Developing Good Money Management Skills

					Oklahoma’s Priority Academic
    Student Skills (PASS)
            and
      Learning For Life

                          August 2000
                             OKLAHOMA’S PRIORITY ACADEMIC STUDENT SKILLS (PASS)                                                                                LEARNING FOR LIFE LESSON PLANS THAT ASSIST
                                                                                                                                                                      IN MEETING OKLAHOMA’S PASS
Social Studies
                                                                                                                                        Elementary Program*: Ethnic Heritage, Race/Religion/Culture, Respecting Differences, World Cultures, Being
(Grades K-12)                                                                                                                           Responsible, Choices, Decision Making, Gangs, Prepared for Today, Code of Ethics, How I Learn from My
                                                                                                                                        Mistakes, Law and Government, Conservation, Empathy, Getting Along With Others, Importance of Family,
Oklahoma’s social studies framework centers on ten instructional themes. These ten themes provide the platform for this                 Service, Violence Prevention, Coping With Stress, Developing Good Listening Skills, Anger/Conflict Management
framework. When teachers and curriculum leaders explore the Oklahoma K-12 Social Studies Framework themes, they
discover a strong connection with the core content areas and the supporting subject areas encompassed within the social                 (*Note: All 60 lesson plans in each Learning for Life elementary books [K-6] will help meet requirements for
studies classroom. The themes help coordinate the social studies curriculum, encouraging connections between social                     PASS.)
studies and the subject areas

The ten social studies themes strengthen curriculum and student learning by:

         •    Building connections with course content to help students develop an understanding of human history and
              their civic role, now and in the future.

         •    Demonstrating how each of the disciplines in social studies affects students’ lives.

         •    Providing a flow and understanding of the human story.                                                                    7th/8th Grade Program: Ethical Decision Making, The Process of Change, Personal
                                                                                                                                        Views, Making Decisions, Money and Budgeting, My Attitude, Service Project, My Problems, Bringing Balance to
The following ten themes are used in a social studies classroom:                                                                        My Life, Relationships, Commitment, Interpersonal Family Relationships, Prejudice, Conflict Resolution, Working
                                                                                                                                        Through My Problems
Civic Ideals and Practices - Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ideals,
principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic. An understanding of civic ideals and practices of citizenship
is critical to full participation in society and is a central purpose of the social studies. In schools, this theme typically appears
in courses and units dealing with history, political science, cultural anthropology, problems of democracy, and fields such as
global studies, law-related education, and the humanities.

Culture - Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the common characteristics of
different cultures including the importance of language. How does the development of beliefs systems, such as religion or
political ideas, influence other parts of the culture? These experiences need to include analysis of how the culture changes
to accommodate different ideas and beliefs. In schools, this theme typically appears in courses and units involving
geography, history, sociology, and anthropology, as well as multicultural topics across the curriculum.

Global Connections - Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the realities of
global interdependence that require an understanding of the importance of diverse global connections among world
societies and the frequent tensions between national interests and global priorities. Students will need to address such
issues as political, economic, and military alliances; economic competition and interdependence; age-old ethnic enmities;
health care; the environment; and human rights. In schools, this theme typically appears in courses and units dealing with
geography, culture, and economics, and draws upon the natural and physical sciences and the humanities.
                            OKLAHOMA’S PRIORITY ACADEMIC STUDENT SKILLS (PASS)                                                                            LEARNING FOR LIFE LESSON PLANS THAT ASSIST
                                                                                                                                                                 IN MEETING OKLAHOMA’S PASS
Social Studies (Continued)
                                                                                                                                     Senior High Program:        Decision Making, Interest and Aptitudes, Leadership and Being A Team Member,
Individual Development and Identity - Personal identity is shaped by one’s culture, by family, by groups and institutional
                                                                                                                                     Work and the Family, Maintaining Balance and Limiting Stress, Dealing With Change, The Global Workplace,
influences. Students should consider such questions as: How do people learn? Why do people behave as they do? What
                                                                                                                                     Importance of Community Service Learning, Ethics In The Workplace, Being a Knowledgeable Consumer
influences how people learn, perceive, and grow? How do people meet their basic needs in a variety of contexts? How do
individuals develop from infancy to adulthood? In schools, this theme typically appears in courses and units dealing with
psychology and anthropology.

Individuals, Groups, and Institutions - Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of
interactions among individuals, groups, and institutions. Institutions such as families, schools, religious bodies, government
agencies, and the courts play an integral role in people’s lives. It is important that students learn how institutions are formed,
what controls and influences them, how they influence individuals and cultures, and how they are maintained or changed. In
schools, this theme typically appears in courses and units dealing with sociology, anthropology, psychology, political
science, and history.

People, Places, and Environments - The study of people, places, and human-environment interactions assists students
as they create their spatial views and geographic perspectives of the world beyond their personal locations. Students need
the knowledge, skills, and understanding to answer questions such as: Why are things located in particular places? How do
those particular places influence our lives? These two essential questions lead students to understandings and explanations
of how and why the world in which they live can support them now and in the future. The subject matter is earth’s surface
and the processes that shape it, the relationships between people and environments, and the connections between people
and places. In schools, this theme typically appears in courses and units dealing with area studies and geography.

Power, Authority, and Governance - Social studies programs should present material on the study of government and the
exercise of power and authority. How and why do human beings create governments? How do they preserve them? How do
they change them? How do people gain power? How do they use power? What is freedom? What are rights? What are
responsibilities? What is the difference between legitimate and illegitimate authority? Social studies programs should help
students develop a broad understanding of how governments work and what the people’s role and responsibility in
government is. Such programs should thus help students become better citizens. In schools, this theme typically appears in
courses and units dealing with history, political science, cultural anthropology and government, and fields such as global
studies, law-related education, and the humanities.

Production, Distribution, and Consumption - Human wants exceed the limited resources available. What is produced
and distributed is a result of decisions to allocate limited resources. The realities of unequal resource distribution
necessitate systems of exchange including trade. The growing interdependence of world economies requires an
understanding of the role of policies and technology in all three economic phases of production, distribution, and
consumption. In schools, this theme typically appears in courses and units dealing with history, political science,
geography, and economics.
Social Studies (Continued)

Science, Technology, and Society - Changes in technology have and will continue to create difficult social choices.
Technology has created a global village by providing instantaneous information and communication connections. The
results of the uses of multifaceted technologies are not always anticipated, and will challenge our belief and cultural
systems. How these results influence our society, as technology and science continue to evolve, will be the challenge of
today and tomorrow. In schools, this theme typically appears in courses and units dealing with history, geography,
economics, and civics and government.

Time, Continuity, and Change - Social studies programs should present material on human history. How have human
beings in different societies thought and acted in the past? How and why have human societies and cultures changed over
time? In what ways have they remained the same? Social studies programs should also introduce students to primary and
secondary sources, how they are generated, what biases they might contain, and how historians might interpret them
differently. Social studies programs should help students develop a broad understanding of the past and of their historical
roots. This will help students make more informed and intelligent decisions about public issues so that they can help shape
the future in a positive manner. In schools, this theme typically appears in courses and units dealing with history, area
studies, cultural anthropology, and archeology.
OKLAHOMA’S PRIORITY ACADEMIC STUDENT SKILLS (PASS)                                                                                              LEARNING FOR LIFE LESSON PLANS THAT ASSIST
                                                                                                                                                       IN MEETING OKLAHOMA’S PASS

Health/Safety Education
Grades 1-4                                                                                                                Elementary Program: Emergency Preparedness, Prepared for Today,
                                                                                                                          Conservation, Violence Prevention,Anger/Conflict Management, Coping With Stress, Health, Clean Air and Water,
I.   The student will comprehend concepts related to health promotion, disease prevention, and safety practices.          Fire Safety, Personal Habits for a Lifetime, Physical Fitness, Safety, Youth Protection
II.  The student will demonstrate the ability to access accurate health and safety information.
III. The student will know health-enhancing behaviors and how to reduce health risks.
IV.  The student will analyze the influence of media, technology, culture, and other factors on health and safety.        7th/8th Grade Program: The Process of Change, Making Time for Everything,
V.   The student will demonstrate the ability to use interpersonal communication skills to enhance health and well-       Assessing Personal Habits and Ongoing Changes, Personal Strengths, Staying Healthy, My Attitude, My
     being.                                                                                                               Problems, Bringing Balance to My Life, Conflict Resolution, Working Through Problems
VI. The student will demonstrate the ability to use goal setting and decision-making skills to enhance health and
     safety.
VII. The student will become an advocate for health and safety enhancement of self, family and community.                 Senior High Program: Maintaining Balance and Limiting Stress, The Importance
                                                                                                                          of Good Health, Dealing With Change

Grades 5-8

I.     The student will comprehend concepts related to health promotion, disease prevention, and safety practices.
II.    The student demonstrate the ability to access valid health information and health-promoting products and
       services.
III.   The student will demonstrate the ability to practice health-enhancing behaviors and reduce health and safety
       risks.
IV.    The students will analyze the influence of culture, media, technology, and other factors on health and safety.
V.     The student will use interpersonal skills to enhance health and safety.
VI.    The student will demonstrate the ability to use goal-setting and decision-making skills to enhance health.
VII.   The student will become an advocate for health and safety enhancement of self, family, and community.


Grades 9-12

I.     The student will comprehend concepts related to health promotion, safety, and disease prevention.
II.    The student knows how to access valid health information, health products and services.
III.   The student will analyze the influence of culture, media, technology, and other factors on health.
IV.    The student will demonstrate the ability to use interpersonal communication skills to enhance health and safety.
V.     The student will develop plans for a healthy future through individual goal setting and decision making.
VI.    The student becomes an advocate for health and safety for self, family, and community.
                            OKLAHOMA’S PRIORITY ACADEMIC STUDENT SKILLS (PASS)                                                                LEARNING FOR LIFE LESSON PLANS THAT ASSIST
                                                                                                                                                     IN MEETING OKLAHOMA’S PASS

Math
Grades 1-5                                                                                                              Elementary Program:      Math, Money Management, Places and Maps

The Priority Academic Student Skills (PASS) for mathematics sets forth the basic mathematical skills for Oklahoma
students. These skills help direct Oklahoma educators in developing coherent and comprehensive mathematics curriculum
appropriate to the needs of their students.

These skills are based on the following goals for all students:
                                                                                                                        7th/8th Grade Program:      Money and Budgeting, The Importance of Managing
      •    Students should value mathematics.                                                                                                       Money, Finding Solutions
      •    Students should be confident in their ability to do mathematics.
      •    Students should be mathematical problem solvers.
      •    Students should be able to communicate mathematically.
      •    Students should be able to reason mathematically.

The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) has identified five process standards: Problem Solving,
Communication, Reasoning and Proof, Connections, and Representation. Using these processes students are actively        Senior High Program:        Money Management
involved in deepening mathematical understandings which lead to increasingly sophisticated abilities required to meet
mathematical challenges. Following is an outline of the five process standards and associated skills.

I.    Problem Solving

      A.    Use problem-solving approaches.
      B.    Formulate problems from everyday and mathematical situations.
      C. Develop, test, and apply strategies to solve a variety of routine and nonroutine problems.
      D. Verify and interpret results with respect to the original problem.
      E.    Distinguish between necessary and irrelevant information in solving problem.
II.   Communication

      A.    Express mathematical ideas coherently and clearly to peers, teachers, and others.

      B.    Extend mathematical knowledge by considering the thinking and strategies of others.

      C. Relate manipulatives, pictures, diagrams, and symbols to mathematical ideas.

      D. Represent, discuss, write, and read mathematical ideas and concepts. Start by relating everyday language to
         mathematical language and symbols and progress toward the use of appropriate terminology.
III.   Reasoning

       A.   Explain mathematical situations using patterns and relationships.

       B.   Demonstrate thinking processes using a variety of age-appropriate materials and reasoning processes

       C. Make predictions and draw conclusions about mathematical ideas and concepts. Predictions become
          conjectures and conclusions become more logical as students mature mathematically.

IV.    Connections

       A.   Relate various concrete and pictorial models of concepts and procedures to one another.

Math (continued)
Grades 1-5 (continued)

       B.   Link concepts to procedures and eventually to symbolic notation.

       C. Recognize relationships among different topics within mathematics.

       D. Use mathematical strategies to solve problems that relate to other curriculum areas and the real world.

V.     Representation

       A.   Create and use a variety of representations appropriately and with flexibility to organize, record, and
            communicate mathematical ideas.

       B.   Use representations to model and interpret physical, social, and mathematical situations.


Grades 6-8

Students in the middle grades will expand and deepen their knowledge of numbers, computation, estimation, measurement,
geometry, statistics, probability, patterns and functions, and the fundamental concepts of algebra bu fpcisomg on
meaningful mathematics in each of these areas.

Instruction in the middle grades should include activities in which the students actively work to pose and solve problems
both individually and together. Learning tools such as concrete models, fraction manipulatives, algebra tiles, geoboards,
calculators and computers are beneficial and should be available to all students.

I.     Problem Solving

       A.   Develop and test strategies to solve practical, everyday problems which may have single or multiple answers.

       B.   Use technology to generate and analyze data to solve problems.
       C. Formulate problems from situations within and outside of mathematics and generalize solutions and strategies to
          new problem situations.

       D. Evaluate results to determine their reasonableness.

       E.   Apply a variety of strategies.

       F.   Use oral, written, concrete, pictorial, and/or algebraic methods to model mathematical situations.

II.    Communication

       A.   Discuss, interpret, translate and evaluate mathematical ideas.

       B.   Reflect on and justify reasoning in mathematical problem-solving.

       C. Select and use appropriate terminology when discussing mathematical concepts and ideas.

III.   Reasoning

       A.   Identify and extend patterns and use experiences and observations to make suppositions.



Math (continued)
Grades 6-8 (continued)

       B.   Use counter examples to disprove suppositions.

       C. Develop and evaluate mathematical arguments.

       D. Select and use various types of reasoning.

IV.    Connections

       A.   Apply mathematical strategies to solve problems that arise from other disciplines and the real world.

       B.   Connect one area or idea of mathematics to another.

V.     Representations

       A.   Use a variety of representations to organize and record data.

       B.   Use representations to promote the communication of mathematical ideas.

       C. Develop a variety of mathematical representations that can be used flexibly and appropriately.
       D. Use a variety of representations to model and solve physical, social, and mathematical problems.


Grades 9-12

The Priority Academic Student Skills (PASS) in mathematics for grades nine through twelve establishes a framework for a
curriculum that reflects the needs of all students. Such a curriculum recognizes that they will spend their adult lives in a
society increasingly dominated by technology and quantitative methods.

I.     Problem-Solving

       A.   Apply a wide variety of problem-solving strategies to solve problems from within and outside mathematics.

       B.   Identify the problem from a described situation, determined the necessary data and apply appropriate problem-
            solving strategies.

II.    Communication

       A.   Use mathematical language and symbols to read and write mathematics and to converse with others.

       B.   Demonstrate mathematical ideas orally and in writing.

       C. Analyze mathematical definitions and discover generalizations through investigations.

III.   Reasoning

       A.   Use various types of logical reasoning in mathematical contexts and real-world situations.

       B.   Prepare and evaluate suppositions and arguments

       C. Verify conclusions, identify counter-examples, test conjectures, and justify solutions to mathematical problems.

Math (continued)
Grades 9-12 (continued)


IV.    Connections

       A.   Link mathematical ideas to the real world.

       B.   Apply mathematical problem-solving skills to other disciplines.

       C. Use mathematics to solve problems encountered in daily life.
     D. Relate one area of mathematics to another and to the integrated whole.

V.   Representation

     A.   Use algebraic, graphic, and numeric representations to model and interpret mathematical and real world
          situations.

     B.   Use a variety of mathematical representations as tools for organizing, recording, and communicating
          mathematical ideas.

     C. Develop a variety of mathematical representations that can be used flexibly and appropriately.
                            OKLAHOMA’S PRIORITY ACADEMIC STUDENT SKILLS (PASS)                                                                         LEARNING FOR LIFE LESSON PLANS THAT ASSIST
                                                                                                                                                              IN MEETING OKLAHOMA’S PASS

Language Arts (Reading, Writing (Grammar/Mechanics/Usage), Listening/Speaking, Literature, and Viewing                            Elementary Program:         Developing Good Listening Skills, Basic Art, Classic
                                                                                                                                  Literature, Communication
(Grades K-12)

English language arts education incorporates the teaching and learning of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing.
Integration of language arts occurs in multiple ways. First, curriculum, instruction, and assessment reflect the integration of
listening, speaking, viewing, reading, and writing. The language arts are not perceived as individual content areas, but as
one unified subject in which each of the five areas supports the others and enhances thinking and learning. Secondly, there
is integration of the teaching and learning of content and process within the curriculum. The common human experiences            7th/8th Grade Program:    Communication, Conflict Resolution, Discriminating
and the ideas, conflicts, and themes embodied in literature and all oral, written and visual texts provide a context for the      Messages, I/You Messages, Communication Styles, Role-Play, Body Signals
teaching of the processes, skills, and strategies of listening, speaking, viewing, reading, and writing. Finally, literacy
educators believe the knowledge, skills, and strategies of language arts are integrated throughout the curriculum, enabling
students to solve problems, and think critically and creatively in all subject areas.

Language arts is the vehicle of communication by which we live, work, share, and build ideas and understandings of the
present, reflect on the past, and imagine the future. Through language arts, we learn to appreciate, integrate, and apply
what is learned for real purpose in our homes, schools, communities, and workplaces.                                              Senior High Program:       Looking At Communication Careers, Effective
                                                                                                                                  Communication, Writing Résumés, Researching Careers in
An effective language arts program should encompass process and content—how people communicate as well as what                    the Library
they communicate. Process includes skills and strategies used in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and viewing.
Content includes the ideas, themes, issues, problems, and conflicts found in classical and contemporary literature and other
texts, such as technical manuals, periodicals, speeches, and videos. Ideas, experiences, and cultural perspectives we
discover in texts help us shape our visions of the world. The insight we gain enables us to understand our cultural,
linguistic, and literary heritages.

In Grades K-12, a locally developed language arts curriculum, embodying these content standards, will ensure all students
are literate and can engage successfully in reading, discovering, creating, and analyzing spoken, written, electronic, and
visual texts which reflect multiple perspectives and diverse communities and make connections within language arts and
between language arts and other fields.

				
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