Marketplace Firefighter Jobs Montana by iwy12388

VIEWS: 21 PAGES: 442

More Info
									PORTFOLIO ID    PORTFOLIO NAME   KNOWLEDGE AREA CODE




               7 Food Safety                       712
               7 Food Safety                       712
               7 Food Safety                       712

               7 Food Safety                       712
               7 Food Safety                       712

               7 Food Safety                       712

               7 Food Safety                       712
               7 Food Safety                       712

               7 Food Safety                       712

               7 Food Safety                       712

               7 Food Safety                       712


               7 Food Safety                       712




               7 Food Safety                       712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety     712

7 Food Safety     712
7 Food Safety     712

7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety     712
7 Food Safety     712




7 Food Safety     712




7 Food Safety     712




7 Food Safety     712




7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety     712




7 Food Safety     712




7 Food Safety     712




7 Food Safety     712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety     712




7 Food Safety     712




7 Food Safety     712




7 Food Safety     712




7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety     712
7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety     712




7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety     712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety     712




7 Food Safety     712




7 Food Safety     712




7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety     712
7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety     712




7 Food Safety     712




7 Food Safety     712




7 Food Safety     712


7 Food Safety     712


7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712
7   Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety     712

7 Food Safety     712


7 Food Safety     712


7 Food Safety     712




7 Food Safety     712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712


7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712

7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712
7 Food Safety   712




7 Food Safety   712
KNOWLEDGE AREA NAME




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms


Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms

Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms




Protect Food From Contamination by Pathogenic Microorganisms
PROGRAM NAME




Tropical Food Processing and Safety
Tropical Food Processing and Safety
Tropical Food Processing and Safety

Safe Food and Human Nutrition
Health

Health

Health
Health

Agricultural & Food Biosecurity

Agricultural & Food Biosecurity

Agricultural & Food Biosecurity


Agricultural & Food Biosecurity




Food Production Systems: Development, Processing, Quality, and Safety
Food Production Systems: Development, Processing, Quality, and Safety




Food Production Systems: Development, Processing, Quality, and Safety
Human Nutrition, Food Safety and Human Health and Well-Being

Human Nutrition, Food Safety and Human Health and Well-Being
Food, Nutrition & Health


Food, Nutrition & Health




Food, Nutrition & Health




Food, Nutrition & Health
Food, Nutrition & Health

Food, Nutrition & Health
Food, Nutrition & Health

Food, Nutrition & Health
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety




Food Safety
Food Safety




Food Safety




Food Safety




Food Safety




Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Nutrition, Food Safety and Healthy Lifestyles
Foods and Nutrition
Foods and Nutrition
Foods and Nutrition

Foods and Nutrition




Food Production Systems: Development, Processing, Quality, and Safety




Food and Nutrition: Choices for Health




Improving Human Health and Wellbeing through Food Function and Food Safety
Improving Human Health and Wellbeing through Food Function and Food Safety




Improving Human Health and Wellbeing through Food Function and Food Safety




Improving Human Health and Wellbeing through Food Function and Food Safety
Improving Human Health and Wellbeing through Food Function and Food Safety

Reducing risk of food borne illness by characterizing food pathogens and risky consumer practices




Agricultural and Food Biosecurity




Developing a recombinant antibody-based biosensor for rapid detection of salmonella in foods
Developing a recombinant antibody-based biosensor for rapid detection of salmonella in foods
Developing a recombinant antibody-based biosensor for rapid detection of salmonella in foods




Food, Nutrition, and Health
Food, Nutrition, and Health




Food, Nutrition, and Health




Food, Nutrition, and Health




Food, Nutrition, and Health
Food, Nutrition, and Health

Reducing risk of food borne illness by characterizing food pathogens and risky consumer practices

Reducing risk of food borne illness by characterizing food pathogens and risky consumer practices

Food Safety




Food Safety




Food Safety




Food Safety




Plants and Plant Products




Food, Nutrition, and Health
3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health

3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health


3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health


3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health
3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health

3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health

3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health

3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health

3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health

3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health


3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health

3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health

3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health




Food Safety and Nutrition




Food Safety and Nutrition




Food Safety and Nutrition
(NFS) Food Safety




(NFS) Food Safety


(NFS) Food Safety




(NFS) Food Safety

Human Nutrition and Health with an Adequate, Safe, and High Quality Food Supply




Basic Food Safety Education




Basic Food Safety Education




Food Product Development, Processing and Safety
Quality of Life




Human Health, Environment, Family, Youth, Society and Community




Human Health, Environment, Family, Youth, Society and Community




Human Health, Environment, Family, Youth, Society and Community




Food Systems and Biological Engineering
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety


Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition
Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition


Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition

Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition

Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition

Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition


Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition


Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition

Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition


Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition


Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition

Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition

Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition


Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition


Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition




Food Safety and Nutrition




Value Added Products
Food, Nutrition & Health




Food, Nutrition & Health
Food, Nutrition & Health




Agricultural and Food Biosecurity




Agricultural and Food Biosecurity
Agricultural and Food Biosecurity




6.Health and Wellness of Hawaii's Families and Communities
6.Health and Wellness of Hawaii's Families and Communities
Food and Non-Food Products
Human Nutrition, Food Safety, and Human Health and Well-being
Human Nutrition, Food Safety, and Human Health and Well-being
Human Nutrition, Food Safety, and Human Health and Well-being




Food Systems-OARDC Led
Food Systems-OARDC Led




Food Systems-OARDC Led




Food Systems-OARDC Led
Food Systems-OARDC Led




Program in Agricultural Animal Health




Program in Agricultural Animal Health




Program in Agricultural Animal Health
Food, Nutrition & Health
Food, Nutrition & Health
Program in Agricultural Animal Health
Food, Nutrition & Health




Food, Nutrition & Health
Food, Nutrition & Health

Food, Nutrition & Health

Reducing the costs of food borne illnesses to small producers, selected food handlers and consumers

Reducing the costs of food borne illnesses to small producers, selected food handlers and consumers
Reducing the costs of food borne illnesses to small producers, selected food handlers and consumers
Reducing the costs of food borne illnesses to small producers, selected food handlers and consumers




Food Safety Program




Food Safety Program

Production and Safety of Food Products
Production and Safety of Food Products


Production and Safety of Food Products

Production and Safety of Food Products


Production and Safety of Food Products




Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition


Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition
Food Safety Program

Food Safety Program

Food Safety Program

Food Safety Program


Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition


Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition




Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition


Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition
Food Safety and Technology




3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health




3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health
California Families, Youth and Communitiy Development


California Families, Youth and Communitiy Development

California Families, Youth and Communitiy Development
Family and Consumer Resources
Family and Consumer Resources


Family and Consumer Resources




Family and Consumer Resources

Food Product Development, Processing and Safety

Food Product Development, Processing and Safety
Program in Food Science and Human Nutrition




Program in Food Science and Human Nutrition


Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition

Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)

Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)
Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)

Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)




Viable Communities and Appropriate Quality of Life for Individuals and Families
Agromedicine, Nutrition and Food Safety




Food Safety
Human Health and Well-being




Human Health and Well-being




Human Health and Well-being




Human Health and Well-being

California Families, Youth and Communitiy Development

California Families, Youth and Communitiy Development




3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health
Nutrition, Food Safety and Healthy Lifestyles




Overall Program
The IMPACT Center




The IMPACT Center




The IMPACT Center




The IMPACT Center


The IMPACT Center


(NFS) Food Safety
Food Safety and Technology
HUMAN NUTRITION, HEALTH AND FOOD SAFETY
HUMAN NUTRITION, HEALTH AND FOOD SAFETY


Food Safety Education Program for Consumers (Extension)

Food Safety Education Program for Consumers (Extension)


Food Safety Education Program for Consumers (Extension)


Food Safety Education Program for Consumers (Extension)




Ohio Dairy Health Management Certificate Program (Extension)
Ohio Dairy Health Management Certificate Program (Extension)




Ohio Dairy Health Management Certificate Program (Extension)




Ohio Dairy Health Management Certificate Program (Extension)




Ohio Dairy Health Management Certificate Program (Extension)
Ohio Dairy Health Management Certificate Program (Extension)


Food Systems-OARDC Led

Human Nutrition/Food Safety

Human Nutrition/Food Safety
Human Nutrition/Food Safety

Human Nutrition/Food Safety




Food Systems


Program in Food Science and Human Nutrition

Food Safety
Food Safety

Food Safety




DC Food Handler Certification Program Model Project


DC Food Handler Certification Program Model Project




DC Food Handler Certification Program Model Project




III. NUTRITION AND HEALTH
III. NUTRITION AND HEALTH




III. NUTRITION AND HEALTH




Agricultural Biosecurity




Agricultural Biosecurity


Agricultural Biosecurity

Agricultural Biosecurity
Food Processing, Product Storage, and Food and Product Safety


Assuring the safety, security and abundance of our food supply

Assuring the safety, security and abundance of our food supply

Assuring the safety, security and abundance of our food supply




FOOD SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION




FOOD SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION


FOOD SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION

FOOD SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION

FOOD SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION

FOOD SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION




FOOD SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION




FOOD SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION
Quality of Life




Improving the Health and Wellness Status of Washington Residents




Improving the Health and Wellness Status of Washington Residents
Food Safety and Technology
Food Safety

Food Safety

Food Safety

Food Safety


Food Safety

Food Safety
Food Processing, Protection & Safety

Agriculture and Food Defence Program / Agrosecurity

Agriculture and Food Defence Program / Agrosecurity




Health and Human Nutrition




Safe Food and Human Nutrition


Safe Food and Human Nutrition

Safe Food and Human Nutrition




Safe Food and Human Nutrition


Agriculture and Food Defence Program / Agrosecurity

Food Processing, Protection & Safety

Food Processing, Protection & Safety
Meat and Dairy Goat Production and Processing

Safe Food and Human Nutrition




New and Improved Food Processing Systems to Ensure a Safe, Wholesome and High-Value Food Supply




Microbiology and a Healthy World




Animal Health and Disease
Animal Health and Disease




Animal Health and Disease


New and Improved Food Processing Systems to Ensure a Safe, Wholesome and High-Value Food Supply




New and Improved Food Processing Systems to Ensure a Safe, Wholesome and High-Value Food Supply




Food Safety




Other Idaho Commercial Crops

Other Idaho Commercial Crops


College of the Environment and Life Sciences Community Access to Research and Extension Services (CELS
CARES)
Nutrition and Food Safety
Nutrition and Food Safety




Nutrition and Food Safety
INSTITUTION NAME 1                INSTITUTION NAME 2




University of Guam
University of Guam
University of Guam

Kansas State University
University of Vermont

University of Vermont

University of Vermont
University of Vermont

University of Arkansas

University of Arkansas

University of Arkansas


University of Arkansas




North Carolina State University   North Carolina A&T State University
North Carolina State University   North Carolina A&T State University




North Carolina State University   North Carolina A&T State University
Purdue University

Purdue University
University of Arkansas


University of Arkansas




University of Arkansas




University of Arkansas
University of Arkansas

University of Arkansas
University of Arkansas

University of Arkansas
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine




University of Missouri
University of Missouri




University of Missouri




University of Missouri




University of Missouri




University of Missouri
University of Missouri
University of Missouri
University of Missouri
Montana State University
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine

University of Maine




North Carolina State University   North Carolina A&T State University




Iowa State University




University of Massachusetts
University of Massachusetts




University of Massachusetts




University of Massachusetts
University of Massachusetts

Tennessee State University




Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State University   Virginia State University




Tennessee State University
Tennessee State University
Tennessee State University




Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State University   Virginia State University
Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State University   Virginia State University




Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State University   Virginia State University




Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State University   Virginia State University




Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State University   Virginia State University
Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State University   Virginia State University

Tennessee State University

Tennessee State University

Texas A&M University




Texas A&M University




Texas A&M University




Texas A&M University




Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State University   Virginia State University




Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State University   Virginia State University
Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station


Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station


Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station
Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station


Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University   NY State Agricultural Experiment Station




Clemson University   South Carolina State University




Clemson University   South Carolina State University




Clemson University   South Carolina State University
University of Wyoming




University of Wyoming


University of Wyoming




University of Wyoming

West Virginia University




University of the Virgin Islands




University of the Virgin Islands




University of Illinois
University of Maryland      University of Maryland - Eastern Shore




Michigan State University




Michigan State University




Michigan State University




University of Missouri
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine


University of Tennessee     Tennessee State University
University of Tennessee                Tennessee State University


University of Tennessee                Tennessee State University

University of Tennessee                Tennessee State University

University of Tennessee                Tennessee State University

University of Tennessee                Tennessee State University


University of Tennessee                Tennessee State University


University of Tennessee                Tennessee State University

University of Tennessee                Tennessee State University


University of Tennessee                Tennessee State University


University of Tennessee                Tennessee State University

University of Tennessee                Tennessee State University

University of Tennessee                Tennessee State University


University of Tennessee                Tennessee State University


University of Tennessee                Tennessee State University




Clemson University                     South Carolina State University




University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
College of Micronesia




College of Micronesia
College of Micronesia




Pennsylvania State University




Pennsylvania State University
Pennsylvania State University




University of Hawaii
University of Hawaii
Iowa State University
Iowa State University
Iowa State University
Iowa State University




Ohio State University
Ohio State University




Ohio State University




Ohio State University
Ohio State University




Washington State University




Washington State University




Washington State University
University of New Hampshire
University of New Hampshire
Washington State University
University of New Hampshire




University of New Hampshire
University of New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire

Tennessee State University

Tennessee State University
Tennessee State University
Tennessee State University




University of Puerto Rico




University of Puerto Rico

Utah State University
Utah State University


Utah State University

Utah State University


Utah State University




University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University


University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University
University of Puerto Rico

University of Puerto Rico

University of Puerto Rico

University of Puerto Rico


University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University


University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University




University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University


University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University
New Mexico State University




Cornell University            NY State Agricultural Experiment Station




Cornell University            NY State Agricultural Experiment Station
University of California


University of California

University of California
University of New Hampshire
University of New Hampshire


University of New Hampshire




University of New Hampshire

University of Illinois

University of Illinois
Washington State University




Washington State University


University of Tennessee               Tennessee State University

Northern Marianas College

Northern Marianas College
Northern Marianas College

Northern Marianas College




University of Nebraska
North Carolina A&T State University




University of Maine
American Samoa Community College




American Samoa Community College




American Samoa Community College




American Samoa Community College

University of California

University of California




Cornell University                 NY State Agricultural Experiment Station
Montana State University




University of Wisconsin
Washington State University




Washington State University




Washington State University




Washington State University


Washington State University


University of Wyoming
New Mexico State University
University of Arizona
University of Arizona


Ohio State University

Ohio State University


Ohio State University


Ohio State University




Ohio State University
Ohio State University




Ohio State University




Ohio State University




Ohio State University
Ohio State University


Ohio State University

Mississippi State University

Mississippi State University
Mississippi State University

Mississippi State University




Prairie View A&M University


Washington State University

University of Rhode Island
University of Rhode Island

University of Rhode Island




University of the District of Columbia


University of the District of Columbia




University of the District of Columbia




Southern University and A&M College
Southern University and A&M College




Southern University and A&M College




Oklahoma State University




Oklahoma State University


Oklahoma State University

Oklahoma State University
Oklahoma State University


Auburn University           Alabama A&M University

Auburn University           Alabama A&M University

Auburn University           Alabama A&M University




University of Delaware      Delaware State University




University of Delaware      Delaware State University


University of Delaware      Delaware State University

University of Delaware      Delaware State University

University of Delaware      Delaware State University

University of Delaware      Delaware State University




University of Delaware      Delaware State University




University of Delaware      Delaware State University
University of Maryland        University of Maryland - Eastern Shore




Washington State University




Washington State University
New Mexico State University
University of Idaho

University of Idaho

University of Idaho

University of Idaho


University of Idaho

University of Idaho
University of Georgia     Fort Valley State University

University of Georgia     Fort Valley State University

University of Georgia     Fort Valley State University




University of Idaho




Kansas State University


Kansas State University

Kansas State University




Kansas State University


University of Georgia     Fort Valley State University

University of Georgia     Fort Valley State University

University of Georgia     Fort Valley State University
University of Georgia     Fort Valley State University

Kansas State University




Oregon State University




Oregon State University




Oregon State University
Oregon State University




Oregon State University


Oregon State University




Oregon State University




University of Idaho




University of Idaho

University of Idaho




University of Rhode Island
Colorado State University
Colorado State University




Colorado State University
INSTITUTION NAME 3   INSTITUTION NAME 4   STATE CODE STATE NAME




                                          GU         Guam
                                          GU         Guam
                                          GU         Guam

                                          KS         Kansas
                                          VT         Vermont

                                          VT         Vermont

                                          VT         Vermont
                                          VT         Vermont

                                          AR         Arkansas

                                          AR         Arkansas

                                          AR         Arkansas


                                          AR         Arkansas




                                          NC         North Carolina
NC   North Carolina




NC   North Carolina
IN   Indiana

IN   Indiana
AR   Arkansas


AR   Arkansas




AR   Arkansas




AR   Arkansas
AR   Arkansas

AR   Arkansas
AR   Arkansas

AR   Arkansas
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine




MO   Missouri
MO   Missouri




MO   Missouri




MO   Missouri




MO   Missouri




MO   Missouri
MO   Missouri
MO   Missouri
MO   Missouri
MT   Montana
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine

ME   Maine




NC   North Carolina




IA   Iowa




MA   Massachusetts
MA   Massachusetts




MA   Massachusetts




MA   Massachusetts
MA   Massachusetts

TN   Tennessee




VA   Virginia




TN   Tennessee
TN   Tennessee
TN   Tennessee




VA   Virginia
VA   Virginia




VA   Virginia




VA   Virginia




VA   Virginia
VA   Virginia

TN   Tennessee

TN   Tennessee

TX   Texas




TX   Texas




TX   Texas




TX   Texas




VA   Virginia




VA   Virginia
NY   New York

NY   New York


NY   New York


NY   New York
NY   New York

NY   New York

NY   New York

NY   New York

NY   New York

NY   New York


NY   New York

NY   New York

NY   New York




SC   South Carolina




SC   South Carolina




SC   South Carolina
WY   Wyoming




WY   Wyoming


WY   Wyoming




WY   Wyoming

WV   West Virginia




VI   Virgin Islands




VI   Virgin Islands




IL   Illinois
MD   Maryland




MI   Michigan




MI   Michigan




MI   Michigan




MO   Missouri
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine


TN   Tennessee
TN   Tennessee


TN   Tennessee

TN   Tennessee

TN   Tennessee

TN   Tennessee


TN   Tennessee


TN   Tennessee

TN   Tennessee


TN   Tennessee


TN   Tennessee

TN   Tennessee

TN   Tennessee


TN   Tennessee


TN   Tennessee




SC   South Carolina




AR   Arkansas
FM   Micronesia, Fed States




FM   Micronesia, Fed States
FM   Micronesia, Fed States




PA   Pennsylvania




PA   Pennsylvania
PA   Pennsylvania




HI   Hawaii
HI   Hawaii
IA   Iowa
IA   Iowa
IA   Iowa
IA   Iowa




OH   Ohio
OH   Ohio




OH   Ohio




OH   Ohio
OH   Ohio




WA   Washington




WA   Washington




WA   Washington
NH   New Hampshire
NH   New Hampshire
WA   Washington
NH   New Hampshire




NH   New Hampshire
NH   New Hampshire

NH   New Hampshire

TN   Tennessee

TN   Tennessee
TN   Tennessee
TN   Tennessee




PR   Puerto Rico




PR   Puerto Rico

UT   Utah
UT   Utah


UT   Utah

UT   Utah


UT   Utah




TN   Tennessee


TN   Tennessee
PR   Puerto Rico

PR   Puerto Rico

PR   Puerto Rico

PR   Puerto Rico


TN   Tennessee


TN   Tennessee




TN   Tennessee


TN   Tennessee
NM   New Mexico




NY   New York




NY   New York
CA   California


CA   California

CA   California
NH   New Hampshire
NH   New Hampshire


NH   New Hampshire




NH   New Hampshire

IL   Illinois

IL   Illinois
WA   Washington




WA   Washington


TN   Tennessee

CM   Northern Marianas

CM   Northern Marianas
CM   Northern Marianas

CM   Northern Marianas




NE   Nebraska
NC   North Carolina




ME   Maine
AS   American Samoa




AS   American Samoa




AS   American Samoa




AS   American Samoa

CA   California

CA   California




NY   New York
MT   Montana




WI   Wisconsin
WA   Washington




WA   Washington




WA   Washington




WA   Washington


WA   Washington


WY   Wyoming
NM   New Mexico
AZ   Arizona
AZ   Arizona


OH   Ohio

OH   Ohio


OH   Ohio


OH   Ohio




OH   Ohio
OH   Ohio




OH   Ohio




OH   Ohio




OH   Ohio
OH   Ohio


OH   Ohio

MS   Mississippi

MS   Mississippi
MS   Mississippi

MS   Mississippi




TX   Texas


WA   Washington

RI   Rhode Island
RI   Rhode Island

RI   Rhode Island




DC   District of Columbia


DC   District of Columbia




DC   District of Columbia




LA   Louisiana
LA   Louisiana




LA   Louisiana




OK   Oklahoma




OK   Oklahoma


OK   Oklahoma

OK   Oklahoma
                      OK   Oklahoma


Tuskegee University   AL   Alabama

Tuskegee University   AL   Alabama

Tuskegee University   AL   Alabama




                      DE   Delaware




                      DE   Delaware


                      DE   Delaware

                      DE   Delaware

                      DE   Delaware

                      DE   Delaware




                      DE   Delaware




                      DE   Delaware
MD   Maryland




WA   Washington




WA   Washington
NM   New Mexico
ID   Idaho

ID   Idaho

ID   Idaho

ID   Idaho


ID   Idaho

ID   Idaho
GA   Georgia

GA   Georgia

GA   Georgia




ID   Idaho




KS   Kansas


KS   Kansas

KS   Kansas




KS   Kansas


GA   Georgia

GA   Georgia

GA   Georgia
GA   Georgia

KS   Kansas




OR   Oregon




OR   Oregon




OR   Oregon
OR   Oregon




OR   Oregon


OR   Oregon




OR   Oregon




ID   Idaho




ID   Idaho

ID   Idaho




RI   Rhode Island
CO   Colorado
CO   Colorado




CO   Colorado
OUTCOME MEASURE




% of participants gaining food safety knowledge
% of participants adopting proper food handling practice
% decrease in foodborne illness
Number of participants with increased knowledge of compounds beneficial to human health
that can be found in Kansas food products, in particular wheat
number of school food managers certified in food safety and sanitation
number of school food service workers using food safety 'best practices' when receiving,
storing, handling, preparing and serving food
number of schools implementing Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point based food safety
programs
people who show improvement in food safety and preservation practices

Number of growers/producers reporting increased awareness of need for biosecurity

Number of growers/producers reporting knowledge gained related to biosecurity practices
Number of growers/producers reporting intent to adopt new biosecurity practices for animal
production facilities
Number of growers/producers adopting new practices outlined in educational programs to
improve biosecurity through proper methods of sanitation; disease prevention, recognition,
and control




Number of program participants who successfully pass the food safety certification
examination.
Number of participants completing National Seafood HACCP Alliance Education and other
food safety HACCP workshops




Number of requests for technical assistance from small business and entrepreneurs for
developing new or expanding food processes or systems.
Number of persons who increased their knowledge of proper hand washing

Number of persons who increased their knowledge of avoiding cross-contamination
Number of research projects conducted related to Food, Nutrition & Health

Number of participants who indicated that they increased their knowledge related to Food,
Nutrition & Health following an educational class, seminar, or workshop




Number of participants receiving certification for Better Process Control School




Number of Refereed Journal Publications
Number of food service managers who report improved food handling practices within a
commercial establishment
Number of growers, producers, distributors, or retailers implementing one or more practices
to minimize food safety hazards
Number of journal articles accepted
Number of 4-H Youth awarded post secondary scholarships related to foods, nutrition, and
health
Adopt appropriate technologies
Adopt behaviors to prevent or minimize complications of chronic disease
Adopt food safety practices
Assume personal responsibility for health
Develop educational programs that address health and safety issues
Keep livestock healthy
Operate equipment safely
Participate in Maine cattle health assurance program
Practice safety
Use relevant UMCE web-based resources
Access relevant UMCE publications.
Demonstrate animal management skills
Demonstrate appropriate food safety practices
Demonstrate how to access community resources
Demonstrate how to locate scientific information
Demonstrate sound agricultural practices
Demonstrate sustainable living skills
Describe age-appropriate safety practices
Describe animal health programs
Describe community resources
Describe HACCP principles
Describe how personal behaviors influence the risk of chronic disease
Describe proper food handling practices
Describe the risks of not handling food safely




Increased knowledge of proper hand washing.
Increased knowledge of cooking foods adequately.




Increased knowledge of avoiding cross-contamination.




Increased knowledge of keeping food at a safe temperature.




Increased knowledge of storing foods properly.




% or # of individuals who indicate an intent to adopt one or more safe food handling
practices.
Increased practice of personal hygiene.
Increased careful food handling practices.
Percent of individuals who indicate using desirable food handling behaviors.
FOOD SAFETY:
Participants will improve all safe food handling practices, but specifically the basic techniques
of safe food handling: Controlling time and temperature when handling food, ensuring
proper personal hygiene, preventing cross-contamination, proper cleaning and sanitizing.
Ultimately, there will be a decline in economic and health consequences of food borne
illnesses.
# of new natural antimicrobials developed from fruits and/or vegetables
% of Maine food processors learning about principles of food safety programs
% of Maine food processors establishing their own HACCP plans
% of Maine food processors adopting new technologies to reduce microbial contamination of
food products




Number of companies adopting new technologies




Number of participants certified in food safety programs.




Accurate research in food safety training and certification for undereducated, limited english
proficient school food service personnel
Accurate research on food safety made availalbe and shared




Accurate research on antimicrobial delivery systems to improve food safety




Accurate research on characterization of transfer of listeria monocytogenes between
processing surfaces and foods
Accurate research on physiology and control of foodborne disease agents
Percentage of targeted consumers that will be following best management practices for
reducing microbial contamination




Number of food companies who register with FDA and prepare a food biosecurity plan




Scientific publications concerning rapid detection of Salmonella in foods
New technologies developed to detect Salmonella in foods
Transfer of new Salmonella detection procedures to commercial food industry




Food Safety - Number of managers, supervisors, and food handling personnel from
restaurants, public school and hospital cafeterias, daycare centers, nursing homes, university
foodservice, correctional centers, and other foodservice industries who increase knowledge
and skills in safe food handling practices
Food Safety - Number of Virginia food producers and processors to implement (pre and post
harvest) HACCP, quality assurance programs and processing technology that will provide for
increased food safety and processing efficiency




Food Safety - Number of home-based business entrepreneurs who are provided with
assistance and training who increase awareness and knowledge in starting a food processing
business




Food Safety - Number of consumers and at-risk populations, including civic/community
groups, senior citizens, child care providers, youth, 4-H youth, Master Food Preservers, and
volunteer cooks at fund-raising events, who increase their knowledge of foodborne illness,
safe food handling practices, and food preservation




Food Safety - Number of producers or marketers learning food protection principles
Food Safety - Number of consumers and regulators learning food protection facts

Proportion of targeted consumers using practices that reduce cross contamination potential

Practices to reduce contamination of meat goat and guinea fowl
FPM Pass/Fail Rate - the is the percentage of participants who pass the DSHS Certified Food
Manager exam on the first attempt.

Self-reported adoption of using a food thermometer to measure internal temperatures of
hot/cold foods being held (% of individuals who report practicing this behavior
"always" after completing the program)

Self-reported adoption of washing hands for 20 seconds using soap and hot water (% of
participants who report practicing this behavior "always" after participanting in
the program).


Self reported increase in the adoption of using a thermometer to determine the doneness of
food (percentage of participants who report practicing this behavior "always"
after participanting in the program).




Number of commercial producers educated about new production techniques or BMPs




Number of raw food samples tested for increased internet purchase food safety.
# of program participants who demonstrate knowledge or skill gains related to food, nutrition
and health topics including: attitudes about healthy eating, healthy food choices, selection of
healthy foods, preparation of healthy foods. (3.1.1e)
# of program participants who demonstrate knowledge or skill gains related to healthy
weight gain during pregnancy and breast feeding. (3.1.1g)
# of program participants who demonstrate knowledge or skill gains related to issues that
influence food and health behavior and associated appropriate public/community actions,
programs, and policy. (3.1.1h)
# of program participants who demonstrate knowledge or skill gains related to status of food
security in their communities and possible actions to promote increased food security.
(3.1.2c)
# of program participants documented to have increased activity levels. (3.1.1j)
# of program participants documented to have increased participation in public/community
health-related programs. (3.1.1.l)
# of program participants documented to have reduced one or more chronic disease
indicators. (3.1.1m)
# of participating communities documented to have made practice and policy changes to
promote healthy food and fitness lifestyle choices. (3.1.1m)
# of participating communities that assess food insecurity and develop appropriate action
plans. (3.12f)

# reported instances of changes made in school nutrition/wellness policies. (3.1.2g)
# of vulnerable children, youth and members of other priority groups documented to have
reduced incidence of overweight and obesity as a result of participating in relevant
educational programs. (3.1.1o)
# of priority group members documented to have increased fitness levels as a result of
participating in relevant educational programs. (3.1.1p)
# of participating communities reporting decline in indicators of chronic diseases associated
with obesity. (3.1.1q)




Number of food establishments represented by food handlers.




Number of people served in the food establishments represented by trained food handlers




Number of facilities meeting HACCP standards for food safety
Increased awareness and knowledge of food safety practices. Target: number of participants.




Behavior or practice changes that improve food safety. Target is number of participants
reporting behavior or practice changed.

Reduced health care cost and economic loss to restaurants as a result of food-borne
outbreaks. Target is number of participants or restaurants reporting reduced economic loss.


Decreased incidence of food-borne illness outbreaks in food service establishments. Target is
the number of restaurants atributing decreased incidence of food-borne illness outbreaks to
CES programs.

General understanding of value of electron beam technology for food safety




Percentage of adults adopting and maintaining at least one food safety practice




Increase awareness among the EFNEP participants about food safety issues related to
personal hygiene, food storage, food preparation, and food handling




Checking Thermometers For Accuracy, Posting Consumer Advisories For Undercooked Food,
And Cooking And Reheating Protein Food To Correct End Temperatures
2. Food Safety: The number of individuals that indicate change in behavior related to good
personal hygiene including hand washing, cooking foods adequately, avoiding cross
contamination, keeping foods at safe temperature




Number of research programs to determine the biological mechanisms that affect the quality
and safety of meat food products.




Number of research programs to develop processing techniques to optimize the safety of
processed protein-based foods.




Number of research programs to develop new methods to reduce the transmission of food-
borne pathogens.




Food safety and health – develop biosensing and microbiological technologies.
Describe the principles of a bio-security plan
Adopt HACCP and bio-security plans
Participate in Salmonella enteriditis surveillance program
Participate in livestock disease monitoring programs
Enhance the safety, sustainability, and dependability of Maine's food supply.
Safe Food Handling Practices for Consumers: Number of participants surveyed who made a
positive change in their attitude about cleaning surfaces, utensils and equipment to prevent
cross-contamination.
Safe Food Handling Practices for Consumers: Number of participants surveyed who made a
positive change in their attitude about how they thaw food.
Safe Food Handling Practices for Consumers: Number of participants surveyed who made a
positive change in their attitude about keeping the temperature in the refrigerator at 40
degrees F or below.
Safe Food Handling Practices for Consumers: Number of participants surveyed who
consumed fewer foods from unsafe sources.
Safe Food Handling Practices for Consumers: Number of participants surveyed who made a
positive change in the way they stored perishable foods.
Safe Food Handling Practices for Consumers: Number of participants surveyed more often
cooked foods to safe internal temperatures.

Safe Food Handling Practices for Consumers: Number of participants surveyed who more
often thoroughly washed their produce under running water before eating them.
Safe Food Handling Practices for Consumers: Number of participants surveyed more often
washed items that came in contact with raw meat, chicken or seafood with hot, soapy water
before continuing to cook.
Safe Food Handling Practices for Consumers: Nmber of participants surveyed who more often
washed their hands with soap and warm running water before eating.

Safe Food Handling Practices for Consumers: Number of participants surveyed who more
often washed their hands with soap and warm running water before preparing food.
Safe Food Handling Practices for Consumers: Number of participants surveyed who more
often washed the plate used to hold raw meat, poultry, or seafood with hot, soapy water
before returning cooked food to the plate OR used a
Safe Food Handling Practices for Consumers: Number of participants surveyed who used a
thermometer to check the internal temperature of food.
Safe Food Handling Practices for Consumers: Number of participants surveyed who used a
thermometer to check the internal temperature of their refrigerator.

Safe Food Handling Practices for Consumers: Number of participants who washed their hands
with soap and warm running water after working with raw meat, chicken, or seafood.
Safe Food Handling Practices for Consumers: Number of pregnant or formerly pregnant
participants surveyed avoided one or more of the following foods during pregnancy: cold hot
dogs, soft cheese like brie, Camembert and queso fesc




Improved food safety at the microbiological level




Increase number of small farmers and producers who adopt UAPB's Fresh-Cut Processing
Technology and utilize it for their fresh-cut process.
Number of program participants who increase awareness of nutrition related health issues.




Number of program participants adopting recommended practices after completing
educational programs.
Annually increase the number of healthy food snacks or lunch programs in schools and
communities.




Number of participants who were evaluated and demonstrated increased knowledge and
skills related to agricultural and food biosecurity issues




Number of participants who were evaluated in a follow up and who implement/adopt
practices related to agricultural and food biosecurity issues
Number of diagnostic tools implemented or adopted for threat identification




Number of people who increased their knowledge in health and wellness through outreach
activities
Total dollar value of grants and contracts obtained.
Number of refereed publications per year.
Number of peer-reviewed publications
Number of proceedings and published abstracts.
Number of theses produced.




Expand the knowledge base for contamination detection within packaged foods by
developing or refining technologies such as magnetic resonance or infrared spectroscopy that
will, within ten years, eliminate the problem.
Contribute to the advancement of food packaging technologies, e.g. ultrasonic sealing,
controlled environment packaging, to the extent that, annually, the risk of contamination due
to packaging is reduced measurably.




Annually document a contribution regarding how to reduce food borne pathogens in the food
supply chain.




Processing technology research will improve and optimize equipment and processing of food
in such manner as meet consumer demand as or before that demand emerges.
Processing technology research such as pulse electronic field, high pressure, ohmic heating,
and microwave will provide processors with a set of alternatives leading to efficiency and
quality gains within economic realities annually.




Define natural occurance and shedding patterns of E. coli O157:H7




Determine the extent of Salmonella typhimurium DT 104 as an emerging and zoonotic
pathogen




Develop PCR test for mycoplasma mastitis in milk samples
Peer Reviewed Publications
Number of graduate students trained
Research support in dollars for the project on E. coli O157:H7
Number of Undergraduate students trained and/or performing investigations


Number of presentations/posters at regional, national or international conferences or
workshops
Number of Grant submissions

Number of public presentations
Number of people with increase knowledge of sources, estimated cost, and
recommendations concerning foodborne illnesses in Tennessee

Number of persons receiving training and education in foodborne illnesses and prevention
Number of consumers applying knowledge from education and training
Number of small producers applying knowledge from education and training




Number of consumers that adopted one or more food handling practices.




Number of participants that approved the certification exam.

Number of clients who increase their knowledge of production and safety of food products.
Number of clients who implement positive food safety practices.

Number of cases per 100,000 population of food borne illness in Utah less than the 2005 UIBI-
PH indicators for campylobacteriosis (expressed as percentage of population).
Number of cases per 100,000 population of food borne illness in Utah less than the 2005 UIBI-
PH indicators for E. Coli (expressed as percent of population).

Number of cases per 100,000 population of food borne illness in Utah less than the 2005 UIBI-
PH indicators for salmonella (expressed as percentage of population).




Fruit and vegetable quality


Stress response in E. coli
Number of participants that wrote a plan to control the temperatures in Potentially
Hazardous Foods (PHF).
Number of participants that adopted 15 or more of 20 selected food handling practices
recommended by the Food Code.
Number of facilities that implement prepared or corrected HACCP plan as a result of the
technical help offered.
Number of facilities improving or modifying the existing GMP and SSOP as a result of the
technical help offered.


Protection from food-borne contamination


Novel biodegradable and edible films and coatings




Foodborne disease from contaminated baby formula


Foodborne bacteria and antibiotic resistance
# of research publications




Albany Fire Department Wellness




Retired Senior Volunteer Program Bone Builders
Number of individuals participating in food safety education programs who gained knowledge
of safe food handling and preparation techniques

Number of individuals and families participating in nutrition and health education programs
who reported readiness to adopt healthier dietary, food safety, and lifestyle practices
Number of individuals participating in food safety education programs who adopted safe
food handling and preparation techniques
Percent of participants who report keeping food at safe temperatures
Percent of participants who practice personal hygiene such as hand washing
Percent of program participants who score 75% or greater on knowledge tests of high risk
practices including: * Personal hygiene * Holding/time and temperature * Cooking
temperatures * Prevention of contamination




Percent of participants who report keeping food at safe temperatures.

Percent of participants who practice personal hygiene such as hand washing

Percent of program participants who score 75% or greater on knowledge tests of high risk
practices including: * Personal hygiene * Holding/time and temperature * Cooking
temperatures * Prevention of contamination
Number of people reporting or demonstrating practice changes including improved decision-
making.

Number of people reporting or demonstrating KASA changes.
Rapid detection systems move to a pilot plant testing phase


Novel rapid detection methods for food pathogens become available to the food and
processing industries improving the safety of the food supply

Number of medium or large food processing companies (1,000,000 food purchases) adopting
an antimicrobial strategy developed through the food safety program.
Increase physical activity among families who enroll in EFNEP (at least 30 minutes of
moderate intensity activity most days of the week);

Increased quality of diets, including the increased consumption of locally grown produce;
Increased food security among economically challenged households
Increase participation in our program, as well as other programs offered by our internal and
external linkages.




1) Food handlers will practice safe food handling procedures to reduce food-borne illness
outbreaks. This will be measured by comparing annual Nebraska statistics from Nebraska
Health and Human Services (NHHS) for reduced incidents of food-borne illness because of
safe food handling, decreased medical costs due to food-borne illness outbreaks and
decreased days lost from work.

   Food handlers (food service workers, food processors and livestock producers) will increase
their knowledge of safe food handling practices measured by increased knowledge about
adequate food handling and preparation and animal management practices.
   Food handlers will implement safe food handling practices for the reduction of food borne
illnesses because of strategies learned through ServSafe, HAACP and Quality Assurance.
# of companies purchasing licenses for food and food safety related patents


Adopt HACCP and bio-security plans
Adopt food safety practices
Participate in Salmonella enteriditis surveillance program
Practice safety
Number of program participants that acquired knowledge and developed skills in nutrition,
vegetable gardening, nutritious meal preparation, food safety and health and physical
activities




Number of program clients that adopted balance diets utilizing local produce and healthy
foods.




Number of program clients who adopted safer food handling, storage, and preparatin
practices




Number of program clients that lived healthier lifestyles
Percentage of individuals participating in food safety education gaining knowledge of safe
food handling and preparation techniques
Percentage of individuals participating in food safety education adopting safe food handling
and preparation techniques




Electrochemical Microbiosensor for Botulinum Toxin Detection on the Farm and in Food
Short Term


EFNEP/FSNP
Number of adults gaining awareness and knowledge regarding the importance of:




             Healthy eating (more fruits and vegetables, more whole grains
             Increasing physical activity
             Food Safety practices
             Food resource management practices
             Food planning and preparation
             Number of youth increasing knowledge regarding the importance of:
             Eating a variety of foods
             Healthy eating
             Increasing physical activity
             Food safety principles (hand washing)

STEPS TO A NEW YOU

Participants will learn about facts, attitudes, behavior change techniques and specific
behaviors related to physical activity, nutrition, body image that will allow them to live
healthier lifestyles and prevent or reduce obesity.

FOOD SAFETY

The participants will learn about safe food handling, specifically facts and skills related to the




Outcome measures for this work are both qualitative and quantitative. We will rely on
feedback from stakeholder groups, advisory boards, and individual constituents, as well as
from UW Extension teams on the relevance, importance and impact of our research program.
 The output measures listed earlier will also serve as outcome measures in that patents
graduate degrees, and publications all include an element of critical review and assessment
of uniqueness, originality, contribution to the science and knowledge base, or other
performance criteria. Finally, we will use the Thomson ISI Essential Science Indicator for
agricultural science as a measure of impact of our research program. Our target for this
outcome measure is to be ranked in the top 5 institutions in the United States. We will
continue to develop impact statements for individual projects which have shown exemplary
and significant impact.
Publications:
Grants




Expanded knowledge base




Graduate students and post-docs trained




Research Support increased


New personnel in research positions

Through research, develop improved detection methods for E.coli and Listeria in food. Target
numbers are detection methods developed or improved.
% of food processors using NMSU for their food product development
Create awareness and increase knowledge
Number of individuals adopting recommendations for nutrition and health
Percentage of adults and youth that demonstrate ability to practice personal hygiene,
practice kitchen cleanliness, cook foods adequately, avoid cross contamination, or keep foods
at safe temperatures

Adults and youth who indicate intent to adopt one or more safe food handling practices

Adults and youth will show a decrease in the number of illnesses caused by biological
contamination of food (such as bacterial, viruses, parasites)
Percentage of adults and youth that demonstrate adoption of practice by handling behaviors
associated with practicing personal hygiene, cooking foods adequately, avoiding cross
contamination, or keeping foods at safe temperatures.




Better understanding of dairy records
Better understanding of economics, nutrition, milk quality, cow comfort, and facilities;
Interpersonal & Leadership skills; and Business & economic skills




A thorough understanding of all aspects in a modern dairy operation




Participants recognize OSU as leader in area




Improved economic viability for dairy veterinary practitioners and their dairy clients
Improved milk quality on client farms
-inform the process of collecting, storing, processing, and distributing waste products from
plant and animal agriculture to the extent that there are demonstrated gains among multiple
outcomes annually
Number of clientele who learn how to use the food pyramid and nutritional guidelines to
make food decisions.

Number of clientele who adopt practices to fit their diets within the dietary guidelines.
Number of clientele reporting improvements in food preparation techniques.

Number of clientele reporting improved health and/or well-being due to changes in diet.
-Commercialization of methods/technology for improving the quality, safety and use of food
and food products for the reduction of obesity, food borne illnesses and other nutritionally
related diseases.
-Nutrition/exercise intervention programs leading to a reduction in obesity.
-Increase in the dissemination and use of research based information into newsletters and
incorporation into extension and other programs leading to a reduction in nutrition related
and food borne diseases and illnesses.

Information in published research is incorporated into production practices thus improving
the safety of the food supply.
Provide food safety training to commercial growers of fruit and vegetables, food industry
producers and school personnel (# trainings per year)
Develop and test internet based training for GMP and personal hygeine for processors and
warehouses
Formulate new approaches to food safety education for consumers, schools and the food
industry in Rhode Island




Percentage of decrease in the risk factors for food borne illness.


Number of Participants gaining awareness, knowledge and skills in Food Handling techniques.




Number of participants scoring 70% or higher on post test and national examination.




1. Percent of clients who gained new knowledge/skills, awareness and/or changed attitudes.
2. Percentage of clients who adopt healthy recommendations




3. Percentage of clients who changed behavior




Establishment of the Oklahoma Center for Agricultural Microbial Forensics and Biosecurity




Number of invitations to agricultural biosecurity team members for participation in
initiatives, programs, presentations, and consultations related to agricultural biosecurity and
microbial forensics


Number of forensics-relevant journal articles published

Conduct research of relevance to forensic plant pathology.
Number of processors and/or regulatory agencies implementing new rapid testing methods
Decreased incidence of cases of food poisoning (AL state stats, % deaths from Salmonella and
other intestinal infections in 2004 = 1.6%). Program success will be indicated by a decline or
no change in this incidence. (Short-term outcome)

New technology(-ies) developed to monitor microbial contaminants. (Medium term outcome)

New professionals in workforce with training in food safety and security. (Long-term)

Increased number of farmers, processors, food handlers, and families who are aware of food
safety and nutrition issues that can lead to illness and long-term health problems and of the
practices and technologies needed to ensure a safe and healthy food supply.

Educational programs for K-12 youth and teachers on food safety and nutrition that will help
reduce the likelihood of food-borne illness, develop good nutritional and dietary habits, avoid
obesity, and prevent chronic illnesses related to poor nutrition.

Increased number of farmers and food processors adopting research-based advances in food
science technology that will prevent the incidence and spread of foodborne illnesses.
Safe, new food products that are preserved using innovative technologies designed to
maintain food quality and nutrient content.

Increased number of program participants improving in one or more safe handling practices.
Increased number of participating youth increasing understanding of safe food handling
procedures.

Food science and technology: basic and applied research will lead to optimization of
intervention strategies incorporating high hydrostatic pressure processing, ultraviolet light,
ozone treatment, active packaging and low-temperature storage to eliminate or significantly
reduce the source of foodborne disease in food products. Applied food science research and
extension programs in these areas will increase awareness to food producers and consumers
of the most effective strategies for food product safety.

Food safety: research and extension programs will lead to enhanced safety and
wholesomeness of foods as a result of improved understanding of the mechanisms whereby
food pathogens exist, enter, survive, propagate and actuate disease syndromes in individuals
who consume contaminated products. Gene-based methods to rapidly and accurately
identify food-borne pathogens will increase the safety of food products.
1. Nutrition: The number of individuals who demonstrate adoption of healthy eating
practices based on the 2005 MyPyramid and the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.




Percentage of participants reporting improved nutritional quality of diet




Percentage of participants reporting improved hand washing practices
# of Extension publications
O: People will use requested advice.I: Percentage or number of people who plan to use
requested advice.

O: People will change behavior.I: Change in intent.

O: Interested consumer will be certified or re-certified in FSA.I: Number of certifications.
O: Other scientists are aware of our research findings.
 I: Number of refereed scientific journal articles.

O: Participants will identify an opportunity for improving hand washing behavior.I:
Percentage of participants who identify an opportunity for improving hand washing behavior.
O: Participants will increase level of knowledge.I: Percentage with increased level of
knowledge.
Number of invited presentations at professional society meetings
Percentage of program participants reporting increased knowledge after program
participation.

County Agriculture Response Teams or county agriculture emergency plans created.




O: An increase in the number of trained graduate students prepared to enter the workforce.
I: Number of M.S. and Ph.D. candidates relevant to this topic team.




Number of participants passing food handler certification


Percent of participants increasing knowledge of storing foods properly
Number of individuals and families who have adopted best management practices for food
handling and agricultural biosecurity




Increase in knowledge level and attitude of clientele in safe food production, handling, and
sanitation programs; best management practices to prevent foodborne illness; and social,
economic, and communications issues related to food safety and agricultural bio-security
Number of additional direct extension contacts made by volunteers, staff, or county agents
not receiving federal funds as a direct outcome of the work of federally funded faculty
associated with this planned program.
Reduction of incidence of foodborne illness due to better training methods on handling and
processing food safety.
Placement of gradutate students in food related industry, government agencies or
institutions of higher education.
Number of research experiments completed on dairy goat products development, food
quality and economic evaluation.
Decreased incidence of food borne illness associated with unsafe food handling practice
*Will not be measured in the near future




Application of knowledge and new leading-edge food technologies will result in improved
food quality, value and safety with positive impacts on value-added food production,
processing, handling, and distribution systems. Another expected outcome is to provide
intervention strategies to reduce bacterial contamination, increase shelf life, and reduce
occurrences of food-borne illnesses.
UNDERSTAND ROLE OF PROTEINS AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY TO MITIGATE DISEASE
- Experiments will increase peer understanding of the structure, function and regulation of
the VV G1L proteinase and the role that it plays during the assembly and maturation of
infectious progeny virions
- Experiments will increase peer understanding of the role a number of critical proteins play
in baculovirus genome replication and processing.
- understand the molecular mechanisms of quorum sensing function and consequences of
these distinct properties, which will have important implications for the development of
antivirulence strategies as well as for the particular role of each signaling system in P.
aeruginosa group behavior and pathogenesis.
- gain more detailed knowledge about the molecular biology of RNA viruses affecting corps,
animals and humans, e.g., early stages of viral infection, Trojan horse model, translational
enhancer sequences, dicistronic expression.
- peers learn how the GALLS protein participates in gene transfer to plants and its role in
plant transformation

- researchers will assess chromatophore cells for their use as a living sensor for rapid
detection of food- and water- associated pathogenic bacteria and their toxins.
- learn about new microorganisms and the mechanisms by which microorganisms acquire and
utilize foreign DNA
Researchers gain information about how viruses and bacteria operate in animals and
shellfish:
- the different pathways for influenza occurrence and pathogenesis
- genetic transformation system for C. suis.
- molecular mechanisms underlying Vibrio bacterial-shellfish interaction
- how SPO0A regulates CPE synthesis
- M. paratuberculosis interacts with the intestinal mucosa
New techniques will change how we manage diseases
- Understanding Vibrio ecology will change how the industry handles post-harvest treatment
of shellfish
- Better prevention of flu virus
- More effective programs for public health measures, personal protection, and clinical
therapies for flu
- Better control over Clostridium, by modulating SPO0A-CPE interactions for therapeutic
purposes
- Better and more efficacious practices of prevention of Johne's disease within the cattle
industry
Lives would be saved or made safer through recombinant flu vaccine, Chitosan-based
bandages, and reduction/elimination of Vibrio presence in shellfish. Furthermore,
preparedness in anticipation of zoonotic outbreaks of avian influenza and better health
promotion.
Distance and Extension education regarding food safety, food processing, value-added foods,
food packaging. Information targeted to consumers, food processing industry, and
government agency / regulatory decision-makers.

Knowledge generation and databases of food safety and food processing technologies; flavor
/ ingredient databases that relate to food quality parameters. As a result of this program
individuals and industry will modify food production and handling practices. Policy makers
will develop food processing regulations that prevent incidences of food-borne illnesses.




O: An increase in the number of trained graduate students prepared to enter the workforce.
I: Number of M.S. and Ph.D. candidates relevant to this topic team.




O: An increase in the number of trained graduate students prepared to enter the workforce.
I: Number of M.S. and Ph.D. candidates relevant to this topic team.
O: Improved water quality in ground and surface water bodies.I: Changes in water quality
data over time (e.g. pesticides, pests).




Enhance research and outreach capabilities at the University of Rhode Island
Percent of participants at trainings indicating an increase in knowledge gained
Number of participants at the trainings




Number of Partnering agencies throughout the state who collaborated in these efforts
OUTCOME TYPE        KA PERCENTAGE - 1862 EXTENSION        KA PERCENTAGE - 1890 EXTENSION




Knowledge Outcome                                    30
Action Outcome                                       30
Condition Outcome                                    30

Knowledge Outcome                                    30
Knowledge Outcome                                     3

Action Outcome                                        3

Action Outcome                                        3
Action Outcome                                        3

Knowledge Outcome                                    25

Knowledge Outcome                                    25

Action Outcome                                       25


Action Outcome                                       25




Knowledge Outcome                                    40                                    40
Knowledge Outcome   40   40




Knowledge Outcome   40   40
Knowledge Outcome   28

Knowledge Outcome   28
Knowledge Outcome    5


Knowledge Outcome    5




Knowledge Outcome    5




Action Outcome       5
Action Outcome        5

Action Outcome        5
Action Outcome        5

Condition Outcome     5
Action Outcome       20
Action Outcome       20
Action Outcome       20
Action Outcome       20
Action Outcome       20
Action Outcome       20
Action Outcome       20
Action Outcome       20
Action Outcome       20
Action Outcome       20
Knowledge Outcome    20
Knowledge Outcome    20
Knowledge Outcome    20
Knowledge Outcome    20
Knowledge Outcome    20
Knowledge Outcome    20
Knowledge Outcome    20
Knowledge Outcome    20
Knowledge Outcome    20
Knowledge Outcome    20
Knowledge Outcome    20
Knowledge Outcome    20
Knowledge Outcome    20
Knowledge Outcome    20




Knowledge Outcome   100
Knowledge Outcome   100




Knowledge Outcome   100




Knowledge Outcome   100




Knowledge Outcome   100




Knowledge Outcome   100
Action Outcome      100
Action Outcome      100
Action Outcome      100
Knowledge Outcome   35
Knowledge Outcome
Knowledge Outcome
Action Outcome

Action Outcome




Knowledge Outcome   40   40




Action Outcome       5




Action Outcome
Knowledge Outcome




Knowledge Outcome




Action Outcome
Knowledge Outcome

Condition Outcome




Action Outcome      15   25




Knowledge Outcome
Knowledge Outcome
Action Outcome




Knowledge Outcome   15   15
Action Outcome      15   15




Knowledge Outcome   15   15




Knowledge Outcome   15   15




Knowledge Outcome   15   15
Knowledge Outcome    15   15

Knowledge Outcome

Action Outcome

Knowledge Outcome   100




Action Outcome      100




Action Outcome      100




Action Outcome      100




Knowledge Outcome    10   10




Action Outcome       15   15
Knowledge Outcome   14

Knowledge Outcome   14


Knowledge Outcome   14


Knowledge Outcome   14
Action Outcome      14

Action Outcome      14

Action Outcome      14

Action Outcome      14

Action Outcome      14

Action Outcome      14


Condition Outcome   14

Condition Outcome   14

Condition Outcome   14




Knowledge Outcome   30   30




Condition Outcome   30   30




Condition Outcome   30   30
Knowledge Outcome   100




Action Outcome      100


Condition Outcome   100




Condition Outcome   100

Knowledge Outcome




Action Outcome       25




Knowledge Outcome    25




Action Outcome      100
Action Outcome      10   10




Action Outcome       5




Knowledge Outcome    5




Action Outcome       5




Action Outcome
Knowledge Outcome   20
Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome      20
Condition Outcome   20


Knowledge Outcome   40   40
Knowledge Outcome   40   40


Knowledge Outcome   40   40

Action Outcome      40   40

Action Outcome      40   40

Action Outcome      40   40


Action Outcome      40   40


Action Outcome      40   40

Action Outcome      40   40


Action Outcome      40   40


Action Outcome      40   40

Action Outcome      40   40

Action Outcome      40   40


Action Outcome      40   40


Knowledge Outcome   40   40




Condition Outcome   30   30




Knowledge Outcome        25
Knowledge Outcome   10




Action Outcome      10
Condition Outcome   10




Knowledge Outcome   10




Action Outcome      10
Condition Outcome   10




Knowledge Outcome   20
Action Outcome      20
Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10




Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome   20




Action Outcome   20




Action Outcome   20
Action Outcome      20




Condition Outcome




Condition Outcome




Knowledge Outcome
Condition Outcome
Action Outcome
Knowledge Outcome
Action Outcome




Knowledge Outcome
Knowledge Outcome

Knowledge Outcome

Knowledge Outcome

Action Outcome
Action Outcome
Action Outcome




Action Outcome      100




Knowledge Outcome   100

Knowledge Outcome    20
Action Outcome       20


Condition Outcome    20

Condition Outcome    20


Condition Outcome    20




Knowledge Outcome    40   40


Knowledge Outcome    40   40
Action Outcome      100

Action Outcome      100

Knowledge Outcome   100

Action Outcome      100


Knowledge Outcome    40   40


Knowledge Outcome    40   40




Knowledge Outcome    40   40


Knowledge Outcome    40   40
Knowledge Outcome    50




Action Outcome       14




Action Outcome       14
Knowledge Outcome     6


Knowledge Outcome     6

Action Outcome        6
Action Outcome       20
Action Outcome       20


Knowledge Outcome    20




Action Outcome       20

Action Outcome      100

Knowledge Outcome   100
Action Outcome




Condition Outcome


Action Outcome      40   40

Condition Outcome   10

Condition Outcome   10
Condition Outcome   10

Condition Outcome   10




Condition Outcome   10
Action Outcome




Action Outcome      20
Knowledge Outcome   20




Knowledge Outcome   20




Knowledge Outcome   20




Knowledge Outcome   20

Knowledge Outcome    6

Action Outcome       6




Action Outcome      14
Condition Outcome   35




Condition Outcome
Knowledge Outcome




Action Outcome




Action Outcome




Action Outcome


Condition Outcome


Action Outcome      100
Action Outcome       50
Action Outcome       33
Knowledge Outcome    33


Knowledge Outcome    50

Knowledge Outcome    50


Condition Outcome    50


Action Outcome       50




Knowledge Outcome    15
Knowledge Outcome   15




Knowledge Outcome   15




Knowledge Outcome   15




Condition Outcome   15
Condition Outcome   15


Action Outcome      20

Knowledge Outcome   15

Action Outcome      15
Action Outcome      15

Condition Outcome   15




Condition Outcome


Knowledge Outcome

Knowledge Outcome   50
Action Outcome       50

Condition Outcome    50




Condition Outcome   100


Knowledge Outcome   100




Knowledge Outcome   100




Knowledge Outcome         10
Action Outcome           10




Condition Outcome        10




Knowledge Outcome   26




Condition Outcome   26


Knowledge Outcome   26

Action Outcome      26
Condition Outcome   32


Knowledge Outcome   28

Action Outcome      28

Condition Outcome   28




Knowledge Outcome   10   10




Knowledge Outcome   10   10


Action Outcome      10   10

Action Outcome      10   10

Action Outcome      10   10

Action Outcome      10   10




Condition Outcome   10   10




Condition Outcome   10   10
Action Outcome      10   10




Action Outcome      15




Action Outcome      15
Knowledge Outcome   50
Action Outcome      40

Action Outcome      40

Action Outcome      40

Action Outcome      40


Action Outcome      40

Condition Outcome   40
Knowledge Outcome   24   24

Knowledge Outcome   10    0

Action Outcome      10    0




Action Outcome       0




Knowledge Outcome   30


Knowledge Outcome   30

Action Outcome      30




Knowledge Outcome   30


Knowledge Outcome   10    0

Action Outcome      24   24

Condition Outcome   24   24
Knowledge Outcome    0   0

Condition Outcome   30




Condition Outcome    8




Knowledge Outcome




Knowledge Outcome
Action Outcome




Condition Outcome


Knowledge Outcome    8




Action Outcome       8




Action Outcome      40




Action Outcome       0

Condition Outcome    0




Condition Outcome    5
Knowledge Outcome   6
Knowledge Outcome   6




Action Outcome      6
KA PERCENTAGE - 1862 RESEARCH        KA PERCENTAGE - 1890 RESEARCH   PLAN START YEAR




                                                                                 2007
                                                                                 2007
                                                                                 2007

                                30                                               2007
                                 6                                               2007

                                 6                                               2007

                                 6                                               2007
                                 6                                               2007

                                25                                               2007

                                25                                               2007

                                25                                               2007


                                25                                               2007




                                40                                               2007
40   2007




40   2007
28   2007

28   2007
 5   2007


 5   2007




 5   2007




 5   2007
 5   2007

 5   2007
 5   2007

 5   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007
20   2007




     2007
2007




2007




2007




2007




2007
2007
2007
2007
     2007
 8   2007
 8   2007
 8   2007

 8   2007




40   2007




 0   2007




29   2007
29   2007




29   2007




29   2007
29         2007

      90   2007




15     0   2007




     100   2007
     100   2007
     100   2007




15    15   2007
15   15   2007




15   15   2007




15   15   2007




15   15   2007
 15   15   2007

      90   2007

      90   2007

100        2007




100        2007




100        2007




100        2007




 10   10   2007




 15   15   2007
14        2007

14        2007


14        2007


14        2007
14        2007

14        2007

14        2007

14        2007

14        2007

14        2007


14        2007

14        2007

14        2007




30   30   2007




30   30   2007




30   30   2007
100   2007




100   2007


100   2007




100   2007

 40   2007




      2007




      2007




 10   2007
10   70   2007




 5        2007




 5        2007




 5        2007




13        2007
20        2007
20        2007
20        2007
20        2007
20        2007


28        2007
28        2007


28        2007

28        2007

28        2007

28        2007


28        2007


28        2007

28        2007


28        2007


28        2007

28        2007

28        2007


28        2007


28        2007




30   30   2007




     25   2007
10   2007




10   2007
10   2007




17   2007




17   2007
17   2007




31   2007
31   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007
10   2007




20   2007
20   2007




20   2007




20   2007
20   2007




10   2007




10   2007




10   2007
15   2007
15   2007
10   2007
15   2007




15   2007
15        2007

15        2007

     60   2007

     60   2007
     60   2007
     60   2007




          2007




          2007

20        2007
20        2007


20        2007

20        2007


20        2007




28        2007


28        2007
     2007

     2007

     2007

     2007


28   2007


28   2007




28   2007


28   2007
50   2007




14   2007




14   2007
 9   2007


 9   2007

 9   2007
     2007
     2007


     2007




     2007

10   2007

10   2007
18        2007




18        2007


28        2007

10        2007

10        2007
10        2007

10        2007




10        2007
     20   2007




20        2007
20   2007




20   2007




20   2007




20   2007

 9   2007

 9   2007




14   2007
    2007




3   2007
 10   2007




 10   2007




 10   2007




 10   2007


 10   2007


100   2007
 50   2007
 33   2007
 33   2007


  0   2007

  0   2007


  0   2007


  0   2007




 15   2007
15        2007




15        2007




15        2007




15        2007
15        2007


20        2007

15        2007

15        2007
15        2007

15        2007




     10   2007


18        2007

50        2007
 50        2007

 50        2007




100        2007


100        2007




100        2007




      10   2007
     10   2007




     10   2007




20        2007




20        2007


20        2007

20        2007
18        2007


28   28   2007

28   28   2007

28   28   2007




10   10   2007




10   10   2007


10   10   2007

10   10   2007

10   10   2007

10   10   2007




10   10   2007




10   10   2007
10   70   2007




          2007




          2007
50        2007
15        2007

15        2007

15        2007

15        2007


15        2007

15        2007
24   24   2007

 0    0   2007

 0    0   2007




 5        2007




30        2007


30        2007

30        2007




30        2007


 0    0   2007

24   24   2007

24   24   2007
 0   10   2007

30        2007




 8        2007




11        2007




12        2007
12   2007




12   2007


 8   2007




 8   2007




15   2007




 5   2007

 5   2007




 5   2007
20   2007
20   2007




20   2007
                        1862 EXTENSION    1890 EXTENSION    1862 RESEARCH
QUANTITATIVE TARGET     OUTCOME MEASURE   OUTCOME MEASURE   OUTCOME MEASURE




                      60 y
                      20 y
                       0y

                       0y                                   y
                      75 y

                      50 y

                    5y
                  196 y

                  350 y                                     y

                  350 y                                     y

                  350 y                                     y


                  300 y                                     y




                  950 y
   50 y   y




   30 y   y
    0y

    0y
   17 y   y


22000 y




   28 y




   30     y
   40 y

   35 y
   10 y   y

    5y
      y
  125 y
 2785 y
      y
      y
   25 y
      y
   40 y
      y
  100 y
  100 y
      y
  270 y
10050 y
      y
      y
   50 y
 2460 y
   65 y
   50 y
  110 y
      y
  670 y
  150 y




    0y
 0y




 0y




 0y




 0y




 0   y
 0   y
 0   y
25   y
      y
  2       y
 30       y
 40       y

 10       y




 30 y     y




850 y




          y
0   y




    y




    y
            y

  0




 50 y   y   y




  1
  0
  0




200 y
100 y   y   y




100 y




100 y




 10 y
 10 y

  0

  0

 75 y       y




 75 y       y




 80 y       y




 72 y       y




500 y   y   y
    0y        y

    0y        y


    0y        y


    0y        y
18000 y       y

 1500 y       y

    0y        y

    0y

   25 y       y

  250 y       y


    0y        y

    0y        y

    0y        y




  100 y   y




 1000 y   y




    1y
500 y




250 y


 10 y




 10 y

  0       y




 55 y




100 y




      y
 6000 y     y




    1           y




    1           y




    0           y




    0           y
   25   y
   25   y
   25   y
   25   y
    0   y


15000 y     y
15000 y   y


15000 y   y

10000 y   y

10000 y   y

10000 y   y


10000 y   y


   10 y   y

10000 y   y


10000 y   y


10000 y   y

10000 y   y

10000 y   y


10000 y   y


10000 y   y




    0         y




    0     y
900 y   y




600 y   y
   6y    y




6500 y   y




2100 y   y
     1     y




   100 y   y
200000 y   y
     5     y
    10     y
    10     y
     8     y




     1     y
1   y




1   y




1   y
    1   y




    1   y




    1   y




    1   y
    7   y
    6   y
50000   y
    5   y




    7   y
   1     y

   7     y

 100

  50
   0
   0




1000 y




2500 y

7200 y
3600 y


  12 y

   1y


  14 y




         y


         y
1200 y

1750 y

   3y

   3y


           y


           y




           y


           y
   1       y




       y




       y
       y   y


       y   y

       y   y
    50 y
    50 y


    80 y




       y

 13400 y

124000 y
   1       y




   1       y


   0       y

  80 y

  80 y
  80 y

  80 y




2000 y     y
   0




       y
300 y   y




300 y   y




300 y   y




300 y   y

 65 y   y

 50 y   y




        y
800 y




160     y
   0       y




   0       y




   0       y




   0       y


   0       y


   1       y
  20 y
2000 y     y
5000 y     y


       y

       y


       y


       y




   0y
    0y




    0y




    0y




    0y
    0y


    0     y

18000 y   y

14400 y   y
 7200 y   y

 7200 y   y




    0


    0     y

    5y
  0y

  0y




100 y


400 y




375 y




 80     y
50     y




30     y




 1y        y




10 y       y


 1         y

           y
0        y


0        y

0        y

0        y




0y   y




0y   y


0y   y

0        y

0y   y

0y   y




0        y




0y   y   y
10000 y   y




   40 y




   25 y
    1y
 2853 y

  483 y

   57 y

    2y    y


 9198     y

 1320 y
    1

   80 y

   10 y




    3     y




    0y


    0y

    0y




    0y    y


26000 y

    0y

    1y    y
1

0y




0    y




0    y




5    y
 5       y




 0       y


10       y




 0       y




 2       y




 2       y

 5y




     y   y
  50 y
3000 y   y




     y
1890 RESEARCH
OUTCOME MEASURE   ACTUAL AMOUNT




                                    70
                                     0
                                     0

                                     0
                                    60

                                     0

                                     0
                                     0

                                   151

                                   151

                                     0


                                    48




                                  1310
 1109




  580
16524

 4104
   69


30222




   32




   82
  159

  127
   83

    9
  106
  131
 4325
  181
    1
   15
   25
   20
  218
37825
 3206
  341
  283
   19
  245
   20
  100
  146
  120
   34
   42
   99
  318
  182




    0
 0




 0




47




51




55
 0
 0
 0
1329
   2
  30
  40

  10




 120




 478




   0
0




0




0
       0

y     25




      50




y      1
y      0
y      0




    1006
y   295




    289




    239




    329
     1245

y       0

y       0

       80




       72




       90




       70




y   22702




y     272
     0

     0


     0


     0
 33376

 16928

     0

     0

   591

  1361


     0

     0

     0




   464




219771




     1
3877




1211


   5




   5

   0




   0




  36




 240
y   40000




        2




        1




        1




        0
        0
        0
        0
        0
        0


    16933
    15630


    16188

    17305

    15816

    15444


    15816


    17491

    17491


    17305


    17491

     7443

    17491


    17305


    15816




        0




y       0
956




593
  11




4955




2464
     1




  6991
254134
     0
     0
     0
     0




     1
1




1




1
     1




     2




     2




     2
     3
     9
153152
    18




    16
       4

      12

y      0

y     25
y      0
y      0




     858




    3006

    1577
     802


      10

       3


      11




       0


       0
1400

1740

 113

   2


   0


   0




   0


   0
   1




   0




   0
 436


 670

1328
  81
  96


  93




   0

   0

   0
       1




       1


       0

       0

       0
       0

       0




    1550
y      0




       0
3376




2350




2350




1500

   0

   0




   0
  0




182
2000000




      0




     26




      0


      0


      1
     40
   2000
   5000


   3173

   2152


    115


    115




      0
        0




        0




        0




        0
        0


        0

    38139

    30511
    30511

    15255




y       0


        1

      140
      1

      1




    149


    580




    580




y     0
y    0




y    0




     1




    20


     0

     0
    0


y   0

y   0

y   0




    0




    0


    0

y   0

    0

    0




y   0




y   0
y   37000




       68




       71
        0
     2573

      822

       52

       12


     2967

      520
y       2

       45

        4




       15




      348


      525

      348




     1000


    10604

        0

        0
y    0

     0




    10




     5




     5
0




0


0




0




5




8

0




1
   76
23876




  224
QUALITATIVE OUTCOME - ISSUES

Every year several outbreaks and about 150 cases of foodborne illnesses are reported by the
Guam Department of Public Health and Social Services. The estimated number of foodborne
illness occurring on Guam each year are between 13,000 and 152,000. The estimated
economic cost is from $5.0 to 40.0 million per year. One identified food vehicle causing
foodborne illness is kelaguen, an ethnic meat dish, which is prepared by mixing raw meat
with lemon, onions, hot peppers and grated coconuts. The high frequency of foodborne
illness on Guam was attributed to the lack of food safety knowledge and poor food handling
practice.




Safe food handling is critical to the health of all of our population. It is critical for food
handlers, whether at home or serving the public to know and understand what constitutes
safe food handling and those proactices to assure that all food that is served or stored is
indeed safe.
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) is a systematic preventive approach to
food safety, pharmaceutical safety, etc. that addresses physical, chemical and biological
hazards as a means of prevention rather than finished product inspection. HACCP is used in
the food industry to identify potential food safety hazards, so that key actions, known as
Critical Control Points (CCP's) can be taken to reduce or eliminate the risk of the hazards
being realized. The system is used at all stages of food production and preparation processes
including packaging, distribution, etc. (Wikipedia). Therefore, consumers and food handlers
must be sufficiently educated whereby all facets of our food supply is safe and protected.


Sourcing information, interpreting regulatory requirements and providing technical support
to small businesses and entrepreneurs is vital service provided through the NC Cooperative
Extension Service. Businesses look to Extension Specialists for unbiased information relative
to the safety, quality and processing technologies in food systems.




The food industry of Arkansas needs continuous training to remain globally competitive.
Workshops and training sessions offered and conducted will allow them to remain
prosperous and competitive.




The need for advanced food research to support Arkansas' vast food processing industries
remains paramount to improving the state's economy. The types of food research include
harvest, storage, processing and nutritional quality.
According to the Centers for Disease Control, 76% of all incidences of food poisoning come
from eating in restaurants. Many of these incidents of food poisonings can be prevented by
certain procedures taught at a program called "ServSafe".

The Arkansas State Health Department has identified language as a barrier when working
with a growing Hispanic audience (employees and food service managers). The most
prevalent issue is communicating the standard set by state and federal guidelines.




The need is to protect food from contamination by pathogenic microorganisms, parasites,
and naturally occurring toxins. Current data indicates a large portion of the population is
improperly and unsafely handling food in the home leading to potentially lethal illnesses.
Seventy-six million cases of food borne illnesses per year with 325,000 cases resulting in
hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths. Clients include limited resource families, school children,
minority families, youth, adults, daycare providers, etc.
The need is to protect food from contamination by pathogenic microorganisms, parasites,
and naturally occurring toxins. Current data indicates a large portion of the population is
improperly and unsafely handling food in the home leading to potentially lethal illnesses.
Seventy-six million cases of food borne illnesses per year with 325,000 cases resulting in
hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths. Clients include limited resource families, school children,
minority families, youth, adults, daycare providers, etc.

The need is to protect food from contamination by pathogenic microorganisms, parasites,
and naturally occurring toxins. Current data indicates a large portion of the population is
improperly and unsafely handling food in the home leading to potentially lethal illnesses.
Seventy-six million cases of food borne illnesses per year with 325,000 cases resulting in
hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths. Clients include limited resource families, school children,
minority families, youth, adults, daycare providers, etc.

The need is to protect food from contamination by pathogenic microorganisms, parasites,
and naturally occurring toxins. Current data indicates a large portion of the population is
improperly and unsafely handling food in the home leading to potentially lethal illnesses.
Seventy-six million cases of food borne illnesses per year with 325,000 cases resulting in
hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths. Clients include limited resource families, school children,
minority families, youth, adults, daycare providers, etc.

The need is to protect food from contamination by pathogenic microorganisms, parasites,
and naturally occurring toxins. Current data indicates a large portion of the population is
improperly and unsafely handling food in the home leading to potentially lethal illnesses.
Seventy-six million cases of food borne illnesses per year with 325,000 cases resulting in
hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths. Clients include limited resource families, school children,
minority families, youth, adults, daycare providers, etc.

The need is to protect food from contamination by pathogenic microorganisms, parasites,
and naturally occurring toxins. Current data indicates a large portion of the population is
improperly and unsafely handling food in the home leading to potentially lethal illnesses.
Seventy-six million cases of food borne illnesses per year with 325,000 cases resulting in
hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths. Clients include limited resource families, school children,
minority families, youth, adults, daycare providers, etc.
Food borne illnesses impact 1 in 65 Montanans so food safety is of growing concern for the
food service industry, public and private agencies. Food safety training ranges from basic safe
food handling practices to understanding HACCP. The financial costs of food-borne illnesses
are tremendous covering lost wages, health care, and investigation. These losses have
widespread implications in health care costs, productivity and the health and economic well-
being of children, families and communities.




Keeping abreast of new developments in processing technologists is vital to ensure
competitiveness in today's markets. Businesses rely upon Extension Specialists to provide
technical assistance and advise on new techniques and emerging issues affecting their
businesses.

The burden of food borne disease in the United States is significant on both the well being of
the economy as well as human health. Mitigation of the high rates of food borne illness must
start at the sources – the handling of food in retail and consumers. In Iowa, Norovirus is the
leading cause of food borne illness and is mainly contracted in foodservice establishments.
Enteric bacteria such as Salmonella and E. coli cause significant amounts of illness also.




UMass Extension, in cooperation with the Universities of Connecticut and Rhode Island, and
national partners in food safety training and certification will improve opportunities for
under-educated and limited English proficient school food service personnel to successfully
complete the food manager certification examination. This integrative approach responds to
the increased diversity of the food service trainees and declining exam passing rates.
Outbreaks of listeriosis derived from consumption of fish contaminated with L.
monoctogenes still occur annually in the U.S. The development of new methods for inhibiting
the refrigerated growth of the organism and destroying L. monocytogenes on seafood in
addition to optimizing sanitary practices of seafood processing plants will assist in greatly
reducing the numbers of this organism in processing plants and on fish tissue and in
eliminating or reducing further seafood derived outbreaks The purpose of these studies is to
reduce the public health hazard of human pathogenic bacteria associated with seafood by
reducing the number of human pathogenic bacteria in processing plants, identifying
optimized plant sanitation practices, and by reduction of psychrotrophic human pathogenic
bacteria on seafood.


In this project we will develop new food preservation strategies based on nanotechnological
approaches to produce nanometer sized antimicrobial systems in the form of particles that
improve antimicrobial activity in food formulations and food process operations. Three
different encapsulation systems have shown promise. These include: (1) natural phenolic
compounds encapsulated in surfactant-based micelles for application in liquid/semi-fluid
food systems (2) phospholipid liposomes for encapsulation of polypeptide antimicrobials and
application in liquid or solid systems and (3) natural phenolic and polypeptide antimicrobials
encapsulated in emulsion droplets for delivery in liquid/semifluid and solid food systems. We
expect that the new systems will have either substantially higher antimicrobial activity or
higher stability than free antimicrobials. Because of the small size of capsules, no change in
appearance and texture of foods should be observed. This research has the potential to
dramatically improves the safety of processed foods and may have counter-bioterrorism as
well as military applications.




L. monocytogenes contamination is responsible for the majority of Class I recalls of processed
foods. The presence of L. monocytogenes in processed foods is thought to be due to post-
processing contamination from established organisms in the processing environment.
Although research has focused upon adhesion and biofilm formation by Listeria
monocytogenes, no one has studied the potential of bacterial transfer from food processing
surfaces to foods, and from foods to processing surfaces. The overall purpose of this research
is to obtain a more precise understanding of the potential for Listeria monocytogenes
transfer and the influence of moisture on this transfer. Ultimately, the results of this research
will answer the question: should food safety advice specify drying of food contact surfaces
after cleaning and sanitizing?
Foodborne illness continues to be a significant and preventable public health issue in the U.S.
This project will determine the cellular events leading to the production of an enterotoxin
responsible for foodborne disease as well as possible use of plant (natural) products to inhibit
growth of selected bacteria which are causes of such illnesses
Eating fresh fruits and vegetables that have not been properly cleaned before increases the
chances of an individual getting sick from eating that food.




In accordance with federal regulations, food processing facilities must be registered for
biosecurity purposes. The registration helps ensure that foods are produced in a safe,
wholesome manner. Recent food borne disease outbreaks from food produced in
commercial facilities has underscored the importance of this registration.

Traditional methods for the detection of Salmonella are time consuming. The rapid method
developed through this research will reduce labor and time of analysis for meat and poultry
processors and thus reduce the risk to consumers.




The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that annually, 76 million
people in the United States become sick with foodborne illnesses; 325,000 are hospitalized,
and 5,000 die each year. Foodborne illnesses are typically caused by improperly prepared
food. The economic cost of foodborne illness is estimated to be between $10 billion and $83
billion dollars per year. This equates to an estimated cost of approximately $131 to $1,092
per foodborne illness case.
HACCP is a leading food safety program in the United States. Implementation of this program
is required by law for juice, meat and poultry, and seafood processors. This program is
voluntary, but widely adopted, for other food processors such as dairy.




Food processors in Virginia need guidance on formulation and regulation of their products to
produce safe and wholesome food products in compliance with state and federal laws.


The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that annually, 76 million
people in the United States become sick with foodborne illnesses with 325,000 hospitalized,
and 5,000 that die each year. Foodborne illnesses are typically caused by improperly
prepared food. The economic cost of foodborne illness is estimated to be between $10 billion
and $83 billion dollars per year. This equates to an estimated cost of approximately $131 to
$1,092 per foodborne illness case.




Small, medium and large food processors in Virginia need guidance on formulation,
processing, food safety programs and regulations regarding their products. Education in
these areas ensures the production of safe and wholesome food products in compliance with
state and federal laws. In addition, the implementation of effective front end food safety
programs can reduce risk and increase the safety associated with various types of food
products.
The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that annually, 76 million
people in the United States become sick with foodborne illnesses: 325,000 are hospitalized,
and 5,000 die each year. Foodborne illnesses are typically caused by improperly prepared
food. The economic cost of foodborne illness is estimated to be between $10 billion and $83
billion dollars per year. This equates to an estimated cost of approximately $131 to $1,092
per foodborne illness case.
Allowing raw foods to come in contact with cooked foods that will not be re-heated increases
the likelihood that the consumer will get a food-borne illness.
Using unsafe sanitary practices while processing meat and poultry increases the likelihood
that the resulting products may be contaminated procedures
In order to become a Certified Food Manager (CFM), an individual must complete and pass
the state exam.


Potentially hazardous foods held at unsafe internal temperatures (41 to 135 degrees F)
increase one's risk for contracting a food borne illness.

Poor personal hygiene is one of the leading factors behind food borne disease outbreaks.
Following proper hand washing procedures can significantly reduce the risk for food borne
illness in retail establishments.

When foods are undercooked, pathogens that might be present on the food have an
opportunity to grow and divide, thus increasing the risk for food borne illness. The only way
to accurately determine if a food has been properly cooked is to measure its internal
temperature.


For the Mennonite community in the Shenandoah Valley and the 400 families who rely on
dairy and poultry as their primary farming operation, economic pressures and environmental
challenges have made it more difficult and expensive to get into and remain in agriculture.
Produce auctions have proven successful in establishing produce growing as a viable
alternative enterprise in other plain communities.


The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that annually, 76 million
people in the United States become sick with foodborne illnesses: 325,000 are hospitalized,
and 5,000 die each year. Foodborne illnesses are typically can be caused by raw food. The
economic cost of foodborne illness is estimated to be between $10 billion and $83 billion
dollars per year. This equates to an estimated cost of approximately $131 to $1,092 per
foodborne illness case. Internet products are sold across the country without necessarily
going through conventional interstate distribution chains. This selling practice in general
reduces the steps associated with getting products to consumers, however it may also bypass
some inspection and testing programs traditionally established by buyer or government
agencies.
The National Restaurant Association has estimated that the average cost of a foodborne
illness outbreak to an establishment is about $75,000. Food handlers should be trained in
safe food handling techniques. According to the Food and Drug Administration, an estimated
two to three percent of all foodborne illnesses lead to secondary long-term illnesses.


The National Restaurant Association has estimated that the average cost of a foodborne
illness outbreak to an establishment is about $75,000. Food handlers should be trained in
safe food handling techniques. According to the Food and Drug Administration, it is
estimated that two to three percent of all foodborne illnesses lead to secondary long-term
illnesses.

The National Restaurant Association has estimated that the average cost of a foodborne
illness outbreak to an establishment is about $75,000. Food handlers should be trained in
safe food handling techniques to meet HACCP standards.
Microbial contamination of food is a serious public health problem: Each year in the U.S.,
foodborne diseases cause approximately 76 million illnesses, 325,000 hospitalizations, and
5,000 deaths. With approximately 60% of foodborne illness outbreaks nationwide
attributable to food-service establishments, food-service personnel are key to reducing the
risk of foodborne illness. UW CES partners with the Wyoming Department of Agriculture or a
local city/county helath department to conduct a variety of educational programs.




Microbial contamination of food is a serious public health problem: Each year in the U.S.
foodborne diseases cause approximately 76 million illnesses, 325,000 hospitilizations, and
5,000 deaths. With approximately 60% of foodborne illness outbreaks nationwide
attributable to food-service establishments, food-service personnel are key to reducing the
risk of foodborne illness.
Microbial contamination of food is a serious public health problem: Each year in the U.S.
foodborne diseases cause approximately 76 million illnesses, 325,000 hospitalizations, and
5,000 deaths.

Microbial contamination of food is a serious public health problem: Each year in the U.S.
foodborne diseases cause approximately 76 million illnesses, 325,000 hospitalizations, and
5,000 deaths. With approximately 60% of foodborne illness outbreaks attributable to food-
service establishments, food-service personnel are key to reducing the risk.
Consumers with concerns involving food safety especially for foods not amenable to heat
treatment such as fresh fruits and vegetables.

In order to help prevent food borne illness outbreaks, individuals enrolled in EFNEP and those
attending food safety lectures and/or demonstrations need to adopt and maintain at least
one food safety practice such as washing hands and surfaces often, avoiding cross-
contamination, refrigerating food promptly, and cooking food at proper temperatures.

In order to help prevent food borne illness outbreaks, individuals enrolled in EFNEP and those
attending food safety lectures and/or demonstrations need to be aware of the importance of
washing hands and surfaces often, avoiding cross-contamination, refrigerating food promptly,
and cooking food at proper temperatures.




As of October 1, 1999, the Food Service Sanitation Code required Illinois certified food service
sanitation managers to attend food safety training with a minimum of five hours or to
complete a re-certification exam to be eligible for re-certification.
Public awareness of food safety has been increasing recently due to several large outbreaks
of bacterial foodborne illnesses associated with beef, peanut butter, and other products, and
widespread publicity about the contamination of certain imported food products. The threat
of bioterrorism on the safety of the food supply is also a growing concern. Consequently,
food safety continues to be a major public health issue in the United States. Millions of
people become sick every year after eating food contaminated with pathogenic bacteria or
their toxins, or through personal contact with people exposed to foodborne pathogens.
Most cases of foodborne illness can be prevented through hygienic practices such as
handwashing and by routinely following proper food handling and preparation
recommendations.

The U.S. still has one of the safest if not the safest food supply in the world. However,
outbreaks of foodborne illness continue to plague this country and represent not only a
serious threat to public health, but a huge economic burden. Each year, an estimated 76
million cases of foodborne illness occur in the U.S., including 325,000 hospitalizations and
5,000 fatalities. The estimated cost of foodborne illness from the five leading bacterial
foodborne pathogens is $6.9 billion annually.
While processed food has taken much of the work and worry out of meal preparation, it has
largely shifted the responsibility for food safety from the consumer's kitchen into the hands
of food processors and food service providers. To help ensure that their products are safe,
food processors must use methods that meet food safety regulations set forth by the federal
government.

With more than 200 known diseases capable of transmission through food, there are no
simple approaches to diagnose foodborne illness. More than 350 million episodes of diarrhea
are estimated to occur annually in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention. Approximately 75 million of these are thought to be due to
foodborne disease, accounting for an estimated 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths.




In the area of food science, probiotics is a growing field that employs new ways to utilize
beneficial microbes to improve food nutrition and safety.
The rapid detection of toxic food agents and the development of strategies to reduce their
presence in food are problems that need to be addressed to improve the safety of the food
and water supply in South Carolina.


Value added products gives the producer increased profit for their agricultural product. The
farmer will recieve increased income at the farm gate because the value of the crop will
increase with processing. Increased producer profit will add to community viability.
The prevalence of non-communicable diseases has been escalating during the past decade.
The population of FSM in fy'07 was estimated at 107,000. In Chuuk State alone, of a
population of 53,595, the number of patients who go to Public Health for diabetes was 6,547
and 9,013 for hypertension. The Needs Assessment Survey conducted in 2003-04; revealed
that 54% of the 851 subjects were overweight and very overweight. More people in the
survey were eating only the energy and body building foods and do not consume vegetables
and fruits. More people combine local as well as imported refined foods in their diet. There is
also big consumption of foods high in saturated fats and sugars. These statistics are
representative of 50% of the FSM population. Everyone cares!

With people's diet too high in sugars, sodium and saturated fats and very low in fruits and
vegetables, the rate of non-communicable disease is escalating everywhere. If this trend
continues, the end results is that there will be more cases of cardiovascular diseases, obesity,
hypertension and significant disability from these chronic diseases. Another problem was
food poisoning or food-borne illnesses. Most of the food consumed in parties, traditional
ceremonies, family and public gatherings, including funerals and important events were
prepared and packed hours before they were actually served without proper storage.

Participants of food technology classes had gained knowledge about processing food




People who had hands on practice in the processing of food products as well as those who
have evaluated the food items by taste tests, demonstrated interest in increasing their
productivity in food provision, as well as opening their minds to go into food businesses,
having been armed with acquired skills and product ideas for sale.

It has always been difficult to reverse the change in attitudes toward fast and imported
processed food, which has become a habit to so many people in the islands. There is a huge
change in the preference of imported processed food over local food, which has contributed
to an increase in NCDs and the escalating cost of health care.

Surveys showed a high rate of vitamin A deficiency is associated with poor eating habits.
Nutrition agents conducted educational programs on human nutrition in order to raise
awareness among homemakers and promoted balance diets to reduce nutrition related
illnesses.
A dietary study carried out in 2001 in Kosrae (Englberger, 2003) involving a random sample of
65 children and 65 women showed that not a single child or woman met the estimated
Vitamin A requirements. The study examined food preferences and investigation for vitamin
A -rich foods that might be promoted to alleviate the VA deficiency and increasing health
problems in Kosrae. Provitamin A carotenoid-rich foods can protect against VA deficiency.
Epidemiological research suggests that carotenoid-rich food may also protect against chronic
diseases including diabetes, heart diseases and certain cancer.

The processing of local foods gives support to the local tourism industry, the lifeblood of the
economy, by providing foods for tourists for them to consume and patronize. This activity
also addresses the problem of low agricultural productivity and large food importation in
Palau. Production and utilization of local foods will result in self-sufficiency and food security.


Large food importation in the islands is currently decreasing the Gross Domestic Product
(GDP) from the agriculture sector. Processing of local food resources is made available as
outreach services attempt to entice and train women and entrepreneurs to go into food
business enterprise. The development of business enterprises has chain reaction and
synergistic effects in helping people meet the needs of tourists and locals for good quality




All citizens of the United States care about the safety of their food system. It is important that
the US put in place proper protections and procedures to respond rapidly in the event of a
threat to our agriculture and food systems. To protect our agriculture and food systems, the
President of the United States issued the Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD 9.




Increased concern of US citizens for the safety of the food system requires that appropriate
protections be assured and procedures created to address potential threats to the food and
agricultural systems. The Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD9) was issued to
help protect the agricultural and foods systems of the US.
Rapid and accurate diagnosis of a threat is key to response and recovery. Action agencies
require a new suite of tools to augment existing capacity to respond to emerging threats.




The 2003 Hawai'i health survey reveals that more than half of Hawaii's adults are overweight
or obese. In some Hawai'i communities, the rate of obesity in children ages 6 to 11 is twice
the national average. About 75% of Hawai'i residents don't eat enough fruits and vegetables,
and many suffer from diabetes, heart disease, or high blood pressure. Hawaiis people, food
and water supply pose serious challenges to Hawai'i's health, economy, and ecosystem.




1. Annually large numbers of people in the US are impacted marketed foods, fresh and
packaged, that have some level of contamination.
2.The terrorist attack of 9/11 highlighted the need to develop rapid detection systems that
can identify potential sources of harm before they could injure us.
1. The improvement of stability and shelf life of fluid milk can contribute to the distribution
and marketing capabilities of milk processing plants that is important to processors and
consumers.
2. Pressure-assisted thermal processing (PATP) is a promising emerging technology for
production of commercially-sterile low-acid shelf-stable foods with minimal thermal impact
on product quality that is important to processors and consumers.
3.Moderate Electric Field (MEF) treatments hold promise for food sterilization and new
knowledge is needed by processors to better utilize this technology.




Despite strict regulations and new technologies in the food industry, foodborne illnesses are
still a major challenge, resulting in more than 300,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths each
year in the US. Food pathogens create an enormous social and economic burden on
communities and their health systems. It is estimated that the yearly cost of all foodborne
diseases in this country is 5 to 6 billion dollars in direct medical expenses and lost
productivity. Infections with the bacteria Salmonella alone account for $1 billion yearly in
direct and indirect medical costs. Recent outbreaks of foodborne illnesses have raised
consumer concerns about food safety hazards.
Salmonella-free market shell eggs is an objective of the US Egg Safety Action Plan. This plan
calls for complete eradication of Salmonella from market shell eggs. Salmonella causes a
serious food-transmitted disease, and incidence of salmonellosis is the highest among food
borne diseases in the US. Ohio is the second in the nation in egg production, and the national
action plan has a major impact on Ohio egg producer and processors, and on the State's
economy.
1. Processors and regulators demand an improved understanding of the safety of pressure
treated products.
2. Techniques to enable the development of better quality, safe foods that are shelf-stable
and do not require refrigeration are needed by clinets ranging from the US military to
communities needing food aid.

E. coli O157:H7 is a zoonotic agent that results in an estimated 70,000 or more cases per year
in the US alone. Cattle are the major reservoir of this bacterium and human cases result from
direct or indirect (food-borne) contact with the agent. This disease is therefore of major
concern for physicians, public health workers, food producers and processors, veterinarians,
feedlot operators, and ranchers.

Salmonella represent one of the top two bacterial foodborne infections of humans.
Salmonella strains with multiple antibiotic resistance of of particular concern as they result in
increased morbidity, and these strains seem to be particularly shared between cattle and
humans. Therefore, understanding of the source and dissemination of this agent is of concern
for physicians, public health workers, food producers and processors, veterinarians, feedlot
operators, and ranchers.

Salmonella represent one of the top two bacterial foodborne infections of humans.
Salmonella strains with multiple antibiotic resistance of of particular concern as they result in
increased morbidity, and these strains seem to be particularly shared between cattle and
humans. Therefore, understanding of the source and dissemination of this agent is of concern
for physicians, public health workers, food producers and processors, veterinarians, feedlot
operators, and ranchers.




It is primarily other scientists in the discipline and some industry researchers that attend
scientific conferences to learn about new and ongoing research and recent discoveries.
Workshops are generally attended by end-users interested in application of research results.
The project PI, AES, college and university administration, other funding agencies.
Consumers and other persons involved in food, nutrition and health education and
practitioners.
Food borne illness costs are real and need to be estimated. Deaths associated with illnesses
also need to be reduced.

Deaths associated with food borne illness need to be reduced.
Food safety and the issue of food borne illness are important in Tennessee.




Consumers who attended the food safety courses achieved the knowledge on proper food
handling practices. When consumers handle food safely, they protect their family and lower
the risk of foodborne disease.
In order to comply with the Food Code 2005, persons in charge of food establishments shall
demonstrate to the regulatory authority knowledge on different food safety topics.
Participants of this course consisted of a varied typed of food retail establishments including:
cafeterias, restaurants, mobile vendors, school cafeterias, Head Start Program, hospitals,
grocery stores, and others.




The mechanism of calcium-induced firmness is debatable since fungi in general contain little
or no pectin substances. The purpose of this study is to enhance our understanding of
calcium binding to macromolecules in plant and mushroom cells.

E. coli contamination of food has repeatedly been in the news in recent months. It is a critical
issue for consumers and the food industry.
Persons in charge of food establishments must comply with the Food Code of 2005 and must
also show the health inspector their food temperature registers.




The public at large, as well as the government are interested in antimicrobial approaches
against foodborne pathogens, including those intentionally used in a terrorist attack, such as
with anthrax.

The food industry is interested in the design and application of biodegradable and edible
films and coatings based on food biopolymers.


Foodborne diseases are one of the most widespread health problems facing the world and
the social and economic impact of these largely preventable diseases on society is significant.

To prevent disease outbreaks, the prevalence, sources, and routes of transfer of resistant
bacteria and resistance genes in livestock environments are important.




Firefighters, because of the stress and intensity of their responsibilities have an increased risk
of suffering a cardiac event in the line of duty.


NYS Dept. of Health statistics indicate that osteoporosis affects 25 % of women over age 60--
an estimated 1,100 women in Schuyler and Yates Counties. Osteoporosis is a painful disease
characterized by weak, brittle, porous bones that tend to fracture. It is a major cause of
fractures of the spine, hip, wrist and other bones. Studies show that progressive weight-
bearing exercise helps reduce the incidence of osteoporosis as it stimulates formation of new
bone.
Food borne illness is one of the greatest concerns of public health experts and the food
industry. Each year, as many as 76 million Americans experience food borne illness, and an
estimated 5,000 deaths are linked to tainted foods. Incredible as these figures are, they
probably represent only a fraction of the whole picture. Many mild cases of food borne
illness are never reported for a number of reasons: The victims pass off the symptoms as flu
and do not seek medical attention, the illness is misdiagnosed as another problem with
similar symptoms, the victim fails to recognize food as the source of the illness, or the
physician doesn't report the illness to local health agencies. Diarrhea, nausea, abdominal
pain, or vomiting without fever or upper respiratory distress is often taken to be flu, but
people who experience such symptoms are highly likely to be suffering from food borne
illness.
All EFNEP Activities were funded by Smith Lever 3D and have a separate reporting.

All EFNEP Activities were funded by Smith Lever 3D and have a separate reporting.
All EFNEP Activities were funded by Smith Lever 3D and have a separate reporting.

All EFNEP Activities were funded by Smith Lever 3D and have a separate reporting.




Agriculture and food processing are Nebraska's main industry. Nebraska leads the nation in
commercial livestock slaughter; hence, meat safety is an economic and public health issue for
citizens, producers, and industry. There is a continual alert for food safety issues that will
impact revenue generation. Because the food service/hospitality industry is the third largest
industry in the state, educational programs targeting food managers is crucial.


Good agricultural practices or GAP certification verifies a farms adherence to the Food and
Drug Administrations Guide to Minimize Microbial Food Safety Hazards for Fresh Fruits and
Vegetables. Successful completion of a GAP certification audit is required for potatoes and
other fresh products purchased under USDA feeding and nutrition programs. Some grocery
chains require certification, as does McCain Foods, an important processor of Maine potatoes.
Obesity and overweight, poor nutrition,lack of exercise, and food safety issues are major
health problems for both adults and youth in American Samoa.

The diets in American Samoa are high in meats, starches, sugars, and fats and tend to be very
low in vegetables, fruits and dairy products. Such diets lead to diet and life style related
diseases such hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, strokes, obesity, and others. Diets could
be greatly enhanced with the increased production and consumption of locally grown
nutrient rich vegetables.

Obesity and overweight, poor nutrition, lack of exercise, and food safety issues are major
health problems for both adults and youth in American Samoa. The value of nutrition
education and food safety for improving the diets the health of people with limited resources
has long been recognized in American Samoa.




Obesity and overweight, poor nutrition, lack of exercise, and food safety issues are major
health problems for both adults and youth in American Samoa.




Foodborne diseases continue to be a major concern in food safety and public health world-
wide. Botulinum toxin is the most toxic natural compound known and has been listed as a
dangerous bioterrorism agent by the Center of Disease Control and Prevention. Foodborne
diseases, including those caused by botulinum and cholera toxin continue to pose a threat to
our society. No sensors are currently available that allow a rapid and inexpensive screening of
our food prior to consumption, during preparation and during production.
The Wisconsin AES has a broad list of stakeholders who potentially benefit from the research
and Extension/outreach from the Wisconsin Formula Research program. This list of
stakeholders includes:
  * General agriculture
  * Food processing and marketing industry
  * Animal and dairy related agriculture
  * Plant and cropping system interests including vegetables
  * Green industry (turf, ornamentals, etc.)
  * Biotechnology
  * Bio-energy and Bio-economy groups
  * Sustainable and organic food producers
  * Environmental groups and interests
  * Consumer and non-traditional groups
  * Governmental agencies and officials
  * Scientific community
Stakeholders seek focused economic analysis of the international market potential for PNW
agricultural goods as well as research on new products, food safety, phytosanitary and other
trade-related issues. Decreasing state and federal support have made it vital to obtain
additional extramural funding to maintain research capacity.




The IMPACT Center's mandate to improve Washington's agricultural exports includes
providing information to stakeholders on market barriers, new products, potential
customers, phytosanitary and other trade issues.




Washington State University is a land-grant university with a principal mission of educating
students. A requirement of each IMPACT project has been the support of a PhD student.

Decreasing availability of state and special grant federal funding has made the search for
extramural funding increasingly important. The IMPACT Center is increasing its search for
cooperative funding from stakeholder sources and from other external agencies.


Decreased funding has hindered IMPACT's ability to hire new research personnel.
Listeria Monocytogenes is a food borne pathogen that can infect the very young, old,
pregnant women, and immuno compromised individuals. It causes severe illness in over 2000
people and 500 deaths each year.




Consumers benefit from practicing safe food handling because foodborne illness is prevented

Consumers benefit from practicing safe food handling because foodborne illness is prevented

Health professionals, economic stakeholders and consumers aspire for for fewer foodborne
illness outbreaks each year compared to the previous year

Health professionals, economic stakeholders and consumers aspire for for fewer foodborne
illness outbreaks each year compared to the previous year
Without actual data, it is extremely difficult to manage dairy herds, or identify problems,
develop solutions, set goals, monitor progress, and evaluate success of changes within a dairy
herd. Several dairy record systems are available to provide these services. Understanding a
dairy record system's strengths and limitations are critical to providing effective dairy
consulting services.
Sustainable, profitable dairy farm businesses require a fine balance of production and
business practices, as well as the ability to work with management teams, consultants and
employees. During their training, veterinary practitioners spend the majority of their time
learning about animal systems, health, prevention and treatment. Rarely is there much time
to learn about other factors in any depth and study the integrated system. To effectively
expand their practices into value-added consulting, practitioners need to expand their
knowledge of these other areas and understand the relationships between them.

The dairy industry has changed significantly in the past 15 years, since many of the
participants began practicing. Understanding the factors that have caused the shift from
smaller to larger farms and the implications for all phases of animal and business
management are critical for a practitioner to act effectively as a consultant.

OSU's Department of Extension Veterinary Preventive Medicine and OSU Extension have
extensive resources and expertise available to help both the dairy practitioner and their dairy
clients. Not all practitioners or their clients are aware of this expertise and how it can benefit
their practices/dairy farm businesses.
Long-term viability of both the dairy practitioner and their dairy producer clients is
dependant on sound production and business practices. Practitioners are in a unique
position to observe both health and management needs as they are on client farms regularly.
 They also have the opportunity to offer input to dairy owners as respected members of the
management team.




The consuming public.


The food industry in Washington and consumers.

State and/or federal regulatory requirements and guidance.
All food industries regulated by FDA.

The public and professionals who share food safety and health information with the public.




The stakeholders, elected officials, individuals, famies, and communities. Safe food handling
is important to maintain a healthy person and environment.
Stakeholders and employers. The passing of the food handler certification course with a 75%
or greater is a requirement in the District of Columbia for food handlers in commerical, non-
commerical and casual food service facilities.




The general public who consumes meals outside the home, stakeholders,elected officials,
and the community.




The citizens of Louisiana were concerned about the nutritional value, quality, safety of their
diets, and affordability of food. The consumer's knowledge level about the relationship of
food, diet, nutrition, fitness, and disease is vital to maintaining a healthy society. According to
the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the Journal of American Medical Association
(JAMA), the leading causes of death in the U.S. in 2000 were tobacco; poor diet; physical
inactivity; and alcohol consumption. The 2005 Louisiana Health Report Card indicated that of
42,297 deaths in 2003, the leading (64%) causes were: diseases of the heart; cancer; stroke;
accidents; and diabetes. Also, adult obesity in Louisiana rose from 16% in 1991 to 27% in
2004, with the largest jump seen in the 18 to 24 year old age group. However, despite the
increased numbers of individuals receiving governmental assistance (food stamps), there
were still food insecure households in Louisiana. Louisiana ranked fourth in food insecurity
and seventh in hunger-filled households nationally. Most of these households were
comprised of a large percentage of young children and the elderly.
The citizens of Louisiana were concerned about the nutritional value, quality, safety of their
diets, and affordability of food. The consumer's knowledge level about the relationship of
food, diet, nutrition, fitness, and disease is vital to maintaining a healthy society. According to
the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the Journal of American Medical Association
(JAMA), the leading causes of death in the U.S. in 2000 were tobacco; poor diet; physical
inactivity; and alcohol consumption. The 2005 Louisiana Health Report Card indicated that of
42,297 deaths in 2003, the leading (64%) causes were: diseases of the heart; cancer; stroke;
accidents; and diabetes. Also, adult obesity in Louisiana rose from 16% in 1991 to 27% in
2004, with the largest jump seen in the 18 to 24 year old age group. However, despite the
increased numbers of individuals receiving governmental assistance (food stamps), there
were still food insecure households in Louisiana. Louisiana ranked fourth in food insecurity
and seventh in hunger-filled households nationally. Most of these households were
comprised of a large percentage of young children and the elderly.

The citizens of Louisiana were concerned about the nutritional value, quality, safety of their
diets, and affordability of food. The consumer's knowledge level about the relationship of
food, diet, nutrition, fitness, and disease is vital to maintaining a healthy society. According to
the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the Journal of American Medical Association
(JAMA), the leading causes of death in the U.S. in 2000 were tobacco; poor diet; physical
inactivity; and alcohol consumption. The 2005 Louisiana Health Report Card indicated that of
42,297 deaths in 2003, the leading (64%) causes were: diseases of the heart; cancer; stroke;
accidents; and diabetes. Also, adult obesity in Louisiana rose from 16% in 1991 to 27% in
2004, with the largest jump seen in the 18 to 24 year old age group. However, despite the
increased numbers of individuals receiving governmental assistance (food stamps), there
were still food insecure households in Louisiana. Louisiana ranked fourth in food insecurity
and seventh in hunger-filled households nationally. Most of these households were
comprised of a large percentage of young children and the elderly.


In response to national security needs, OSU established an institute which will enhance local,
state and national programs to support and address issues of crop and food biosecurity, and
impacts on society and the economy.




Microbial forensics is a new and emerging field of science within the national biosecurity
program. National security needs dictate that research and training be conducted towards
biosecurity needs.

Dissemination of research results is critical to extension of knowledge, application of research
to work related real-world problems and training professionals to deal with biosecurity needs.
Development of detection and diagnostic tools and strategies is a top priority of national
defense units including U.S. DHS and FBI.
Food safety is of critical concern to processors and consumers. Minimization of the economic
and health impacts from food safety crises requires testing methods that are robust, sensitive
and rapid.
County example (Allegany County): When prioritizing the needs for extension education, it is
apparent that nutrition and health education are vital since the rates of chronic disease are
higher than the state rates. Specifically, Allegany County has the sixth highest diabetes rate
in the state. Combating this epidemic through education is essential since annual medical
costs for people with diabetes averages $13,243 versus $2,560 for people without diabetes.
The prevalence of obesity is also evidenced by residents' median BMI's (Body Mass Index) in
the overweight range for most counties. It is vital that education focus on obesity since
annual medical costs for obese adults are 37% higher than costs for those at a healthy
weight; and obesity costs Maryland $2.5 billion per year in health care expenses and lost
productivity.




Given limited success of school-based programs in reducing the epidemic of childhood
obesity, researchers have argued that programs that involve the family are likely to have the
greatest success (Floodmark, Marcus & Britton, 2006). To date, relatively few family
interventions have been developed and evaluated for school-age children.

An emerging threat to health security is the growing prevalence of MRSA (methicillin
resistant Staphylococus aureus) infections. In recent years, MRSA strains have evolved and
are resistant to a growing number of antibiotics. Although the infections begin on the skin,
MRSA can spread to internal organs and become life-threatening. Patients in health care
settings are at higher risk of contracting MRSA infections because of skin breaks (from
surgery, burns, IV lines) and/or depressed immune systems. Health care workers as a group
are repeatedly exposed to MRSA-positive patients and risk a high rate of infection if they do
not exercise precautions. Hand-washing is a key safeguard to protection from MRSA
infections.
UI Researchers participate in the Northwest Regional Center of Excellence for Biosecurity.
The expertise in immunology and Gram-negative pathogenesis at the UI is being directed
toward vaccine development for Class A Biosecurity agents which present significant risks,
particularly if administered via aerosols. Currently, there is no widely available vaccine for
organisms such as Yersinia pestis (plague) and Francisella tularensis (tularemia).
A recent study reported that only 10% of Americans got foodborne illness in the past year.
However, current published statistics indicate that over 25% of Americans suffer from
foodborne illness. There is a need for education to reduce the risks associated with
foodborne illness.




Food safety, from farm to table, is a complex issue with vast implications.
This program will advance fundamental knowledge about food, nutrition and health.




These studies are providing insights into gene expression by eukaryotic ribosomes, as well as
explaining expression mechanisms used by positive strand RNA viruses. Crown gall is a
problem world-wide and causes damage to commercial crops. Data demonstrates that the
cell based biosensor has applications for the detection of bacterial pathogens and chemical
toxicants in food products as well as in food production environments.




By elucidating the specific survival and adherence mechanisms displayed by Vibrio species in
shellfish, specific treatments could be devised to disrupt that interaction.
Drying of sugar-rich food products like berries is ordinarily problematic and novel methods
for preservation are crucial for this industry. One component of these foods is anthrocyanins
which have beneficial health properties. Quantifying the level of anthocyanins in dehydrated
fruit products is beneficial to US consumers because it will help them in making informed
choices on foods that have potential to provide more health benefits. The information will
support the processing and marketing of Northwest berry products that satisfy consumers'
needs.




The bean industry in the US faces challenges in production as well as in competition in
international markets. To remain competitive, new varieties with improved qualities are
needed. The UI has an internationally recognized bean breeding program located at the
Kimberly Research and Extension Center.




Meeting stakeholder needs is dependent upon our capacity to generate new knowledge,
techniques, technologies, ideas, and strategies.
Food borne illness in the US is a major economic burden and cause of human suffering and
death. Economic and social consequences are estimated to be over $3 billion each year, with
lost productivity estimated at $30-40 billion. It is estimated that food borne contaminants
cause approximately 76 billion illnesses, 325,000 hospitalizations, and 5,000 deaths in the US
each year. The risk of food borne illness is especially important when hazardous food is
served in group settings (eating establishments, child and assisted care facilities).

Issues of food safety and human health are of concern to communities and community
agencies across the state. The cost of food borne and life changing illnesses including
diabetes and obesity are a constant in the popular press. The health issues of an aging US
population have been clearly documented.
QUALITATIVE OUTCOME - WHAT WAS DONE




Food safety education curricula was developed for adults and school children. Food safety
workshops were provided to the community and schools. Key food safety handling practices
are disseminated to general consumers. Pathogen survival in kelaguen preparation was
studied and a safe kelaguen preparation curriculum was developed and desseminated in
workshops. A "Safe Kelaguen Preparation" guide was provided to consumers, food workers,
and food safety educators in community.




Not measured.




Food safety training programs have been conducted by Extension to allow those persons who
handle foods to know and understand what practices to follow to prevent food
contamination in the storage, preparation, and presentation stages. A specific program
called ServSafe is a nationally recongized certification program to assure that food handlers
have indeed demonstrated proficiency in knowledge and skills to assure that those who pass
the certification examinations are proficient in exercising exemplary and safe food handling
practices.
Due to regulatory requirements, food handlers in the state's school cafeterias must
participate in HACCP training programs. Training programs were conducted in counties
throughout the state by Extension to provide the affected citizens opportunities to
participate in this required HACCP training.


Public workshops, individual business assistance and individual entrepreneurial services were
provided state wide to help answer questions related to safety, quality and value-added food
products. Technical services and guidance in conjunction with state and federal agenices
provide an invaluable tool for small businesses and entrepreneurs. Many of these needs
would go upmeet without help from Extension Specialists across the state.




The Institute of Food Science & Engineering at the University of Arkansas has been offering
the Better Process Control School (BPCS) since 1973 which is one of the oldest in the nation
and required for FDA controlled canning industries. Twenty-eight BPCS are offered each year,
and historically Arkansas is the only contiguous state except for Texas offering the program.




The University of Arkansas Food Science Department of the Bumpers College and the Division
of Agriculture was recently ranked fourth nationally for faculty scholarly productivity by
Academics Analytics.
The ServSafe program was implemented as a vehicle to reach a Hispanic audience with
limited language skills in the Northwest counties within the state. Several classes were
offered especially for Hispanics with a language barrier, and course materials were purchased
and disseminated in Spanish.




The approach to food safety education involves answering consumer questions and teaching
safe food handling concepts within the Family Nutrition Education Program curriculum.
Opportunities for programming regarding food safety happen throughout the state.
Programs include but are not limited to occasional quantity cooks, FNEP, FSNE, and Food
Power. The evaluation data of these methods indicate successful behavior change regarding
food handling.
The approach to food safety education involves answering consumer questions and teaching
safe food handling concepts within the Family Nutrition Education Program curriculum.
Opportunities for programming regarding food safety happen throughout the state.
Programs include but are not limited to occasional quantity cooks, FNEP, FSNE, and Food
Power. The evaluation data of these methods indicate successful behavior change regarding
food handling.

The approach to food safety education involves answering consumer questions and teaching
safe food handling concepts within the Family Nutrition Education Program curriculum.
Opportunities for programming regarding food safety happen throughout the state.
Programs include but are not limited to occasional quantity cooks, FNEP, FSNE, and Food
Power. The evaluation data of these methods indicate successful behavior change regarding
food handling.

The approach to food safety education involves answering consumer questions and teaching
safe food handling concepts within the Family Nutrition Education Program curriculum.
Opportunities for programming regarding food safety happen throughout the state.
Programs include but are not limited to occasional quantity cooks, FNEP, FSNE, and Food
Power. The evaluation data of these methods indicate successful behavior change regarding
food handling.

The approach to food safety education involves answering consumer questions and teaching
safe food handling concepts within the Family Nutrition Education Program curriculum.
Opportunities for programming regarding food safety happen throughout the state.
Programs include but are not limited to occasional quantity cooks, FNEP, FSNE, and Food
Power. The evaluation data of these methods indicate successful behavior change regarding
food handling.

The approach to food safety education involves answering consumer questions and teaching
safe food handling concepts within the Family Nutrition Education Program curriculum.
Opportunities for programming regarding food safety happen throughout the state.
Programs include but are not limited to occasional quantity cooks, FNEP, FSNE, and Food
Power. The evaluation data of these methods indicate successful behavior change regarding
food handling.
Food Safety training for Food Service Employees covered the basics of safe food handling
focusing on controlling time and temperature, ensuring personal hygiene, preventing cross-
contamination, and proper cleaning and sanitizing. Additional training included HACCP and
the ServSafe Food Protection Manager Certification Course designed to provide food-safe
knowledge and skills to maintain a food-safe establishment, the impact of safety on your
operation, the flow of food through your operation.




Extending science-based knowledge through industry specific workshops, trade association
meetings and conferences were conducted throughout North Carolina, the region and nation.
These programs addressed the issues identified by industry through roundtable discussions
with regulatory agencies.




Extension has been the key provider of food safety education in the state of Iowa. During
this report period, 531 people have taken ServSafe® and SuperSafeMark® Food Safety
certification courses through ISU Extension.


To date, over 2,000 copies of the Word List have been distributed. In Phase III, 58 trainers,
with an average of 8.4 years experience teaching food manager certification courses,
completed an online survey with 89.7% reporting food safety training experience, and 63.8%
completing a food safety trainer course. Most difficult aspects of being a trainer were
language barriers, keeping information interesting, and dealing with diverse learner
backgrounds and needs. Forty-nine percent described the text used as accommodating of
different learning styles; 16.0% felt it was understandable to non-English speakers. Fifty-
seven percent felt that supplemental materials were culturally appropriate and 26.5% felt
they were understandable to non-English speakers. A final outcome of the project was the
development of a research-based website [http://www.umassone.net/ete/index.html].
The seaweed Porphyra yezoensis was grown, harvested, and fed to rainbow trout at a level of
30%. Results indicated that the growth rate of the trout was similar to the reference diet.
Seaweeds were also found capable of taking up and metabolizing various organic aquatic
toxicants. Isolates of the human pathogenic bacterium Plesiomonas shigelloides from various
environmental sources were found to exhibit significant genetic diversity via RAPD analysis .
These studies also indicated that seafood may be a serious source of potential risk of human
infection by this bacterium. A quantitative PCR assay developed for P. shigelloides in shellfish
was found capable of detecting 60 CFU/g. Phenolics from oregano and cranberry extract
were found to inhibit L.monoytogenes synergistically. This inhibition was enhanced by lactic
acid. The establishment of Listeria monocytogenes on environmental surfaces was found not
to occur in the presence of competing biofilms microflora. Among a total of 62 strains of
Bacillus cereus isolated from seafood, 33 were found to produce enterotoxin.
During the project funding period we developed, characterized and validated the activity of
antimicrobial carrying capsules as novel preservation systems for foods. 1. Liposomes as
Antimicrobial Carrier Systems. Ability of liposomes to maintain integrity was tested by
encapsulation efficiency (EE), zeta potential, and vesicle size. PC, PC/PG 8/2, and PC/PG 6/4
(mol fraction) liposomes retained between ~70-90% EE despite exposure to elevated
temperature or extreme pH. Liposome size averaged 100-240 nm. L. monocytogenes
inhibition depended slightly upon dose, but was heavily dependent upon phospholipid
constituents of liposomes. Near complete inhibition of E. coli O157:H7 with liposomal
antimicrobial and chelator at concentrations below those required for unencapsulated
antimicrobial and chelator was found. In milk, liposomal nisin was inhibitory to L.
monocytogenes strains, and effects on strains were equivalent, regardless of milkfat level. 2.
Microemulsions as Antimicrobial Carrier Systems. Eugenol was solubilized into cationic-
nonionic (Mirenat-N-T-Maz80K or LAE-TM) and nonionic surfactant mixtures (T-Maz80K-
Surfynol485W or TM-S485). Physicochemical characterization included surface tension,
particle size, charge and solubilization capacity.

For this objective, the influence of surfaces, inoculation method, hydration level, and food
upon transfer was evaluated. Our results strongly suggest that stainless steel (mean EOT=
0.52) transferred more Listeria to food surfaces than HDPE (mean EOT= 0.21) (P=0.05).
Overall, L. monocytogenes transferred more efficiently to bologna (mean EOT= 0.44) than
cheese (mean EOT= 0.29) (P<0.05). These results indicate that inoculation method; food
product and moisture level can influence bacterial transfer. The impact of the hydration level
on the transfer was significantly higher for dried biofilms growing on stainless steel (P<0.05).
No significant differences in hydration level were seen under other conditions (P>0.05). To
study the influence of moisture, prior to transfer to bologna and hard salami, biofilms were
equilibrated over saturate salts to control water levels in biofilms. Our results showed that
more bacteria were transferred to bologna (mean EOT=3.0) compared to hard salami (mean
EOT= 0.35, P<0.01). As biofilms became drier, the transfer of Listeria from stainless steel to
both foods increased (P<0.05).
Three hundred and forty seven fresh and processed seafood samples were examined for the
presence of the foodborne pathogens Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens, and
Clostridium botulinum. The presence of C. perfringens and C. botulinum was confirmed in
one and zero samples respectively. On the other hand 62 B. cereus isolates were confirmed
at levels from 3.6 to >1100/gm. Thirty of the isolates produced the two enterotoxins known
to be associated with this organism. As determined by PCR the presence of at least one of the
three genes of the NHE enterotoxin complex was detected in 99% of isolates while 71%
possessed at least one of the three genes of the HBL enterotoxin complex. Fifty of the 62
isolates were from imported seafood. A majority of enterotoxin-producing isolates were
resistant to two of 10 antibiotics tested.
One thousand food safety brochures were distributed to recipients of fresh foods and
vegetables.




During 2007, five workshops and two roundtables were held with food processors and food
distributors to discuss, Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point System (HACCP), recall, and
biosecurity procedures. These three day sessions were activity based to help participants
develop HACCP, recall, and biosecurity plans.

Experiments were conducted to evaluate performance of a rapid detection method using a
sensor platform. The project findings were presented to food industry scientists and
representatives at the Institute of Food Technologists/IFT Annual Meeting.




ServSafe(TM) a nationally recognized certification program teaches safe food handling
practices and helps prevent foodborne illness outbreaks. In Virginia, the program is
conducted by VCE and targets employees in food service establishments. In 2007, 13 family
and consumer science agents conducted the ServSafe(TM) program throughout Virginia. To
successfully complete the course, participants must score 75% or higher on the completion
exam.
In 2007, 20 juice processors were trained in Juice HACCP using the FDA approved curriculum.
Additionally, manuals were developed that include approved curriculum and numerous
reference documents. Bilingual HACCP training was provided for 275 individuals representing
six companies focusing on safe production of seafood and juices.




Food products and processes are analyzed and recommendations are delivered to food
processors. As a Process Authority for acidified foods, food processors receiving guidance can
file required processing documents with the FDA. In the absence of this guidance, processors
could not legally sell their products. Associated education included regulations for processed
food products, formula and process modifications to comply with regulations or improve
safety, and filing and maintenance of required documentation.




Food safety training for nonprofit faith-based and civic organizations was provided to
improve the quality of food safety and sanitation procedures of quantity food preparation
personnel. The Cooking for Crowds curriculum was offered through Virginia Cooperative
Extension family and consumer science agents.




For medium and large producers across the state food safety programming was provided to a
wide range of audiences. This training includes Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP)
courses as well as Good Agricultural Practices (GAP's) and recall workshops for industry. For
small producers, food products and processes wre analyzed through the Food
Entrepreneurship Program, and recommendations for ways to improve their product were
provided.
To educate consumers in safe food handling, two different programs were provided through
VCE: The "Cooking for Crowds" curriculum for individuals cooking for large quantities of
people a few times a year (churches, fund raisers); and ServSafe, a nationally recognized
certification program for food service establishments. A total of 1,245 individuals in Virginia
attended one of these programs.


Project on cross-contamination prevention education just beginning.

Producer education has not yet begun.
Implementing the Food Protection Management program allows individuals to prepare for
the CFM exam.


Monitoring the internal temperature of hot/cold foods being held can help assure that foods
are kept out of the danger zone (41 to 135 degrees).


Hand washing is clearly emphasized in the FPM program and proper procedures for hand
washing are reviewed and demonstrated.

The FPM program reviews and emphasizes the importance of using a food thermometer to
determine whether or not a food has been properly cooked. Participants have an
opportunity to work with food thermometers and learn how to use them and calibrate them
so they accurately measure the internal temperature.


Through VCE programming and the work of area farmers, the Shenandoah Valley Produce
Auction was formed as an agricultural-based enterprise. In 2007, VCE supported this new
enterprise by providing educational programming and personalized horticultural
consultation. Events for these new growers included workshops on sustainable vegetable
production, nursery and greenhouses, bedding plants, field grown fresh cut herb production,
and commercial vegetable production.


Virginia State University conducted a project that examines the microbial and chemical
quality of raw meats, frozen beans, and honey sold through the internet for food saftey. In
2007 a total of 272 fillets consisting of aqua-cultured catfish, salmon, tilapia, and trout each
from nine local and nine Internet retail markets were tested. The fillets had total aerobic
mesophiles at 5.7 log CFU/g, psychotrophs at 6.3 CFU/g, and coliforms at 1.9 log MPN/g.
Internet trout had about 0.8-log higher aerobic mesophiles than those pruchased locally.
About 27% of the fillets had Listeria spp. and a positive correlation between the prevalences
of Listeria and Listeria monocytogense was observed. Internet fillets had higher prevalence of
both Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes than those purchased locally.
Agents taught 884 food handlers representing 429 food establishments.




Food handlers representing 464 food establishments attended safe food handling
educational programs.




One restaurant was evaluated and met HACCP standards.
Coalition team members trained 928 food handlers in the following workshops: Basic 208;
Intermediate 348; Advanced 323; ServSafe - 179; Day Care 82; and Food Safety works - 79. In-
house food service training reached 102 individuals. In addition CES educators presented
programs in schools reaching 1000 youth. Consumer programs and displays reached 971 and
876 individuals, respectively.




UW CES educators in collaboration with health inspectors from the Wyoming Department of
Agriculture or a local city/county health department conduct a wide variety of educational
programs. CES educators take basic food safety including handwashing programs into schools.
CES in collaboration with the Wyoming Food Safety Coalition, delivers a variety of food safety
courses to food-service personnel, public school lunch staff, and others in the food service
industry.




Numerous classes have been conducted by CES educators and collaborators with the
Wyoming Food Safety Coalition.
Electron beam treatment has been tested and found effective in reducing bacterial
populations in foods ranging from red meats to leafy vegetables.




Basic food safety information was disseminated to adults through a series of lessons over 12
weeks. In addition, basic food safety information was shared at fair-type settings.




Basic food safety information was disseminated through a series of 6-12 week lessons.




Workshops on food safety have been conducted statewide by Extension educators.
Classroom presentations have been presented by professional and hourly staff to youth.
In 2007 one Educator in an urban county taught six classes for 195 individuals with topics
including handling and preparing food safely, food safety during the holidays and a food
safety update for Department of Social Services Project Home/CARE providers as a
certification requirement for licensing and renewal.




Research to better characterize the risk of L. monocytogenes contamination and subsequent
disease associated with the consumption of deli-sliced ready-to-eat meats; and to
understand the structure and function of the protein secretion apparatus responsible for the
secretion of toxins in V. cholerae and E. coli.

MAES and MSU researchers are creating and verifying computer models that can predict how
pathogenic bacteria are affected by food characteristics and food processing methods. Pilot
studies began last spring in a newly constructed bioisafety processing plant at MSU to
validate many of the models developed over the past five years.

The goal of this research is to assess the risk of foodborne trichothecenes to humans and
ameliorate this risk by dietary intervention. The two primary objectives of this project are to:
(1) determine the molecular mechanisms by which trichothecenes induce inflammatory gene
expression and immune cell death and (2) develop prophylactic and therapeutic approaches
to prevent trichothecene toxicity by nutritional supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids.

Scientists work to optimize the survival of beneficial organisms in fermented and
unfermented dairy and soy products and during passage through the gastrointestinal tract. In
the area of food safety, researchers investigate the efficacy of feeding beef cattle
microencapsulated probiotic bacteria to analyze the effect on fecal shedding of E. coli
O157:7. In vivo studies using mice have been completed to investigate the effects of
probiotic-fortified soymilk on specific health aspects, including reducing undesirable microbes
in the GI tract, reducing cholesterol and specific fecal enzymes.
Researchers are utilizing nanotechnolgy to develop rapid and simple biosensors to detect the
presence of intentional and ubiquitous toxic agents in food and water. Additionally, active
antimicrobial and antioxidant packaging films are being developed to reduce the risk from
these toxic agents by using natural materials.




We have initiated screening of natural fruit and vegetable anti-oxidants and anit-microbials
for use in fresh cut greens.
A three-week (two hours per day) food technology-training course offered to the public as
outreach services of PCC-CRE was conducted in three States. 44 participants attended these.
Taste tests of food products were conducted during visits of different groups to the R&D
Station, Vocational Education Week, Earth Day Celebration, and Olechotel Belau Fair.

Programs on Adult and Youth EFNEP continued to be conducted by EFNEP staffs throughout
the islands to women groups and school children to educate them on healthy eating, healthy
diet utilizing local food, and proper food handling and storage.

Other training programs were on proper food handling and storage. Through the ADAP HLPI
project, health and nutrition staff continued to provide food safety, nutrition, and health
education programs to youths and families throughout the islands in Micronesia.

Nutrition agent conducted trainings and workshop to homemakers on human nutritional
issues. One major community evaluation and intervention effort was conducted in
collaboration with other agencies in Pohnpei. Results have been published internationally
through the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and through the
Secretariat of the Pacific Community. Nutrition agents collaborated with the FSM National
Government to establish health and nutrition guidelines, food labeling requirements and
nutrition standards for the Micronesian population. The 'Go Local' theme to promote the
value of local produce was promoted by all agencies addressing the nutrition concerns of the
nation.

The participants of the three Food Technology Classes practiced what they have learned by
providing their families with novel foods from abundant local resources like root crops, fish
and fruits. Some participants prepared selected foods for custom practices. Those who have
tasted the food products during civic events signified their interest to learn more about these
local products.

After taking the Food Technology Classes, follow up encounters with participants was
conducted through personal visits and telephone conversations. Linking the processors with
prospective buyers was also explored.

Introduction of new recipes using local food products and demonstrating these new recipes
Nutrition and food safety training workshops were conducted throughout the four states.
Group members shared tips and knowledge in preparing healthy food for daily consumption.
The 'Go Local' theme to promote the value of local produce was accepted by and promoted
by all agencies addressing the nutrition concerns of the nation. Nutrition education classes
were given in schools and as support for the Early Childhood Development programs. Where
lunch programs are available in the schools and communities there is a greater offering of
local produce.

In order to keep track of the teaching activities conducted among the participants, changes in
condition outcome measures was investigated. List of participants and food products learned
from the courses that are being marketed were determined.




Extension provides solutions to Food and Agriculture Safety and Security issues for
individuals, families, farms, businesses, and communities. Educational interventions through
best management practices, educational training and exhibits, research trials, laboratory
sampling, and awareness campaigns provide a comprehensive program plan to mitigate,
respond to, and/or recover from incidents that have the potential to affect the safety and
security of our food and agriculture system.




Cooperative Extension provides solutions to food and agricultural safety and security issues
through sharing of best management practices, educational training and exhibits, research
trials, laboratory sampling, and awareness campaigns that help individuals, families, farms,
businesses and communities avoid, respond to, and/or recover from events that may have
potential impact on the safety and security of our food and agricultural system.
Previous chemical ecology research has documented the ability of insect antennae to
respond to a wide range of unexpected chemical volatiles. Refinement to the computer
algorithms that classify odorants and to the integrated anemometer on the detection device
lead to improved discriminatory capacity. Several select agent chemicals are produced by
Fusarium fungi. Fusarium chemotypes can be characterized by molecular methods,
increasing diagnostic capacity.




CTAHR conducted integrated research, extension and education projects to improve the
health and wellness of Hawai'i's families and communities. Outreach programs focused on
efforts to educate the people of Hawaii on the role of nutrition and lifestyles in health and
disease, food safety concerns, recommendations for health, and effective prevention of
contaminant release and management of contaminants and chemicals found in communities
and households.




1.This OARDC study looked a an array of retail foods and assessed for contamination.
2. This research investigated the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for non-
destructive detection of bacterial contamination in sealed packages. This system is also useful
for the detection of microorganisms in cases of unintentional contamination.
1. It was reported that that ultrapasteurized milk packed in light-protected polyethylene
terephthalate (PET) bottles had a refrigerated shelf life of 90 days without detectable
changes in flavor and milk. This knowledge was confirmed and industry personnel were
engaged with the new findings.
2. The inactivation and recovery of PATP-treated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores in
selected low-acid foods (egg patty mince and green pea puree) during extended storage was
studied. The study increased the knowledge of the dairy industry personnel.
3.Kinetics of bacterial growth during Moderate Electric Field (MEF) treatments was studied.
The intention is to determine kinetic parameters for verification of an in-package sterilization
process.




OARDC researchers developed a rapid and cost-effective techniques for effective microbial
surveillance of our food supply to ensure food safety.




OARDC scientists have established a successful collaboration with a consortium of Ohio egg
producers and equipment manufacturers to optimize an ozone-based technology for
eradication of Salmonella in fresh eggs.
1. In-situ properties of food materials under pressure were studied to provide needed
information sought by both processors and regulators. Thermal conductivity (k) of selected
foods (carrot, guacamole, cheddar cheese, chicken breast and fat) as a function of pressure
(0.1-700 MPa) and temperature (25-75C) was measured. Pressure-volume relationships at
25C were measured for sucrose solutions, apple juice, honey, soybean oil, clarified butter,
chicken fat, soy protein isolate solutions, guacamole, carrot, cheddar cheese, chicken breast.
Reaction volumes between selected buffering agents (citric acid, phosphoric acid, 2-(N-
morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (MES) and sulfanilic acid) and NaOH solutions were
measured to 400 MPa at 25C. A polycarbonate sample holder with piston arrangement
allowed sensor placement and pressure transmission. Use of custom-made pressure
equipment enabled in-situ temperature, voltage, and current and impedance measurements.
The experimentally determined values of calibration material were compared against
published literature to establish probe specific calibration factor.
2. Electrical conductivity of a wide variety of foods has been characterized, both in the fresh
form, and after diffusion with salt via a short blanching treatment to increase electrical
conductivity.


We compared genetic strain types of E. coli O157:H7 isolated from clinical cases with those
isolated from cattle feces (as a measure of the strains circulating in the reservoir), ground
beef (as a measure of strains contaminating foods), and from untreated human sewage (as an
indirect measure of all strains - not just virulent strains - passing through humans).




We have searched for emergence of new salmonella strains in our regions and attempted to
identify the location(s) where antibiotic resistant strains are selected.




We have searched for emergence of new salmonella strains in our regions and attempted to
identify the location(s) where antibiotic resistant strains are selected.




Sixteen conference and workshop presentations were made.
PI have been encouraged by NH AES and college administration to use AES funding to address
immediate issues in agriculture and to conduct research that will increase their ability to
attract additional funding for synergistic studies from other sources.
"Get Smart Eat Local" workshops were run in connection with the NH Farm to School
program.

Collaborators for the research were identified.

Internet and library research is continuing. Recruitment of an advisory group proceeds
Key participants and partners have been contacted.


PRAES home economists offered Fight BAC! courses with a minimum of four lessons. They
had to offer at least one lesson of each of the Fight BAC! campaign steps: Separate, Cook,
Chill, and Clean. Volunteer leaders would also participate of the coordination and offering of
theses courses. The Fight BAC! course was offered to 941 consumers.
The health inspector refers the participants in order to give the establishment the
endorsement or license to operate and verifies the knowledge of the person in charge during
visits to the establishment. Eighteen (18) home economists and two specialists offered FSCC
to the persons in charge of food establishments. The Puerto Rico FSCC includes the 17
knowledge areas described in the Food Code.




Stepwise extraction of apple, cucumber and mushroom tissues resulted in a set of fractions,
which were analyzed for protein, neutral polysaccharides, pectins and chitin content, and
binding of calcium.

We used DNA microarrays to study gene expression in E. coli under refrigerated and acidic
conditions.
During the past year, the Puerto Rico Department of Health adopted a new inspection form
for which they must conduct their inspections based on HACCP principles. The health
inspector will write down on this new form the food temperatures that have been measured
during their visit. The Inspector will also require evidence of the person in charge of the food
establishment that they are measuring: cooking, holding, and cooling temperatures. As part
of the FSCC, there are examples of temperature records in the materials handed out to the
participants, which they can modify according to the needs of the establishment they work
for.




We looked at the sporicidal capabilities of household disinfectants and other products against
Bacillus cereus as surrogates for B. anthracis on spinach and cantaloupe in case of a large-
scale terrorist event.

We tested crystallinity, metal-binding capacity, and antibacterial efficiency of thick, thin, and
ultra-thin films using different chitosan/PEO blend ratios.

Results indicate that once E. sakazakii attaches to surfaces it produces biofilms, making it
resistant to the bactericidal effect of chlorine solutions, explaining the contamination of
formula which can result in foodborne disease outbreaks.
PCR analysis was performed on E. coli and salmonella from chickens, pigs and sows in the US
and Thailand, and class 1 integrons were more prevalent in isolates from Thailand compared
with the US.




An Extension Educator provided nutrition education to the Albany Fire Department.
Providing such information as reducing dietary fat and cholesterol, adhering to proper
portion sizes and consumption, and increasing availability of fresh fruits and vegetables. to
the 260 person Albany Fire Department.

From Oct 2006 to May 2007, trained RSVP volunteers led weekly preventive exercise sessions
at three sites in Schuyler and 4 sites in Yates. Educational programs about the prevention of
osteoporosis through exercise, nutrition and other healthy lifestyle practices were
incorporated into these sessions. Each fall new leadership volunteers receive training and
experienced leaders receive a refresher course, utilizing Tufts University research-based
exercise plan. Five Bone Builder classes were conducted each week at five sites in Schuyler &
Yates from October 2006 to May 2007.
44 Safety Awareness in the Food Environment (SAFE) programs were conducted statewide in
FY 07 reaching 893 food workers. Educators indicated the primary establishments attending
these programs as: 18 programs were conducted for restaurants, 2 for food entrepreneurs,
14 for food pantries, 21 for non-profits such as schools and nursing homes, and 4 programs
were conducted for volunteer food workers. Educators administered the ServSafe
examination to 294 food managers/workers in formal programs and individually.

Nutrition Connections administers the federally funded EFNEP and the USDA Food Stamp
Nutrition (FSN) grant funded Food Stamp Nutrition Education (FSNE). Both programs target
low income families, youth and individuals. Nutrition Connections focuses on improving short
and long term outcomes related to diet quality and physical activity; food safety; and
shopping behavior and food resource management. Individuals gain awareness and
knowledge to apply skills and/or change behaviors. A total of 655 families participated in
lessons with 404 graduating from a series. Sixty one percent of the program families were at
or below 125% of poverty.

Food safety and preservation education was offered through some local offices to consumers.
Evaluated a unique enzyme of E.coli for rapid monitoring of the microorganism in Food.
Determined specificities of certain enzymes formed by residual chymosin during ripening of
semi-hard cheese.

Evaluated a unique enzyme of E.coli for rapid monitoring of the microorganism in food. With
conventional methods it took about 24 hours to measure, however we are working to
develop a 10-15 minute rapid method to enumerate E.coli in food.




All EFNEP Activities were funded by Smith Lever 3D and have a separate reporting.

All EFNEP Activities were funded by Smith Lever 3D and have a separate reporting.
All EFNEP Activities were funded by Smith Lever 3D and have a separate reporting.

All EFNEP Activities were funded by Smith Lever 3D and have a separate reporting.




Since 2000, Extension has helped over 1,100 processors adopted Hazard Analysis and Critical
Control Points (HACCP). Extension is a prominent provider of ServSafe, with more than 700
food service employees participating in 2006. Over 1,000 school-age youth were taught
proper hand washing. Meals on Wheels recipients were taught refrigerator temperatures.
On-going programming related to food safety is conducted for occasional quantity cooks,
school cooks, and daycare providers.




GAP audits for basic food safety, mitigation of hazards associated with land use and water,
and mitigation of microbial contamination during harvest, field packing, storage and
transportation were made possible by the documentation developed and supplied to growers
by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension Potato Program.
F4HN professional and paraprofessional staff provided nutrition education programs to
youth, homemakers, community residents, and other traditional and nontraditional clients.
F4HN staff conducted workshops, presentations, and food demonstrations in villages,
schools, Day Cares, Health clinics, churches and government offices. In-school programs
emphasized the importance of physical activity to reduce the high risk of obesity, production
and the consumption of local food with gardening projects, and food safety.

F4HN staff conducted 75 workshops, presentations, and demonstrations in the villages,
schools, churches, government agencies, and community groups on developing and testing
recipes using locally grown produce. "Putting Food on the Table" brochures with step by step
instructions on how to grow your own vegetables in addition to cooking recipes using these
vegetables were developed and distributed to clients.
F4HN staff conducted 75 food safety workshops and demonstrations about safe food
handling, storage and preparation to youth, childcare providers, WIC participants, Food
Stamp clients, homemakers, and other clients. Demonstrations on the correct way to wash
hands to
prevent food borne illness were also conducted to school age children and adults.
F4HN staff conducted 80 exercise and physical activity programs in schools, villages,
community groups, government agencies, churches, and other community settings.
Community awareness programs on the negative impacts of obesity, overweight, poor
nutrition, lack of physical activity,
and food safety issues were also implemented. Moreover, sports, aerobics, and other
exercise programs were implemented in schools, work place, and village settings as
alternative physical activity programs.




The research has developed a rapid, sensitive, and reliable detection method for botulinum
toxin in food and farm samples. It will thus improve the safety of our food, from farm to
table, and will enhance the safety and health of humans and livestock.
Each year through a competitive, investigator-driven, peer-reviewed process, the Wisconsin
AES funds approximately 160 research and integrated activity projects focused on national,
regional and local issues and priorities linked to stakeholder interests. In addition to serving
stakeholder needs through these competitively funded projects, which address critical
applied research as well as basic science questions, this program sets a priority on training
our next generation of applied and science based professionals through its graduate-student
training mission.
IMPACT scientists and faculty have secured an additional $2 million in grants to supplement
core funding.




Cutting edge research in the fields of food safety and security, market economics, foreign and
domestic policy analysis, international trade and economic theory has been shared with
stakeholders through popular media, and peer-reviewed journal articles.

Twenty-six PhD students have been supported in full or in part by IMPACT Center funding
during the past year. Funding is not permitted for post-docs, but many of the individual
projects have post-docs supported from alternative funding sources working on the project.
IMPACT has one post-doc supported by administrative funding.


IMPACT Center scientists have applied for a variety of commodity commission, federal and
industry grants.
With reprioritization of existing funds, a new assistant research professor and a new
associate for research were hired to conduct IMPACT Center research, outreach, and
engagement activities.

Genes involved in mediating resistance to the food preservation agent pediocin Ach have
been identified.




Numerous multi-contact and single-contact programs for adult and youth consumers

Numerous multi-contact and single-contact programs for adult and youth consumers
Extension food safety programs (ServSafe, Occasional Quantity Cooks, EFNEP, Family
Nutrition Program, Vegetable Safety, GAPs Training, Quality Assurance Programs, etc) aime
to teach adulty and youth principles of food safety
Extension food safety programs (ServSafe, Occasional Quantity Cooks, EFNEP, Family
Nutrition Program, Vegetable Safety, GAPs Training, Quality Assurance Programs, etc) aime
to teach adulty and youth principles of food safety


One of the first modules focused on dairy record systems, their use in dairy herd
management, benchmarking client herds, and using these systems to identify opportunities
for client farms.
The 3-year curriculum was designed to spend time studying these areas in-depth with
homework activities, in-class discussion and individual interactions both exploring and
reinforcing the relationships between these production-based areas and overall dairy farm
business management and profitability.


Workshops were designed to update practitioners on critical dairy production issues such as
reproduction and health issues. These were balanced by business modules that also
considered industry factors impacting the dairy business.
The Ohio Dairy Health Management Certificate Program has exposed participating dairy
practitioners to specialists from the College of Veterinary Medicine, and from the
Departments of Extension, Animal Science and Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering
as teachers for the workshop. Other workshop speakers were brought in from other
universities across the country.




Participants are referring clients to OSU Extension specialists to help answer financial and
benchmarking questions.




Developed information briefs.

Training in HACCP, safe quality foods and food sanitation. Research on food microbiology is
included into these programs.

Training using standardized curriculum and regulation/guidance.
Internet course was developed and reviewed.

Performed assessments, developed materials, and trained target audiences.




None of the trainined food handlers reported any risk form food borne illnesses in their
facilities.


100% of the participants gaineed knowledge and skills in food handling techniques.
100% of the participants met all measures




All of the individuals participated the 210 clock hour training program, and passesd both the
national exam and the DC Code exam.




In FY 2007 SUAREC conducted the following activities: research on the effects of diet on
obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. The aim were to develop early nutrition intervention
strategies for elementary school teachers, expand nutritional knowledge and food label use
among college students, and assess consumer acceptance of value-added alternative meat
products. SUAREC promoted focus groups; advisory committees; mentor program; use of
nutrition curriculum; school food nutrition curriculums; health tips during school activities. It
also conducted the following activities: school in-Service, kids cafe(c), FF-NEWS, EFNEP, and
youth health fair. Also, food demonstrations, publications such as fact sheets, newsletters,
technical bulletins, and research reports were disseminated. Collaboration, cooperation and
partnership with local, state and federal agencies, institutions, groups, and private
organizations/associations were utilized in seeking and delivering services to citizens.
In FY 2007 SUAREC conducted the following activities: research on the effects of diet on
obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. The aim were to develop early nutrition intervention
strategies for elementary school teachers, expand nutritional knowledge and food label use
among college students, and assess consumer acceptance of value-added alternative meat
products. SUAREC promoted focus groups; advisory committees; mentor program; use of
nutrition curriculum; school food nutrition curriculums; health tips during school activities. It
also conducted the following activities: school in-Service, kids cafe(c), FF-NEWS, EFNEP, and
youth health fair. Also, food demonstrations, publications such as fact sheets, newsletters,
technical bulletins, and research reports were disseminated. Collaboration, cooperation and
partnership with local, state and federal agencies, institutions, groups, and private
organizations/associations were utilized in seeking and delivering services to citizens.




In FY 2007 SUAREC conducted the following activities: research on the effects of diet on
obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. The aim were to develop early nutrition intervention
strategies for elementary school teachers, expand nutritional knowledge and food label use
among college students, and assess consumer acceptance of value-added alternative meat
products. SUAREC promoted focus groups; advisory committees; mentor program; use of
nutrition curriculum; school food nutrition curriculums; health tips during school activities. It
also conducted the following activities: school in-Service, kids cafe(c), FF-NEWS, EFNEP, and
youth health fair. Also, food demonstrations, publications such as fact sheets, newsletters,
technical bulletins, and research reports were disseminated. Collaboration, cooperation and
partnership with local, state and federal agencies, institutions, groups, and private
organizations/associations were utilized in seeking and delivering services to citizens.

The National Institute for Microbial Forensics, and Food and Agricultural Biosecurity was
established in 2007. A director and one faculty member were appointed to the institute. A
website was established and proposals for funding were submitted to agencies. Initiated a
graduate program and currently have 5 students associated with the institute.

-Hosted a national workshop focused on development of forensic capacity.
-Made approximately 20 presentations to various public groups describing the needs and
importance in protecting food and crop resources through forensic work.
-Developed a state-wide Agricultural Emergency Preparedness Task Force.


At least 10 manuscripts in science, peer review journals and additional publications have
been published in the past year.
Initiated research projects including one dealing with movement of E. coli within the food
system.
Rapid detection methods using immuno-PCR-magnetic bead technology to detect toxins and
real-time PCR to detect DNA from allergen causing foods are under development. Research
has demonstrated the efficacy of the magnetic bead technology and efforts are under way to
expand that research into other important food toxins. Enhanced sensitivity has been
demonstrated using real-time PCR in soy products. Robustness of the method to detect soy
DNA (both intact and severely degraded) has been demonstrated in a variety of highly
processed soy products. Tests are currently underway to determine if there is a matrix effect.
In one county, Allegany, over 150 individuals were reached by the educator via trainings
focused on heart health, weight management, holiday eating, food safety, and physical
activity. The target audience for the programs included clientele at weight loss groups, senior
centers, civic clubs, universities, as well as the general public.




The FSNEP program in Washington State (Food $ense) utilizes parent newsletters as an
outreach tool to reinforce student learning in elementary and middle-school classrooms. In
2007, 27,196 parents received newsletters that offered practical suggestions for improving
diet quality and physical activity at home. Evaluations were designed to assess the degree to
which parents reported changes in behaviors related to childhood obesity reduction. Of the
16,204 surveys distributed, 3,928 were returned (24 percent return rate).




Hand-washing education was offered in a Washington State health care facility as a pilot
project to address MRSA infections. The Germ City simulation was utilized as the educational
mechanism for training clinic-based registered nurses. In the simulation, nurses received
basic instructions on hand-washing, utilized a special gel to practice, and examined the
results under black light conditions. Education on hand-washing frequency and other
safeguards accompanied the experience. Two on-site sessions were conducted for the health
care staff.
Experiments were conducted to elucidated how the direct manipulation of the mammalian
innate immune response can provide protection against plague and tularemia and enhance
antibiotic therapy in otherwise immunologically naive individuals. This work was reported at
two international meetings and in two peer-reviewed publications, and also trained
technicians and graduate students in the use of Category A microorganisms under BioLevel
Safety 3 conditions.




Four hundred three participated in ServSafe training and took the certification exam.




The focus on microbial food safety continues to be on methods development and validation
studies. That work continues to be transferred to end users through efforts such as the Rapid
Methods and Automation in Microbiology Workshop. The chemical food safety effort
continues to attract recognition because of work on ammonia contamination, heterocyclic
amines and methods for measuring irradiation of beef. Additionally the economics, policy,
and trade implications of food safety as well as food security are also reported.
Investigators in this program conducted experimental approaches to develop new and
improved food processing systems to ensure a safe, wholesome and high-value food supply.
Specific focus was placed on the following food products: fish and shellfish, fresh and
processed berry fruits, and wine and beer. In the fish and shellfish subprogram, investigators
developed value-added products through applied research and product development
activities. Further research continues into production of salmon-waste and sardine products.
Investigators also conducted studies to investigate foodborne illnesses from raw shellfish
consumption, specifically, V. parahaemolyticus, the leading cause of human gastroenteritis, in
oysters and histamine producing bacteria (HPB), the leading cause of scombroid poisoning, in
fish. Studies looked into the effects of temperature depuration on V. parahaemolyticus and
electrolyzed oxidizing water (EOW) treatments on HPB. The fresh and processed berry fruits
investigators developed methods to reduce incidence of foodborne illnesses through
intervention processing technologies. They worked to determine the effect of EOW as a
surface disinfectant on the suface microflora of fresh strawberries and blueberries. They also
developed edible coatings to extend the shelf life of these products. The enology research




Activities include studying the roles of the untranslated regions (UTRs) of the genomic RNAs
of the positive strand RNA viruses Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) and the mosquito-
borne flaviviruses dengue virus and West Nile virus and development of an agrobacterium
oncogene silencing strategy to produce plants resistant to crown gall. In the food and water
safety subprogram, research sought to characterize and evaluate the probiotic potential of
exopolysaccharide (i.e. biopolymer) producing Lactic acid bacterial (LAB) strains.




Investigating the different cellular processes that are activated in bacteria when they
associate with shellfish
Three drying methods (spray drying, freeze drying, and Refractance Window drying) were set
with the objective of successfully producing blueberry powder. Blueberry juice concentrate
with 64.5% dissolved solids was dried by the three three methods. Various amounts of drying
aids such as corn maltodextrin were added to the juice concentrate before being diluted with
deionized water to a consistency that could either be applied on the belt of the RW dryer or
pumped into the atomizer of the spray dryer. The freeze-dried product was prepared in a
pilot-scale freeze-dryer with the heating plate temperature set at 20 degrees Celcius and
3.3kPa chamber absolute pressure. The samples were collected after drying for analysis of
anthocyanins.


The UI bean breeding program focused on variety testing of pinto and great northern
varieties (replicated trials to generate essential data for PVP in addition to the Western
Regional Bean Trial and in the North American Cooperative Dry Bean Nursery) as requested
by the Idaho Bean Commission. Varieties were screened and tested for agronomic
properties, disease resistance and seed quality.


We have supported a variety of new projects that cross cut the needs of a variety of
stakeholder groups in Rhode Island. Additionally, a mix of state (91%), federal (4%) and
private funds (5%) have been used to construct a new Center for Biotechnology and Life
Sciences.
CUS Extension has implemented ServSafe and Food Safety Works curriculum throughout the
state. More than 4000 individuals were trained last year in the safe handling of food. Most
of these individuals represented food service group settings.




Through the food safety, Dining with Diabetes, and Strong Women,Strong Bones programs,
CSU Extension has provided an opportunity for community agencies to support programs
that aim to address significant health issues.
QUALITATIVE OUTCOME - RESULTS




Eighty participants in workshops increased knowledge in proper food handling practices.
Participants in safe kelaguen workshop increased knowledge of the principles of pathogen
control in kelaguen preparation and service and mastered the skills to prepare safe kelaguen.




Over 50 ServSafe training programs that require sixteen hours of training time to complete
were conducted throughout North Carolina. This allowed 1615 food handlers to participate.
Of those, 1310 passed the certification exam with a 75% correct rate and higher. These
restaurant workers, school lunchroom personnel, public and institutional food sites workers
and others who serve the public needs for a quality food availability and servings assures that
fewer opportunities are created whereby improper food handling causes food poisoning or
related illnesses.
Such training programs led to a much larger than planned participation level in HACCP
training programs in North Carolina. Reports from the HACCP training participants indicate
an increased knowledge and appreciation level for
assuring that food is properly processed, handled, stored, prepared and served in to assure
that hazards related to food safety are recognized and prevented on a continuous basis
throughout the entire food handling process.




Sustainable small business and start up of new entreprenerial businesses are the larger
segment of the North Carolina food industry. Many of these businesses are the direct result
of the technical services and information provided during workshops and followup contacts
provided through the state Extension Service programs.




Since starting the Better Process Control School at the University of Arkansas in 1973, over
2,300 people have been certified mostly from major canning companies in the region. This
allows for these Arkansas-based companies to train a large number of their employees at a
reduced cost since travel costs are reduced. For the University of Arkansas, the Better
Process Control School has served as a springboard to other food-related workshops for
industry to include food safety, food defense, food labeling, microbiology, sensory evaluation
and other courses under development. Six additional food-related workshops that reached
250 people per class was the end-product of efforts expended as an outreach of the Better
Process Control School.

The UA Food Science Department's ranking testifies to its productivity in food research in
aiding food processing in Arkansas. In addition, the well-trained Food Science Department
graduates are hired by food processors in Arkansas assuring the continued success of
Arkansas food processing industries. Peer-review articles appeared regularly in the Journal of
Food Science and Journal of Food Protection.
ServSafe training in Washington and Benton Counties showed a reduced incidence of critical
violations reported in the local newspaper. Test results for certification indicated that there
was an increase in the pass rate for Hispanic participants, who received Spanish ServSafe
course books and participated in classes designed specifically for that audience.




Of 3,329 teachers surveyed, they indicated 82% of their students improved their hand
washing skills and behaviors after participating in the Food Stamp Nutrition Education
Program. With an average of thirty (30) children per classroom, that is over 81,500 children
who demonstrated marked improvement.
Forty-seven percent of EFNEP participants completing the program improved their behavior
of not thawing foods at room temperature.




Fifty-one percent of Food Stamp Nutrition Education adult participants evaluated improved
their food storage practices and did not allow foods to sit out at room temperature for more
than two hours.




Five hundred fifty-five (555) of 1,019 EFNEP adult participants who completed the program
(55%) improved one or more food handling practices.
Foods Safety training in counties/reservations caused food establishments and potential
employees to recognize the importance of handling food safely. After holding the basic food
safety trainings, 5 counties were asked to repeat the course so additional businesses and
employees could attend. At least 10 counties reported that there was a new commitment
from the County Sanitarian to continually work on food safety. At least 40 businesses,
agencies and schools have incorporated food safety training for employees at regular
intervals and at least 10 participants who were hired in the industry received a higher wage
or were promoted because they had participated in the basic food safety training.
Additionally, of the 28 participants in the ServSafe Food Protection Manager Certification
program, 25 passed the test and were certified. Counties who have actively participated in
Extension Food Safety programs report fewer complaints related to food safety issues and
food borne illnesses.




North Carolina businesses increased their knowledge in development of new technologies
and have adopted many of these techniques to optimize their processing systems thereby
increasing profits and creating new jobs.




Food safety certification was awarded to 478 participants reflecting a 90% pass rate on
certified exams.




This project has the potential to improve food safety comprehension, efficacy, training and
assessment for under-educated and limited English proficient school food service workers
who participate in food manager certification training programs and examinations. The novel
approach of this project provides insight to addressing the needs of diverse audiences on
issues critical for food safety and protection. These data suggest a need for further study of
exam policies, exam construction, and item testing.
The seaweed Porphyra yezoensis was found capable of taking up and metabolizing various
organic aquatic toxicants. The development of a rapid quantitative PCR assay for P.
shigelloides in shellfish capable of detecting 60 CFU/g of tissue greatly facilitates the rapid
detection of this human pathogenic organism in shellfish. The ability of oregano and
cranberry extracts to synergistically inhibit Listeria monocytogens has potential for
significantly reducing the public health risk of this organism associated with seafood. Our
studies on the surface development of L. monocytogenes have significantly contributed to
our insight into the occurrence and development of this organism on processing surfaces. The
observation that strains of Bacillus cereus from seafood are capable of producing enterotoxin
indicates the potential hazard involved with this organism when seafood is subjected to
storage temperature abuse.
The antimicrobial efficiency of cationic-non-ionic micelles was high since LAE alone inhibited
the growth of E. coli O157:H7 and Listeria. Micelles inhibited all microbial growth with
exception of TM:LAE (5:1) ratio. Addition of eugenol at 3mM inhibited the growth of Listeria
and 7 mM inhibited the growth of E. coli O157:H7. When microemulsions were tested in a
food system (milk), the antimicrobial efficiency varied depending on the fat level. 3.
Emulsions as Antimicrobial Carrier Systems. Emulsions containing eugenol and a carrier lipid
were kinetically stable depending on eugenol and lipid mixing ratios. Corn-oil emulsions
loaded with eugenol were the most stable and inhibited the growth against E. coli O157:H7
strains depending on loading ratio but failed to inhibit growth of Listeria strains. Specific
Impacts/Outcomes: Colloidal carrier systems can prolong activity of a large number of
antimicrobials in model microbiological and model food systems. Some carrier systems can
enhance the activity of antimicrobials against selected microorganisms and in some cases not
only inhibit but inactivate pathogens. Overall, less antimicrobial is needed to retard activity of
pathogen if an encapsulation system is used compared with the simple addition of the
antimicrobial to the food. Products can be microbially stabilized for a significantly enhanced




Results showed that the maximum pull-off force and retraction work needed to retract the
cantilever for glass (-85.42 nN and 1.6x10-15 J respectively) were significantly lower than
those of polyethylene (-113.38 nN and 2.7x10-15 J respectively) (P<0.001). The results of this
study suggest that Listeria biofilms adhere more strongly to hydrophobic surfaces than
hydrophilic surfaces. We hypothesize that weakened cell-to-cell interactions and cell-to-
surface interactions of biofilms and the presence of capillary forces in the food are involved
in the increased transfer upon drying.
The presence of toxigenic B. cereus in seafood has never been determined. Our results show
that not only is this organism present in this commodity but can be present at relatively high
levels. Most of the isolates were from imported seafood including those producing the
highest concentration of enterotoxin.
Of those participants who received the brochure, 25% reported that they had read the
brochure and followed the cleaning instructions.

Fifty facilities registered their company with the Food and Drug Administration. The training
sessions increased the awareness of food regulations by food producers. In many cases this
was the first exposure these individuals had to food microbiology and food safety principles.
Participants increased their knowledge of the value of regulations to produce products in a
safe manner. Continual learning and improvement in food safety also adds economic value
for the facility.


The sensor was able to specifically detect S. typhimurium in the coexistence of non-
pathogenic microorganisms.




During 2007, 1,006 (passing rate of 86%) food service employees successfully completed the
ServSafe(TM) program across Virginia taught by FCS extension agents. Five hundred and
twenty-nine restaurants, schools, caterers, and daycare centers sent employees to the
program.
Seventy-six participants from three classes responded to a three to six month follow up
survey, for a response rate of 23%. Of respondents, 87% adopted at least one new food
safety practice. Of those who adopted a new food safety practice: 83% improved time and
temperature practices, 68% made changes to prevent food contamination, and 90% made
changes to personal hygiene practices
As a result of the ServSafe(TM) program in Virginia, $132,369 to $1,098,663 was potentially
saved from pain and suffering, reduced productivity and medical expenses if one foodborne
illness case per participant successfully completing the course was prevented across Virginia.
HACCP workshops aid processors by delivering the training required to support existing
programs in their companies. Since HACCP is required by law for juice and seafood products,
this education allows companies to be in compliance with federal and state regulations.
These trainings have resulted in better understanding, application and monitoring of HACCP
regulations and application of sanitation procedures. These trainings have become required
attendance by the employees at some of the processing plants.

During 2007, food products produced by 289 food businesses (92% Virginia based) were
analyzed and recommendations provided. Of the products tested, 33 had a significant food
safety issue that, left uncorrected, could result in unsafe food in the marketplace.
Approximately 200 of these products had a significant quality issue that may have resulted in
significant economic loss for the processor. For many of these products, VCE acted as an FDA
recognized Process Authority and was instrumental in aiding Virginia Food Processors in
correcting deficiencies. Without those corrections, these companies would have suffered
severe enforcement actions from FDA including fines and injunctions. One company in
danger of enforcement action has $500,000 income annually.




During 2007 a total of nine cooking for crowds programs were offered for occasional quantity
cooks statewide. End of session surveys revealed 239 respondents indicated an increased
knowledge of causes of food borne illness and food preparation skills. As a result of the
Cooking for Crowds program in Virginia, $31,447 to $261,014 was potentially saved from pain
and suffering, reduced productivity and medical expenses if one foodborne illness case per
participant successfully completing the course was prevented across Virginia.


In 2007, bilingual HACCP training was provided for 295 individuals focusing on safe
production of seafood and juices. In addition to these trainings, Extension specialists met
with tomato growers twice in 2007 and with VT scientists at the Eastern Shore AREC to
address growing issues in tomato safety. The tomato growers gave positive feedback and like
the team approach to solving a problem of great importance to Virginia agriculture.
Recommendations provided to the growers align with the national GAP's program.

Food products produced by 289 small food businesses were analyzed and recommendations
provided. Of the products tested, 33 had a significant food safety issue that, left uncorrected,
may have resulted in unsafe food in the marketplace. Approximately 200 of these products
had a significant quality issue that may have resulted in significant economic loss for the
processor.
End of session surveys revealed 100% of participants in the Cooking for Crowds program
increased knowledge on the causes of food borne illness and food preparation skills. Eighty-
six percent of food service employees completing ServSafe indicated significant gain in safe
food preparation and handling. As a result of these two programs in Virginia, $163,095 to
$1,355,940 was potentially saved from pain and suffering, reduced productivity and medical
expenses if one foodborne illness case per participant successfully completing the courses
was prevented across Virginia.




80% of the individuals who come to our program and take the CFM exam pass.

Before the FPM program, 32% (n=126) of program respondents (those who completed our
survey) reported that they "always" measured the internal temperature of hot/cold foods
being held. Thirty days after the program ended, that percentage rose to 72% (n=283).
Nearly two-thirds (67%; n=263) of the participants (who completed our follow-up survey)
reported that they "always" washed their hands for 20 seconds using soap and hot water
before coming to the FPM program. Thirty days after completing the program, that
percentage had risen to 90% (n=352).
Before the FPM program, 37% (n=144) of participants (completing our 30-day follow-up
survey) used a food thermometer "always" to determine the doneness of food. Thirty days
after the program ended, that percentage rose to 70%. During the 2007 year, we began
providing all program participants with a food thermometer so we hope that this added
incentive further increases our impact.

In its first three seasons, the auction exceeded the members and participating growers'
expectations. Gross sales receipts for the 2007 season surpassed $1.3 million. These sales
come from over 350 registered vendors, most of who are from the Mennonite community
and other groups within a 100-mile radius. As a startup enterprise, the produce auction
helped diversify the farm economy for Mennonite families and others, provided new
agriculture-based opportunities and enterprises for women and youth, and enhanced VCE's
programming efforts with men, women, and youth in this distinct agricultural community.




This study shows that Internet fish products are either equally or more likely to have
excessive microbial contamination, including L. monocytogenes, than locally purchased fillets.
Effective educational and/or regulartory interventions are needed to support the healthy
development of this emerging market.
A total of 769 (87%) people gained knowledge and received a course certificate.
The approximate economic value of the trainings in South Carolina was $31,577,550 due to a
reduction of incidence of foodborne illness, which reduces the likelihood of medical costs
that are incurred due to food-borne illness.
A total of 219,771 people are served by food establishments represented by participants in
the training.
The approximate economic value of the trainings in South Carolina was $31,575,000 due to a
reduction of incidence of food-borne illness, which reduces the likelihood of medical costs
that are incurred due to food-borne illness.
205 (97%)made at least one change related to cleanliness, for example, washed their hands
more often.
169 (80%)made at least one change related to cooling food, for example, put food into
shallow containers or cut meat into smaller pieces before putting in the refrigerator.
165 (78%) made at least one change related to food preparation, for example, prevented
cross-contamination by keeping raw meats, cooked foods, and fresh produce separated.
158 (75%) made at least one change related to other miscellaneous areas, for example,
monitored critical control points more closely.
148 (70%) made at least one change related to cooking food, for example, used a stove or
microwave - not a steam table - to reheat food.
1000 youth reported learning proper techniques to wash hands and demonstrated this during
the class.
205 (97%) of adults made at least one change related to cleanliness.
169 (80%) made at least one change related to cooling foods.
165 (78%) made at least one change related to food preparation.
158 (75%) made at least one change related to miscellaneous areas, such as monitored
critical control points more closely.
138 (70%) made at least one change related to cooking food.


5 participating food service establishments credit the food safety classes as proving impact to
positive inspections by regulatory agencies. No outbreaks were reported.


Improved food handling behaviors, such as those estimated to have been made by workshop
participants, increase the likelihood that food served in Wyoming is safe and, therefore,
decrease the risk of foodborne illness.
Has performed well in attempts to control bacterial populations on foods not amenable to
heat treatment.




No data is available at this time.


Awareness among EFNEP participants about food safety issues related to personal hygiene,
food storage, food preparation, and food handling was increased among adults and youth
who attended the 6-12 week series of lessons.

Based on previous surveys, an estimated 240 participants in the Food Safety Refresher
Course adopted one or more of some 29 food safety practices as a result of the University of
Illinois Extension training. Most frequently mentioned were checking thermometers for
accuracy, posting consumer advisories for undercooked food, and cooking and reheating
protein food to correct end temperatures.
When random sample of class participants (n =61 ) were asked their intentions regarding
food safety practices 100% responded they intend to follow the key recommendations of
food safety - clean, separate, cook and chill more often; 100% intend to improve their food
safety habits more often. 100% of participants intend to more often use a food thermometer
to monitor the temperature of potentially hazardous foods and 100% intend to more often
wash fruits and vegetables before eating and/or preparing them. 100% of participants also
intend to more often wash their hands before working with food. In addition Project
Home/CARE providers indicated they intend to more often serve foods that are safe and
appropriate for the elderly.




Research findings are being used to develop scientifically-based best consumed by dating for
deli meats and to develop risk communication and education strategies for consumers and
deli workers.




The central goal over the next three years is to create a tool for the meat processing industry
so they can plug in their product and verify whether it's safe.


Research findings provided new mechanistic data on how foodborne ribotoxic chemicals act
and how their toxicity can be prevented. This data was disseminated in presentations at
several conferences and shared with students in undergraduate and graduate courses at
Michigan State University.


Consumers are becoming more aware of the benefits of consuming functional foods
containing beneficial bacteria. Research in this area will provide much needed information
about the viability of probiotics, delivered in various foods, and the health benefits they
provide. Regarding food safety, finding ways to decrease the prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 in
cattle, prior to slaughter may provide a new tool for reducing the likelihood of bacterial
contamination in raw beef.
Research is continuing.
We have found that fruit stage of maturity affects the quality of fruit extracts for use as anti-
oxidants.
A blackberry planting has been established. We have identified black berries as a good crop
for value added processing. The planting will be used to the best cultivar for production and
the fruit will be used in value-added experiments.
Results showed that participants in formal Food Technology Training Course have learned
how to process about 50 products from local resources like root crops, fish, banana and
coconut. Food product evaluators of different age groups, genders and affiliations increased
their awareness on the utilization of local crops into value-added processed food products.

According to CRS5 Behavior Checklist Summary Report, 27% or 15 of 56 adult participants
showed improvement in planning meals, making healthy food choices, preparing foods
without adding salt, reading nutrition labels and having children eat breakfast. For youth,
91% of 68 increased their ability to select nutritious foods.

About 30-50% of homemakers started to apply learned knowledge to their families,
especially on food preparation by adding fruits and vegetables to the family meals depending
on group and location. About fifteen percent already learned how to read food labels by
doing this in the stores and sharing with the storekeepers the problem of selling expired food
to customers. About fifty percent of the school children and out of school youths learned the
names of the different kinds of local food and the nutrient content of each food by sharing
with other family members.




As a result of the follow up activities, two participants working at the PCC Cafeteria started
preparing some of the food products that they have learned from the class. These processed
foods were served to the students and those who take their meals at the Cafeteria. A
storeowner prepared foods for sale. One participant prepared tapioca pancake mix and
served them to 50 LEEP students during a 4-week camping activity. Eight other participants
prepared some of the foods for traditional events such as funerals and birth ceremony.

People have come to appreciate the value added products from their staple food crops as a
result of their gained knowledge in processing them.

Thirty percent of the homemakers started to apply learned knowledge to their families
especially on food preparation by adding fruits and vegetables to their family meals. About
fifteen percent already learned how to read food label by doing this in the stores and sharing
with the storekeepers the problem of selling expired food to customers. About fifty percent
of the school children and out of school youth learned the different kinds of local food and
the content of each food by sharing with their families and friends.
There was an increase in the number of healthy food snacks or lunch programs in schools and
communities. Observations of local markets and quick lunch stands indicate a greater
demand for local produce.

One participant has successfully embarked on the commercialization of Taro Sub Sandwich.
Another continued to prepare taro wine and selling the product. Tapioca steamed cakes
were sold at the Bethlehem market during payday weeks. A participant sold tapioca cookies
and cakes during civic events like Tourism Week. One participant is producing tapioca starch
for sale at grocery stores. A manager of a big hotel indicated interest in serving local foods to
their guests after they tasted the food products that were taught to the participants of the
Food Technology Course.

Different recipes of local food content are now being accepted by an increasing number of
people in the communities. Varieties of banana and taro that have a high nutrient and
Vitamin A content and easy to cultivate have been widely accepted for their taste, which is
contributing to a healthy and well-nourished population.


Program impacts include increased awareness and knowledge gained in new and emerging
diseases, benefits of a herd biosecurity plan, vaccination protocols, symptoms of infectious
diseases, factors leading to antibiotic resistance and the resulting threat to human health,
testing options for animal diseases, quality assurance certification, and infectious disease
control measures. Participants in Serv-Safe learned HACCP protocol for group food
preparation. Family food preparers learned correct food purchase, cooking, and storage
techniques to minimize exposure to harmful organisms. The role and responsibility of Penn
State Extension in Food and Agriculture biosecurity is better understood. Intrastate and
interstate agencies and producers have become better prepared to work as a team during an
incident.

Six times as many pre-purchase animal biosecurity diagnostic kits have been used by
producers and veterinarians since the start of the program in 2002 (52 in 2002, 297 in 2007).
The kit contains collection and shipping vials for milk, feces, and blood. The milk is sampled
for mastitis pathogens, and the serum sample is examined for bovine viral diarrhea (BVD),
infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR), and bovine leukosis virus (BLV). The fecal samples are
examined for Salmonella and Clostridium perfringens. There was a 47 percent increase in the
use during the last year. The purpose is to isolate the potential for disease pathway through
purchased animals coming onto the farm. Land O Lakes milk cooperative has duplicated and
distributed the Penn State BioSecurity poster to their co-op members
(http://vetextension.psu.edu/biosecurity/docs/biosecuremain.jpg). The sign identifies the
farm facility as a restricted biosecurity area.
A sensor comprised of 4 insect antennae (a quadraprobe) has been demonstrated to detect a
variety of chemical odors with high specificity and sensitivity. The quadraprobe showed
promise for detection of plant volatile chemicals, chemicals associated with explosives, and
various illicit drugs. Further research on the composition of odor plumes and the manner in
which the insect antenna processes these plumes suggested improvements to the
quadraprobe and associated software that could take further advantage of the bio-inspired
design of this sensor system. Improvements to the anemometer of the quadraprobe led to
wind direction information synchronously with the sampling of each odor strand. The
quadraprobe with these improvements is able to indicate the location of an odor source from
a distance. A sequence database for more than 2000 Fusarium clinical isolates comprises
most species associated with human infections; this database was used to resolve a case of
contact lens keratitis.

Over 300 adults and 1200 youth in one extension program increased their knowledge of the
benefits of physical activities and healthy eating habits. Members of the FCE acknowledge the
aging population and have agreed to look out for one another and assist one another at all
opportunities.
Of the over 5000 people seeking information on catchment water systems 718 requested
additional information . The Urban Garden Center continued to be a popular place to learn
about urban gardening with over 4400 completing non-formal educational programs held on
a variety of topics. Plant sales, gardening displays, open houses, and other outreach activities
also attracted an additional 4,000 persons.




1.OARDC results revealed for the first time that our retail foods, including many ready-to-eat,
generally considered "healthy" items, are heavily contaminated with antibiotic resistant
bacteria and these bacteria are transmitted to human through daily food intake. Commensal
organisms in the food chain not only can serve as a resistance gene reservoir but an enhancer
for the transmitting of resistance genes. Our results illustrated a potentially very important
avenue in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in the general public, and likely will
have enormous impact on food safety and public health. Besides the contribution to scientific
understanding, this research also has significant impact on food industry. In the US alone, this
research affects the annual production of 20 million pounds of fermented dairy products
business. Worldwide, the number is much larger. Its impact on the even larger fresh produce
business is yet to be evaluated.
2. The results of this research shows that the presence of microorganisms could be detected
within a sealed package without opening the container. Since beginning this research, the
literature has reported on research into the use of electronic portable devices that are
capable of detecting the presence of bacteria without the need to perform time consuming
1. Dairy industry personnel learned that depending on the processing temperature-time
combination, endogenous (from the cow) and exogenous (from psychrotrophic bacteria)
enzymes can be reactivated during storage. Active enzymes under refrigeration, plasmin and
lipoprotein lipase (LPL), are considered the most important endogenous enzymes responsible
for milk protein and lipid degradation over the product shelf life. Unless the bacteria count
exceeds 106 CFU/mL, it was found that psychrotrophic bacterial enzymes do not significantly
contribute to lipolyisis and proteolysis of milk components. Therefore, the above mentioned
processing, packaging and storage conditions significantly slowed the rate at which this
chemical changes occur in food systems. The results of the study showed that milk samples
were chemically stable, and thus bitter off flavors in milk as a result of proteolysis, could have
been avoided. Ultra high temperature processing combined with light-protected PET bottles
can further improve the shelf life of skim and 3.25% milk. The improvement of stability and
shelf life of fluid milk can contribute to the distribution and marketing capabilities of milk
processing plants.
2. The study found that pressure (700 MPa) treatment in combination with heat (105-121C)
beyond selected pressure holding times decreased B. amyloliquefaciens populations to
undetectable levels by the enrichment procedure. In-situ properties (thermal conductivity,
reaction volume and density) of food materials under pressure were studied. Thermal
This project has developed an infrared sensing protocol to isolate and identify foodborne
pathogenic bacteria, specifically Salmonella enterica serovars and Bacillus spp., from foods by
using immunomagnetic separation or hydrophobic grid membranes (HGM) and infrared
spectroscopy. Our optical sensing technology is based on unique spectral signature profiles
that permit the chemically based classification of intact microbial cells and produce complex
biochemical patterns or "fingerprints" that are reproducible and distinct for different
bacteria, making it possible to discriminate between signals from the target microorganism
and signals from cross-reacted sample constituents. Pattern recognition models developed
form infrared spectra of affinity-captured target organisms correctly predicted the presence
of Salmonella at species and serovar levels.

The outcome of this project will provide the food industry with efficient and effective
detection techniques for processed foods with regard to contamination by pathogenic
microorganisms. Implementation of rapid testing by the industry and regulatory agencies
would help to streamline food safety and quality assurance and will prevent the widespread
and growing public health problem of foodborne diseases that creates an enormous social
and economic burden on our health systems. This technology can provide the food industry
with means to reduce microbial contamination by detecting and removing potential food

Nationally, there are 700,000 cases of salmonellosis and $1.1 billion in losses annually from
contaminated foods. Ohio State researchers have developed a system that utilizes ozone and
thermal treatment to kill Salmonella inside shell eggs while protecting quality. EggTech LLC, a
partnership of researchers and businesses, plans to implement this patented technology in
Ohio egg-producing plants.
1. In-situ properties of food materials under pressure are useful for modeling heat transfer
and temperature distribution during high-pressure sterilization and pasteurization. While k
under pressure increased with increase in moisture and temperature, it decreased with
increasing fat content. Among the products tested, carrot had the highest k at 700 MPa and
75C (0.90 W/mC), while chicken fat had the lowest k (0.43 W/mC) under similar conditions.
Density of all samples increased as a function of pressure. Compressibility of sucrose and
protein solutions decreased as a function of increasing concentration. At 700 MPa, all
samples, except ethanol, reduced in volume by 13-16%. pH change from 0.1 to 400 MPa was -
0.48 for citric acid, -1.09 for phosphoric acid, 0.28 for MES, and -0.01 for sulfanilic acid.
&#8232;Results of the study will be helpful in the process characterization of pressure
treated low-acid shelf stable foods. The study will provide improved understanding of role
thermal process uniformity during high pressure processing. Improved knowledge on thermal
effects under pressure will help food processors and regulators in the safety assessment of
pressure treated products.
2. OARDC scientists have documented clearly, the enhancing effect of electric fields on
diffusivity of ionic species. Electrical conductivity data are now available for a wide range of




Clinical isolates represented a distinct subset of cattle strain types.


We identified a new clonal strain of Salmonella that is epidemic in the pacific northwest and
are working to identify the means by which it is spread. We have also documented the high
degree of multi-drug resistance in serovar Dublin isolated from dairy farms and heifer
ranches, which indicates that the selection pressure for increased resistance is more likely
occurring on these types of farms given the high degree of host specificity of this serovar.


We identified a new clonal strain of Salmonella that is epidemic in the pacific northwest and
are working to identify the means by which it is spread. We have also documented the high
degree of multi-drug resistance in serovar Dublin isolated from dairy farms and heifer
ranches, which indicates that the selection pressure for increased resistance is more likely
occurring on these types of farms given the high degree of host specificity of this serovar.




The audiences gained up-to-the-minute knowledge in their respective disciplines.
Submission of proposals to competitive programs in the USDA and other funding agencies is a
way of leveraging AES formula funds. It has allowed us to find additional resources to solve
issues that are central to the mission of the AES.
27 schools in 10 districts with over 15,000 students have benefitted from locallay grown
produce in school menus




91% of the 941 consumers that participated of the Fight BAC! courses adopted one or more
safe food handling practices. Among the practices adopted were: more than 90% wash their
hands frequently and clean and disinfect the surfaces in contact with food and 40% of the
participants use a food thermometer to measure internal food temperatures.


92%, of the 3,274 FSCC participants that completed the course, approved the certification
exam with a score of 70% or more. There were persons in charge of different types of retail
food establishments among the participants.




Understanding the capacity of various macromolecules in plant and mushroom tissues in
binding of calcium will provide novel and more efficient pre- and post-harvest practices to
enhance quality of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables.
Information on the stress response in E. coli at reduced temperatures will help the food
industry understand how this organism behaves in food products and how the stress
response is affected by pre-storage temperatures.
47%, of the 3,274 FSCC participants, wrote a plan to control the temperatures of Potentially
Hazardous Foods and keep records.




113 Plants implemented the HACCP plan.


Studies demostrated that heat-based processes could be inadequate, chlorine-based
products are recommended, and high-pressure homogenization of fluid foods had excellent
potential for microbial inactivation without significant heat.
Addition of natural polysaccharide, chitosan, to synthetic PEO films would increase the
functionality and biodegradability of the material, and at the same time partially reduce use
of petrochemicals for polymer production.

Information on the risk of growth of Enterobacter sakazakii in infant formula held at room
temperature (25 C) was presented to hospital staff, parents and visitors. Information on
appropriate handling of rehydrated infant formula was widely disseminated.
The information derived from these studies will provide much-needed guidance to maintain
livestock health and productivity while reducing the risk of antibiotic resistance in foodborne
bacteria that may infect humans.


In collaboration with the firefighters union and local healthcare organizations, CCE provided
educational intervention regarding all aspects of cardiac wellness. As a result of this
educational intervention, firehouse menus have been altered to incorporate less dietary fat
as well as more fresh produce. Additionally, the firefighters have made progress toward
incorporating more physical activity into their daily routine. Two hundred-sixty Albany
firefighters participated in this mandatory program with the intention of sustained follow-up
by various cardiac health entities. Through this intervention each firefighter has been
provided with the knowledge to mitigate the stress incurred in their line of work by
employing better dietary strategies and improving their fitness status.




71 individuals age 55 and older learned and practiced research-based exercises designed to
reduce the incidence of osteoporosis. 58% (41 participants) responded to post-program
surveys reporting as follows: 28 reported improved balance; 27 reported improved balance;
26 reported increased flexibility; 15 reported increased stamina/endurance; 20 reported
increased energy and 27 reported an overall increased sense of well-being.
See crosscutting outcome measure narrative.
See crosscutting outcome measure narrative.


See crosscutting outcome measure narrative. were received from SAFE participants. 703
759 post-workshop knowledge questionnaires
participants (93%) scored 75% or greater on the knowledge questionnaire.

557 post-workshop SAFE practices questionnaires were completed. These data report food
workers' intent to implement 8 food safety practices recommended during the SAFE
program. Here is a listing of the practices along with the number and percent of participants
who indicated they were practicing it routinely:
- Wash hands before and after preparing food. 533 (96%)
- Wash hands for 20 seconds. 490 (88%)
- Change single-use gloves between tasks. 494 (89%)
- Wash and sanitize utensils, equipment and surfaces before and after using. 517 (93%)
- Use gloves, tongs, or tissues to prepare and /or serve ready-to-eat food. 508 (91%)
- Check food temperature with a calibrated thermometer. 340 (61%)
- Keep perishable food out of the temperature danger zone. 453 (81%)
- Use a SAFE recommended method for cooling a large amount of hot food. 394 (71%)

Of the 294 ServSafe participants, 234 (80%) passed the examination with a score of 75% or
greater.

Home Food Safety
Entry and exit food recalls and survey question evaluation results show that:
- 28% (100 of 354) of participants more often did not allow meat and dairy foods to sit out for
more than two hours
- 51% (180 of 355) of participants more often did not thaw foods at room temperatures

Comments from participants:
- "I defrost food in the refrigerator."
- "When my daughter helps me cook, I make sure she cleans her hands before and after a

Data is reported under the more specific indicator that was added for this report.
Data collected in this planned program is included under the added outcome indicator at the
practice change level
Continue to work on developing a 10-15 minute rapid method to enumerate E.coli in food.
Elucidation of peptidase activities on casein derived bitter peptides may allow specific
manipulations of lactic acid bacteria resulting in decreased ripening times and increased
cheese quality.


Using these new methods, we can save more than 23 hours measuring E.coli numbers in
food. This will be very helpful for food safety and quality.


We were unable to quantify this outcome.

All EFNEP Activities were funded by Smith Lever 3D and have a separate reporting.

All EFNEP Activities were funded by Smith Lever 3D and have a separate reporting.
All EFNEP Activities were funded by Smith Lever 3D and have a separate reporting.

All EFNEP Activities were funded by Smith Lever 3D and have a separate reporting.
The following are examples of program results:
The incidence of E. coli bacteria found in Nebraska ground beef samples declined from 59
positive tests in 2001 to 20 positive tests in 2007.
School Food Service providers reported a 90% increase in Standard Operating Procedures, an
84% increase in knowledge about the process approach to HACCP, and a 40% increase in
knowledge about categorizing recipes/menu items into one of the three HACCP processes as
a result of their training.
Participants in ServSafe programs increased their knowledge of safe food handling practices
(25%) use of thermometers (20%), and sanitation (23%).
As a result of the Food Safety Task Force Conference for Food Service Professionals, 91
program participants gained knowledge about the food safety of ethnic foods (65% increase),
safety of produce (38% increase), custom-exempt meat processing (45% increase) and the
food code (46% increase).
Approximately 500 4-H youth successfully completed Quality Assurance programs before
showing meat animals at state and regional shows.




During 2007, 100 percent of growers producing potatoes for McCain Foods were GAP
compliant, helping to minimize the potential of microbial infection in processed potato
products from Maine, and keeping an important part of the food supply safer. The crop
represented a value of $44 million paid directly to 123 potato growers, and $13 million in
wages paid to McCain Foods employees.
3376 program participants acquired knowledge and developed skills in nutrition, vegetable
gardening, nutritious meal preparation, food safety and health and physical activities.

Twenty-one (21) different recipes were given out to the participants. 2350 participants
adopted recipes and diets using local produce and healthy foods. More vegetables were
consumed and more participants' health improved. Participants have shown improvements
in diet, knowledge and food related behavior. Moreover, participants learned how to use
local fruits and vegetables in preparing economical and nutritious recipes.


2350 program participants adopted safer food handling, storage, and preparation practices.
Teachers reported that more students are washing their hands before preparing family meals
and consumption of food.




1500 program participants lived healthier lifestyles as evident by participants increased in
physical activities, weight loss and improved self-esteem, adoption of food safety practices,
and consumption of balanced and nutritious meals. Participants acqired knowledge and
developed skills in nutritious and balanced meals preparation, vegetable gardening, food
safety, and health and physical activities.




Sensors developed in this project provide food producers and consumers with the ability to
determine the safety of their products. Formats available include a lateral flow assay for the
simple analysis and a microfluidic sensor for more sensitive a refined analysis in food
production plants and doctors' offices. Biosensors and microanalytical systems for pathogens
such as E. coli, C. parvum, have been developed. These biosensors address problems related
to specificity, speed of analysis, sensitivity and costs. A molecular biological approach for the
recognition of the pathogens is combined with engineering of microchannel systems in order
to provide these bioanalytical Microsystems that are truly portable biosensors. A good
example is the C. parvum biosensor. It can detect as few as 1 oocyst in only 4 hours. Current
technology requires about 7 days of detection time, since water treatment plants have to
send their sample to a testing lab and have to pay about $400 per analysis (in comparison to
an estimated $25 per analysis with the biosensor if carried out in house of the water
treatment plant.
For FY2007, Wisconsin AES Hatch funded projects resulted in 182 publications, 6 patents
disclosures and 1 patent, and 62 graduate students trained. The Wisconsin AES also tracks
the Thompson ISI Essential Science indicator as a measure of impact. Our goal is to remain in
the top five and we were ranked first in the last published ranking. Examples of
representative impacts resulting from individually funded projects within our portfolio are
described, to the extent possible, in the Summary of this Annual Report.
Additional research has been funded to supplement core funding from state and federal
sources.

Results include a cost-effective fiberboard product from wheat straw; new preservation
technology for Washington's fruits and berries; a mechanical harvester for Washington sweet
cherries; cost-effective production of Omega-3 fatty acids from cull potatoes; development
of a new class of Hard White Wheat to produce bread and noodles for the Asian market; new
tests for measuring safety of food products and for E. coli contamination; and high-pressure
thermally sterilized vegetables and others.




PhD level students and post docs are working on all IMPACT-funded projects.


Scientists were able to obtain $2 million in external funding relating to IMPACT-funded
research projects in 2007.

Research projects focusing on targeted economic research are being planned and conducted
by IMPACT Center staff personnel.

This information is important in designing food preservation methods using the principle of
multi-factorial food preservation.




85% of program participants report improved knowledge in safe food handling

57% of participants report intent to implement new knowledge of safe food handling
Foodborne illness outbreaks increased in 2006 (last available data). Outcomes should reflect
multiple years of reporting to determine progress. One year is insufficient to monitor
outcomes.
Foodborne illness outbreaks increased in 2006 (last available data). Outcomes should reflect
multiple years of reporting to determine progress. One year is insufficient to monitor
outcomes. 115 outbreaks reported.

Throughout the certificate program, use of records in the areas of quality milk production,
reproduction and herd health has been incorporated into teaching and discussions
emphasizing on-farm application. Participants recognize the importance of using these tools
and teaching their clients to use these tools in herd management.
Participants are looking at both their client dairy farms and their own dairy practitioner
businesses more holistically. Through discussions both in the classroom and individually, they
exhibit awareness of and importance of applying business principles both to their client
businesses and their practices.

Participants are more aware of and comfortable with the whole dairy farm management
picture. A closing discussion during the final workshop indicated a desire to visit and study a
wide variety of successful dairy operations that can serve as models for some of their
clientele.


As a result of their participation and relationships built during the workshop, practitioners
have increased contacts with OSU specialists for assistance with both their clients and their
practices.

Participants are more aware of and seeking answers to their own practice's profitability and
efficiency issues. They are considering how they need to change to meet new demands and
take advantage of new opportunities. Also, how they should value their business as they
consider ways to fairly and successfully pass the business to the next generation.




Public awareness.

Safer food production which translates to a safe food supply for consumers. Changes in food
handling and packaging processes in the industry to prevent foodborne illness.

Maintained or expanded business.
Internet course is available through Cornell University distance learning.

Needs assessments have resulted in the development of effective training and materials.




The "Serving Food Safely" Curriculum developed as part of the program was taught in three
states, Louisiana, Mississippi and Arkansas. Program staff in ten parishes made contacts
through the FF-NEWS program, 2,047 families enrolled who attended classes or participated
in workshops and acquired new knowledge and skills. Respondents to a survey indicated that
information provided was pertinent and that they will utilize it. The EFNEP program was in its
first year of implementation, 800 individuals benefited by gaining knowledge and awareness
of important food and health issues. During the pilot phase of the sisters-together program,
some success stories that ranged from weight loss to individuals being taking off medications
for hypertension and diabetes were recorded. Preliminary results on alternative meat
products suggested that goat patties and sausages were highly accepted by consumer
panelists when compared to beef patties and sausages. Goat hams were only moderately
accepted. Panelists indicated that they would purchase goat products if offered in the
market.

When surveyed, 100 percent of the participants at the program classes indicated that their
health knowledge and awareness were improved. The also indicated that they will use
knowledge gained to improve the health conditions of their family members and friends.
A survey of participants in SU Ag Center nutrition and health activities indicated that 50
percent met and/or exceeded their goal of a healthy weight. Also, when surveyed, 100
percent of the participants at the program classes indicated that their health knowledge and
awareness were improved. The also indicated that they will use knowledge gained to
improve the health conditions of their family members and friends. Additionally, with
escalating health care costs, and an average cost of $80 - $100 per primary care visit, the
program saved citizens especially the socially and economically disadvantaged thousands of
dollars in health and related care costs.




A survey of participants in SU Ag Center nutrition and health activities indicated that 50
percent met and/or exceeded their goal of a healthy weight. Also, when surveyed, 100
percent of the participants at the program classes indicated that their health knowledge and
awareness were improved. The also indicated that they will use knowledge gained to
improve the health conditions of their family members and friends. Additionally, with
escalating health care costs, and an average cost of $80 - $100 per primary care visit, the
program saved citizens especially the socially and economically disadvantaged thousands of
dollars in health and related care costs.

Two graduate students received M.S. degrees in Forensic Science with research focused on
plant pathology. Forensic plant pathology objectives and needs have been added to the
official U.S. Plant Disease Recovery Plans as part of the federally mandated National Plant
Disease Recorvery Program.
-National policy-makers (Congressional members and staff) and federal agency
administrators were educated regarding importance of food and crop biosecurity needs and
development of forensic science infrastructure.
-Implemented a Memorandum of Understanding between Oklahoma State University & the
Oklahoma Department of Food and Forestry to define emergency roles and responsibilities in
case of bioemergency.

The publication of refereed journal articles ensures distribution of knowledge to the scientific
community and publicaion of books and presentations direct knowledge to the general public.
Results will indicate how the bacteria move among sectors in the food system and provide
insight into control and management methods.
Magnetic bead coupled with immuno-PCR can effectively detect enterotoxin in foods. Real-
time PCR can effectively detect soy DNA regardless of the degree of processing.
In Allegany County, following participation in the trainings, 58% of participants reported they
planned to choose high fiber foods and whole grain foods more often. After taking the
classes, 54% intend to choose smaller portions of food more often and 58% of claimed that
they would make small changes to increase physical activity such as taking the stairs.
In another example, the MD EFNEP and the Primary Care Coalition's (PCC)--Care for Kids
Program (CFK) are leading the way in reducing childhood obesity in limited-income,
traditionally underserved populations. Over the past year, they have worked together to
develop, implement, and evaluate a family-centered healthy lifestyle program in
Montgomery County for children who are overweight or at risk for overweight and their
families. This bilingual program has reached a total of 180 Latino participants. This highly
effective program has been extensively evaluated and plans are underway to expand the
program to African/African American/Caribbean families who are CFK participants in
Montgomery County, with a goal of providing access to all low-income overweight children
within the next 3-5 years.




Parents reported the following diet and physical activity behaviors:

- 82 percent reported doing physical activity as a family in the current week.

- 80 percent reported that their families ate more fruits and vegetables now than before
participating in the program.

- 78 percent reported greater awareness of the MyPyramid serving sizes.

- 76 percent reported buying healthier snacks for children since participating in Food $ense.

- 73 percent reported eating more meals together as a family now versus before program
participation.

- 70 percent reported changes in food preparation to reduce fat, sugar or salt.




In a six month follow-up, 84 percent of respondents (n=34 registered nurses) maintained
improvement in hand-washing practices as measured by a repeated Germ City simulation. In
addition, 91 percent reported that they had increased their frequency of hand-washing and
85 percent reported washing their hands for longer periods of time since participating in the
Germ City experience.
98 % of those surveyed followed the advice of food safety experts.
822 individuals indicated their intent to adopt new behaviors that reduce risk of food-borne
illness.




A protective vaccine has been developed for pneumonic plague using a rat and mouse model.
These findings have initiated steps in testing the vaccine efficacy in a nonhuman primate
model. The efforts of this work have a key societal benefit in protection against illicit or
accidental exposure to these biological agents. Our dissection of the basic pathogenesis of
these organisms has also shown that pathogenesis is due to genetic loss in Y. pestis.




Three hundred forty-eight passed the certification exam.
Five hundred twenty-five individuals participated in entry level ServSafe classes. Seventy-
seven percent of 2006 EFNEP participants showed improvement in one or more food safety
practices.
Four hundred three people participated in training and took the certification exam; 348
passed the certification exam.




This farm-to-table, information and transfer approach—covering food safety as well as
security—including integration of the economic, trade and policy aspects, has positioned the
Food Safety Consortium to lead to the future in a comprehensive way relative to scientific
discovery, technology transfer and education.
Data not being collected.
Low-temperature depuration appears to be a simple and inexpensive process for reducing
contamination in oysters without adverse effects on the oysters. The process can easily be
adopted by the industry for producing raw oysters for safe consumption. Scombroid
poisoning, caused by histamine intoxication, is one of the most prevalent illnesses associated
with seafood consumption in the U.S. Treatments of EO water completely inactivated the
inoculated bacteria on food contact surfaces. The development of specific intervention
processing technologies will provide mechanisms to ensure not only safe products but also
products of the highest nutritional value and of desirable sensory characteristics. Outbreaks
of foodborne illness associated with fresh and minimally processed fruits have raised interest
to develop alternative food disinfectantion systems. Acidic EO water has attracted interest
from the food industry as a promising technology for sanitation and microbial inactivation.
Other investigative work suggested that edible coatings may be beneficial for retaining
quality of fresh blueberries. This technology provided potential to develop ready-to-eat fresh
blueberry for the commercial market. The key to the continued economic health of the
Oregon wine industry is the high quality of its wines, as the relatively small scale of




Studies on the translational expression of Turnip yellow mosaic virus have shown the ability
of AUG initiation codons to be recognized in a simultaneous way by ribosomes. The team has
coined this modality "initiation coupling," and expects it to be significant in the expression of
non-viral eukaryotic mRNAs. Investigators developed a method to create apple and grape
rootstocks resistant to crown gall. Investigators discovered a novel Agrobacterium virulence
protein that transports foreign DNA into the nucleus of plant cells and functions more
efficiently than alternative Agrobacterium-encoded nuclear import proteins. Data generated
indicates that environmental conditions as well as a genetic orientation controls the synthesis
and characteristics of lactococcal exopolysaccharides, thus impacting the probiotic potential
of LAB strains. Research has led to the discovery of a bacterial polymer, composed of simple
sugars and which thickens liquids. Mutational analysis provided genetic evidence for a model
of exopolysaccharide gene organization and evolution in Lactococcus.




It is likely that, in nature, vibrios encounter a variety of stimuli (including self-generated
quorum sensing signals) that trigger differential gene expression.
Total anthocyanin contents were from 41.2 to 46.3 Abs/g for RW dried blueberry with and
without drying aid and 47.52 Abs/g for freeze dried counterparts. A spray-dried blueberry
powder that was formulated with rice oligodextrin showed an absorbance of 61.7 Abs/g. The
anthocyanin content of blueberry concentrate powders prepared using RW were similar with
and without use of drying aids. Anthocyanins are more stable when concentrated or
dehydrated and their recovery during the spray drying process most likely improved due to
the encapsulating effect of the rice polysaccharide. The conclusions are that RW is a relatively
inexpensive alternative to freeze drying for preparation of blueberry juice concentrate
powder without addition of drying aids. Investigations are continuing to further improve this
process to retain anthocyanin pigments and other antioxidants in Northwest berries.

Two new high quality slow darkening pinto cultivars, namely Kimberly and Shoshone and two
high quality great northern cultivars, namely Hungerford and Sawtooth were released in 2007
for production in Idaho and other western states. In addition to resistance to bean common
mosaic virus and rust, the two pinto cultivars are the first slow darkening bean ever
developed in the USA. Similarly, the two great northern cultivars possess excellent seed
qualities unmatched thus far by any private and public cultivars in that market class.




We have implemented new programs and are currently completing construction of a
laboratory building that will bring new capacity to the University of Rhode Island and to our
state stakeholders.
Seventy-five to 99% of program participants demonstrated knowledge gain through pre- and
post program evaluations. Sixty-six percent of participants indicated they would implement a
procedure that reduces a food safety risk. Approximately 43% indicated that they would
train others in food safety procedures.




Through Nutrition and Food Safety programs, more than 220 community agencies have
partnered with Extension to address significant community health issues.

								
To top