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Chronic Mild Broca's Aphasia _1_

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					Lingraphica: AAC & Aphasia Reference Sheet

Chronic Mild Broca’s Aphasia

I. CHARACTERISTICS
   • Western Aphasia Battery Aphasia Quotient range: 56 ≤ AQ < 80
   • Motor plans for speech seem to have gone awry
   • Words come slowly, laboriously and haltingly
   • Long pauses between words, sometimes within words
   • Intonation and stress patterns are markedly diminished
   • Utterances are short, consisting mostly of content words (nouns, verbs, …)
   • Function words are mostly missing (conjunctions, articles …)

II. TYPES
   • basic choice communicators           require maximal assistance from partners
   • controlled situation communicators participate in conversations structured by a
                                        skilled communication partner
   • augmented input communicators        have auditory language processing difficulties
                                          indicating support of verbal input through
                                          gesture or visual symbols
   • comprehensive communicators          avail themselves of a range of preserved skills
                                          to facilitation communication (e.g., pointing,
                                          gestures, limited letters / speech …)

III. AAC INTRODUCTION / USE
   • Assess device’s communicative capabilities against client’s communicative needs
   • Assess device’s operational demands against client’s motor, sensory and cognitive
     capabilities
   • Adapt device’s communicative contents to client’s communicative situation,
     support
   • Train client and family in access, use, and adaptation of communicative materials
   • Monitor use, noting improvements often occur in natural language production with
     device use
   • Extend available materials, adapt for newly possible communicative situations -
     turn improvements to client advantage
IV. CLINICAL RESULTS
    • Over 69% of Lingraphica users with mild Broca’s aphasia evolved to anomic
      aphasia (71 < AQ < 89, mean ∆AQ = +17.1).
    • Mean CETI Overall improvement of this latter group was +28.7


                   Improvements in Functional Communication with Lingraphica

       90.0%

       80.0%

       70.0%

       60.0%

       50.0%                                                                                              Initial

       40.0%                                                                                              Final

       30.0%

       20.0%

       10.0%

         0.0%
                    a.   b.   c.   d.    e.    f.   g.   h.   i.   j.   k.   l.    m.   n.      o.   p.
                                                     CETI Items



  Figure Key:                                                                     CETI Item #
   a. Indicating understanding of what is being said to him/her.                         5
   b. Giving yes and no answers appropriately.                                           3
   c. Getting somebody’s attention.                                                      1
   d. Communicating physical problems such as aches, pains.                              9
   e. Communicating emotions.                                                            4
   f. Responding or communicating without words.                                        11
   g. Understanding writing.                                                            13
   h. Saying the name of person in front of him/her.                                     8
   i. Having a one-to-one conversation with you.                                         7
   j. Having coffee-time visits with friends, neighbors.                                 6
   k. Getting involved in group talks about self.                                        2
   l. Having a spontaneous conversation.                                                10
   m. Participating in a conversation with strangers.                                   15
   n. Participating in a fast group conversation.                                       14
   o. Starting a conversation with people not in family.                                12
   p. Describing or discussing something in depth.                                      16


References
Brookshire, 1997                        Garrett, 1992                        Lomas, 1989
Kertesz, 1982                           Weintich, 1995

				
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