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More loans for small businesses and farmers
KOMU – Updated 09-30-10
Posted by ; Adrianna Amato
COLUMBIA - An announcement from the state treasurer means more loan money to create more than 2,000
jobs in the next year.

Commerce Bank is committed to lending $100 million dollars in low interest loans to small businesses in
Missouri.

Money from commerce bank adds 100 million to the 392 million dollars treasurer Clint Zweifel has approved for
state small business owners and farmers since January 2009.

The loan program is all a part of State Treasurer Zweifel's jobs and economic development package.

There are 112 banks in the state participating in the lending program.

However commerce is the largest Missouri-based bank with 128 branches in the state.

He said the money from commerce will boost statewide low-interest lending by 41 percent.

Zweifel also saidcommerce's contribution is the largest single commitment of any single bank.

"We're going to see investment and new businesses that started and look much different five years later because
they have more employees, more equipment and they're making those investment that really create the ground
for a strong economy in our state," said Zweifel

Missouri small businesses with up to 99 employees and farmers are eligible to receive a loan through the link
deposit program.

Local governments, housing developments and alternative energy focused projects may also qualify for low
interest loans.




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Health insurance reforms take effect
By Sandra Jordan of The St. Louis American
Wednesday, September 29, 2010 10:48 PM CDT

September 23 was a long-awaited date for supporters of changes in the nation‘s health insurance law passed by
President Obama. On that date, several key measures dealing with prevention and coverage for young adults
and children with pre-existing conditions went into effect

First Lady Michelle Obama spoke to thousands of the nation‘s nurses by telephone, thanking them for their
service and encouraging them to spread the word to patients about what is covered in the Affordable Care Act.

―Many preventative services are now covered at no out-of-pocket costs. Things like mammograms, cervical
screenings, colonoscopies, childhood immunizations, prenatal and new baby care, high blood pressure
treatment – all of these are included in new insurance plans with no deductible, no co-pay,‖ Mrs. Obama
explained.

―These steps are crucial because they can help combat preventable conditions that can have serious health
consequences later in life.‖

However, a key word is ―new.‖ Several of the act‘s provisions apply only to new group health insurance plans.

Young adults and children
Young adults between the ages of 18 and 26 who are uninsured can now get back on their parents‘ health plan,
regardless of where they live, whether they are in college, claimed on their parent‘s taxes, working, married or
have their own children (the benefit does not extend to their spouses and children, however).

―While this is a very progressive definition of a dependent, if they work in a place that offers insurance they
cannot be claimed by their parents on their parent‘s insurance, regardless of how expensive that insurance is,‖
said Thomas McAuliffe, policy analyst for the Missouri Foundation for Health.

―That is, until 2014. In 2014, that provision drops away.‖

The Affordable Care Act also prohibits insurance companies from kicking children with pre-existing conditions
out of its health plans.
―Children with preexisting conditions cannot be denied coverage in new plans, and it‘s really important to make
the distinction,‖ McAuliffe said.

―There are going to be children who are covered on their parent‘s plans and they could be exempted for
insurance on the basis of a preexisting condition, but for the most part, all new plans will not be able to exempt
children.‖

McAuliffe also points out an age gap for children with preexisting conditions.

―The law says that insurers are prohibited from excluding preexisting medical condition for children under the
age of 19 – not to the age of 26‖ McAuliffe said.


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―If you are between the age of 19 and 26, insurance reform doesn‘t do much for you on the basis of a preexisting
condition.‖

After the law was passed, some insurance companies stopped coverage for children in policies or raised its
rates.

―Children tend to be, on the whole, fairly healthy, and they don‘t cost a great deal [to insure], and to say that
children are going to cost that much – it‘s really unfair,‖ McAuliffe said.

Co-pays and tax credits

Co-pays and out-of-pocket costs excluded under the Affordable Care Act are grandfathered into existing plans
for the next four years.

―That‘s for new plans,‖ McAuliffe explained. ―For people who get their insurance through their employers, they
can still be charged co-pays, but in 2014, all co-pays go away.‖

Tax credits to help employees pay for health insurance are now in effect for businesses.

Medicare beneficiaries with high prescription drug costs who fall into the donut hole coverage gap between what
the plan pays and out-of-pocket expenses are receiving a one-time $250 check to help pay for their medication.
Next year, seniors who reach the donut hole will get a 50 percent discount on brand-name drugs.

McAuliffe also pointed out that annual lifetime limits or spending caps are now for the most part prohibited, and
provision that require Medicare to become more effective and efficient ―kick in over the next five or six years.‖

Other provisions will roll out incrementally over the next four years. One next year will require insurance
companies to prove they spend 80 percent of their income for direct health care.

Military exceptions

Unfortunately, extended dependent coverage up to age 26 in the Affordable Care Act does not apply to adult
children of military service members.

Those who gambled to keep the Defense Department‘s TRICARE health coverage out of the health reform
debate for fear of losing existing benefits lost out on an important benefit now afforded to other young adults
covered under civilian policies.

In addition, a separate law, the TRICARE Affirmation Act, grandfathered TRICARE‘s coverage as the minimal
essential coverage under the Affordable Care Act.

Currently, TRICARE allows adult children enrolled in school to stay on its plan until age 23.

―Now that health care has come around and some of the provisions are more generous than TRICARE, all of a
sudden there is an effort to amend TRICARE,‖ McAuliffe said. ―The problem is that requires specific legislative
action.‖

There are provisions pending in versions of the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal Year 2011 that
would extend health coverage to age 26. In 2014, these individuals will be able to go to the exchange to

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purchase health insurance.

Health insurance reform provisions in effect

• Insurance companies cannot deny coverage to children with pre-existing conditions

• Insurance companies cannot cancel policies when you get sick without proving fraud

• Young adults can remain on parent‘s policies (except TRICARE, and stand alone, private retiree plans) until
age 26 (employers are required to provide notice of a special enrollment period) if they don‘t have coverage on
the job

• New health plans cannot charge co-pays or deductibles for preventive care

• No annual limits in new plans; lifetime limits are banned

• New health plans provide cost free-preventive services

• New health plans are required to let insured select a primary care doctor or pediatrician from its network and let
them see an OB-GYN without a referral

• New health plans, prior approval is no longer needed to use the nearest emergency room, and they can‘t
required higher co-payments or co-insurance for out-of-network ER services

• In new health plans, persons have the right to appeal any denial of payment claims by insurance companies –
including an external appeal to an independent reviewer




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Stimulus package, a success story?
KMOX – 09-29-2010
Kevin Killeen

ST. LOUIS (KMOX) – With Democrats fight for every vote they can get, a local Congressmen is hoping the
stimulus package will be seen as a success instead of failure back at home.
Democratic Congressman, Lacey Clay is trying to sell the stimulus success story in a district where 20 percent of
black men are unemployed.
Clay claims the stimulus has created 1,200 jobs in his district and saved what he calls ―countless‖ other jobs.
Voters however, see it differently.
―Actually, I believe people are going to stay at home. It‘s not going to any good if you sit down and vote, and
things are still going the same way they are going any ways!‖ expresses voter, James Glover. ―There‘s going to
be discouraged voters.‖
Others complain that the only jobs open now are in fast food, and they miss the days when north St. Louis was
supported by good-paying manufacturing jobs.




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Blunt: Government can help create private-
sector jobs
By Ken Newton – St. Joseph News-Press
Thursday, September 30, 2010 at 12:01 a.m.


Public money has a place in creating private-sector jobs, Senate candidate Roy Blunt says, but government
needs to limit its role and stop choking innovation with regulations.
The Republican congressman made the remarks during a St. Joseph stop on Wednesday. He toured a science
and technology incubator named for Kit Bond, the man he wants to replace in the U.S. Senate.
The facility on the campus of Missouri Western State University took root from a $2.5 million federal grant and
aims to help start-up businesses. Unlike the federal stimulus outlays, which Mr. Blunt regularly criticizes, the
incubator investment serves in the initial phases of bringing economic development to fruition, the candidate
said.
―(It‘s) a place where fledging businesses can go that turn into real job creators for the economy,‖ he said. ―Often
the government can be the facilitator to bring those things together without them becoming projects that are
directed by the government or suffocated by way too much government involvement.‖
Gary Clapp, president of the Institute for Industrial and Applied Life Sciences, which manages the incubator, said
government has some responsibility to help small businesses grow.
―In the past, we would bootstrap ourselves and try to make our path forward,‖ Dr. Clapp said. ―In today‘s
regulatory environment, today‘s loan environment, it‘s inhibitive. We‘ll never do it.‖
Mr. Blunt, who has made more than 20 campaign stops in St. Joseph since beginning his campaign, toured the
incubator labs and offices and held a roundtable with those with a stake in the facility.
Edward J. Robb, vice president of research and development for Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica Inc., talked
about federal regulations that prove counter-productive to American economic growth. The company leases
space in the building, and a third of the 45 employees there work directly with government regulations and
compliance.
―Vaccine that‘s approved in Germany or Vietnam or Japan now has to go through a USDA process again, adding
no value (and) taking time,‖ Dr. Robb said. He noted the company could escape the bureaucracy by
manufacturing the products in Mexico, costing jobs in St. Joseph. ―It almost forces you to build plants outside the
country.‖
Tom Watkins, chairman of DT Search & Designs, told the congressman about the difficulties in trying to navigate
federal bureaucracy to sell a product. His company, located at the incubator, makes a communications system
for combat situations.
―The internal processes that you have to go through are so arcane and so difficult, so complex, that people that
we‘re dealing with don‘t understand the regulations,‖ he said.
Mr. Blunt, who represents a Southwest Missouri district in the U.S. House, is running against Democrat Robin
Carnahan, Libertarian Jonathan Dine and Constitution Party candidate Jerry Beck.




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Prop A and the poor
By Rebecca S. Rivas of The St. Louis American
Wednesday, September 29, 2010 10:48 PM CDT


For Missourians who make $17,000 or less, about six percent of their income goes towards sales taxes – and
less than one percent goes towards income taxes, according to a November 2009 study by the Institute on
Taxation and Economic Policy.

For those who make $412,000 or more, it‘s almost completely opposite.

Less than one percent of their income goes towards paying sales taxes, and 4.4 percent goes towards income
taxes.

If Missouri‘s poor pay proportionately more sales tax and the rich pay proportionately more income tax, an
important question for voters this November is: Why would a billionaire propose a ballot initiative that would
result in getting rid of local income tax and replacing it with more sales taxes?

On Nov. 2, Missourians will vote on Proposition A, a ballot initiative funded by retired billionaire financer Rex
Sinquefield. If passed Prop A would trigger voters in St. Louis and Kansas City to vote every five years on
whether to phase out their cities‘ earnings taxes. It also would bar other municipalities throughout the state from
enacting their own earnings taxes.

To remain competitive, Sinquefield and his researchers at the Show-Me Institute say, cities such as St. Louis
and Kansas City that border other states cannot afford to have additional income taxes.
In St. Louis city, residents and people who work in the city pay an additional one percent income tax on their
earnings. For this fiscal year, this local income tax is expected to generate $137.5 million, said Comptroller
Darlene Green. That is almost one-third of the city‘s general fund budget.

If Proposition A passes on the statewide ballot on Nov. 2, then voters in St. Louis would be triggered to vote next
April on whether to retain or sunset the city‘s one percent earnings tax. If voters refuse to give up the city‘s
earning tax, the issue will come up again for renewal in five years.

Some local politicans believe that Sinquefield‘s agenda puts St. Louis‘ economic future in jeopoardy.

State Rep. Tishuara Jones (D–St. Louis) said the five-year renewal aspect of the proposition would make it more
difficult for St. Louis and Kansas City to obtain bond financing.
―No one in their right mind would buy bonds from a municipality with an unstable income stream,‖ said Jones,
who is vice president of public finance for Blaylock Robert Van, LLC, one of the country‘s largest minority-owned
investment firms.

Jones gives this example. Say a person wanted to buy a house with a 30-year mortgage, and the bank knew
that every five years, that person might lose his or her job. The bankers would be far less likely to give that
person a home loan.

If Proposition A passes, St. Louis and Kansas City would find themselves in exactly the same scenario, she said.


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Further, in her view, the city‘s earnings tax structure has not hindered the city‘s growth.

―In recent years, both St. Louis and Kansas City have experienced exponential development through the use of
historic and other tax credits,‖ she said.

St. Louis taxathon

If St. Louis City were to get rid of its local income tax, the city would have to triple its current local general
revenue sales tax from 1.375 percent to 5.3 percent, according to Amy Blouin, executive director and founder of
the Missouri Budget Project.

That means that sales tax could be as high as 13.166 percent, depending if the area is a special taxing district.
For every dollar a person spends on groceries, he or she would pay 13 cents, instead of the current 8 cents. If
that person spends $100 on groceries a week, that‘s $20 more in taxes a month for food.

For sit-down restaurants, there is currently a 1.5 percent sales tax added to the current 8.241 percent. To
compensate for the lack of local income tax, restaurants would have to charge up to 14.66 percent sales tax.

The other anticipated source of expanded revenue would come from increased property taxes in the city.

―It is truly disheartening that the philosophical interests of one person can determine the economic future of two
of the metro areas that contribute more than 60 percent of the state‘s general revenue,‖ Jones said.

―I urge you, vote against Proposition A.‖

The city‘s financial decisions are made by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, comprised of the mayor,
president of the Board of Aldermen and comptroller.

Comptroller Darlene Green, who has received no campaign funding from Sinquefield, has forcefully and publicly
opposed Proposition A.

Mayor Francis G. Slay and aldermanic president Lewis Reed both have received significant contributions from
Sinquefield, who is Slay‘s single largest campaign donor. Neither has publicly opposed Prop A. Both have
repeatedly failed to respond to The American when questioned on the issue.

Some aldermen and other officials held a press conference against Prop A soon after it was announced for the
Nov. 2 ballot. Slay and Reed did not participate, and chiefs of staff for both officials were observed slipping into
City Hall immediately after the press event was concluded.

Sales tax Sinquefield

Sinquefield ultimately wants to eliminate Missouri income tax completely.

Currently there are two Missouri House bills (HJR 56 and HJR 71) in motion and one Missouri Senate bill (SJR
29), which Sinquefield supports, to do just that. In Sinquefield‘s Show-Me Institute studies, researchers show
that the U.S. states that don‘t have income taxes, such as Texas, Nevada, Florida, Tennessee and Washington,
achieve higher economic growth.


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Sinquefield points to a study ―Rich States, Poor States‖ released by the American Legislative Exchange Council
this year. It shows Missouri‘s gross state product growth rate from 1998 to 2008 was 44.8 percent. Tennessee is
a bordering state that does not have personal income tax, but does have corporate income tax. It had a growth
rate was 56.7 percent.

In an essay Sinquefield co-authored, ―Why a Sales Tax is Better for Missouri than an Income Tax,‖ he writes that
there is a strong correlation between Tennessee‘s lack of personal income tax and its economic gains.

Blouin of the Missouri Budget Project refutes this claim. She said that Missouri‘s personal income growth over
the past 10 years, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, is 44 percent, compared to Tennessee‘s 43
percent. Tennessee also has a higher unemployment rate.

Blouin said that Kansas and Illinois, states with higher personal and corporate income taxes per capita than
Missouri and Tennessee, have stronger economic growth.

Sinquefield said Missouri would need to increase sales taxes to make up for the elimination of income tax.

―In 2007, Missouri‘s sale tax generated $2 billion. To replace the income tax fully, the sales tax would have to
produce another $4.9 billion,‖ the Sinquefield essay states. ―If no other items were added to Missouri‘s sales tax,
the rate would have to rise to nearly 11 percent in order to achieve the necessary $4.9 billion.‖

Sinquefield said that 140 categories of items are exempt from sales tax, including college athletic events and
―animals or poultry used for breeding or feeding purposes.‖ He wrote that sales tax should be applied to every
product and service purchased by an individual. If that were to happen, a general sales tax rate of about five
percent would suffice.

Blouin said this would increase the tax burden on those living in poverty because it would make child care and
necessities taxable.

Of those nine states that Sinquefield touted as having impressive economic growth and no income taxes, the
Institute on Taxation found that Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Florida and Nevada were in the top 10 U.S.
states that put the highest tax burden on their poorest residents.

These states ask their poorest residents – those in the bottom 20 percent of the income scale – to pay up to six
times as much of their income in taxes as they ask the wealthy to pay.




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Proposition B stirs debate in Northeast
Missouri
By Jackie Kinealy – Truman State University Index
Published: Thursday, September 30, 2010, Updated: Thursday, September 30, 2010 02:09


As the November elections approach, a political battle is mounting over the future of Missouri's dog breeding
industry.
Missourians will vote on ballot initiative Proposition B on Nov. 2, which proposes new regulations for large-scale
dog breeders in Missouri. Under Proposition B, breeders who violate the new regulations could be charged with
a class C misdemeanor.
Missouri has the largest dog-breeding industry of any state in the country, home to one-third of all breeders
licensed by the United States Department of Agriculture, according to a report issued in March by the three
branches of the Missouri Better Business Bureau. Missouri has four times as many USDA-licensed dog breeders
as Nebraska, the next highest state.
Breeders who sell puppies to pet stores must be licensed by the USDA and the state of Missouri, but breeders
who sell to individual pet owners have to be licensed only by the state. The Missouri Code of State Regulations
currently requires breeders to provide animals with adequate and sanitary food, water, shelter and rest between
breeding cycles. The 22-page document of current animal care regulations in Missouri is available for the public
to read at sos.mo.gov. The full version of Prop B is also available there.
Proposition B would add to state regulations by limiting breeders to 50 female dogs for breeding per facility at
one time. It would reinforce the requirements of sufficient food, clean water, living space, veterinary care,
regular exercise and adequate rest between breeding cycles by creating a misdemeanor crime of "puppy mill
cruelty" for any violations.
"Basically what we're trying to do is have additional boots on the ground, and Proposition B will allow law
enforcement to help enforce the standards that we want to set up," Barbara Schmitz, campaign manager for
"Yes! on Prop. B" and director of the Humane Society of Missouri, said.
The Adair County Humane Society said it is not taking an official position on Proposition B.
Supporters of Prop. B think new regulations are needed in Missouri to prevent abusive conditions at large-scale
breeding facilities in the state. Schmitz said the proposed regulations under Prop. B are modest and reasonable.
"What we are seeking to do is not change that licensing scheme," she said. "We're attempting to layer over that
by having humane care standards for the dogs, and those standards would apply under Proposition B regardless
of whether you're licensed or not."
The Missouri Pet Breeders Association and others in the agricultural industry in the state oppose the proposition.
"The regulations we already follow are sufficient to eliminate anybody who is not doing it right," Barb York,
president of the Missouri Pet Breeders Association, said. "It does absolutely nothing for your unlicensed
substandard breeders who are doing it wrong. It does not address that problem at all. It only adds more
regulations to the licensed breeders."
Missouri's dog breeding industry is



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regulated by the Animal Care Facilities ActProgram in the Missouri Department of Agriculture. The department
employs twelve staff members to inspect the more than 1,400 licensed facilities throughout the state and to
handle issues with unlicensed breeders, according to the ACFA website.
Diane Fisher runs DogCrazy, a small-scale dog rescue and breeding facility in Unionville, Mo. one hour north of
Kirksville. Fisher breeds keeshonds and cockapoos. She said an aid inspector visits her kennel two or three
times per year.
"I don't know about how other inspectors are, but I can tell you mine don't play games," she said. "You're either
doing it right, or you're not doing it, and they're pretty clear about it."
Fisher said she doesn't think there should be a limit on the number of dogs one breeder can own.
"Nobody in their right mind would tell somebody that they can only sell 50 real estate properties or tell a bank
that it can only have 50 clients," Fisher said. "Yet we are willing to say that to somebody who's running a legally
licensed facility. That just seems crazy. It's not the number that you have, it's how you're caring for them."
Under current state and federal regulations, "adequate shelter" means a sanitary facility, protection from extreme
weather, proper ventilation and appropriate space depending on the size of the animal. Proposition B defines
"adequate shelter" more specifically, as a temperature-controlled indoor space that does not get colder than 45
degrees or hotter than 85 degrees Fahrenheit.
Schmitz said the proposed regulations are not unreasonable for breeders to follow.
"The requirements under Proposition B are modest," Schmitz said. "They're common sense, and they're
reasonable. What we are talking about is making sure that dogs have cages that allow them to move around,
and if you think in terms of size of cages, picture a cage the size of a dining room table, those are the size cages
that we're talking about."
York said proposed regulations like larger indoor pens for each animal and heating and air-conditioning would be
so cost prohibitive for many licensed breeders across the state that they would go out of business if Proposition
B passes.
York said there needs to be a crackdown on unlicensed breeders and more enforcement of laws already in
place, not more government regulations for breeders who are responsible and knowledgeable.
"We have regulations for food, water, shelter, exercise, vet care, all of that is already covered," York said. "Most
of us are educated. We know how to take care of our animals."
Schmitz said current regulations on dog breeding are not acceptable.
"It is currently legal in Missouri to have dogs at large scale breeding facilities and to treat them in a neglectful or
cruel way," Schmitz said. "It is almost up to the individual large-scale breeder to decide how they are going to
treat those dogs, and that's not acceptable," she said. "Some of the breeders are cutting corners to maximize
profits, and the dogs are paying the price."
York said she fears Proposition B is a step in the direction to outlaw animal confinement operations in the state
of Missouri altogether. She said if Prop. B passes, well-funded out-of-state animal rights groups like the Humane
Society of the United States will come back to Missouri to pass more regulations on animal agriculture in the
state.
"That's their goal, is to eliminate animal agriculture, so that no one owns an animal, and that everyone is a
vegan," York said.
Schmitz said accusations that Prop. B is aimed at outlawing animal agriculture altogether are completely false.



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"What we are doing is trying to address the issue of puppy mills," Schmitz said. "That's what this measure is
about. The language that we are putting before the voters has been available for public consumption since
November of last year. The language is clear. There is no other agenda."




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China Hub booster says Lambert deal is
taking shape
KMOX – 09-29-2010
Kevin Killeen


ST. LOUIS–(KMOX)–A leading proponent of plans for a Chinese Air Cargo hub at Lambert airport is responding
to criticism that the project has only ‖a snowball‘s chance.‖
Fresh back from China, Dick Fleming , the CEO and President of the Regional Chamber and Growth
Association, says there‘s a ―70 percent chance‖ Chinese cargo planes will be landing at Lambert by early 2011.
Fleming was responding to remarks made on the Charlie Brennan show on KMOX by Aviation Consultant
Michael Boyd of the Boyd Group. Boyd bashed the China Hub vision as unworkable.
―It isn‘t gonna happen,‖ Boyd said, ―You‘ve gotta have air cargo to where the stuff is being used or where it‘s
being built, not to get put on a truck and shipped another day and a half to get to New York.‖
Calling Boyd a ―gadfly‖ and ―bombastic,‖ Fleming defended the China Hub plan as practical. ―His premise is
that we‘re just serving inbound and outbound goods from St. Louis,‖ Fleming said, ―The realities today is that
cargos travel great distances.‖
A guest on the Mark Reardon show on KMOX, Fleming allows there is a 30 percent chance the deal could fall
through. The next step is a visit by Chinese officials here in October to try to resolve ―five remaining issues,‖
which Fleming declined to elaborate on — except to say they are related to the ―customs process.‖




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Franklin County leader to head East-West Gateway Council.

Regional agency picks new director
BY Ken Leiser – St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Posted: Thursday, September 30, 2010 12:00 am


Profile: Ed Hillhouse
ED HILLHOUSE
Age • 61
New job • Executive director of East-West Gateway Council of Governments
Related experience • Presiding Franklin County commissioner for last eight years; superintendent of Meramec
Valley School District in Pacific (1988-2002)
Education • Doctorate, educational administration, St. Louis University (1978); ED.S. education administration,
University of Missouri-Columbia (1974); master's degree, political science, University of Missouri-Columbia
(1972); bachelor of science, political science, Southwest Missouri State (1970)
Family • Wife, Shirley; two sons, Heath and Hart


ST. LOUIS • For nearly eight years, Ed Hillhouse has tended to mending political fences in mostly rural Franklin
County.
Now the Franklin County presiding commissioner is being asked to bring his consensus-building touch to a much
larger political theater. Hillhouse, 61, was tapped Wednesday to be executive director of the East-West Gateway
Council of Governments, the regional planning agency that helps decide how local transportation money is
spent.
"I did not actively apply for this," said Hillhouse, who has served on the council for the last eight years, including
this past year as board chairman. "It all happened a few months back. I was approached by a representative
from the Illinois side and then a representative from the Missouri side. Would I be interested? I said, 'Interested
in what?'"
After taking time to think about it and talk it over with his wife, he figured the agency needed an administrator.
Before taking office as presiding commissioner in Franklin County, Hillhouse had spent 25 years at the Meramec
Valley School District in Pacific — the last 15 years as superintendent.
He succeeds Les Sterman, a civil engineer and planner who stepped down from East-West Gateway in June
2009 after 26 years to take a top job at the Southwestern Illinois Flood Prevention District Council.
Hillhouse will earn $140,000 a year as the new executive director and will take over on Nov. 1. As presiding
commissioner, he made $66,000.
St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, who sits on the council of governments with other regional leaders, said the
agency conducted a national search. When it became clear that the group wouldn't be able to agree on a finalist,
someone mentioned that Hillhouse was winding up his second term in Franklin County.
"This is a big, important job, and we wanted to make sure we had somebody who would work as a regional
partner," Slay said. "And everyone was convinced Ed could do that."


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Slay expressed confidence that Hillhouse will be able to reach across county and state lines to build a regional
consensus. One of the council's biggest jobs is to prioritize projects and parcel out increasingly scarce
transportation dollars.
Hillhouse said he decided that if his first term as presiding commissioner went well, he would serve a second.
But when he publicly announced in February that he would not seek a third term, it caught several people off
guard.
"They said, 'Wait a minute. Why?'" said Hillhouse, a Republican. "I said, 'We had just decided two terms. I'm
leaving the position liking it as well as I did when I started.'"
In his new role, Hillhouse said he will draw from his experience as schools chief in the Meramec Valley School
District. At Meramec Valley, he answered to seven elected members of the board of education.
At East-West Gateway, he will answer to a 24-member board — which includes top city and county elected
officials from both sides of the Mississippi River. He sees East-West Gateway playing a key role in regional
economic development by "analyzing the region's fiscal condition and helping coordinate efforts to create jobs
and pursue a sustainable economy."
Franklin County District Commissioner Terry Wilson, also a Republican, described Hillhouse as a political
consensus-builder in the state's fourth-largest county for land mass. In fact, Hillhouse said Franklin County is
nearly as large as the state of Rhode Island, albeit with one-tenth the population.
During his tenure, Hillhouse said, the county completed a major public works project — including a new judicial
building and government center. Franklin County voters also agreed to make permanent an existing half-cent
sales tax to pave more gravel roads.
As presiding commissioner, Hillhouse said he worked with several elected officials and things were "fractured"
when he arrived.
"One of the challenges right off the bat was can we all come together and work together as a group?" he said.
"Now that has happened."
Wilson said the East-West Gateway board's unanimous approval of Hillhouse's appointment spoke volumes.
"Their gain is our loss," Wilson said.




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Panel hears pleas to save incentives

Nixon puts eye on cuts to tax credits.
By T.J. Greaney – Columbia Daily Tribune
Wednesday, September 29, 2010


They came looking for ideas on how to tighten the belt. Instead, a state panel got an earful on why Missouri‘s
$584 million in annual tax credits is a good investment and shouldn‘t be changed.
In its fifth and final stop on a tour of cities across the state, the Tax Credit Review Commission held a four-hour
open forum last night at Stamper Commons on the Stephens College campus. The commission is made up of 25
state leaders appointed by Gov. Jay Nixon in July to review the efficacy of Missouri‘s 61 tax credit programs.
Tax credits have a bull‘s-eye on their backs as reformers are questioning the return on investment and efficiency
of what critics say too often amount to giveaways to wealthy developers. Advocates contend that the credits
incentivize important projects that would otherwise fall by the wayside, such as preserving historic structures,
building housing for low-income seniors or building in rural communities.
In April, a report by state Auditor Susan Montee showed that in the past eight years the state‘s tax credit
redemptions had increased 57 percent, from $372 million in 2001 to $584 million in 2009. Eighteen new tax
credit programs have been created since 2003. A plan by Nixon to reduce the cost of tax credits to the state by
more than $100 million failed near the end of the last legislative session.
Yet, instead of cost-cutting measures, the commission yesterday heard mostly from beneficiaries of the tax
credits who said, in effect: ―Hands off.‖
Deb Sheals, a Columbia historic preservation consultant, told the panel that without historic preservation tax
credits the restoration of downtown landmarks such as the Missouri Theatre, the Atkins Building and the Tiger
Hotel would not have occurred.
Sheals cited a Maryland study that showed preservation tax credits pay for themselves and then some in the
form of added sales tax, property tax and other benefits.
―I think it‘s well-run, and I don‘t think it‘s broken,‖ she said of the historic tax credit program which, at $186 million
last year, is the state‘s largest. ―Trying to fix it could do more harm than good.‖
The panel also heard powerful testimony from residents of Macon, where Neighborhood Assistance Program tax
credits have helped build a repertory theater, a community child development center and a YMCA.
But when pressed on what could be done to streamline the credits, Patricia Knowles, director of the child
development center, appeared stumped. ―I guess you could make the tax credit bigger, like 80 percent,‖ she
said. ―But you probably are not going to do that.‖
This type of testimony left commission member and local attorney Craig Van Matre crawling up the walls. Van
Matre repeatedly reminded speakers that the state has a projected budget deficit as high as $500 million and
must find places to save money.
―The big problem with what‘s going on here is we‘re not focusing on how to balance the budget, which was the
challenge given to us,‖ Van Matre said in an interview. ―Because if you look at where the governor can take
money out of … it‘s probably going to be higher education. How does that impact Columbia? And then, how
does preserving a historic tax credit for the entire state impact Columbia? We‘re going to lose a hell of a lot more


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money in terms of higher education than we‘re ever going to make back in terms of this hypothetical ripple effect‖
from historic preservation tax credits.
Among those giving testimony, there was at least one critical voice. Bruce Hillis, a retiree from Mexico, Mo., and
a free market advocate, called on the commission to abolish tax credits of all stripes.
―This evil is destroying economic freedom,‖ he said. ―So, if anything, I‘d recommend you legalize capitalism,
promote economic freedom and the benefits will come.‖




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Sales tracking system aims to halt meth
production before it starts
By JASON NOBLE – Kansas City Star
Sept. 29, 2010


JEFFERSON CITY | A new drug-sales tracking system will make it harder for meth smurfers to obtain cold pills
in Missouri, and easier for police to catch the ones who try.
The system will monitor sales of pseudoephedrine, the methamphetamine precursor found in some cold
medicines, and record them in a real-time, statewide database.
When a ―smurfer‖ — someone who shops multiple drugstores buying cold medicines to produce meth —
attempts to buy more than the daily or monthly limits allowed by law, the system will cancel the sale and send an
alert to police.
―Basically, what this new system does is make it easier to track those folks who are attempting to purchase
illegal amounts, to go talk to them and to conduct an investigation,‖ said Sgt. Jason Clark of the Missouri
Highway Patrol‘s division of drug and crime control.
In an appearance this week announcing the establishment of the system, Gov. Jay Nixon called it a way to halt
meth labs before they‘re set up.
―Over the years, Missouri law enforcement has been very aggressive in busting meth labs,‖ Nixon said in a
statement. ―This database gives those officers a high-tech weapon to stop production before it even starts.‖
The database will replace the current tracking system in which individuals seeking medicine containing
pseudoephedrine must show an ID and sign a logbook before purchasing the drug. Often, the logs are kept on
paper and available only at the pharmacy.
That leaves a paper trail on smurfers, but requires law enforcement officials to visit each pharmacy, copy the
records and manually compare them to find evidence of smurfing.
With the new system, that legwork will be done automatically.
―It certainly makes it easier,‖ Clark said.
There‘s little question about the need for an updated system. Missouri, long known for its high rate of meth
production, recorded 1,774 meth-lab incidents in 2009. Through June of this year, the state had more than 900
incidents, according to the patrol.
―The vast majority of meth used and produced in this state comes from what we call ‗mom and pop‘ operations
— small-time meth cooks who are out purchasing pseudoephedrine and other precursors,‖ Clark said.
The new system is strongly supported by pharmacies in the state, which see it as the best way to ensure their
products are used only for legitimate purposes, said Ron Fitzwater, CEO of the Missouri Pharmacy Association.
At Matt‘s Medicine Store in Independence, pharmacist Matt Mallinson said he received his notification from the
state Wednesday and was speaking with a computer consultant about adopting the new tracking system.
Mallinson, who has operated his pharmacy near the corner of U.S. 24 and Sterling Avenue for 23 years, said he
was ―incredibly happy‖ the new system was coming.



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―I am not enthused with having to do more paperwork,‖ he said, ―but we are certainly enthused about the end
results.‖
Drug manufacturers also are on board. A trade group for manufacturers of over-the-counter medicines, in fact,
agreed to pay for the system after a lack of state funding delayed implementation for more than a year.
Lawmakers passed a law mandating the electronic system in 2009 but were unable to fund it in last year‘s
budget or in the current one.
For the industry, stepping up made good business sense.
―It keeps a legal product available for patients and eliminates the people trying to game the system,‖ Fitzwater
said.
The regulations requiring the tracking system went into effect Tuesday, and some pharmacies have already
adopted it, officials said.
All must have it in place by late December.




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Public Universities Can Increase Tuition by
More Than Rate of Inflation
KOMU – 09-29-10
Reported by ; Parker Leppien Posted by ; Adrianna Amato


JEFFERSON CITY- College students in the UM system who pay in-state tuition can expect to pay more next fall,
according to UM System President Gary Forsee. The question now is how much. A state statute says public
universities can increase tuition at the rate of inflation.

Schools do have the option of raising tuition by more than the rate of inflation but with a fine. According to
Department of Higher Education Interim Commissioner David Russell, if a school goes over the rate of inflation,
the state can fine the university.

"The fine can be up to five percent of the institution's state appropriations," Dr. Russell said. "Universities can
avoid that fine though if they get a waiver from the commissioner's office."

Once the commissioner receives the request, he then looks at a set of predetermined criteria. Russell said he
will also get input from his staff to help the decision process. He said he wants the whole process to be as
transparent as possible.

"The presidents of the institutions know what criteria I plan to use," Russell said. "We will also put the requests
on our website so the public can see what we are looking at."


Next year's inflation rate will not be determined until January. At this time last year, the inflation rate in Missouri
was four-percent. To put this in perspective, if a tuition hike had gone into effect this year, in-state students in the
UM System would be paying on average $350 more a year.

The increase has one MU student upset.

"It kinda annoys me," freshman Daniel Forman said. "One of the reasons I went to the in-state school was the
price. I knew it was going to be one of the cheaper options."




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Raising tuition carries red tape

UM likely will need waiver from state.
By Janese Silvey – Columbia Daily Tribune
Wednesday, September 29, 2010
If the University of Missouri System needs the state‘s OK to raise tuition next year beyond the rate of inflation
without penalty, administrators will be taking that request to a longtime colleague.
A three-year-old state law requires public universities increasing tuition beyond the consumer price index to be
financially penalized unless that fine is waived by the Missouri commissioner of higher education. This year, that
decision falls to interim Commissioner David Russell, who‘s also on leave from his post as UM System chief of
staff.
Russell this morning vowed not to let his personal ties get in the way of the waiver process.
―Frankly, I‘m going to make the call the best way I can regardless of my own personal interest,‖ he said. ―I take
this job very seriously and am not going to compromise it based on any personal situation.‖
Last week, UM President Gary Forsee indicated he‘ll seek a tuition increase higher than the inflation rate.
―Without question, we will need to be coming to the board for a proposition to increase tuition, and I think the
board should expect that will require us to ask for a waiver,‖ he told the Board of Curators.
This will be the first time colleges and universities are expected to seek tuition waivers since the law went into
effect in 2007.
The statute says colleges can justify tuition waivers based on higher operational costs, but Russell said he‘ll also
take into account what they‘ve done to rein in costs during lean budget years.
That factor could give UM an edge. Two years ago, Forsee put a freeze on hiring and salaries and ordered
administrators to slash travel and supply budgets.
UM administrators ignored Tribune questions about the waiver process, saying in an e-mail only that curators will
make a tuition decision based on budgetary needs and the level of state appropriations.
Last year‘s 5.2 percent cut to higher education won‘t be a factor, Russell said, because it affected all public
colleges and was ―less of a decrease in appropriation than almost any other part of state government.‖
The waiver process will include some checks and balances. Russell said he‘ll have Department of Higher
Education staff review each request and make a recommendation, ensuring he has ―someone else‘s
independent assessment.‖ Those denied a waiver can appeal to the Coordinating Board for Higher Education.
Russell said he won‘t feel obligated to approve any request and that he‘ll look at each case independently.
―If the University of Missouri came in first with a request for waiver of penalty and I approved it, somehow would I
be obligated to approve all others?‖ he said. ―That‘s not valid. That‘s no more valid than the idea of some other
institute coming in first and making me obligated to approve all others because of some precedent.‖
Russell said he‘ll make tuition decisions with students in mind.
―I‘ll be thinking of this in terms of a student sitting down at a kitchen table with his or her family and looking at a
tuition bill for the subsequent fall,‖ he said. ―Is this maintaining higher education at a level that ensures quality
while also ensuring access and affordability?‖
Using that process, ―it makes no difference what institute I may have worked for in the past.‖


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Loophole gives some colleges easier process
Columbia Daily Tribune
Wednesday, September 29, 2010


Under the tuition freeze agreement with Gov. Jay Nixon this past school year, Missouri public colleges and
universities were allowed to put a tuition increase ―on the books‖ without actually charging it to students.
Schools that took advantage of that will be allowed to increase tuition next school year by last year‘s 2.7 percent
consumer price index, plus whatever the CPI is at the end of this year, without penalty or a waiver from the
commissioner of higher education.
The University of Missouri System did not take advantage of that, which means it will need permission to raise
tuition beyond CPI or else be fined.
―It did not make sense for the university to ‗book‘ a tuition increase it was not going to implement,‖ UM System
spokeswoman Jennifer Hollingshead said in an e-mail.
About half of Missouri‘s 13 four-year public universities took advantage of that ―on the books‖ tuition increase,
said David Russell, interim commissioner of higher education.




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Testing, troubled economy top list of teacher
union concerns
Thursday, September 30, 2010
By M.D. Kittle - Southeast Missourian

Pension problems. Curricula. Standards-based testing.
Southeast Missouri public school teachers have a lot of concerns about the state of education. But none is more
pressing than the troubled economy, according to a Cape Girardeau teacher and elected official with the
Southeast Region of the Missouri State Teachers Association.
The local organization, among those representing 12 regions in the association, on Tuesday kicked off the fall
schedule of regional meetings to help forge policy positions. The union's statewide convention in November will
refine the regional resolutions and set policies the teachers association will lobby for or against in the next
session of the Missouri Legislature.
"The biggest concern everyone has right now is the economy" because funding affects every element of
education, said Becky Ledbetter, president of the Southeast Region. About 100 people turned out for the
meeting at Drury Lodge, 74 of whom were union delegates. The Southeast Region includes 75 school districts.
Delegates did not craft any new resolutions to send to the state convention but discussed lingering concerns.
The teachers union will likely fight changes in the pension system, including the effect of a proposed two-tiered
system that would mandate new teachers pay more into a system decimated by stock market declines in 2008.
The Public School Retirement System of Missouri, considered one of the most generous pensions in the nation,
lost $5.3 million in assets. While the pension fund gained back much of that loss last year, the returns fall far
short of covering liabilities.
Ledbetter, a librarian and computer lab teacher at Clippard Elementary School, said educators are concerned
about the effect the pension changes would have on teacher recruitment.
"What's going to happen to our teaching pool? Will the younger people want to come and join us?" she said.
Testing remains an important topic for the teachers association, which has about 44,000 members and is not
affiliated with the National Education Association. Chief among the concerns is the Missouri Assessment
Program, the state's test to measure progress in the federal No Child Left Behind Act. The standards-based
education reform demands all students be proficient in math and communication arts by 2014.
The teachers association joins critics who say the standards are unrealistic.
"Teachers are concerned standardized testing is beginning to drive the bus, so to speak," said Bruce Moe,
deputy executive director of the teachers union.
Despite the challenges, Ledbetter said she's optimistic about the future of public education.
"I think teachers are in their business because they see the future for our country and the potential of each child,
and for that reason I'm hopeful," she said.




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Audit criticizes management of funds by Scott
County prosecutor's office
Thursday, September 30, 2010
By Carrie Bartholomew - Southeast Missourian


BENTON, Mo. -- A newly released report on Scott County finances from the Missouri state auditor's office says
there is little assurance money is being properly handled by the prosecuting attorney's office.
The report said the office does not maintain adequate records and that controls are poor. Monthly lists of
liabilities, or debts, are not prepared and reconciled to the cash balance for the county's restitution account and
bad check restitution money collected is not distributed in a timely manner. As a result, the report said, the
account has unidentified funds. In May, the auditor's office requested a liabilities list from the prosecuting
attorney's office, and the account had about $17,500 in unidentified funds.
The audit went on to say the prosecuting attorney's office cannot reconcile receipts to deposits because no
complete record of receipts is maintained. Prenumbered receipts are not issued for all the money collected,
partial payments are not recorded in the electronic accounting system, nor is a log of receipts maintained.
Another concern outlined in the audit is that the office does not follow up on old outstanding checks for the
restitution account.
According to the auditor's report, similar conditions were noted in the county's last audit in October 2006.
The auditor's office recommended several record-keeping improvements to the prosecuting attorney's office,
suggesting that a complete and accurate list of liabilities for the restitution account should be prepared and
reconciled to the book balance monthly and that the office needs to ensure restitution payments are distributed
on a timely basis. It also said an attempt should be made to investigate unidentified money. Any funds that
remain unidentified following the investigation should be disbursed in accordance with state law.
The report also suggested receipt slips should be issued for all monies received and those slips should be
reconciled with money deposited. It stated adequate supporting documentation for receipts and disbursements,
such as copies of money orders and letters to victims, should be maintained as well.
The prosecuting attorney's office was told it should follow up on old outstanding checks, and if payees can be
found, they should be issued new checks. For those who cannot be located, the outstanding money should be
disbursed in accordance with state law.
While Scott County Prosecuting Attorney Paul Boyd did not return calls for comment, the recommendations were
addressed in the response portion of the report. It said the recommendations were being implemented; however,
due to software limitations the office was unable to electronically document partial payments made by a
defendant. New software is being considered. The office also said it would be working with professionals to
address the necessary improvements in its bookkeeping.
Allison Bruns, director of communications for the state auditor's office, said while the auditor's office can make
recommendations, it cannot hold anyone accountable for implementing them.
"We do not have enforcement authority," she said. "We provide them a road map and work with governments
and entities to try and correct issues, but we can't make them do anything."
The state auditor is required by state law to conduct audits once every four years in counties, like Scott, that do
not have an auditor. The audit also covers areas of county operations, as well as elected county officials, as

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required by Missouri's constitution. The scope of the Scott County audit included, but was not necessarily limited
to, the two years ending Dec. 31, 2009.
Other findings
* Scott County has imposed two separate sales taxes under state law, which allows for a rate of one-quarter,
three-eighths or half percent. The law does not contain a provision for two sales taxes that exceed the maximum
allowed. The audit recommended legal counsel review the various sales taxes imposed and determine which are
valid and if further action should be taken. The written response in the audit said the county had legal counsel
review the ballots on which the latest tax appeared.
* Until March 2010 the county collector did not prepare monthly lists of liabilities to reconcile with cash balances,
resulting in unidentified money. The collector's office written response said attempts are being made to identify
the money and monthly lists of liabilities are now being prepared.
* Employees of the collector's office share one password to the county's property tax system, and that password
is not periodically changed. The collector's office responded saying it will look into changing the password
monthly during the office's peak time, November to January.




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New sentencing matrix shows Missouri judges
the cost of prison
Wednesday, September 29, 2010 | 6:23 p.m. CDT; updated 9:51 p.m. CDT, Wednesday, September 29, 2010
BY Deniz Koray – Columbia Missourian


COLUMBIA — Judges in Missouri are now in a unique position. They are the only ones in the country who know
the projected costs of housing prisoners before sentencing.
They also have access to a computer formula that predicts recidivism rates, which is the likelihood that an
inmate will be arrested again after being released from prison.
These two reforms are part of a concerted effort to develop a sentencing matrix that reduces recidivism rates
and hands out consistent punishments across counties.
Judge Gary Oxenhandler, the presiding judge of the 13th Judicial Circuit, which covers Boone and Callaway
counties, said it will be challenging to bring uniformity to state sentencing, but he hopes to do so eventually.
According to a report by the Missouri Sentencing Advisory Commission, as of June 30, 2009, 57 percent of the
Boone County prison population had been convicted of nonviolent crimes. Scotland County had the highest
percentage of nonviolent criminals at 80 percent, while Jackson had the fewest, at 28 percent.
David Oldfield, research director for the Missouri Department of Corrections, said 98 percent of incarcerated
offenders eventually are released from Missouri prisons.
The average annual cost of housing a single prisoner was $16,308 in fiscal 2010. That‘s $44.68 per day.
According to the sentencing commission, slightly more than half the state‘s inmates last year were imprisoned
for nonviolent crimes.
By comparison, Oldfield said probation costs $1,354 annually, or $3.71 per day, per offender. Enhanced
probation, which provides more structured activities such as GED preparation, drug counseling and career
support, costs $1,792 annually per offender, or $4.91 per day, according to fiscal 2009 statistics, the most recent
available for probation costs.
Oxenhandler said he believes the sentencing will have little impact on judges‘ decisions, especially in violent
crimes.
―In any felony with an injury, the cost is not taken into consideration," he said. "It is not how we make our
decision." However, in other cases ―every bit of information that we have impacts our decision, and every bit of
information that affects our decision is worth having.‖
Dan Knight, Boone County prosecuting attorney, worries that the sentencing data would obscure the hidden
costs of criminal behavior.
―If an individual is placed on probation and then commits another crime, it will be very costly to society,‖ he said.
Knight cited not only the suffering of victims but also the economic costs that police and prosecutors would incur
if people on probation commit more crimes. If charges are filed, he said, those costs would extend to judges and,
potentially, public defenders.
―If they were in a penitentiary from the start, then the crime and all of its associated costs would have never
occurred. It is extremely difficult to put a price tag on justice,‖ he said.


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Knight said another unintended consequence could be lowering deterrence. While he does not recommend all
people convicted of felonies spend time in prison, he said appropriately strong punishments deter people who
might contemplate committing crimes in the future.
Oxenhandler disagreed, saying that revealing the costs of incarceration would not influence deterrence.
―The populace that is out committing crimes is not looking at sentencing data," he said. "The people who are out
committing crimes don‘t analyze the consequences to their actions. They don‘t ask ‗What will happen when I get
caught?‘ They don‘t think they are going to get caught.‖
The formula for recidivism rates is based on 11 factors, including an inmate‘s age, education, employment
history, prior arrests and the severity of the crime committed. Based on the variables, judges can give
aggravated sentences to high-risk offenders, mitigated sentences to low-risk offenders and presumptive
sentences to those in between.
Oxenhandler said the recidivism formula has been available to judges in the past, but this is the first time it
allows them to compare probation and incarceration costs immediately and online.
Judge Michael A. Wolff of the State Supreme Court is chairman of the sentencing commission. He said that in
the 1990s, the state prison population grew 184 percent, in comparison to the general population‘s 9 percent
increase.
In the past five years, the prison growth rate has stabilized because of reforms in sentencing, re-entry programs
for recently paroled inmates and drug courts, but Wolff said the prison population remains twice as high as it was
in 1993.
―It is not possible to keep growing the state‘s prison system without increasing taxes, and that is not something
the people of Missouri want to do,‖ Wolff said.
He also said that the rates of re-offense for certain crimes are higher for criminals assigned to prison than for
those given alternative sentences such as probation. One explanation might be that those sentenced to prison
have longer and more serious criminal records.
Wolff, however, said there is another explanation for lower rates of re-offense for those receive alternative
sentences. ―They don‘t go to prison where they would learn new criminal behavior and thinking,‖ he said.
Rodney Uphoff of the MU School of Law said the changes are a very good idea because they increase
transparency and allow judges to make more informed decisions.
―If some judges utilize the new information to hand out shorter sentences, it may be a positive development,‖ he
said. ―The general public does not understand the financial consequences of prison, especially for nonviolent
offenders.‖
Uphoff, who was previously a professor at the University of Oklahoma, said people who bounced $100 checks
had been been sentenced to prison for more than two years because it was a felony in that state.
―In this day and age, we can‘t lock up nonviolent criminals without appreciating the financial cost,‖ he said. ―The
tax-paying public has the right to know how their tax dollars are being spent.‖
―There are some cases where nonviolent offenders deserve prison sentences,‖ he said. However, ―it is not a
wise use of our tax dollars to incarcerate people for minor, nonviolent offenses.‖




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Lawyers talk about issues facing our courts
by Mark Slavit – KRCG
Posted: 09.29.2010 at 3:28 PM


COLUMBIA, MO. -- More than 1,000 lawyers and judges are in Columbia this week to discuss the latest issues
facing our courts.
The Annual Missouri Bar and Missouri Judicial Conference is taking place at the Holiday Inn Executive Center
between now and Friday.
Speakers from across the United States will cover a wide range of topics at the three-day event.
Columbia Attorney Skip Walther is this year‘s Missouri Bar President.
Walther says a growing number of Missourians count on lawyers to help solve their legal problems.
Walther said, ―Attorneys in this state, I think it‘s fair to say, are perceived by the public to be the true leaders. It‘s
our goal to encourage as many of our members as possible to fulfill their leadership responsibility to the citizens
of Missouri.‖
Members of The Missouri Bar also provide guidance to Missouri lawmakers through their legislative committee.
State legislators depend on members of The Missouri Bar to help them draft legal language and provide
constructive criticism for proposed legislation.




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KC Council committee endorses proposal to
privatize sewer facilities
By LYNN HORSLEY - The Kansas City Star
Sept. 29, 2010


A Kansas City Council committee narrowly endorsed a proposal Wednesday to explore privatizing the city‘s
sewer facilities, despite fierce opposition from the city‘s largest union.
Later Wednesday, some council members confirmed they had met with representatives of the Black & Veatch
engineering firm, who expressed interest in operating the Blue River Wastewater Treatment Plant, near
Interstate 435 and East Front Street.
The Finance and Audit Committee voted 2-1 to allow the city manager to solicit information from companies
interested in managing city assets, including sewer plants and parking garages. The manager would report back
within 60 days.
Mayor Mark Funkhouser and Councilwoman Deb Hermann supported the idea, while Councilman John Sharp
vehemently objected. Committee members Beth Gottstein and Sharon Sanders Brooks were absent.
The measure will go to the full council Oct. 7.
Troy Schulte, the acting city manager, noted that the city is embarking on a $2.5 billion sewer overhaul plan in
which the private sector might provide the city with cash while saving taxpayer dollars.
Funkhouser, who sponsored the resolution, said private companies might have creative approaches that
improve efficiency and give taxpayers better value.
―There‘s a whole lot of angst about this, but we‘re looking for information,‖ Funkhouser said. ―We‘ll be careful,
responsible stewards of the city‘s assets.‖
But Robert Patrick, president of the city‘s largest union, pointed to examples nationally where privatization of
sewer facilities has led to skyrocketing rates, cost overruns and bad service.
Sharp said he learned after the committee meeting that Black & Veatch was proposing to invest $80 million at
the Blue River facility in exchange for a 30-year management contract and a significant rate of return for the
company. Sharp, who had not met with the company, said he was concerned about a specific proposal flying
under the radar, giving one company an unfair competitive advantage.
Black & Veatch did not return a call seeking comment Wednesday.
Six other council members said Wednesday they had met individually weeks ago with company representatives,
but they didn‘t remember specifics. Several said there was no attempt to rush anything or to favor a particular
company, and any outsourcing plan would have to protect existing city employees.




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BLOG ZONE

Carnahan welcomes support from police,
firefighters -- and Carville
By Jo Mannies, St. Louis Beacon Backroom
Posted 12:21 am, Thu., 09.30.10


Fiery Democratic commentator James Carville will headline a fund-raising event next Wednesday for U.S.
Senate nominee Robin Carnahan, offering another signal that her campaign now is paying attention
to energizing the party's base, with just over a month to go until the Nov. 2 election.
The Carville event's tickets are only $75, cheap by political campaign standards, which indicates that Carnahan
is aiming the event at local rank-and-file Democrats -- not high-rollers. That's yet another sign that the
campaign's emphasis is shifting, at least partially, to whipping up existing supporters so they turn out at the polls
Nov. 2. That's a role Carville is known to relish.
(Her Republican rival, U.S. Rep. Roy Blunt, also is focusing on energizing allies with such events as last Friday's
visit by former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani. Click here to read the Beacon's account of the former mayor's
stop.)
Carville also fits in with Carnahan's "I'm independent'' message, since the commentator most recently attracted
attention for his TV blasts at President Barack Obama during the Gulf oil-spill crisis this summer. Carnahan, now
Missouri's secretary of state, has touted her own differences with the president, although Republicans continue
to play up Obama's July campaign stop in Kansas City on her behalf.
The Carville stop, by the way, comes the day before Vice President Joe Biden is scheduled to headline a fund-
raising event for Carnahan next Thursday in Springfield, Mo., Blunt's home turf.
Police, firefighters' Groups praise and Endorse Carnahan
This Wednesday morning in south St. Louis, Carnahan sought to highlight her law-and-order credentials by
campaigning with the state leaders of the Missouri chapter of the Fraternal Order of Police and the state Council
of Firefighters.
Both groups, which combined represent almost 12,000 police and firefighters, are endorsing Carnahan as part of
a new group called "First Responders for Carnahan."
Tony Kelley, president of the firefighters council, praised Carnahan for supporting the additional federal spending
necessary to achieve "interoperability'," in which different types of communication systems can still communicate
with each other.
The lack of interoperability is blamed for many of the deaths among law enforcement personnel in the World
Trade Center during the 9/11 attacks, because firefighters and police could not communicate with each other
because of their different radio systems.
The same problem also was reported during the New Orleans disaster when Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005.



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Carnahan cited the findings of the 9/11 Commission, and said she would support federal cuts elsewhere to make
sure that there was adequate money to help law enforcement agencies achieve interoperability -- which she said
was crucial in the case of any future major disaster.
Carnahan also touted her support for the federal COPS program that added 100,000 police to the nation's
streets in the 1990s.
Kevin Ahlbrand, state head of the Missouri FOP, said in an interview afterwards that he believed police officers
around the state and the country are paying close attention -- and getting energized -- about the Nov. 2 mid-term
congressional elections, because of funding cuts and layoffs at many police departments around the country.
Police will support the candidates most willing to commit to the spending needed for proper staffing and
equipment needed to keep communities and neighborhoods safe, Ahlbrand said.
Missouri's U.S. Senate race is the only congressional contest where the state Fraternal Order of Police has
made an endorsement, he added.




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Russ Carnahan goes for the jugular in new TV
ad
By Jo Mannies, St. Louis Beacon Backroom
Posted 11:30 am, Wed., 09.29.10


U.S. Rep. Russ Carnahan, D-St. Louis, has swiftly dropped his positive-ad approach for a new spot that goes all
out against Republican rival Ed Martin, by focusing on the e-mail controversy that ensued while Martin was chief
of staff to then-Gov. Matt Blunt.
Carnahan's ad flat-out calls Martin "corrupt" -- an assertion made by both candidates during last weekend's
debates.
In the e-mail dispute, Martin fired Blunt's staff lawyer three years ago this week. Scott Eckersley (now a
Democrat running for Congress in southwest Missouri) contended that the governor's office was destroying e-
mails that should be saved under the state's open-records and record-retention laws. Martin maintained that
Eckersley was fired for other reasons.
Two lawsuits on various aspects of the case were settled out of court, with no declaration of wrongdoing by
anyone (although Eckersley got a letter of apology from the state for what he contended were accusations that
defamed his character). Missouri taxpayers paid more than $2.4 million, some of which was used to pay legal
fees for Martin, Blunt, Eckersley and others.
Carnahan's ad doesn't get into all the details but asks the viewers if they really want to send someone like Martin
to Washington.
Martin said repeatedly during the debates that the court case in which Eckersley claimed his character had been
defamed was settled over Martin's objections. Martin said he had wanted to continue the court fight.
The ad also refers to a disparaging characterization of Martin by the Center for Responsibility and Ethics in
Washington, a non-profit group that Martin contends is really aligned with Democrats. The group, know as
CREW, disagrees.




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Most are gutless
Missourinet: The Blog
by Bob Priddy on September 29, 2010


A few days ago we told you our political candidates were facing a deadline to complete Project Vote Smart‘s
Political Courage Test, a non-partisan survey of their positions on key issues in this elections cycle. And we said
we‘d name names for those gutless candidates who don‘t want the voters to know what they think about issues.
PVS folks tell us the most common reasons candidates don‘t respond is because their parties and their
consultants don‘t want them on the record because their opponents might use the information to campaign
against them. So the advice is to ignore surveys of their positions and stick to the proven one or two message
points that seem to have the most favorable response from voters.
Would you think that approach shows political courage?
Project Vote Smart thinks not.
For candidates that don‘t answer the survey, PVS has had scads of researchers looking at voting records and
public statements that will allow PVS to INFER candidates‘ positions on the issues. Of course the candidates
can make corrections if they think the inferences are wrong.
If you want to look up whether candidates in your district answered the surveys and what their answers are (or
PVS‘ inferences) go to the Project Vote Smart Website, www.votesmart.org. Here are some of the responses
from campaigns around the country.
To cut to the chase:
PVS reports only 43% of the Missouri candidates for Congress and only 13% of the candidates for state
legislative seats ―were willing to tell voters where they stand on key issues facing the nation.‖ (Those are PVS‘s
words.) Most of those who responded were third party candidates. Only two incumbent Congressmen
responded.
So herewith is our Guts & Gutless list.
GUTS: U.S. Senate
Jerry Beck, Constitution
GUTLESS U. S. Senate
Roy Blunt, Republican
Robin Carnahan, Democrat
Jonathan Dine, Libertarian.
GUTS: U. S. House (District listed after name)
William L. Clay, Democrat (incumbent) 1
Robyn Hamlin, Republican 1
Arthur Lieber, Democrat 2
Steve Mosbacher, Libertarian 2
Nicholas Ivanovich, Constitution 3


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Emanuel Cleaver, Democrat (incumbent) 5
Dave Lay, Constitution 5
Clinton Hylton, Democrat 6
Kevin Craig, Libertarian 7
Rick Vandeven, Libertarian 8
Christopher Dwyler, Libertarian 9
PVS lists Libertarian Jason Braun (4) and Independent Bill Lawrence (8) as ―pending.‖
GUTLESS U. S. House
The other 19 candidates for Congress including eight incumbents..
GUTS Missouri State Senate
Bob Ludlow, Libertarian 19
George Weber, Democrat 26
PVS lsits Independent Nick Gargeios (4) and Maria Chappelle-Nadal (14) as ―pending.‖
GUTLESS Missouri State Senate
The other 27 candidates including six incumbents.
Three of the 27 candidates are without opposition in November: Mike Kehoe (6), Ronald Richard (32), and
incumbent Brad Lager (12)
GUTS Missouri State House
Gary Murray, Constitution 5
Dale Toms, Democrat 7
Michael Clynch, Republican 11
Chuck Gatschenberger, Republican 13
Debbie Bixler, Democrat 16
LaurieNauser, Republican 24
Delus Johnson, Republican 28
William Caldwell, Democrat 29
Kevin Kobe, Libertarian 51
Jeffrey Workman, Republican 51
Jeanette Mott Oxford, Democrat 59
Tommie Pierson, Democrat, 69
Stacey Newman, Democrat 73
Glen Lindermann, Republican 78
William Spaits, Constitution 79



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Don Gosen, Republican 84
Cloria Brown, Republican 85
Alice Geary Sgrol, Democrat 95
Daniel Fitzhenry, Constitution 97
Jan Polizzi, Democrat 97
Randall Lewis, Constitution 100
Richard Blowers, Constitution 102
Joseph Fallert, Democrat 104
Ray Herron, Constitution 116
Raymond Kish, Constitution 119
Richard Hoxsey, Constitution 120
William Truman Wayne, Libertarian 121
Eric Burlison, Republican 136
Devon Cheek, Democrat 136
Teddy Michael Fleck, Libertarian 140
Michael Chipman, Independent 141
Ron Yarbro, Democrat 154
John Page, Democrat 155
Ron McCormick, Republican 161
Three are listed as ―pending‖: Charles Smith, Independent (90); Randy Dinwiddie, Independent (115); Steven
Reed, Independent (138)
Candidate Bill Slantz, Libertarian (15) is shown by PVS as answering only 9% of the questions. GUTLESS
Missouri State House
247 candidates, 57 of whom are unopposed in November.




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Sen. Brad Lager joins $100,000 donation club
By TONY MESSENGER – St. Louis Post-Dispatch Political Fix
Posted: Wednesday, September 29, 2010 3:30 pm


JEFFERSON CITY -- If it seems like it's raining $100,000 checks in the capital city, that might be because it is.
On the heels of last week's $100,000 campaign donation from Rex Sinquefield to Rep. Steve Tilley, R-Perryville,
this week, a Senate Republican -- Brad Lager of Savannah -- got into the big money game.
Today, Lager reported receiving a $100,000 check from Joplin's David Humphreys, owner of Tamko Roofing.
Humphreys is a big donor to many Republicans, but he's most well known for his campaign donations to try to
overturn the Missouri Nonpartisan Court Plan.
While there is much speculation in the Capitol over Sen. Chuck Purgason's plan to challenge Sen. Kevin Engler
for the position of Senate President Pro Tem, (check out the Beacon's coverage here, and read Purgason's letter
here, at the Arch City Chronicle), Lager figures to play a major role in deciding the top leadership spots in the
Senate, and Engler and Purgason are likely not the only players. Both Lager and Sen. Rob Mayer, R-Dexter,
have been mentioned as possible candidates for the Senate's top job.
During the special session on the Ford bill, Lager sought to position himself as peace-maker between Purgason,
who was filibustering the bill, and Senate leaders who wanted it passed.




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Buying Cold Medicine in Missouri Is About to
Be A Great Big Hassle
By Keegan Hamilton – Riverfront Times
Wed., Sep. 29 2010 @ 1:10PM


Missouri residents suffering from runny noses and stuffy sinuses are about to discover that buying certain types
of cold medicine will make them even more sick and tired.

Yesterday, new regulations took effect requiring more than 1,300 pharmacists statewide that sell medicine that
contains pseudoephedrine -- i.e. Sudafed, Claritin-D and Contac -- to enter personal information about the
buyers into an electronic database.

Pseudoephedrine is the one of main ingredients in meth and Missouri is one of ten states that requires stores to
electronically track the drug's sales. The tactic is intended to prevent meth cooks from "smurfing" large quantities
of the medicine for illicit use but, according to local and federal law enforcement officials, the new database will
do little to prevent meth addicts from stockpiling the stuff.

Here is the SE Missourian explaining the new electronic tracking measures:
Under Missouri's new rules, pharmacies will have to enter a customer's full name, address, birth date and
signature in the database, as well as specific details about the type and quantity of the pseudoephedrine-based
product that was purchased. The system will reject customers who already have exceeded the limit and alert
police about the attempted purchase...

Missouri law limits people to buying 3.6 grams a day -- which is about 120 standard tablets -- or 9 grams in a 30-
day period of products containing pseudoephedrine.
And here is what Kent Shaw, the assistant chief of California's Bureau of Narcotic Enforcement, told Congress in
April about electronic tracking:
"The [pharmaceutical] industry has mastered appearing as if it is attempting to solve the problem," he said. "In
reality, it is merely perpetuating the problem in order to continue reaping the financial gains generated by meth
labs."
That quote comes from the Riverfront Times feature story, "Shaken and Baked," which detailed the latest
innovation by the nation's backyard meth cooks. A process called "The Shake and Bake Method" allows
tweakers to use small amounts of pseudoephedrine to make meth. Also from the story:
Shaw and other law-enforcement officials say the electronic databases are shortsighted and ultimately
ineffective. They argue that requiring a doctor's prescription to obtain pseudoephedrine -- a policy that was in
place in the U.S. until 1976 -- is the only surefire solution.

The results in Oregon seem to back them up. Before becoming the first state to adopt a pseudoephedrine
prescription measure in 2006 (Mississippi joined Oregon earlier this year), Oregon seized more than 200 meth
labs annually. Last year police found just ten.

When enacted locally, pseudoephedrine prescription laws have had similarly dramatic effects. Last July
Washington became the first of ten Missouri communities (nine cities and one county) to ban over-the-counter

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sales of Sudafed and similar products.

"Ninety days after the law went into effect, we saw a 94 percent drop in sales of cold remedies containing
pseudoephedrine," Jason Grellner says, "and a corresponding 84 percent drop in crimes in the Washington,
Missouri, zip code."
The best way to avoid the hassle when buying your over-the-counter cold medicine? Pick one the (many)
products that doesn't list pseudoephedrine as an ingredient.




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MISSOURINET

McCaskill wants Arlington changes (AUDIO)
by Bob Priddy on September 29, 2010
in Human Interest,Military,Politics & Government


Senator McCaskill thinks it‘s time somebody else was in charge of America‘s most important cemetery.
The discovery that some veterans had not been buried properly or that their graves had been mismarked at
Arlington National Cemetery has led to the ouster of the people in charge at Arlington.
McCaskill is behind legislation taking supervision of the cemetery away from the Army and giving it to the
Veterans Administration. She would leave the Army in charge of honor ceremonies and in some of the important
other traditions there. But she thinks the day to day supervision should be moved to the V-A.
McCaskill, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, says there still does not appear to be a definite
understanding of how widespread the problems are. She has had her first meeting with the woman who is the
new superintendent to see if she has been able to determine the scope of the issue.




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EDITORIALS … & Letters to the Editor

We need to vote our strength
St. Louis American
Wednesday, September 29, 2010 10:47 PM CDT


The staggering differences between the mood in the country in the 2010 election cycle and that of 2008 have
been much discussed. We are facing a midterm election on Nov. 2, meaning it is halfway through a presidential
term so there is no presidential contest at the top of the ticket. This difference – always critical in terms of voter
participation – is greatly amplified by the Obama factor. As we all know, Obama swept from unknown status as a
black candidate with ―big ears and a funny name,‖ as he often said, to beat Hillary Clinton in the Democratic
primary and then Republican John McCain in the general election.

The Obama factor was responsible for an achievement that the Democratic Party should never forget, though it
already has shown startling signs of amnesia. With a young, charismatic African American at the top of the
Democratic ticket, about 65 percent of blacks went to the polls, according to the Pew Research Center – nearly
matching the 66 percent voting rate for whites. ―If we only voted our strength‖ is a commonly expressed sigh in
black political circles. When we had the choice of electing Obama, we did vote our strength – and the
Democratic Party reaped heady dividends.

Again, as we all know, Republicans have capitalized on the deepest recession since the 1930s to rile up
discontent among an angry white fringe. They are angry and on the fringe, but because they are white they are
portrayed in the mainstream media as more mainstream than they actually are; and with the Democrats and their
progressive wing failing to produce a more compelling alternative political narrative, this angry, white and often
abusive fringe has managed to dominate the election story. Whether that will translate into sweeping Republican
victories on Nov. 2 remains to be seen, especially given that the GOP has nominated a number of very
unappealing and controversial fringe candidates in its primaries.

Here in Missouri, a state seldom known for its progressive stance on issues where race is in play, many
Democrats are running in apparent fear of Obama and the party‘s black base, anxious to do nothing that might
fuel the angry white right and (as this questionable reasoning goes) throw conservative Democrats over the
fence to the Republican voting bloc. In a midterm election where we might have expected many newly energized
black voters to sit out anyway, based on historic trends, the Democrats – especially in Missouri – have all but
written off the black base and its newly emboldened voting strength.

While we consider this a shame, perhaps a scandal, for Missouri Democrats, our thoughts, first, are for this
community. And the only choice this community has is to organize itself and build upon the gains in voting
participation and strength that Obama brought to our community. It is absolutely essential that we begin to talk
and organize among ourselves to make sure that African Americans know there is an important election on Nov.
2 and are making plans to vote. To vote, one must be registered, and in the absence of any significant voter
registration drives led by Missouri Democrats, we should conduct our own. Now is the time to ask your family,
fellow parishioners, friends and associates if they are registered to vote; and if they are not registered to vote,
they must know that next Wednesday, Oct. 6 is the deadline to register to vote in the Nov. 2 elections.


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You may register to vote at any office of the Missouri Department of Motor Vehicles, public library, Missouri
Department of Social Services office, or other governmental office. For more information, contact the city
election board (300 N. Tucker) at 314-622-4336 or the St. Louis County election board (12 Sunnen Dr., Ste. 126
in Maplewood) at 314-615-1800. You may register to vote by Oct. 6 if you are 17-and-a-half, but must be 18 to
vote on Nov. 2. If you don‘t vote, you don‘t count.




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Ugly Campaign
Washington Missourian Editorial
Sept. 29, 2010


We thought we had seen it all in dirty political campaigns, but the race betweeen Congressman Roy Blunt and
Secretary of State Robin Carnahan for U.S. senator is about as low as any of the political consultants have
reached in Missouri. Both of the candidates have been bruised by the misleading advertising.
We‘ve heard from voters who also are sick of the advertising.
Republican Blunt and Democrat Carnahan are slugging it out with ads that are personal and mudslinging.
Political consultants tell their clients that these types of attacks do pay off in votes and are necessary to win.
There are many instances in which the dirty ads turn off voters. Parties become desperate in wanting their
candidates to win. Money is raised and spent wildly.
In attacks on a candidate, the ads come up with photos that make a person look bad, like someone you have
doubts about and would never trust. If a candidate has a record in office, he or she is blamed for just about
everything that has turned negative.
Carnahan has been running behind in polls but has narrowed Blunt‘s lead. She has pictured Blunt as a member
of the Washington establishment and a friend of lobbyists. He has based much of his attacks on Carnahan‘s
support of President Obama and his policies. Millions of dollars are being spent. Both candidates appear to be
well funded. Both candidates have name recognition throughout the state. Carnahan is a liberal. Blunt is a
conservative. They have some common ground on issues, but not many.
Carnahan and Blunt will have a couple of debates. One will be at the Missouri Press Association‘s annual
convention in mid-October at the Lake of the Ozarks.
The race is being given national attention as are other races for the U.S. Senate and House seats. It would be
much more enlightening to voters if the candidates from Missouri for the U.S. Senate would be issue driven in
their ads rather than engaging in personal and mudslinging attacks.




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Seeking Oversight
Washington Missourian Editorial
Sept. 29, 2010


Sometimes it appears that Missouri‘s Sen. Claire McCaskill is the only one in Washington, D.C., seeking
oversight on government spending. She is fighting for oversight in the spending of billions of dollars in
Afghanistan and wants the watchdog over those expenditures fired.
Sen. McCaskill has urged the president to ―clean house‖ at the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan
Reconstruction agency, including the firing of the director, Arnold Fields. The Council of Inspectors General on
Integrity and Efficiency has found many problems in the agency, including failure to produce any meaningful
strategic plan for audits and investigations.
McCaskill‘s subcommittee on contracting oversight has held hearings on problems on awarding contracts for
work in Afghanistan. One hearing investigated $6 billion in contracts for the training of the National Police Force,
but because of waste and poor oversight, ―we have little to show for that investment,‖ McCaskill said. She added
that the government is spending $51 billion in Afghanistan for reconstruction.
McCaskill and a bipartisan group of senators await action by the president.




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For its poverty rate, Missouri should be placed
on child neglect registry.
The Editorial Board – St. Louis Post-Dispatch (The Platform)
Posted: Wednesday, September 29, 2010 9:00 pm


Under Missouri‘s child protection law, teachers and other school officials with responsibility for the care of
children are ―mandatory reporters‖ who must ―immediately report or cause a report to be made‖ to the Children‘s
Division of the Missouri Department of Social Services whenever they have ―reasonable cause to suspect that a
child has been or may be subjected to abuse or neglect.‖
The hot lines must be ringing off the hook.
On Tuesday, the U.S. Census Bureau reported a sharp rise in child poverty in 2009. One in every five Missouri
children — 20.3 percent or 284,306 in total — was living in poverty. That‘s up more than 30 percent since 2000,
when it stood at 15.2 percent, the low mark for the decade.
Missouri‘s child protective statute defines neglect as the ―failure to provide ... the proper or necessary support,
education as required by law, nutrition or medical, surgical, or any other care necessary for the child‘s well
being.‖
Poverty, in turn, is defined as family income for four people (including two children) of $22,050 a year, or
$1,837.50 a month or less.
By these federal standards, poor means dirt poor.
Gather your bills — rent, utilities, food, transportation, clothing, out-of-pocket medical expenses, just the basics
— and see for yourself. Then imagine what life would be like when the little available for necessities runs out.
Then talk to some teachers or area charities that work with low-income families about the practical challenges
they face just getting by.
If not a form of neglect, what would you call pushing more and more Missouri children into poverty?
Who is responsible? Who should be reported to the social services department?
Certainly not the children themselves. Indeed, the greatest proportion of children living in poverty are those
younger than 6.
In absolute terms, the greatest number of Missouri children living in poverty reside in suburban and rural parts of
the state. In terms of the rate of child poverty, rural and urban areas nearly were tied according to 2008 data: 30
percent of children in urban areas and 27 percent in rural areas were a part of families whose income fell below
the federal poverty standard.
When you add families with income between 100 percent and 200 percent of the poverty level, low-income
families account for 60 percent of families in rural areas and 47 percent in urban centers.
Perhaps we should report parents for their children‘s plight, those ―able-bodied adults‖ who, state legislators
always complain, aren‘t supporting their families.
Some parents might well be able to do better by themselves and their kids. But, in 2008, more than two-thirds of
Missouri children living in poverty had at least one parent working full time or part time, according to data
gathered by Columbia University‘s National Center for Children in Poverty.


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Today, with higher unemployment rates, parents ―don‘t have bootstraps to pull themselves up by,‖ said Ruth
Ehresman of the Missouri Budget Project.
―Many don‘t even have boots,‖ she said.
Maybe we should report Congress, particularly those members of Missouri‘s congressional delegation who have
opposed extensions of federal unemployment benefits. There is no surer way to make poverty even deeper.
Or what about state lawmakers who balanced the budget by making more than a billion dollars in spending cuts,
not by asking Missourians to do more. Included were deep cuts in programs that serve children, including the
educational funding these same officials said was essential to meeting minimum standards of education.
Anyone found to have committed child neglect in Missouri is supposed to be placed on a ―central registry.‖ We
might just keep things simple and register the entire state.
Of this we can be sure: One day, we all will pay the price for those Missouri children living in poverty today.




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Letters to the editor, September 30
St. Louis Post-Dipatch Letter
Posted: Thursday, September 30, 2010 12:00 am


People take different steps on the path to teacher certification
"Teacher-creation idea limps along" (Sept. 24) described the American Board for Certification of Teacher
Excellence program. Kathleen Sullivan Brown, an associate professor in the College of Education at the
University of Missouri-St. Louis, degraded the graduates of the program as those who took shortcuts. She clearly
implied that they were lacking relative to those who attended teacher-education programs such as the one in
which she teaches.
Participants in the ABCTE program have degrees in fields other than education and take courses to become
certified to teach. Ms. Brown states that just because a person has a bachelor's degree does not mean that he
can teach. Likewise, just because a person has a degree in education does not mean he has the knowledge or
competence to teach.
While some ABCTE participants have degrees in mathematics, engineering and hard sciences, enrollees in
education programs, even at the graduate level, typically are terrified when required to take introductory courses
in statistics, tests and measurements or mathematics. In fact, they often are not required to take these courses
as undergraduates.
Most teachers have difficulty interpreting student test scores and standardized tests at any level of depth. They
typically cannot understand quantitative research studies in their own field. Many lack basic knowledge of
childhood diseases and conditions that warrant detection. There are some who write poorly and may not even
use standard English.
Before Ms. Brown casts aspersions, she needs to look in her proverbial own back yard.
Jerry M. Powers • Webster Groves


Journey to mediocrity
In the ongoing coverage of the various issues facing public and private education in the St. Louis area, I found
the latest entry, "Teacher-creation idea limps along" (Sept. 24), very provocative. Consider recent accounts of
money-laundering, out-of-control school boards, stripped accreditation and outrageous insurance packages for
superintendents and their spouses, etc. The journey toward educational mediocrity in some area districts
continues.
Now, University of Missouri associate professor Kathleen Sullivan Brown, who is employed at a state university,
takes issue with Missouri's decision to accept alternative certification programs. After all, what an atrocity to
allow programs such as American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence to offer rigorous, quality training,
allowing highly educated candidates to transition into a career as a teacher. What good could possibly come
from a well-respected program that provides certification for areas in critical need, such as math and science?
Ms. Brown's comments demonstrate a lack of professionalism and unnecessary judgmentalism toward the
individuals who pursue teaching as a transitional career change. More important, however, her attitude reflects a
disturbing unwillingness on the part of some to explore new ideas to strengthen and possibly improve our school
systems.


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As Bob Dylan once sang, "The times, they are a changing."
Robert Denstedt • St. Louis County


Not for just another casino
A proposed casino at the Chain of Rocks Bridge is an assault on the character of this region. We don't believe
the area should, or even can, support this development, and we don't think city leaders have thought this
through.
St. Louis' water intake is immediately downriver from the proposed casino. Have city leaders considered the
serious threat to the safety of our city's drinking water that parking lot run-off, accidental spills, waste disposal
and increased demands on sewer lines might represent? It is not worth the risk for just another casino.
Riverview Drive is a two-lane road prone to flash floods. It is difficult to maintain as a connecting route for
commuters and trucks to Interstate 270. Why increase traffic on an over-taxed road? It is not worth risking the
safety of everyone who uses Riverview Drive for yet another casino.
This area provides access to the only stretch of barge-free river from St. Paul, Minn., to the Gulf of Mexico with
no industrial or commercial development. What effect will 25 acres of commercial activity have? The developer
says the birds and animals will adjust. We say it's not worth the cost.
Recently, tourists told us that they visited three places in St. Louis: the Arch, Ted Drewes and the Old Chain of
Rocks Bridge. We are proud that our neighborhood serves as a visitor's entrance to the city and the state. We
would not be proud to have that entrance spoiled by just another casino.
Barbara Floreth • St. Louis President, Chain of Rocks Community Association


A poorer nation
Regarding Kevin Horrigan's column "Everything is khoobsoorat" (Sept. 26):This would have been an interesting
column if people on the left actually thought about it. Here in the United States, more than half of the people pay
no taxes. It isn't the rich people whom Mr. Horrigan would paint as greedy oppressors; it is the poor. The
Treasury Department's website shows who is paying all the taxes, including what percentage of those are small
businesses who are employing the other half.
Yes, there is a deplorable gap between the salaries of the CEOs and the people in the maintenance department.
Talk about that. Yes, some here seem to get around many taxes. Mr. Horrigan denigrates the rich who, in the
United States, do pay taxes. He fans the flames of class envy.
Mr. Horrigan should know that the trillions of dollars not being spent by banks, corporations and individuals is
being held because of fear that this country is becoming like Pakistan economically. That is thanks to the lack of
business experience in the current administration and the arrogance of the elite from either party. For them,
power is supreme, not the people.
We are poorer as a nation because if the greed of a few. Sadly, they run our country.
Joan Costello • Ballwin




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Abandoned the people
The editorial "New and endangered" (Sept. 24, which noted the benefits of the health care reform and the figures
on the expanding cost for medical care and its overall effect, verified my belief that the Republican Party is now
the party of cowards, liars and bullies.
The facts on increased spending on health care since 2000 were not locked away in a vault only to be
discovered by the Post-Dispatch. The damaging effect to the pay of workers is well-known. Because of this
inflation on premiums, employers have done everything possible to reduce the number of employees covered by
their health plans, as noted by the increased number of people without health insurance, along with making their
employees take on a greater share of paying for health care.
The Republicans had every opportunity to show some courage and address one or some of the troubles facing
our people in need, but they did nothing. Knowing full well that President Barack Obama may have
accomplished something good, and on which they could have been leaders, they continue to lie — just as they
did during the negotiations leading up to the passage of the bill. Their cry was not "no," but "hell no to
Obamacare."
Simply to get power back from the Democrats and to assure that Mr. Obama does not achieve or get credit for
anything, they have abandoned the American people and our troubled nation. Their only interest is Republican
dominance.
Carl Gudiswitz • Grantwood




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USA TODAY MISSOURI NEWS
Monday, Sept. 27 -- Cape Girardeau — Officials at Southeast Missouri State said sorghum may replace corn
as the preferred crop for ethanol. Wesley Mueller, Southeast professor of agriculture, said sorghum grown at the
university farm in the future could produce 500 gallons of ethanol per acre. These figures rapidly outpace corn,
which generally yields 235 gallons of ethanol per acre.


Tuesday, Sept. 28 -- St. Louis — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is placing the Vienna Wells site
on its Superfund National Priorities List over concerns about the drinking water in the town of Vienna. The
designation gives the site a high priority for cleanup.


Wednesday, Sept. 29 -- St. Louis — The odds against winning $1 million in the Lottery: astronomical. How
about doing it twice? It happened to a man from Bonne Terre. Ernest Pullen, 57, won $1 million in June. And this
month, he won $2 million. Pullen considers himself a "lucky guy."


Thursday, Sept. 30 -- Springfield — A city councilman and his wife are suing the school district and the county
sheriff over law enforcement searches of students. Councilman Doug Burlison and his wife, Mellony, alleged that
using dogs and officers to search students without a specific suspicion violates the right to privacy. The lawsuit is
a response to a search for drugs at Central High on April 22.




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