 1911 Photo, Players in Addie Joss Memorial Game, 1911 Jersey worn by Nap Lajoie, c. 1912 Bat used by Joe Sewell, 1920s

Indians History, Glory Years, 1940s-1950s: Glove used by Lou Boudreau, 1940s Ball from Bob Feller’s 1st no-hitter, 1940 Bob Feller shoes, 18 K’s in one game, 1938 Bronzed glove, Bob Lemon, 1948 no-hitter Ball, first pitch of 1948 World Series 1948 World Series ring Ball signed by Al Lopez & Early Wynn, record 111th win, 9/25/54

Indians Modern History: Indians cap worn by Dennis Eckersley during no-hitter, 5/30/77 Indians cap worn by Len Barker, perfect game 1981 Kenny Lofton spikes, 1995 World Series, record six stolen bases Bat used by Sandy Alomar Jr., 1997 All-Star Game, MVP

Baseball As America, the most significant exhibition of baseball artifacts and history ever assembled, was organized by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in

Cooperstown, New York. The national tour of Baseball As America is sponsored by Ernst & Young, LLP. Locally, the exhibit is supported by Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Indians and the Cuyahoga County Commissioners. The Great Lakes Science Center is one of the nation’s leading science and technology centers, featuring more than 400 hands-on exhibits, themed traveling exhibits, daily demonstrations and the awe-inspiring OMNIMAX Theater. The Science Center is open daily 9:30AM to 5:30PM, with discounted parking for guests in the attached 500-car garage. For more information, contact the Science Center at (216) 694-2000 or visit www.GreatScience.com. ###

Contact: Jamie Finley Director of Marketing 216-696-3634 finleyj@glsc.org

Baseball As America Swings into Great Lakes Science Center March 31 through September 3, 2007
WHY COOPERSTOWN? From humble beginnings, the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum has become one of the nation’s most recognizable and popular educational institutions. The Museum is located in the pastoral village of Cooperstown in central New York State, nestled between the Catskill and Adirondack mountains, 70 miles west of Albany, the state capital. Located on Main Street, the Baseball Hall of Fame officially opened its doors on June 12, 1939. Cooperstown represents a step back in time, with buildings dating to the early 19th century and orange geraniums hanging from the classically styled streetlights. More than 350,000 people travel to the village each year to pay tribute to our National Pastime by visiting the Hall of Fame, an institution which honors excellence, preserves history and connects generations. Visitors wonder why this small village of 2,200 inhabitants located in central New York State should be the home of Baseball's Exciting Showcase. The answer to this oftenasked question involves a commission, a tattered baseball, a philanthropist and a centennial celebration. THE MILLS COMMISSION The Mills Commission was appointed in 1905 to determine the origin of the game of Baseball. The committee's formation was urged by Albert G. Spalding, one of the game's pioneers, following an article by Henry Chadwick, a famous early baseball writer, who contended that the sport evolved from the English game of rounders. Seven prominent men comprised the Commission, including Col. A.G. Mills of New York, who played baseball before and during the Civil War and was the fourth president of the National League (1882-1884); the Hon. Morgan G. Bulkeley, former Governor and then U.S. Senator from Connecticut, who served as the National League's first president in 1876; the Hon. Arthur P. Gorman, U.S. Senator from Maryland, a former player and ex-president of the National Base Ball Club of Washington; Nicholas E. Young of Washington, D.C., a longtime player who was the first secretary and later fifth president

of the National League (1884-1902); Alfred J. Reach of Philadelphia and George Wright of Boston, both well-known businessmen and two of the most famous players of their day; and the president of the Amateur Athletic Union, James E. Sullivan of New York. During its three-year study, the committee was deluged with communications on the subject. The testimony of Abner Graves, a mining engineer from Denver, in support of Abner Doubleday, figured prominently in the committee's inquiry. Both Graves and Doubleday had attended school together in Cooperstown. Doubleday later was appointed to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, graduating in 1842. Subsequently, he served in the Mexican and Civil wars. According to historical records, he commanded the cannons which fired the first shot for the Union at Fort Sumter, S.C. In his letters to Spalding, Graves claimed to have been present when Doubleday made changes to the then popular game of "town ball." As Graves described the game, one player tossed the ball straight in the air, allowing another player to hit the ball with a four-inch flat bat. Some 20 to 50 players, scattered about the field, attempted to catch the ball before the batter could run to a goal 50 feet away. According to Graves, Doubleday used a stick to mark out a diamond-shaped field in the dirt. His other refinements to the rudimentary game included limiting the number of players and adding four bases (hence the name, “base ball”). The committee's final report on December 30, 1907 stated in part that "the first scheme for playing baseball, according to the best evidence obtainable to date, was devised by Abner Doubleday at Cooperstown, N.Y. in 1839." THE BASEBALL The discovery of an old baseball in a dust-covered attic trunk in 1934 supported the committee's findings. The ball was located in a farmhouse in Fly Creek, a village about three miles from Cooperstown, where the baseball -- undersized, misshapen and obviously homemade – was discovered. The stitched cover had been torn open, revealing stuffing of cloth instead of the wool and cotton yarn that comprises the interior of the modern baseball. The ball soon became known as the "Doubleday Baseball." THE PHILANTHROPIST Soon after its discovery, the baseball was purchased for $5 by Stephen C. Clark, a Cooperstown resident and philanthropist. Clark conceived the idea of displaying the baseball, along with such other baseball objects as could be obtained, in a room in the Village Club, which now houses the Cooperstown village offices. The small one-room exhibition attracted tremendous public interest. With the assistance of Alexander Cleland, who had been associated with Clark in other endeavors, support was sought for the establishment of a National Baseball Museum.

Ford Frick, then president of the National League, was especially enthusiastic. He obtained the backing of Kenesaw Mountain Landis, Baseball's first commissioner, and William Harridge, president of the American League. Contributions and historically significant baseball memorabilia soon poured in from all parts of the country as word spread. BASEBALL'S CENTENNIAL Coincidentally, in 1935, plans were also being formulated for an appropriate celebration in Cooperstown to mark Baseball's upcoming 100th anniversary, which would take place four years later. Frick proposed that a Hall of Fame be established as part of the shrine to honor the game's immortals. The cooperation of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America was enlisted to select the playing greats who were to be so honored. The first election was conducted in January 1936 and five players were selected – Ty Cobb, Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner, Christy Mathewson and Walter Johnson. The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum was officially dedicated on June 12, 1939. The game's four ranking executives of the period – Landis, Frick, Harridge and William G. Bramham, president of the National Association – participated in the ribboncutting. Of the 25 immortals who had been elected to the Hall of Fame up to that point, eleven were still living, and each journeyed to Cooperstown to attend the centennial celebration. A baseball postage stamp commemorating the occasion was placed on sale that day at the Cooperstown post office, with Postmaster General James A. Farley presiding. NEW RESEARCH After the Commission reported its findings in 1908, many of the game’s historians disputed Graves’ accounts, noting that many of the innovations he attributed to Doubleday were already being practiced earlier in the 1830s. The discovery in 1999 of the original Mills Commission papers, long reported to have been burned, supports the view of many researchers that Baseball developed from, and along with, other bat-andball games earlier in the nineteenth century. One day, historians may determine that Abner Graves’ testimony, covering a period when the widely played game of “town ball” was undergoing rapid changes, captures that point in time when these changes to the game arrived in one typical American community and caused a minor revolution on the sandlot. Nevertheless, such a finding will not diminish the Mills Commission’s contribution to our National Pastime a century ago. By collecting the memories of many early fans and players while they were still living, the committee created a treasure trove of early baseball history that would otherwise have been lost. Moreover, by identifying a site for Baseball’s origin, the Mills Commission initiated the process that ultimately established a home for the sport – the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

EVOLUTION OF THE MUSEUM AND LIBRARY Since 1939, several significant physical changes have taken place at the Museum. Expansions in 1950 and 1980 added much more exhibit space, while the Hall of Fame Gallery was dedicated in 1958. In 1994, the original Library, which had opened in 1968, was renovated and connected to the Museum. In 2002, the Museum began a three-year renovation to create a safer environment for visitors, develop even better handicapaccessible facilities, provide a smoother traffic flow through the Museum’s galleries, better manage and control the climate for artifacts and provide a greater presence of interactive technology for visitors. Representing all aspects of baseball – both on the field and in our culture – the Museum collections total 35,000 three-dimensional artifacts (including bats, balls, gloves, caps, helmets, uniforms, baseball shoes, trophies and awards) and 130,000 baseball cards. All artifacts in the Museum’s collections have been donated. Founded in 1939 as part of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, the National Baseball Hall of Fame Library is by far the largest repository of baseball information in the world. The Library’s mission is to acquire, organize, preserve and disseminate all archival material related to the history of baseball and its impact on culture and society. The Hall of Fame Library contains 2.6 million items housed in climate-controlled areas and maintained by a professional staff using state-of-the-art techniques. The photo collection contains more than 500,000 historic images of players, teams, ballparks and other baseball subjects. In addition, the Library’s film, video and recorded-sound archive contains more than 10,000 hours of footage dating back to the early part of the century, including an extensive collection of Hollywood movies featuring baseball. The Library is a public facility where numerous researchers and Museum visitors are served annually. While the majority of patrons are independent baseball fans conducting research, others utilizing the facilities in the past have included such esteemed authors as George Plimpton, Roger Kahn and George Will; officials from many major and minor league clubs; former big league players; writers from The New York Times, USA Today and The Wall Street Journal; television shows such as Jeopardy; and students of all ages. Whether it’s simply answering a question or fielding a request from the White House for information for a presidential speech, the research department answers approximately 60,000 inquiries annually. THE BASEBALL HALL OF FAME TODAY In August 2000, the board of directors of the Museum elected the founder’s granddaughter, Jane Forbes Clark, as chairman. The year before, Dale A. Petroskey became the Museum’s fifth president. Under their leadership, the Museum has begun to build an endowment to ensure its long-term financial security and has continued to

broaden its educational outreach. In 2002, Baseball As America, an exhibition of select artifacts from the Museum, opened a national tour to much acclaim at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. The national tour of Baseball As America is sponsored by Ernst & Young LLP. Published by National Geographic, Baseball As America: Seeing Ourselves Through Our National Game is the official companion volume to the tour. The Hall of Fame’s educational programs extend the Museum’s reach to children throughout the United States. America Grows Inning by Inning – an extensive series of thematic lessons – teaches core curriculum subjects using the game of baseball as a “hands-on” foundation for helping students better learn key concepts, based upon national academic standards. In addition to on-site school visits, the Museum delivers interactive programs into classrooms outside of Cooperstown via distance learning. Through partnerships with Ball State University in Muncie, Ind., and Project View in Schenectady, N.Y., one hour to half-day electronic field trips and videoconferences have been enjoyed by nearly 100 million students nationwide in the last five years. As part of its public programming for visitors of all ages, the Museum also offers an extensive year-round calendar of entertaining and informative events designed for both families and scholars of the sport. From roundtable discussions with Hall of Fame members and Sandlot Stories – featuring staff and visiting experts highlighting the game’s rich history – to gallery talks, treasure hunts, concerts, movies and plays, the Baseball Hall of Fame presents more than 300 special events each year. Additionally, Hall of Fame Weekend, featuring the Induction Ceremony and scores of returning Hall of Fame members, highlights the schedule of events for the year. The annual Hall of Fame Game, featuring two major league teams in an exhibition contest at historic Doubleday Field, draws thousands for an afternoon game at the home of baseball. From its embryonic stages, the Baseball Hall of Fame has become an international destination that chronicles the evolution of our National Pastime. From humble beginnings and a small collection of artifacts in the mid-1930s, the Hall of Fame has evolved into a cultural showcase, where people come to learn about the past and discover that Baseball is the common thread of our national spirit.

Baseball As America, the most significant exhibition of baseball artifacts and history ever assembled, was organized by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York. The national tour of Baseball As America is sponsored by Ernst & Young, LLP. Locally, the exhibit is supported Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Indians and Cuyahoga County Commissioners.

The Great Lakes Science Center is one of the nation’s leading science and technology centers, featuring more than 400 hands-on exhibits, themed traveling exhibits, daily demonstrations and the awe-inspiring OMNIMAX Theater. The Science Center is open daily 9:30AM to 5:30PM, with discounted parking for guests in the attached 500-car garage. For more information, contact the Science Center at (216) 694-2000 or visit www.GreatScience.com.

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Ernst & Young: Proud Sponsor of Baseball As America
Ernst & Young is excited to be the national sponsor of Baseball As America because, quite simply, baseball is America. “Since its earliest days, baseball has been a source of American ingenuity and inspiration. It has served as a symbol of our country’s egalitarian ideals, a catalyst for positive social change, and a shining example of how America really is a land of opportunity,” said James S. Turley, Chairman of Ernst & Young. As the national sponsor of Baseball As America, Ernst & Young is the first business ever to take part in a public partnership with the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Helping to bring the treasures of the Hall of Fame to Americans all across the country -- most of whom have not been fortunate enough to experience the treasures in person in Cooperstown, New York -- is a privilege. “Ernst & Young shares so many of baseball’s values, especially leadership, teamwork, diversity, innovation, opportunity and performance excellence. Our people perform like baseball players, who may step up to bat alone, but must rely on an entire team in order to win the game,” Turley added. In sponsoring the Hall of Fame’s creation and tour of Baseball As America, Ernst & Young is helping to ensure that these values -- along with the remarkable artifacts that represent them -- will be celebrated and cherished as never before. ###
About Ernst & Young
Ernst & Young, a global leader in professional services, is committed to restoring the public's trust in professional services firms and in the quality of financial reporting. Its 114,000 people in 140 countries pursue the highest levels of integrity, quality, and professionalism in providing a range of sophisticated services centered on our core competencies of auditing, accounting, tax, and transactions. Further information about Ernst & Young and its approach to a variety of business issues can be found at www.ey.com/perspectives. Ernst & Young refers to the global organization of member firms of Ernst & Young Global Limited, each of which is a separate legal entity. Ernst & Young Global Limited does not provide services to clients.


				
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