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					Dome Industrial Park
Community Redevelopment Plan

       Adopted in 2007

      City of St. Petersburg
Economic Development Department
DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
      COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

                       Adopted in 2007




               MAYOR/CRA EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
                        Rick Baker

                     CITY COUNCIL/
         COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY (CRA)

                       John Bryan, Chair
                  James S. Bennett, Vice Chair
                         Leslie Curran
                          Jeff Danner
                        Rene Y. Flowers
                     David W. “Bill” Foster
                          Herb Polson
                        Earnest Williams




                           ADMINISTRATION
         Tish Elston, First Deputy Mayor/City Administrator
Goliath Davis III, Deputy Mayor for Midtown Economic Development
       Rick Mussett, Senior Administrator, City Development
   Dave Goodwin, Director, Economic Development Department
                                                               Table of Contents

I     Project Description and Overview                                       1
      Redevelopment Roles                                                    1
      History of the Dome Industrial Park                                    3
      Overview of the Blight Study and Findings of Necessity                 5
      Policy on Eminent Domain                                               9
      Boundary Justification                                                 9
II    Statistical Profile and Land Use Inventory                            10
      Statistical Profile                                                   10
      Business Composition in the DIP                                       11
      Clusters and Economic Development                                     11
      Land Use and Zoning Characteristics                                   13
              Existing Land Use                                             13
              Future Land Use                                               13
              Zoning                                                        15
III   Prior Planning Efforts in the Dome Industrial Park                    20
      Business Retention and Development Program                            20
      Business Retention and Economic Development Report                    20
      Central Neighborhood Plan                                             20
      22nd Street South Revitalization Plan                                 20
      Enterprise Zone                                                       22
      Brownfield Program Area                                               22
      The Business Opportunity Plan                                         22
      Dome Industrial Park Plan                                             24
      Economic Development Strategy                                         24
      Midtown Strategic Planning Initiative                                 25
      Grand Central Business District                                       25
      Vision 2020                                                           25
      Dome Industrial Park CRA                                              25
IV    Redevelopment Issues in the Dome Industrial Park                      27
      Public Safety, Image and Appearance                                   27
      Infrastructure Issues                                                 28
      Transportation Issues                                                 28
      Business Expansion and Promotion                                      30

V     Plan Objectives, Strategies and Implementation                        36
      Plan Objectives and Strategies                                        36
      Implementation Program                                                40
      Potential Sources of Redevelopment Funding                            44
      Timing of Redevelopment                                               46
      Development Controls and Plan Implementation                          46
      Property Disposition Policy                                           46


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                                                Community Redevelopment Plan
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                                                               Table of Contents


VI     Neighborhood Impact Element                                          48
       Relocation and Replacement Housing                                   48
              Programs to Assist Residents                                  49
              Programs to Assist Developers                                 49
       Impact of Redevelopment Activities                                   50
              Infrastructure and Utilities                                  51
              Emergency Evacuation Facilities                               52
              Environmental Quality                                         52
              Effect on Educational Facilities and School Population        53
              Provision of Park and Recreational Facilities                 53
       Consistency with Neighborhood Plans                                  53
VIII   Compliance with Florida Statutes                                     55

       Exhibits
       Exhibit A     Legal Documents for Adoption of Dome Industrial Park
                     Community Redevelopment Area
       Exhibit B     Legal Description of Redevelopment Area
       Exhibit C     Business Incentives available for the DIP
       Exhibit D     Business Financing Programs
       Exhibit E     Housing Replacement and Resident Relocation Plan

       Maps
       Map   1-1     DIP CRA Project Area Map                                2
       Map   2-1     Existing Land Use in the DIP                           14
       Map   2-2     Future Land Use in the DIP                             16
       Map   2-3     Zoning in the DIP                                      19
       Map   3-1     Midtown Planning Area                                  21
       Map   3-2     Enterprise Zone Boundaries                             23
       Map   4-1     Transportation Deficiencies in the DIP                 31


       Tables
       Table 2-1     2005 Demographic Overview                              10
       Table 2-2     Industry Composition of the DIP                        11
       Table 2-3     Industry Clusters in the DIP                           13
       Table 2-4     Existing Land Use in DIP                               13
       Table 2-5     Zoning Districts in the DIP                            17
       Table 5-1     Major Public Improvement Projects in the DIP (2007-    42
                     2047)
       Table 6-1     Buildout Scenarios in the DIP                          50




                                                        DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                  Community Redevelopment Plan
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              Chapter One
Project Description and Overview
                                                               Chapter One
                                              Project Description and Overview


On August 25, 2005, the City of St.       South and 23rd and 24th Streets South,
Petersburg City Council approved a        has been historically a mix of
resolution finding the Dome               residential and industrial uses, but
Industrial Park area a blighted area      has been included within the City’s
and identifying it as a community         earliest planning efforts in the DIP,
redevelopment area (Resolution            namely with the expectation that it
2005-450). Subsequent to that             would transition to industrial use
approval, the Pinellas County Board       through private efforts. However, the
of County Commissioners delegated         area has maintained a stable
redevelopment authority to the City       residential base for the past twenty
(Resolution 05-228), thereby              years and, in fact, new residential
enabling the City to begin preparing      investment is occurring. Because the
a community redevelopment plan            original blight study boundaries are
(see Exhibit A for the text of each       being altered, City Administration
resolution).                              updated the findings and found no
                                          significant difference in the original
The Dome Industrial Park                  blight conditions (see Exhibit B for a
Community Redevelopment Area              legal description of the DIP with its
(DIP) is located in the City’s 5.5-       amended boundaries).
square mile Midtown area. The
158.6-acre DIP area is bounded            REDEVELOPMENT ROLES
roughly by I-275 on the east and
south, 1st Avenue South on the north      On August 25, 2005, the City Council
and 34th Street South on the west         designated itself as the Community
(see Map 1-1). It includes the bulk       Redevelopment Agency (CRA)
of the area designated in March           responsible for administering the
1999 by the City Council as the           Dome Industrial Park Community
“Dome Industrial Park Plan,” with         Redevelopment Area (DIP) and
the exception of the DIP Pilot            directed City Administration to
Project Site because it has already       prepare a redevelopment plan.
been designated as a community
redevelopment area. It also               City Council has the authority to
extends the DIP boundaries south of       amend the Redevelopment Plan.
Fairfield Avenue South from 28th          However, some amendments will
Street South to 31st Street South and     require approval from the Pinellas
west to 34th Street South.                County Board of County
                                          Commissioners as part of the
As part of the redevelopment              delegation of redevelopment
planning process, the City of St.         authority to the City. The following
Petersburg reduced the DIP area, as       amendments will require Board
identified in the 2005 Blight Study, by   review:
7.5 acres. This section, located
roughly between 1st and 4th Avenues


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                                            Community Redevelopment Plan
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                 Chapter One
 Project Description and Overview




      DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
Community Redevelopment Plan
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                                                               Chapter One
                                              Project Description and Overview


                                          income workers, primarily African
1. The addition of a new public           Americans, who lived in the Gas Plant
   improvement program, not in            neighborhood where Tropicana Field
   the Plan as of the date of the         now sits. Many of these African-
   original City Council adoption.        American workers came to St.
                                          Petersburg in the 1880s to help finish
2. An increase in the total debt          the Orange Belt Railroad and would
   service requirements above that        remain in St. Petersburg. The Gas
   identified in the original             Plant neighborhood, formerly known
   Redevelopment Plan.                    as “Pepper Town,” was a tightly knit
                                          community with schools and
3. An enlargement of the                  community gathering places with an
   redevelopment area boundary.           adjacent commercial hub along 22nd
                                          Street South.
HISTORY OF THE DOME
INDUSTRIAL PARK                           The 22nd Street South neighborhood,
                                          known as “The Deuces,” grew up south
The history of the Dome Industrial        of the Dome Industrial Park in the late
Park Community Redevelopment              1910s and 1920s, receiving the bulk of
Area is closely related to the            African-American in-migration to the
development of the Seaboard Coast         City during the period. With its mix of
Line Railroad, which bisects the          residences and businesses, The Deuces
district from the northeast to the        became the hub of the African-
southwest. The newly renovated            American community in the decades
1926 Seaboard Coast Line Building,        prior to desegregation in the 1960s.
a historic landmark sitting aside the     Landmarks from the corridor’s past
tracks at 22nd Street South, remains      abound, including the Manhattan
a symbol of this industrial past put      Casino (located within the Dome
to an adaptive reuse. Because most        Industrial Park Pilot Project Area), from
cargo was transported by rail in the      which was heard the music of famous
years before the development of           entertainers such as Louis Armstrong,
the highway system and the trucking       Fats Waller, Duke Ellington, Ray
industry, properties near railroad        Charles and many others; Mercy
lines were generally developed as         Hospital, which was the primary
industrial uses.                          medical facility for African Americans
                                          during the Jim Crow era; Royal
Development along the railroad lines      Theater, which showed movies for the
in the DIP, as well as elsewhere in St.   community in the 1950s and 1960s;
Petersburg, followed the classic          Jordan School which educated many
pattern of industrial users and freight   from the African-American community;
handlers locating near the trunk and      and Jordan Park Housing Project, which
spur lines. Furthermore, the DIP          improved the housing conditions for
attracted modest housing for low-         many in the community.


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                                            Community Redevelopment Plan
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                                                               Chapter One
                                             Project Description and Overview


After the Second World War, African      emergence of the “Euclidean”
Americans embarked on a sustained        zoning philosophy in planning
struggle for civil rights in St.         practice justified the separation of
Petersburg as well as throughout the     residential neighborhoods from
South. Their success during the 1960s    industrial districts, in order to allow
led to sweeping and dramatic changes     both to flourish without conflict.
within the community as African          However, older industrial districts
Americans were able to shop, live and    including the DIP often are
work in other parts of the City. These   contiguous with residences, leading
events would lead to the decline of      to the detriment of both. To be
commerce on “The Deuces” and,            economically viable, industries must
consequently, the surrounding            be able to expand, yet in doing so
neighborhood.                            they negatively impact
                                         neighborhoods that have difficulty
Another change that impacted the         thriving adjacent to the fumes,
area was the extension of Interstate     noise and light attendant with
275 into downtown St. Petersburg in      industrial use. Furthermore, the
the 1970s. I-275 sliced through the      industrial zoning in the DIP CRA
area, separating the Gas Plant           precludes new housing construction
neighborhood from today’s Dome           and deters investment in the
Industrial Park area and 22nd Street     existing housing stock, while the
South commercial hubs,                   small lot layout and the inadequate
contributing to the decline of each.     road network do not support the
In the two decades after the             needs of modern industrial users.
construction of the interstate
system, communities throughout the       In the 1960s and 1970s, City leaders
United States would come to              viewed the Gas Plant area east of I-
recognize the inherent blighting         275 as an opportunity for
effects that such major roadway          redevelopment; in 1978, the City
construction would have on               identified the area as “blighted,”
adjacent neighborhoods.                  according to the requirements of
                                         Florida Statutes, and adopted a
Like the Gas Plant neighborhood,         redevelopment plan for its
the DIP Community Redevelopment          revitalization. The plan called for the
Area became isolated due to              Gas Plant to be redeveloped for
interstate construction and declined     industrial development and multi-
significantly. With the rise of          family housing. In the early 1980s,
suburban industrial parks and the        however, the Gas Plant
shift in transportation of goods from    Redevelopment Plan was revised and
the railroad to long-haul trucking on    incorporated into the Intown
the interstate, the number of            Redevelopment Plan to accommodate
industrial businesses in the area        a domed stadium complex. To
declined. In addition, the               implement this redevelopment effort,


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                                            Community Redevelopment Plan
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                                                                   Chapter One
                                                 Project Description and Overview


both plans proposed that most of the         outdated building densities and
Gas Plant neighborhood be                    diversity of property ownership–
demolished.                                  work to limit the DIP’s ability to
                                             provide sites suitable for
Still recognizing the peril in losing        contemporary business uses. A
its industrial base, the City also           summary of the deficiencies
developed a business retention and           follows. (For the complete blight
development strategy for the area            analysis, see Exhibit B in Resolution
west of the stadium complex and I-           2006-481.)
275, now known as the Dome
Industrial Park, which was designed          Defective or Inadequate Street
to reestablish the area as a major           Layout
employment center providing jobs
in the inner city.                           The interior roadway network in the
                                             DIP does not meet the current
OVERVIEW OF BLIGHT STUDY                     minimum requirements established
                                             for modern industrial park
AND FINDINGS OF NECESSITY 1
                                             development. Roadways are too
                                             narrow for heavy truck traffic. In
The Florida Community                        fact, 65 percent of nearly 50,000
Redevelopment Act recognizes                 lineal feet of roadway in the DIP
thirteen conditions that undermine           does not meet the Institute of
the socio-economic health of a               Traffic Engineers recommended
community and create blight                  minimum pavement width of 28 feet
(Section 163.340[8], F.S.); only two         for industrial parks.
must be present for an area to
qualify as a community                       Turning radii at the intersections
redevelopment area. The Dome                 are also insufficient for large
Industrial Park Blight Study                 vehicles and those with trailers.
identified five of these conditions,         While the recommended standard
which advanced blight in the area            for industrial parks ranges between
and contributed to its economic              a minimum of 25 feet to a preferred
underperformance. These                      40 feet, most road segments within
conditions – defective or inadequate         the DIP fail to meet the minimum
street layout, faulty lot layout,            standard. According to the City’s
deteriorated site or other                   roadway data for the DIP, more than
improvements, inadequate and                 88 percent of its 107 road segments
                                             have turning radii less than 25 feet.
1
 The overview includes the modifications
to the DIP Blight Study that resulted from   Substantial portions of road
removing the 7.5-acre area west of 23rd
Street South and roughly north of 5th        surfacing material in the DIP do not
Avenue South. For the complete findings of   meet current standards. In addition
blight, see City Council Resolution No.      to 3rd Avenue South between 20th
2006-481, dated September 21, 2006.


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                                               Community Redevelopment Plan
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                                                             Chapter One
                                            Project Description and Overview


and 22nd Street South and 7th           section, the DIP is characterized by
Avenue between 28th Street and 31st     small lot sizes that limit not only
Street South which are unpaved,         the size of buildings that can be
seventeen of 55 blocks within the       constructed but also the provision
DIP Redevelopment Area have             of on-site parking to accommodate
unpaved alleys.                         employees and customers. The
                                        provision of adequate parking
Many streets are also paved with        facilities has been identified as an
brick. An abundance of brick streets    issue in previous planning efforts
is one of the unique features in St.    and will remain a hindrance to
Petersburg and adds character and       economic development throughout
value to many of the city’s             the DIP that will require
residential neighborhoods.              collaborative and imaginative
However, as a roadway surface for       solutions.
industrial areas, brick is improper
for day-to-day use by heavy loaded      Faulty Lot Layout
trucks. Approximately 19 percent of
more than 49,600 lineal feet of         Lot configurations within the DIP
roadway in the DIP is surfaced with     were platted several generations
brick.                                  ago and are too small to meet the
                                        needs of current industrial users.
Finally, several streets within the     Among the 382 parcels zoned for
DIP terminate with dead ends or         industrial use at the time the blight
end at 90 degree or oblique angles      study was prepared - by far the
with other streets. Historically, the   most prevalent use within the DIP --
street and block pattern in this part   over 26 percent are nonconforming
of St. Petersburg represents an         for the district’s minimum lot size
extension of the grid pattern upon      of 5,000 sf, while 37 percent are
which much of the city is arranged.     nonconforming for the minimum lot
While appropriate for general           width of 50 feet.
commercial and residential
development, this block pattern         Nonconformity describes only the
does not easily accommodate             failure of lots to meet the minimum
modern industrial or business needs,    standards the industrial zoning
especially for firms needing large      district; these standards themselves
floor plates, truck loading docks and   are far below the land and building
assembly line layouts (see Map 4-1      requirements of contemporary
for a view of transportation            manufacturing and distribution
deficiencies within the DIP).           users. Contemporary industrial
                                        users often require several acres of
Insufficient Parking Facilities         land to accommodate a facility with
                                        integrated manufacturing,
As will be demonstrated in the next     warehousing and distribution


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                                          Community Redevelopment Plan
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                                                               Chapter One
                                             Project Description and Overview


functions.                              contemporary industrial
                                        requirements, many buildings within
Inadequate and Outdated Building        the DIP need either demolition or
Densities                               significant adaptive reuse to meet
                                        current standards. It is generally
The DIP also possesses inadequate       recognized that structures housing
and outdated building densities that    primary employers have an effective
make it unsuitable for modern           physical life of approximately 30
industrial purposes. While the          years and rarely greater than 40
median building size of industrial      years. Construction standards for
and flex spaces offered for lease in    such features as building clear
industrial parks throughout St.         height, column span, power
Petersburg such as Metropointe,         demands and security needs change
Gateway Business Center and             over time as the needs of
Skyway Business Center is 41,000 sf,    manufacturing and distribution
the same measure for the DIP            facilities shift in response to new
redevelopment area is six percent       market demands. If it is not feasible
of that size, or 2,520 sf. Moreover,    to upgrade or retrofit these aging
only 33 of its 235 structures with      buildings then a total
industrial zoning exceed 10,000 sf in   redevelopment of the properties is
size, sixteen have a size greater       required. 2
than 25,000 sf and only seven
buildings exceed 40,000 sf.             Based on building-age data provided
                                        by the Pinellas County Property
With small buildings come low floor-    Appraiser’s Office, the median
area ratios (FAR), further              construction year for a structure
illustrating the obsolescent building   zoned IG in the DIP is 1950. More
patterns within the DIP. FAR is a       importantly, 152 structures (69
measure of development intensity        percent of the total) are fifty years
used in land development                of age or older and 86 percent are
regulations to calculate the total      35 years or older. In comparison, St.
square footage of a building relative   Petersburg’s business and industrial
to the lot on which it sits. The IG     parks in the Gateway area were
zoning district, which was in place     built in the 1980s or later and are
when the community                      more serviceable for today’s
redevelopment area was                  manufacturing and industrial uses.
established, permits a FAR between
.65 and .75. In contrast, the 235
improved parcels zoned IG have a
median FAR of .31.                      2
                                         Pinellas County Board of County
                                        Commissioners. The Opportunities Summit
Finally, due to age and/or              Findings: Economic Development and
functional obsolescence relative to     Redevelopment for the Pinellas Community
                                        (April 2003), 11.


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                                            Community Redevelopment Plan
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                                                                 Chapter One
                                             Project Description and Overview


Deteriorated Site or Other              Diversity of Ownership
Improvements
                                        Fragmented land ownership is an
Site and building conditions within     underlying fact of the DIP and
the DIP are also a blighting            hinders private redevelopment
influence. A September 2004 field       efforts. Diverse ownership holdings
survey analyzed factors relative to     make it difficult for private parties
building site conditions to evaluate    to assemble and consolidate
the “Overall Condition” of each         property to expand their enterprise.
parcel. The survey found that the       Of the 412 parcels within the DIP,
“Overall Condition” for 39 percent      263 parcels totaling nearly 103
of the properties in the DIP was        acres cannot be consolidated with
“Deteriorated” while the remainder      other properties under current
was identified as “Sound.”              ownership. Consequently, individual
Differentiating between the most        parcels that cannot be consolidated
predominant land uses within the        by the current owner into larger
DIP – industrial and residential -      holdings represent two-thirds of the
yields a more refined picture of the    acreage and total parcels in the
blighting influences. The Overall       DIP. 3 The median size of these
Condition analysis found 27 percent     parcels is 6,534 sf, slightly larger
of industrial properties being          than most single-family lots within
“Deteriorating.”                        St. Petersburg, but clearly
                                        inadequate for contemporary use.
Deteriorating physical conditions
also affect the improvement value       The remaining 149 parcels can be
and tax yield of each parcel as         consolidated into 57 holdings of two
defined by its land-to-improvement      or more parcels. However, virtually
value ratio (LIV). According to the     all of these properties are
2004 tax roll, the assessed property    comprised of less than five parcels
value of all parcels in the DIP was     apiece. Moreover, thirty-eight of
$37.6 million, with a land value of     these 57 holdings, comprising nearly
$10.3 million and an improvement        40 acres, consist of holdings of only
value of $27.3 million. These values    two parcels, with each holding
establish a LIV of 1:2.65. The ratio    having a median size of 12,197 sf.
indicates that for every dollar value   Only six of these 38 holdings are
of land within the DIP, its             larger than one acre. The remaining
improvement value is approximately      nineteen holdings comprise less
triple. This ratio falls squarely       than seventeen acres or 11 percent
within the range of the LIVs found in   of the total acreage of the DIP.
other community redevelopment
areas in the city when their            3
                                         A “holding” represents a unit of land one
redevelopment plans were adopted.       or more contiguous parcels in size, held by
                                        a single property owner or related interest
                                        that can be consolidated and developed.


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                                            Community Redevelopment Plan
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                                                             Chapter One
                                            Project Description and Overview


Policy on Eminent Domain                Boundary Justification

Florida’s Community                     The boundary for the DIP
Redevelopment Act once allowed          community redevelopment area is
localities to acquire by eminent        based generally on the original
domain private property within a        Business Retention Area boundary,
community redevelopment area and        which comprised approximately 122
convey it to private developers as a    acres, as well as land zoned
tool to remedy blight within the        Industrial Traditional between 28th
CRA. However, the City of St.           Street and 34th Street South. The
Petersburg has a long-standing          justification for this boundary is
policy of only using eminent domain     inclusion of most of the contiguous
to acquire land as a last resort,       land that will provide the
preferring instead to negotiate with    opportunity for employment-
landowners to implement its             generating redevelopment. As
revitalization goals.                   indicated above, a 7.5-acre section
                                        between 23rd and 24th Streets South
The City’s self-limiting policy has     north of 5th Avenue South was
now been codified by Florida            removed in recognition of the
lawmakers. During its 2006 session,     extent of residential units in the
the Florida Legislature amended         area. In addition, the DIP CRA does
Section 163.375, F.S., regarding the    not include the Dome Industrial Park
use of eminent domain in                Pilot Project Site, located south of
community redevelopment areas.          5th Avenue South and east of 22nd
In response to the United States        Street South, which was designated
Supreme Court’s decision in Kelo v.     as a community redevelopment area
New London, Connecticut (2005),         in 2000.
which upheld local government’s
right to condemn property for
economic development purposes,
the Florida Legislature significantly
modified its statutory authorization
for use of eminent domain in
community redevelopment areas.
Now, Florida law permits localities
to condemn property only for public
“use” such as utilities, parking
garages, stormwater facilities,
infrastructure and roadways.




                                                DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                          Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                Page 9
                      Chapter Two
Statistical Profile and Land Use Inventory
                                                                                       Chapter Two
                                                    Statistical Profile and Land Use Inventory


STATISTICAL PROFILE 1                                 to be 196 persons. This is based on
                                                      an average household size of 2.25.
The Dome Industrial Park is
characterized primarily by industrial                 Based on the 2000 Census, the
and commercial uses with a                            community redevelopment area
residential population concentrated                   population had a per capita income
along the I-275 corridor west of 22nd                 of $8,803, which is 42 percent of
Street South and southeast of the                     the city figure for that reporting
intersection of Fifth Avenue South                    year; a median family income of
and 28th Street South.                                $15,151, which is approximately
                                                      one-third of the citywide average;
The DIP spans two census tracts –                     and a median household income of
218 and 219 – with the majority of                    $15,574, which is less than one-half
the CRA located within Tract 218                      the citywide average. Fifty-seven
Block Group 5. 2 Tract 218 Block                      percent of families in the DIP CRA
Group 5 also contains the entirety                    were below the poverty line.
of the Dome Industrial Park Pilot
Project Site (DIPPP) CRA, which                       Again, this Census information is
complicates using 2000 Census data                    impacted by the inclusion of the
because more than forty households                    DIPPP, which had severe conditions
were relocated from the Pilot                         of blight and poverty. Utilizing
Project site after the 2000 Census.                   2005 Claritas data, the income
Consequently, data on socio-                          figures improve moderately. Table
economic aspects of the DIP CRA                       2.1 compares the DIP and City
such as poverty, median income and                    measures on key socioeconomic
unemployment rate must be                             indicators.
estimated. To do so, staff
conducted field survey and analysis                                   Table 2-1
                                                         2005 Demographic Overview of the DIP
of the Pinellas County Property                        Category                DIP        City
Appraiser’s database to derive an
                                                      Income
accurate figure of properties                                   Per Capita $11,514      $24,117
currently in residential use.                               Median Family $18,438       $50,755
                                                         Median Household $18,824       $39,737
With approximately eighty-seven                       Family Poverty Rate    53.9%       9.3%
residential units, the full-time                      High School/GED        58.4%       82.1%
population of the DIP is estimated                    Bachelor’s/higher        0%        23.1%
                                                      Sources: Claritas 2005 Report.


1                                                     Lack of educational attainment has
  The statistical profile is based on information
from the 2000 Census Summary File 3 (SF3),            led to limited opportunities for
2005 Estimates from Claritas and field                residents of the DIP to increase their
surveying.                                            income and contributes to the
2
  The portion of the DIP west of 28th Street
South is located within Tract 219 BG5, but            excessively low wages and high
contains no residential population.


                                                                DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                          Community Redevelopment Plan
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                                                                                Chapter Two
                                              Statistical Profile and Land Use Inventory

poverty rate. Only 58 percent of                                     Table 2-2
residents over the age of 25 have                      DIP Establishments by Industry Sector 4
                                                    Industry Sector            Est.   Employees
completed high school or an
                                                    Manufacturing               13        417
equivalency and none have a
                                                    Construction                14        182
bachelor's degree or higher. By
                                                    Wholesale Trade             11         92
comparison, 82 percent of residents
                                                    Retail Trade                 8        201
citywide have completed high school
                                                    Transport/Warehouse          4         42
or an equivalency and more than 23                  Other Services 5            22         91
percent have a bachelor's degree or                 Total                       72       1025
higher.                                         Source: 2005 2Q EQUI Database


The poverty rate in the DIP reflects            “Clusters” and Economic
this low percentage of educational              Development
attainment. Approaching 54%, the
family poverty rate in the DIP is               Economic development practice
almost six times the citywide rate.             since the 1990s has focused on
                                                building and sustaining industry
Business Composition in the DIP                 clusters. An industry “cluster” is a
                                                group of competing, complementary
Based on 2005 second quarter data, the          and interdependent firms, economic
DIP is dominated by manufacturing,              actors and institutions that are
construction, wholesale trade,                  located near one another and that
automotive services and retailing. 3            draw productive advantage from
Manufacturing, construction and                 their proximity and connections. 6
wholesaling are important industries            These can include supplier
for maintaining and improving the well          networks, universities, research
being of St. Petersburg by providing the        facilities, and firms in related
higher wage, primary industries that            industries. The geographic scope of
bring money into the local economy.             clusters can be a region, state or
Since they often are independent of             single city or span neighboring
the local business sector, primary              countries. 7
industries buffer St. Petersburg from a
local or regional economic downturn.            4
                                                  “Industry Sector” is based on the 1997 North
Table 2-2 depicts the industrial                American Industry Classification System that
composition of the DIP.                         classifies establishments that perform similar
                                                activities and have similar inputs and outputs.
                                                5
                                                  Includes automotive, transportation and
                                                warehousing, professional, science and technical
                                                services, landscaping services and real estate.
                      ***                       6
                                                  Joseph Cortright, “Making Sense of Clusters:
                                                Regional Competitiveness and Economic
                                                Development.” The Brookings Institution
                                                Metropolitan Policy Program (March 2006): iv.
                                                7
                                                  Michael E. Porter, “Location, Competition, and
3
  State of Florida. Agency for Workforce        Economic Development: Local Clusters in a
Innovation, Enhanced Quarterly Unemployment     Global Economy,” Economic Development
Insurance (EQUI) Database.                      Quarterly 14(2000)1: 16.


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Clusters can develop where buyer-                  Park based on number of
supplier relationships require                     establishments and persons
proximity, and having a dense                      employed - construction,
network of suppliers and buyers can                automotive services and food
produce efficiencies. Clustering is                services. In fact, three-quarters of
especially beneficial to small and                 DIP establishments and over 86
medium sized enterprises that are                  percent of its employees are linked
unable to take advantage of the                    to one of these three clusters. Table
efficiencies of scale and vertical                 2-3 depicts the distribution of
integration customary for large                    establishments within these
companies.                                         clusters.

A cluster economic development                     The construction cluster, by far the
focus is also related to industries                largest in the DIP, illustrates the
that the City targets for its business             manner in which a grouping of
expansion and attraction efforts.                  businesses not in the same industry
These include manufacturing,                       sector provide inputs and outputs
medical technologies, information                  and promote economic
technologies, marine sciences and                  development. Within the DIP, there
financial services. These types of                 are residential renovators, single-
business would not only support                    family homebuilders, cabinet
existing industry clusters, but also               makers, retail home centers,
typically have higher-wage jobs. For               electrical contractors, painters and
instance, a recent analysis of wages               specialty trades, which all provide
revealed that while accounting for                 inputs at different points in the
less than one-fourth of the City’s                 construction process. By looking
employment base, these targeted                    only at certain industry sectors, one
sectors produced more than one-                    would have missed the potential
third of wages earned in the City.                 linkages between cabinet makers,
All told, workers in these targeted                home centers and residential
industry sectors earned an average                 renovators, and overlooked possible
annualized wage of $61,053, well                   economic development strategies
above the $41,956 overall average                  designed to solidify and promote
annualized wage earned in the City.                them.
For non-targeted industry sections,
the average annualized wage was
$36,054. 8
                                                                      ***
Three significant “clusters” can be
identified in the Dome Industrial

8
 City of St. Petersburg. “Major Industry
Analysis: Update on Major Industries,” Channel
Marker Volume 3, Issue 3 (August 2005).


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                     Table 2-3                       transportation maintenance facilities,
        Industry Clusters in the DIP in 2005         rights-of-way, railroad property and
    Cluster                  Est.    Employees
                  9
                                                     nonprofit facilities. Another 24.5
    Construction              32        538
                                                     acres, roughly 15 percent of land
    Automotive
       Services
                              15        149          within the DIP, is vacant.
    Food Services              6        202          Collectively, these uses account for
    Total                    53         889          approximately 84 percent of the land
Source: State of Florida. 2005 2Q Unemployment       within the DIP. Single and multi-
Insurance Reports.                                   family residential, commercial and
These clusters have remained                         other uses account for the remaining
persistent over time. The Business                   occupants of the land, none
Opportunity Plan prepared for the                    comprising more than ten percent of
DIP in 1998 also identified these                    the DIP.
same business clusters. According to
their data, there were 35                            Table 2-4 provides a detailed
auto/marine related businesses, 17                   breakdown of existing land uses
construction related and four food                   within the DIP. Map 2-1 shows the
companies.                                           location of these land uses throughout
                                                     the area.
LAND USE AND ZONING                                                     Table 2-4
                                                                 Existing Land Use in DIP
The DIP includes approximately                        Parcel Use            #     Acres               %
158.6 acres containing property in                    Vacant              130      24.5             15.4
existing single-family, multi-family,                 Industrial          124      80.0             50.4
commercial, industrial and public                     Single family        76      10.0              6.3
                                                      Commercial          40       9.7               6.2
use. In addition, City Future Land
                                                      Public               21      29.3             18.5
Use designations and zoning                           Other               11       3.9               2.5
regulations for these properties --                   Multifamily         10       1.2               0.7
not necessarily reflective of their                   Total              412      158.6             100*
existing use -- allow for the same                   Source: Pinellas County Property Appraiser Office
                                                     (2004)
broad ranges of use.
                                                     Future Land Use
Existing Land Use
                                                     As part of the Future Land Use
Of the 158.6 acres in the DIP, parcels
                                                     Element of the Comprehensive Plan,
in existing industrial use account for
                                                     the City assigns every parcel within
80 acres, or more than 50 percent of
                                                     its boundaries a future land-use
the study area. Public and semi-
                                                     category corresponding with land-use
public uses comprise more than 29
                                                     categories described in the Element.
acres and are the next largest use of
land, including such uses as
9
 Includes retail establishments engaged in sales
of construction materials.


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This land use category system                   units per acre. Research/
provides for the location, type,                Development, Commercial
density and intensity of development            Recreation, and Light
and redevelopment and prescribes                Manufacturing/ Assembly (Class A)
areas of the city acceptable for                uses may also be allowed in this
commercial, mixed- use, residential,            plan category pursuant to local
office, industrial, open space and              government standards which
other uses. 10                                  address neighboring uses and the
                                                character of the commercial area in
Industrial General represents 95                which it is to be located; noise,
percent of the land within the DIP,             solid waste and air quality emission
with 379 parcels and 151 acres. IG              standards; hours of operation;
allows a mixture of light or heavy              traffic generation; and parking,
industrial and industrial park uses             loading, storage and service
with a floor area ratio up to 0.75.             provisions.
Buffers are required between
industrial and other land uses.                 Zoning 11
Office, retail and personal/office
service uses are allowed as                     Future land use categories are broad
accessory uses within the structure             descriptions of generally appropriate
to which it is accessory and may not            land uses within a given area. The
exceed 25 percent of the floor area             details and implementation of land
of the principle use.                           development is left to one or several
                                                zoning districts which are required by
The area of the DIP devoted to                  Florida law to be consistent in intent,
Community Redevelopment District                uses and intensity with the underlying
comprises 23 parcels and 4.2 acres.             future land-use category. While
This category allows mixed use                  several zoning districts may
retail, office, service and medium              implement the same future land-use
density residential up to a 1.25 FAR            category, each require different
and a density between 24 and 40                 development intensities or densities
dwelling units per acre.                        and not all may be appropriate in
                                                certain existing development
Ten parcels are planned for Planned             contexts.
Redevelopment-Mixed Use which
allows mixed-use retail, office,                In years past, the DIP had four zoning
service and medium density                      districts -- Industrial General, Urban
residential uses not to exceed a                Village-1, Residential Multifamily-
floor area ratio of 1.25 and a net
residential density of 24 dwelling              11
                                                  For specific information on allowed uses,
                                                intensities and dimensional requirements
10
  For more information, refer to the Future     for each zoning district within the Dome
Land Use Element of the City of St.             Industrial Park, refer to the City of St.
Petersburg Comprehensive Plan.                  Petersburg Land Development Code.


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12/15 and Commercial Industrial --        previous industrial-zoning emphasis
with more than 95 percent of its          for the area will be retained as will
acreage devoted to Industrial             the mixed-use character of First
General. In 2007, however, the DIP        Avenue South. However, design
was rezoned to bring it into              guidelines have been established
compliance with the new land              and density allowances have been
development regulations (LDRs).           increased.
These LDRs were a product of the
Vision 2020 planning effort begun in      Table 2-5 shows the extent of new
2001. The new LDRs were designed          zoning districts throughout the DIP,
to reform the City’s zoning code and      while Map 2-3 shows their location.
replace it with development
regulations that will encourage more                       Table 2-5
intensive infill and mixed use                     Zoning Districts in the DIP
                                          Parcel Zoning    #       Acres          %
development.
                                          IT              379      151.4         95.4
                                          CCT-2            23        4.2         2.6
The City’s existing development           CCT-1             9        1.5         0.9
regulations were antiquated and           CCS-1             1        1.6         1.0
reflected St. Petersburg’s vision for      Total          412      158.6         100
suburban and automobile
development that was prevalent at         Like the IG district which it
the time the regulations were first       replaces, the Industrial Traditional
adopted. This development vision          (IT) district is by far the largest
was ineffective in addressing and         proposed district in the DIP, both in
enhancing the traditional areas of        terms of number of parcels and
the City in terms of development          acreage. While the number of
patterns and urban form. In               parcels zoned for industrial uses
addition, the previous regulations        declined by nine, the area increased
had been rendered inadequate by           by .10 acres. The area zoned IT
the escalating cost of land, the          generally encompasses the same
diminishing supply of affordable          area as IG with four exceptions,
housing and the City’s relative           three of which involved removal of
inability to expand its boundaries to     land from the IT district - the
accommodate new growth.                   southeast corner of 28th Street and
                                          5th Avenue South (to CCT-1), across
The four new zoning designations          22nd Street South from the
proposed for properties within the        Manhattan Casino (to CCT-1), and a
DIP include Industrial Traditional        small site across from Cox Lumber
(IT), Corridor Commercial                 near 34th Street South (to CCS-1).
Traditional (CCT-1), Corridor             The St. Petersburg Clay Company
Commercial Traditional (CCT-2) and        site, previously zoned Commercial
Corridor Commercial Suburban (CCS-        Industrial, was added to land zoned
1). With few exceptions, the              Industrial Traditional.



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The purpose of the IT zoning district     rehabilitation, improvement and
is to permit rehabilitation,              redevelopment in a manner that
renovation and redevelopment in a         encourages walkable streetscapes.
manner that is consistent with the        The corridor features urban design
character of the neighborhood and         guidelines, including zero setbacks,
surrounding residential uses. This is     building design, cross access and
done by eliminating lot area              other standards, to reflect and
requirements (formerly 5,000 sf)          reinforce the unique character
and increasing allowed FAR (0.75)         within each of the applicable sub-
and impervious surface ratios             districts. The allowable FARs and
(0.95). At the same time, the             density have also been increased.
district enhances buffering               One parcel, approximately 1.6 acres
standards between industrial and          in size and abutting 34th Street
non-industrial uses.                      South, was rezoned from
                                          Commercial General and Industrial
The area zoned Corridor                   General to Commercial Corridor
Commercial Traditional - 2 district       Suburban-1 (CCS-1). The purpose of
corresponds with the area formerly        the CCS-1 zoning district is to
zoned Urban Village-1. CCT-2 allows       improve the appearance of
one- to five-story development            restaurants, big box retailers, drug
containing mixed uses with multi-         stores and apartment buildings,
family density up to 40 units-per-        accommodate both vehicles and
acre. Additional density is possible      pedestrians, and improve
when affordable work force housing is     connections between individual
provided.                                 developments and compatibility
                                          with surrounding neighborhoods.
As indicated above, CCT-1 is located      The district does allow one- to
at the southeast corner of 28th           three-story development with multi-
Street and 5th Avenue South and six       family residential.
parcels located on the west side of
22nd Street South across from the
Manhattan Casino. Rezoning the
latter area was designed to promote
reuse of the Casino by attracting
supportive commercial activity
across the street. Rezoning three
parcels on 28th Street South from
industrial to commercial reflects
the existing uses on the site.

The purpose of the CCT-1 district is
to protect the traditional
commercial character of these
corridors, while permitting the


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                                                                         Chapter Three
                                       Prior Planning Efforts in the Dome Industrial Park

Planning efforts within and beyond                need to retain the existing
the Dome Industrial Park have been                commercial and industrial
widespread. Since the early 1980s,                businesses in the area. Nearly 55
the City of St. Petersburg has made               percent of business owners surveyed
concerted efforts to revitalize,                  reported economic losses due to
redevelop and improve the quality                 crime and vandalism and 34 percent
of life in the Midtown area (see Map              contemplated relocation. The
3-1). Within Midtown during the                   BRTA, which comprises most of the
period, more than $100 million has                Dome Industrial Park, has remained
been invested in infrastructure and               a focal point for the City in its
other projects. Within and near the               economic development efforts.
community redevelopment area,
formal revitalization planning and                Central Neighborhood Plan
activities have concentrated on
three areas - Dome Industrial Park,               The 1992 Central Neighborhood Plan
the 22nd Street South Business                    included a broad area from Ninth
District and Grand Central.                       Avenue North on the north, 34th
                                                  Street on the west and Interstate I-
Business Retention/Development                    275 on the east and south. In
Program                                           addition to the industrial uses of the
                                                  DIP and other areas, the planning
In 1985, the City initiated the BRDP,             area included residential and
which established a target area                   commercial uses. The DIP was
called the “Central Industrial Area               identified as portions of Zone 7 and
Redevelopment Improvement                         all of Zone 8. Four principal areas of
Project” (which comprises most of                 concern were identified by residents
the DIP) and allocated $300,000 for               and owners within the zones including
street and utility improvements and               safety, maintenance and
acquisition in the area.                          improvements, expansion constraints
                                                  and business enhancements.
Business Retention and Economic
Development Report 1                              22nd Street South Revitalization
                                                  Plan 2
In 1991, the Business Retention and
Economic Development Report for                   The 1994 22nd Street South
the Business Retention Target Area                Revitalization Plan was created to
(BRTA) identified declining                       help the businesses located within
businesses and jobs, spurring the
                                                  2
                                                    In 2001, the 22nd Street South
1
 City of St. Petersburg. Business Retention       Redevelopment Corporation, Inc. received
and Economic Development of the Business          a Florida Main Street Designation for the
Retention and Target Area (November               corridor with a vision to revitalize the
1991). Department of Housing and                  street into a historical commercial district
Economic Development.                             with small shops, services and residences.


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the 22nd Street South corridor from                industrial and commercial centers
5th Avenue South to 22nd Avenue                    that provide on-site entrepreneurial
South. While most of the Plan focus                and job training opportunities. The
concerned the commercial corridor                  EZ report specifically identified the
between I-275 and 18th Avenue                      area as ideal for the development of
South, it did note the importance of               an industrial park designed to
revitalizing the DIP and job creation              attract industries related to
in fostering improvement. The Plan                 emerging technologies, such as the
identified the following four major                marine science and biomedical
issue areas: crime, social services,               industries.
neighborhood image/improvement,
and economic development.                          Brownfield Program Area

Enterprise Zone                                    The DIP is also located within both a
                                                   federal and state Brownfields
In 1995, the City received                         Program Area. 4 The term
“Enterprise Zone” status from the                  “brownfields” refers to areas with
State of Florida. The City’s                       abandoned, idled or underused
Enterprise Zone (EZ), a 10-square                  industrial and commercial facilities,
mile area, includes a Strategic Plan               where expansion is complicated by
to encourage redevelopment                         real or perceived environmental
opportunities for commercial                       contamination. This designation
businesses along 22nd Street South,                facilitates grant funding to
in the DIP and within other selected               commercial/industrial property
commercial corridors. Businesses                   owners as an incentive to perform
and residences located within the                  Phase I, as well as Phase II (if
EZ are eligible for incentives such as             needed), environmental audits on
tax credits, abatements or refunds,                their properties. Also available is a
as well as a reduction or abatement                Brownfields Cleanup Revolving Loan
of local impact fees. 3                            Program which is used for cleaning
                                                   up environmentally contaminated
The Dome Industrial Park was                       properties.
identified as key to the EZ strategy
because it addressed “opportunity                  Brownfield designation has enabled
clusters” which are intended as                    the City to secure $1.3 million in
                                                   grant funding, conduct 85
3
 For a list of tax incentives available for        assessments within the designation
businesses located in the Enterprise Zone,
see Exhibit C. Business owners and
residents within the Zone have been
                                                   4
certified for nearly $5 million dollars in          In June 2003, City Council expanded the
credits or refunds. Recipients include             State of Florida Designated Brownfields
restaurants, cafes, retailers, movie               Area in St. Petersburg to overlay the
theaters, manufacturers, hotels and                boundaries of the state Enterprise Zone
residential.                                       Boundaries.


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area, and eliminate the perception                crime, but noted the DIP’s location
of contamination for 79 properties.               was good, basic infrastructure was in
                                                  place and development of the area “a
The Business Opportunity Plan                     linchpin in the evolution of central St.
                                                  Petersburg and a necessity for
In 1998, the City prepared The                    increasing the quantity and quality of
Business Opportunity Plan (BOP),                  job opportunities.” 6
which was designed to identify and
create opportunities for the Dome                 While the Plan dealt with the entire
Industrial Park while eliminating                 DIP, its primary implementation
obstacles to new development and                  focus was developing the “Pilot
job creation. One source of                       Project Site,” a roughly 20-acre site
opportunity was to retain existing                bounded by 22nd Street South, 5th
businesses and reduce barriers which              Avenue South and I-275. 7 After
may be a hindrance to business                    several unsuccessful attempts to
expansions. Recruiting new businesses             market the site to private
and value-added jobs is a primary                 developers, the City sold it to the
objective for this area. The BOP also             United States Department of Labor
identified other strategic issues that            (DOL) for the development of a Job
weakened business development,                    Corps facility.
such as property ownership
fragmentation, security and property              Economic Development Strategy
maintenance, transportation
improvements, parking and property                In April 2000, City Council adopted
lighting, street and alley conditions             an economic development strategy
and needed infrastructure                         for St. Petersburg, its first since
improvements. 5                                   1979. It identified many of the
                                                  issues highlighted in the other
Dome Industrial Park Plan                         planning documents discussed in
                                                  this chapter and included many of
In March 1999, City Council approved              their adopted goals and objectives.
the Dome Industrial Park Plan to                  In addition, it provided eight
retain existing businesses and attract            overarching goals by which to focus
new ones to the area. The Plan                    the City’s economic development
reiterated the constraints of the area            efforts, including increasing the tax
mentioned in other studies, namely                base; increasing employment
small plots, diverse ownership,                   opportunities; assisting target
dilapidated structures, potential                 neighborhoods; developing a quality
contamination, limited access and
                                                  6
                                                    The Dome Industrial Park Plan: A
                                                  Community Call to Action, City of St.
5
 Tampa Bay Engineering. Business                  Petersburg (December 1998): 3.
                                                  7
Opportunity Plan: The Business Retention            The Pilot Project Site itself was
Target Area, City of St. Petersburg, (1998):      designated a community redevelopment
9.                                                area in 2000.


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workforce; and ensuring a                          zoning, architectural design and
sustainable community offering a                   marketing. The primary goal of the
high quality of life.                              Plan is to create a more pedestrian
                                                   friendly district. This has been
Midtown Strategic Planning                         substantially implemented through
Initiative                                         the adoption of the Urban Village
                                                   zoning district, which allows for a mix
In 2002, the City Council of the City              of retail, office and residential uses
of St. Petersburg approved the St.                 to be developed on one site.
Petersburg Midtown Strategic
Planning Initiative. The Midtown                   Vision 2020
Initiative noted twenty-five plans in
the area but found that, because they              In 2001, the City undertook a city-
were developed individually, without               wide planning effort known as “Vision
a community-wide vision, residents                 2020” which generated the creation
were unaware of improvements made                  of the new land development code
outside their immediate areas. This                adopted by City Council in 2007. This
project will guide future policy and               new code will positively impact the
devise strategies that integrate                   shape and form of redevelopment
planning, neighborhood, and                        opportunities in the Dome Industrial
economic development principles to                 Park by reducing dimensional
attain the expressed goals of the                  requirements for new construction
Midtown community.                                 and additions, while at the same time
                                                   requiring enhanced buffering. In
Grand Central District                             addition, the new code expands
                                                   allowable permitted uses to include
A small portion of the Dome Industrial             the manufacture of electronics,
Park along First Avenue South lies                 stone, glass and clay; warehousing,
within the Grand Central District for              including the storage of materials
which a redevelopment strategy --                  related to manufacturing; outdoor
the Central Avenue Tomorrow Plan --                assembly of boats and cars; fleet
was adopted in 1999. 8 The strategy                storage; and retail related to onsite
focuses on enhancements to                         manufacturing and assembly along
transportation, urban design,                      major corridors.
streetscape design, land use and
                                                   Dome Industrial Park Community
8                                                  Redevelopment Area
 In 2001 the Grand Central District was
designated a Florida Main Street District by
the State of Florida. The Main Street              In July 2005, the City began meeting
program promotes sustained economic                with DIP residents, businesses and
growth built on local assets and past              property owners to collaborate in the
history, implemented by a management               creation of the community
plan that addresses the improvement of
design, organization, promotion and                redevelopment plan.
economics of the District.


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The citizens identified many issues
including:

      improving identity and image
      corridor improvements
      enhanced code enforcement
      and public safety
      creating a marketing plan
      studying the feasibility of a
      district-wide stormwater
      facility
      improved streets and parking
      facilities
      expanding/promoting
      incentive programs
      regulatory reform
      site assembly
      establishing buffers and
      transitions between
      residences and businesses.




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Redevelopment Issues in the Dome Industrial Park
                                                                    Chapter Four
                                 Redevelopment Issues in the Dome Industrial Park

Several of the planning studies that        impairs future growth by contributing
have been undertaken in the DIP             to a poor environment for
over the years have identified              investment.
common issues and strategies to
resolve them. Major issues can be
included under the following four
categories – public safety, image
and appearance; infrastructure
improvements; transportation; and
business expansion and promotion.

PUBLIC SAFETY AND IMAGE

Enhancing public safety and image
are important elements in any               Deteriorating building on 6th Avenue South
revitalization strategy. The
condition of property is an                 Unattractive Transportation
immediate and apparent measure of           Corridors
an area’s prospect for investment
and growth. The DIP has seen                Nearly all of the planning studies
steady improvement in these                 identified the corridors running
measures over the past decade.              through the DIP – First and Fifth
However, there are still issues to be       Avenues South, 22nd, 28th, and 31st
addressed. The most significant of          Streets South – as important assets
these issues, as identified in the DIP      but in need of improvement. The
blight study, include deteriorated          City has upgraded or widened 5th
properties, unattractive                    Avenue South, 20th Street South,
transportation corridors and a lack         28th Street South and 31st Street
of district identity.                       South during the last fifteen years,
                                            but visual improvement awaits
Deteriorated Properties                     implementation.

Site and structural condition is an         Along 22nd Street South, the City
important indicator of blight within        installed lighting, landscaping and
the DIP and represent a possible            sidewalks on the grounds of the
threat to public safety through arson.      Dome Industrial Park Pilot Project
A substantial number of deteriorated        Site. In addition, a streetscaping
buildings and sites in an area indicate     plan has been completed and will
a relative lack of private investment       be constructed in phases over the
in the development, redevelopment,          next three years for the remainder
and maintenance of building assets.         of the corridor between First
The presence of deteriorated                Avenue South and 18th Avenue
buildings and site improvements also        South.


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Lack of District Identity                  quality, quantity and timing of it is
                                           important to regulate. In addition,
Previous planning efforts cited the        the City constructs and maintains
DIP as not having an identity to           the stormwater drainage systems
outside residents and businesses.          within the DIP, so it is important
Initially, the City “re-branded” the       that infrastructure can
area from the “Business Retention          accommodate business expansion
Target Area” to the “Dome                  and new construction. Finally,
Industrial Park” in order to tie the       because many of the properties
area to a recognizable identifier. In      within the DIP are small, their
addition, the City has attempted to        expansion efforts are impacted by
address this issue through provision       City regulations requiring onsite
of six monument signs along 22nd           parking and stormwater treatment.
Street, 5th Avenue, 28th Street, and       Consequently, creative strategies
1st Avenue South. With the                 are necessary to meet all of these
expansion of the DIP boundaries to         environmental, infrastructure and
34th Street, the City will need to         business expansion needs.
provide markers there as well.
Through a marketing plan, the DIP’s        Lack of Reclaimed Water
identity can be further established.
                                           While the City has the first and
INFRASTRUCTURE ISSUES                      largest reclaimed water facilities in
                                           the United States, the system
Infrastructure is an important             capacity is currently inadequate to
ingredient in any successful               allow further extensions of
economic development program.              reclaimed water in the City. There
For instance, without adequate             are currently no plans to extend the
water and sewer facilities,                network in the next several years.
businesses would not be able to
operate efficiently, much less             TRANSPORTATION ISSUES
expand their output. The following
issues have been identified in prior       Of all the components necessary to
studies as well as during the public       ensure the development of a
comment on the current community           successful industrial or business
redevelopment plan.                        park, transportation access may be
                                           the most important.
Stormwater Retention                       Transportation issues within the
                                           Dome Industrial Park include
Stormwater is an environmental,            substandard pavement width and
infrastructure and business                surface, tight turning radii which
retention issue. Because runoff from       inhibit the movement of large
the DIP drains into either Boca            vehicles, and the prevalence of
Ciega Bay or Bayboro Harbor, the           dead-end and rigid intersections


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(see Map 4-1). In addition, small            Turning Radii 1
lots create parking and loading
difficulties for many businesses.            The turning radius for many streets
                                             in the DIP makes it difficult for
Pavement Width                               large vehicles to negotiate turns.
                                             The desired standard for an
A substantial majority of the                industrial park development ranges
pavement widths within the DIP do            from a minimum of 25 feet to a
not meet the recommended                     more desirable 40 feet. The existing
standards for industrial roads.              radii of streets within the DIP range
According to the Institute of                from zero to 70 feet, with the
Transportation Engineers (ITE), the          median radius for all streets within
desirable lane width for industrial          the study area being fifteen feet.
traffic is 14 feet for each travel lane
which enables tractor trailer trucks         Dead End Streets/Rigid Intersections
and other larger vehicles to easily
pass one another. However, nearly            The ease of maneuverability of
66 percent of the road segments              truck traffic within an industrial
within the DIP do not meet this              park is of critical importance to its
standard.                                    overall success. The existence of
                                             dead end streets, which prevent the
Pavement Type                                opportunity to turn trucks around,
                                             and sharp right-angle intersections,
Substantial portions of road                 may impair opportunities to attract
surfacing material in the DIP do not         industrial development.
meet current standards. Several are
unpaved (2000 block of 3rd Avenue            Within the DIP, there are five dead
South and 2800 block of 7th Avenue           end streets as well as offset
South) and nearly 20 percent of its          intersections which inhibit direct
roads are brick. This is important           flow of traffic through the
because traffic engineers                    neighborhood. For example,
recommend using asphalt surfaces,            Terminal Drive between 22nd Street
which are poured on a compacted              South and 27th Street South
base, as opposed to brick that is            intersects with these streets at rigid
laid in sand and tends to settle             angles which, coupled with the
unevenly. Furthermore, resurfacing           narrow roadway widths, exacerbate
brick roads are more labor
intensive, requiring individual
handling of each cell.                       1
                                              The curve created at the intersection of
                                             two streets or a driveway with a street.
                                             The size of the turning radius determines
                                             the ease with which a vehicle can turn a
                                             corner. Large trucks with trailers require
                                             much larger turning radii to accomplish the
                                             same maneuver.


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turning movement problems for                   and increase their competitiveness
larger vehicles.                                in the wider marketplace.

                                                While business attraction and
                                                recruitment programs receive more
                                                public attention, approximately 70
                                                percent to 80 percent of all new
                                                jobs are created by existing
                                                businesses expanding their
                                                enterprises. 2 Therefore, it makes
                                                for sound economic development
                                                policy for a community to focus on
                                                growing its existing firms.
Dead end at 2100 block of 3rd Avenue South
                                                In addition, successful BRE programs
Parking and Loading                             send a strong message to firms
                                                interested in relocating that the
The DIP is characterized by small lot           community will be helpful and
sizes which limit not only the size of          supportive once they arrive.
buildings that can be constructed
but also the provision of on-site               The City’s Economic Development
parking facilities to accommodate               Strategy (2000) recognizes the
employees and customers. The                    importance of BRE when it states
provision of adequate parking                   that
facilities has been identified as an
issue in previous planning efforts                  existing plants, offices and stores
and will remain a hindrance to                      that are doing business in St.
economic development throughout                     Petersburg are an important
                                                    economic resource… Increased
the DIP that will require
                                                    attention should be given to
collaborative and imaginative                       maintaining, retaining and
solutions.                                          expanding existing business, rather
                                                    than depending solely on attracting
BUSINESS RETENTION AND                              new firms. Evidence continues to
                                                    point to the fact that, in terms of
EXPANSION
                                                    cost effectiveness, business
                                                    retention has a higher probability
Business retention and expansion                    of success and benefit.
                                                                             3
(BRE) is a core component of any
economic development program.                   An example of the City’s
BRE programs assist businesses in an            commitment to BRE involved the
effort to keep them from relocating
to other areas; help them survive
                                                2
economic difficulties; assist them                International Economic Development
                                                Council. Business Retention and Expansion
with expansions that add new jobs;
                                                (2006): 7.
                                                3
                                                  p.12.


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                                                                          Chapter Four
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construction of Euro-Bake’s new
55,000 SF facility. The City was
able to provide incentives, land
assembly, and environmental
remediation expertise to ensure
the commercial baker and its 75
employees was retained in St.
Petersburg rather than forced to
relocate to meet its expansion
plans. While Euro-Bake
purchased one-half a block, the                   Small lot on 4th Avenue South
city secured the other half,
which was languishing due to                      Site Assembly
environmental issues. Using
federal grant funds, the City                     Private initiatives to improve the
remediated the site and resold                    economic function of properties by
the land to the bakery.                           expanding building or site area are
                                                  hindered not only by small lot sizes
                                                  but also by the preponderance of
                                                  fragmented land ownership. With
                                                  multiple property owners, land
                                                  assembly to accommodate building
                                                  expansions becomes more difficult
                                                  for the private sector to
The Euro-Bake facility on 4th Ave S.              accomplish.

These private-public partnerships                 The City of St. Petersburg can assist
will be necessary in the DIP, which               businesses’ efforts to expand by
has several conditions that inhibit               acquiring property, consolidating
local business expansion. These                   blocks, and offering the property for
include:                                          sale through a competitive bidding
                                                  process. Using this strategy, the
Inadequate Lots                                   City has been acquiring property in
                                                  the DIP for several years in an effort
The DIP is characterized by parcel                to assemble properties large enough
sizes more reflective of a residential            for redevelopment.
neighborhood than an industrial
park. As a result, a firm’s physical              Obsolete Buildings
expansion is limited unless they are
able to purchase adjoining                        Many buildings within the DIP are
properties.                                       obsolescent and in need of either
                                                  demolition or adaptive reuse. As
                                                  technology, business models, and
                                                  markets shift in scope and location,


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                                     Redevelopment Issues in the Dome Industrial Park

buildings that functioned efficiently           Regulatory Constraints
when initially constructed no longer
meet contemporary needs.                         Prior to 2007, the City’s zoning
                                                ordinance imposed minimum lot
Real estate experts recognize that              area requirements and landscaping
structures housing primary                      standards while restricting building
employers have an effective                     coverage on industrial lots. The
physical life of approximately 30               new land development regulations
years and rarely greater than 40                have eliminated minimum lot area
years. Construction standards for               requirements, applied flexible
such users change over time in                  landscaping standards, and
response to new market demands. If              increased building coverage on
it is not feasible to upgrade or                industrial lots. While not addressing
retrofit these aging buildings, then            issues related to the marketability
a total redevelopment of the                    of lots, the relaxation of zoning
properties is required. 4 Nearly 70             requirements should relieve
percent of the industrially-used                property and business owners of
buildings in the DIP are fifty years of         some of the regulatory process that
age or older.                                   would have otherwise been
                                                required.

                                                Tax Incentives /Lack of Capital

                                                 Early planning studies for the DIP
                                                indicated a lack of business
                                                incentives available for small
                                                businesses, which are often short of
                                                capital and expertise on how to
                                                obtain private and public financing
SCL Building was renovated in 2000
                                                to expand their enterprise. The
                                                City does have in place public
The renovation of the historic                  incentive programs, including
Seaboard Coastline Building by the              Brownfields grants and Florida
St. Petersburg Clay Company is a                Enterprise Zone tax incentives, to
fine example of adaptive reuse of               assist businesses, as well as the
an obsolescent building. However,               Business Assistance Center, which
its historic and architectural                  provides training, technical and
significance, which enhanced its                other assistance for small
value for adaptive reuse, is not                businesses. This will remain a
found on many other buildings in                priority economic development
the DIP.                                        policy for the City, and it will
                                                continue to provide these services
4
  Pinellas Board of County Commissioners
(2003), 11.


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                                                                  Chapter Four
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to assist business expansion efforts         serious impediment to investment
in the DIP.                                  and expansion. Bankers are
                                             reluctant to approve mortgages on
Zoning and Land Use Conflicts                properties that have the potential
                                             of exposing themselves and the
This issue concerned primarily the           borrower to liability claims even for
area between 1st Avenue and 5th              contamination that is not their
Avenue South between 23rd Street             responsibility. As mentioned above,
and 24th Street. This area had been          the City has a Brownfields program
identified as an industrial transition       designed to assist property owners
area, given the existence of                 in the DIP and elsewhere, but the
residential zoning intermixed with           perception of environmental
industrial zoning. However, the              contamination will remain an issue
area has maintained its residential          in the DIP. Thus, the City will
character, and approximately fifty           continue to provide services to
percent of residential units in this         support businesses confronting this
area are owner occupied. In                  issue.
recognition of these residential
properties, City Administration              Cluster Identification and Promotion
removed it from the community
redevelopment area.                          As mentioned above, the
                                             composition of industry in the DIP
Even after redrawing the boundaries          has been predominantly
of the DIP, the redevelopment area           concentrated in construction,
still contains a small core of               automotive services and food
homesteaded, single-family                   services. The redevelopment plan
residents southeast of the                   should continue to promote and
intersection of 28th Street South and        grow these industries while also
5th Avenue South. These properties           looking to diversify the base.
have been zoned for industrial use
for several decades and are                  Its proximity to Bayboro Harbor’s
surrounded by industrial                     marine industries as well as the
development. Acquisition and                 medical district gives the DIP a
assembly of this area for industrial         locational advantage over other
redevelopment will occur when and            sites. Moreover, the 1998 Business
if the owners are willing to                 Opportunity Plan found that
voluntarily sell their property.             seventeen of the 30 fastest growing
                                             occupations in the Tampa Bay area
Existence and/or Perception of               were health related. 5 Since 1998,
Environmental Contamination                  little or no business investment in
                                             these industries has taken place in
The existence or perception of               the DIP.
environmental contamination is a
                                             5
                                                 see p. 23.


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Previous studies suggest marine                 Pittsburgh and San Francisco, and
related industries and medical                  nearly outperformed Boston, which
technologies as appropriate industry            are considered national leaders in
clusters that may be attracted to               medical research and
the DIP. 6 A 2002 study found that              manufacturing. 8 Factoring in total
more than 70 percent of the jobs                employment, location quotient,
associated with the medical product             salary and patents, the Tampa Bay
industries in the Tampa Bay area                region ranked as the 20th largest
were located in Pinellas County. In             medical technology cluster in the
addition, the pharmaceuticals,                  country.
biotech and medical device
industries constituted over one
percent of the total employment in
Pinellas County and were expected
to produce nearly $2.1 billion in
economic activity during the study
year in Tampa Bay. The “ripple” or
secondary effects of the medical
products cluster generated an
additional thirty thousand jobs in
secondary or supplier industries
throughout the region. 7

A 2003 study sponsored by the
Florida High Tech Corridor Council,
Inc, the Tampa Bay Partnership and
the University of South Florida
found the Tampa Bay region to
contain a higher proportion of its
workforce engaged in medical
technologies than the nation as a
whole. More importantly, the
region outperformed metropolitan
areas like San Diego, Denver,                   8
                                                  Florida’s Medical Technology Clusters
                                                (Spring 2003): 13. The report uses a
                                                “location quotient” (LQ) to describe how
6
  “Medical technology” describes                specialized a metropolitan area is toward
companies engaged in medical                    medical technology. A LQ of 1.0 would
manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, clinical        indicate that the region has the same share
research and development and                    of medical technology in its economy as the
biotechnology. It does not include              nation at large. Tampa Bay had a LQ of
hospitals.                                      1.89. In comparison are Boston (1.93), San
7
  Center for Economic Development               Francisco (0.73), Denver (0.64) and
Research. University of South Florida.          Pittsburgh (0.52), cities expected to have a
Medical Product Industries Cluster in           significant medical technology component
Tampa Bay (October 2002).                       in their economies.


                                                          DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
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                           Chapter Five
Plan Objectives, Strategies and Implementation
                                                                   Chapter Five
                           Plan Objectives, Strategies and Implementation Program

The Dome Industrial Park has long           PLAN OBJECTIVES AND
been a focus of the City of St.             STRATEGIES
Petersburg’s economic development
efforts. The DIP’s strategic location       The following plan objectives and
next to Interstate 275, the dearth of       strategies are subject to available
land available in the City and              funding allocated for the Dome
Pinellas County for business and            Industrial Park Community
manufacturing purposes, and the             Redevelopment Plan in any given
relatively higher wage paid by firms        year.
engaged in manufacturing or export
enterprises than in the service or          Objective 1: The City will continue
tourist industries will continue the        to pursue land assembly
City’s efforts to revitalize and            opportunities in the Dome
enhance the DIP.                            Industrial Park to facilitate
                                            business retention, expansion and
The plan objectives and strategies          relocation efforts.
below are designed to focus the
City’s funding and administrative           1.      Utilize proceeds from the
efforts in the DIP on business                      sale of the Dome Industrial
retention, expansion and                            Park Pilot Project Site to
recruitment. Because                                acquire land in the DIP to
approximately 70 percent of all job                 retain existing businesses,
growth in a community comes from                    attract new businesses and
its existing businesses, the City will              create new jobs.
focus on maintaining and growing
this resource. At the same time, it         2.      The City will dispose of
is also essential to diversify the base             property in the Dome
of the DIP to buffer it from cyclical               Industrial Park provided it:
downturns in certain sectors of the
economy such as construction,                       a. furthers the City’s policy
which represents a major                               of assembling land to
component of the DIP’s businesses.                     provide larger tracts for
To that end, the City should                           manufacturing and other
continue its efforts to recruit                        employment generating
medical and marine industries to                       uses; or
the area to capitalize on the
existing strength of those clusters in              b. assists existing DIP
the area and the DIP’s proximity to                    businesses in their
hospitals and the marine research                      expansion efforts,
complex that surrounds the                             excluding direct monetary
University of South Florida-St.                        awards.
Petersburg and Bayboro Harbor.




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                         Plan Objectives, Strategies and Implementation Program

3.   Promote business retention,          8.      Monitor tax liens and
     expansion and relocation                     foreclosures for possible
     efforts through the land                     acquisition by the City or
     disposition policies permitted               marketing to adjacent
     by the Florida Community                     property owners who desire
     Redevelopment Act when                       land for expansion.
     such disposition is
     appropriate and consistent           Objective 2: Upgrade the image
     with the objectives of this          and attractiveness of the Dome
     plan and City land disposition       Industrial Park by continuing
     policies and procedures.             streetscaping and landscaping
                                          improvements on major corridors.
4.   When disposing of property,
     priority should be given to          1.      Consider extending the Dome
     facilitating the creation of                 Industrial Park gateway
     larger holdings suitable for                 marker program to areas
     industrial and business use.                 along 5th Avenue South, 31st
                                                  Street South and 34th Street
5.   Promote block consolidation                  South.
     through street and alley
     vacations as well as utility         2.      Identify locations outside the
     relocations.                                 DIP to provide signage that
                                                  will direct customers and
6.   When disposing of property,                  clients to the area.
     the City should give
     consideration to assisting DIP       3.      Develop and implement
     business owners in their                     consistent streetscape design
     expansion efforts as well as                 treatments for the DIP’s
     the need to generate new                     major transportation
     jobs.                                        corridors to provide an
                                                  identifiable theme for the
7.   The City may exercise its                    DIP.
     eminent domain powers to
     acquire land for public uses,        4.      Where feasible, extend the
     as allowed by Florida                        sidewalk network in the DIP
     Statutes, including but not                  so that it connects with
     limited to regional                          adjacent neighborhoods and
     stormwater management                        transit facilities.
     facilities and road projects.
                                          5.      Ensure the streetscaping
                                                  design and implementation
                                                  plans along the 22nd Street
                                                  South corridor are


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                                                                Chapter Five
                         Plan Objectives, Strategies and Implementation Program

      coordinated with the                1.      Encourage amendments and
      proposed Job Corps facility.                interpretations of City codes
                                                  that promote business
Objective 3: Support business and                 expansion and development,
industrial development in the                     while ensuring existing
Dome Industrial Park by                           buildings undergoing
maintaining, expanding and                        renovations, changes of use
upgrading its utility and                         and/or additions meet all
transportation infrastructure.                    life/safety code
                                                  requirements.
1.    Where feasible, develop
      regional stormwater facilities      2.      Continue the City’s
      that will eliminate the                     Brownfields program by
      burden on business of                       identifying properties where
      providing on-site treatment.                redevelopment is hindered by
                                                  perceived/real environmental
2.    When brick streets are                      contamination and providing
      vacated or resurfaced, the                  all available assistance to
      City should make reasonable                 ensure remediation.
      efforts to salvage the bricks
      for use elsewhere in the City.      3.      Encourage innovative private-
                                                  public partnerships to solve
3.    Ensure utility, street and                  redevelopment and expansion
      alley vacations do not                      issues.
      negatively impact the level of
      service for the DIP’s               4.      The Economic Development
      infrastructure or undermine                 Department will work with
      the street network.                         developers and businesses to
                                                  facilitate DIP development
4.    Maintain and enhance                        proposals through concept
      east/west access through the                development, site plan,
      DIP.                                        variance and other review
                                                  processes.
5.    Where needed, improve
      street lighting throughout the      5.      All projects in the DIP CRA
      Dome Industrial Park.                       exceeding $1 million in
                                                  construction costs shall
Objective 4: Create a positive                    require a finding of
regulatory environment that is                    consistency with the DIP
efficient, expedient and                          Community Redevelopment
responsive to the needs of                        Plan by the CRA.
businesses in the DIP.




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                                                                Chapter Five
                         Plan Objectives, Strategies and Implementation Program

6.   CRA staff shall have the                     building code compliance;
     authority to administratively                loan programs and
     approve all projects in the                  guarantees; and additional
     DIP costing less than $1                     infrastructure improvements.
     million provided they are
     consistent with all applicable       5.      Promote incentives currently
     City rules and regulations.                  available to the DIP though
                                                  the website, written
Objective 5: Continue developing                  materials and technical
business incentive programs that                  assistance.
promote retention, expansion and
recruitment.                              6.      Seek creative financing
                                                  opportunities for new
1.   Increase outreach and                        development in conjunction
     continue to connect DIP                      with the private sector.
     businesses with sources of
     technical assistance, such as        7.      Collaborate with DIP
     the Business Assistance                      businesses in providing
     Center and Pinellas WorkNet,                 innovative solutions to the
     and the Department of Labor                  area’s parking issues.
     Job Corps facility to improve
     small businesses’ access to          Objective 6: Establish a DIP
     capital and labor pools.             marketing program that will
                                          promote the Dome Industrial Park
2.   Develop program to publicly          to outside customers, businesses
     fund or reduce the costs of          and investors.
     impact fees for businesses
     expanding in or relocating to        1.      Promote the DIP to the City’s
     the DIP.                                     targeted industries (i.e.,
                                                  manufacturing, medical and
3.   Support business counseling,                 information technology,
     training and financing                       financial services and marine
     programs and strengthen                      science) as an area for
     linkages with financial                      relocation and expansion.
     institutions to offer financing
     alternatives for DIP                 2.      Maintain a database on
     businesses.                                  properties within the DIP that
                                                  are on the market or near the
4.   Identify funding sources for                 end of lease to support
     new incentives such as                       business recruitment and
     revolving funds for                          expansion efforts.
     renovations relating to
     façade improvement or


                                                     DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
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                                                               Chapter Five
                         Plan Objectives, Strategies and Implementation Program

3.    Develop a webpage for the           Land Assembly and Site Preparation
      DIP promoting its businesses
      and their products and              Land assembly is essential for
      services.                           growing existing businesses and
                                          attracting new businesses to the
4.    Continue developing and             Dome Industrial Park. The City
      marketing the identity of the       intends to seek acquisition of
      DIP through signage and             property throughout the
      corridor improvements to            redevelopment area to fulfill the
      include off-site directional        intent of federal funding obtained
      signage.                            to assemble the site for the future
                                          Job Corps facility to be located
5.    Work with the DIP businesses        within the DIPPP CRA. The facility,
      to identify and fund key            projected to be nearly 165,000 sf in
      promotional strategies.             size and cost $34 million, should be
                                          a catalyst for new development and
6.    Promote the private-public          business. With a portfolio of
      sector efforts to remedy the        additional consolidated sites, the
      existence and perception of         City will be well-positioned to
      environmental contamination         facilitate new development.
      to reassure potential
      investors in the DIP.               The land assembly effort may also
                                          involve vacating streets, alleyways
IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAM                    and associated utilities such as
                                          water, sewer and stormwater
The implementation program for            facilities. The City may need to
the Dome Industrial Park Community        fund the site work involved in the
Redevelopment Plan centers on land        vacations as well as relocation of
assembly, disposition and                 utilities. Site preparation work may
development efforts; infrastructure       also require the performance of
improvements; transportation              preliminary environmental reviews
improvements and enhancements;            to assess the extent of
business assistance programs; and         contamination on the site.
development and enhancement of
the DIP’s identity and appearance.        The City’s Engineering Department
The total cost for the public             prepared estimates for street and
improvement program is expected           alley vacations and utility
to exceed $42 million in 2007             relocations in this area. Their
dollars but implementation of the         estimates include removal and
program will be phased over many          restoration of pavement, sanitary,
years with costs being impacted by        water and stormwater facilities as
inflation (see Table 5-1).                well as engineering fees and
                                          contingency.


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                                                                 Chapter Five
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                                           22nd Street South as well as 3rd
The City also intends to acquire the       through 5th Avenue South.
remaining residential property in
the northwest quadrant of the DIP          Parking requirements also inhibit
located south of 5th Avenue South          expansions on small lots, but are
and east of 28th Street South as it        necessary to mitigate external
becomes available on the market.           impacts on adjoining property
                                           owners. Consequently, shared
Public Infrastructure Improvements         parking is a possible solution also
                                           requiring study to determine the
Public infrastructure improvement          level of participation from business
projects that will promote                 owners and the management of
retention, expansion and attraction        demand.
include the study and possible
development of shared stormwater           Transportation infrastructure is a
and parking facilities; and road           vital component supporting business
extensions, resurfacing and                growth and development. The DIP
widening.                                  redevelopment plan proposes to
                                           study key road segments for road
Early planning studies in the DIP and      widening, resurfacing and extension
the 2005 Blight Study identified the       to ensure the efficient movement of
prevalence of small lots in the area,      traffic through the redevelopment
coupled with parking and                   area. This study will also indicate
stormwater requirements, and their         areas of the DIP where street
collective impact on business              vacations should be discouraged due
expansion. To assist businesses in         to their impact on traffic
addressing this issue without              circulation.
needing to acquire additional land,
shared stormwater and parking              Moreover, road improvement
facilities could be a potential            projects will likely be prioritized by
solution. In order to undertake a          imminent redevelopment project(s)
shared stormwater facility, the City       that will promote the goals and
will need to conduct an engineering        objectives of the DIP plan.
study of the two watersheds that
serve the Dome Industrial Park and         Business Assistance Programs
identify potential locations and
designs for regional stormwater            The DIP Community Redevelopment
facilities. The timing of this study       Plan proposes business assistance
is important because its                   programs that will focus primarily
implementation may result in cost          on expanding existing businesses in
savings to the City’s box culvert          the Dome Industrial Park, while
stormwater system that is currently        attracting new businesses within the
being designed for 19th, 20th and          City’s targeted industries. These


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                                                                                       Chapter Five
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                                     Table 5-1
                    Major Public Improvement Projects in the DIP
                                                Primary Funding                               2007 Value
    Designated Project                               Source 1                                    (in $M)
                                                                                                           2

    Property Acquisition/ Site Preparation           Multiple                                   $20.5 3
    Stormwater Improvements                    Stormwater Utility                               $11.8+
                                                       Fund
                                    Regional SWM Pond Study        Stormwater Utility Fund       $0.10
                               Terminal Drive Improvements         Stormwater Utility Fund        $1.0
                             22nd Street South improvements        Stormwater Utility Fund        $3.5
                        Develop Regional Stormwater Facility       Stormwater Utility Fund        TBD
                   Drainage Improvements to 22nd St/6th Ave        Stormwater Utility Fund       $0.70
                                          Box Culvert System       Stormwater Utility Fund       $6.50

    Corridor Streetscape Improvements 4                               General Fund               $3.5

               5th Avenue South (from I-275 to 28th Street)             General Fund             $0.86
                    th               th
               28 Street (from 5 Avenue South to I-275)                 General Fund             $0.42
       st
     31 Street South (from Freemont Terrace to I-275)                   General Fund             $0.60
              th                          st                th
            20 Street South from 1 Avenue to 5 Avenue                   General Fund             $0.27
       st                                              rd
      1 Avenue South (from I-275 to 23 Street South)                    General Fund             $0.36
                                                Terminal Drive          General Fund             $0.40
                                 22nd St S (1st Ave S to I-275)         General Fund             $0.58
                                  Construct Gateway Markers             General Fund             $0.05

    Atherton Site Redevelopment                                          Multiple                $1.1 5
    Transportation Improvements                                          Multiple                $5.7

                                 Terminal Drive Improvements              Multiple                $1.2
                         nd                       th
            Enhance 22        Street South (5 Avenue S/I-275)             Multiple                $2.4
       Enhance east-west industrial access through the                    Multiple                $2.1
                                                   DIP
     Trail Crossing/Intersection Improvements (5th A/S                    Multiple               $0.06
                                        and 22nd S/S)
    Total                                                                                       $42.6


1
  Primary funding sources for any Designated Project may change depending on their availability at the
time of project implementation.
2
  Total funding for any “Designated Project” may vary, provided that the total value ($42.6 million) is not
exceeded.
3
  Includes allowance for land acquisition, if any, of Atherton Oil Site properties.
4
  Based on linear foot costs for proposed 22nd Street South streetscaping program.
5
  Includes estimated cleanup of $628,000 and redevelopment of site.


                                                                         DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                                   Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                                                  Page 42
                                                                Chapter Five
                          Plan Objectives, Strategies and Implementation Program

industries include manufacturing,          applicable departments to ensure
medical technologies, information          their compliance with applicable
technologies, marine sciences and          City codes and ordinances, including
financial services. As mentioned in        building and zoning.
above chapters, the marine science
and medical technology sectors             In addition, Economic Development
contain businesses that could be           staff will provide assistance on
attracted to the DIP because of its        business expansion and new
proximity to existing industry             development proposals. This
clusters in the City.                      assistance can be provided from the
                                           outset of project concept and
Expansion Opportunities. The DIP           design development through the
redevelopment plan envisions a             approval process.
cooperative strategy to assist
businesses in their expansion efforts      Improve District Image and Identity
through land assembly. From this
effort opportunities should emerge         Enhancing the DIP’s image and
for collaboration between the City         identity will promote stability in the
and DIP businesses proposing to            area as well as attract new
expand.                                    investment and businesses.
                                           Moreover, as it abuts the 22nd Street
Impact Fee Assistance. The City will       South and Grand Central main street
explore the possibility of mitigating      commercial districts, the DIP serves
the effect of transportation impact        as a gateway to these important
fees on business expansion by              retailing and mixed-use districts.
establishing a fund designed to            To improve the area’s identity, the
write-down the cost of the impact          DIP redevelopment plan proposes to
fees for projects in the DIP.              enhance streetscaping along those
                                           portions of main thoroughfares that
Regulatory reform. With the rewrite        lie within the bounds of the
of its land development regulations,       community redevelopment area.
the City has addressed some of the         These include 5th Avenue South, 28th
issues posed by landscaping and            Street South, 31st Street South, 1st
dimension standards in the old             Avenue South and 22nd Street South.
zoning ordinance. The DIP                  Total project costs for the
Community Redevelopment Plan               streetcaping improvements are
also establishes a $1 million              estimated to exceed $3.5 million.
threshold for review of individual
projects by the Community                  The Plan also proposes to add
Redevelopment Agency to ensure             gateway monuments to those areas
consistency with the redevelopment         not originally included in the
plan. All other projects will be           BRTA/DIP. In the past several
reviewed by CRA staff and other            years, the City has constructed


                                                    DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                              Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                         Page 43
                                                                 Chapter Five
                           Plan Objectives, Strategies and Implementation Program

monuments at highly visible                 General Fund
locations in the DIP. Possible
locations for additional gateway            General fund revenues can be used
markers could include 34th Street           to finance “bricks-and-mortar”
South and Fairfield Avenue; 31st            redevelopment activities. In
Street and Fairfield Avenue and 31st        addition, general fund revenues are
Street and I-275 or other highly            the source of staffing assistance to
visible locations within the DIP that       the redevelopment program. Local
currently do not have markers.              government enterprises may also be
                                            used to fund system improvements
POTENTIAL SOURCES OF                        in the redevelopment area.
REDEVELOPMENT FUNDING
                                            Proceeds from Sale of DIPPP Site
In order to carry out
redevelopment, the City will use            In 2006, the City sold the 20-acre
multiple funding sources, including         Dome Industrial Park Pilot Project
private sector as well as local, state      Site to the United States
and federal government sources.             Department of Labor for a proposed
General funding methods and                 Job Corps facility. The $2.25 million
sources that will be examined to            will be used for acquisition and/or
finance redevelopment activities to         site development work in the Dome
implement the plan include the              Industrial Park.
following:
                                            Grant Funds/Loans
Penny for Pinellas
                                            Various federal, state and private
The “Penny for Pinellas” is a one-          sources will be considered to
percent local option government             implement the DIP redevelopment
sales tax that is earmarked for             plan by both the public and private
capital improvement projects                sectors. These include potential
dealing with roads, flood control,          federal Economic Development
park improvements, preservation of          Initiative (EDI) and Brownfields
endangered lands and public safety.         Economic Development Initiative
The Penny for Pinellas was first            (BEDI) grants. Both of these grants
passed by voters countywide in              are competitive and can be used to
1989, and a second round approved           provide direct loans, and subsidize
in 1997 extending the funding               borrower’s interest rates, serve as
through 2010. In March 2007, voters         debt service or guarantee for the
approved a third round, which will          Section 108 Loan described below.
be devoted to funding infrastructure
projects from 2010 to 2020.                 Community Development Block
                                            Grant allocations may be used as
                                            equity to finance HUD 108 Loans. In


                                                     DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                               Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                          Page 44
                                                                        Chapter Five
                           Plan Objectives, Strategies and Implementation Program

this program, HUD sells notes to            domestic market place. Loan
investors and passes sales proceeds         amounts range between $500,000
to the locality which uses them to          and $2,000,000.
finance a project. Cash flow from
the project is used to repay the            Community Development Block Grant
notes, but in the event the project
defaults, HUD draws upon the                Provided by the federal
locality’s annual CDBG allocation to        government, CDBG monies are often
pay debt service on the loan.               used to fund housing programs but
                                            can also be used to provide capital
Industrial Revenue Bonds                    for a revolving loan program, fund
                                            public infrastructure projects,
Tax-exempt industrial revenue               establish a micro-enterprise loan
bonds are issued by state and local         fund, provide small business
governments and offer below-                technical assistance or provide
market-rate financing to qualified          grants to write-down development
private enterprises. These bonds            costs. 6
are payable from and secured by
the revenues of the project they            Tax Increment Financing
finance. Currently, small issue IRB
uses are limited and are usually for        Tax increment financing (TIF) is a
manufacturing projects. The                 power delegated by Florida Statutes
program provides long-term, fixed           to community redevelopment
rate loans of $1 million to $10             agencies. Under TIF, incremental
million for land, new or existing           revenues generated in a designated
buildings and new equipment. IRBs           area are set aside to fund specific
cannot be used for inventory,               projects or activities rather than
working capital or refinancing of           being paid to the normal taxing
existing debt.                              jurisdictions. The increment is the
                                            amount of City and County taxes
The State of Florida also provides          generated above the base amount
financial assistance through the            within the community
Enterprise Bond Program. The                redevelopment area. The base
program offers tax-exempt, low              amount is set at the time the tax
interest bond financing to qualified        increment financing district is
manufacturing and 501(c)(3) non-            established. This increment can be
profit organizations. This program          bonded or used to fund ongoing
was designed to improve low-cost            activities. Although the City of St.
capital availability to Florida’s
growing and expanding businesses,           6
                                              For economic development projects to be
including minorities and rural              funded using CDBG funds, they must achieve a
communities, to allow them to be            national objective, provide a public benefit of
                                            no less than $35,000 of funds per job created,
more competitive in the global and          and the monies must not unduly enrich the
                                            private firm.


                                                     DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                               Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                                    Page 45
                                                                 Chapter Five
                           Plan Objectives, Strategies and Implementation Program

Petersburg does not intend to               approval in a public meeting if the
request authority from Pinellas             construction costs for the proposed
County at this point to establish a         project exceed $1 million.
TIF district for the Dome Industrial
Park, it does reserve the right to          PROPERTY DISPOSITION
pursue establishing it at a later           POLICY
date.
                                            For the purposes of this Plan, the
TIMING OF REDEVELOPMENT                     Community Redevelopment Agency
                                            is authorized to sell, lease,
Due to the needs of the community           exchange, subdivide, transfer,
redevelopment area and the desire           assign, pledge, encumber by
to spur private investment,                 mortgage or deed of trust, or
implementation of the                       otherwise dispose of any interest in
redevelopment plan is anticipated           real property. To the extent
to begin upon plan adoption. It is          permitted by law, the Agency is
anticipated that redevelopment of           authorized to dispose of real
the DIP will be completed within            property in accordance with Florida
forty (40) years as allowed by              Statute Chapter 163 and in
Section 163.362(10), F.S.                   compliance with this Plan.

DEVELOPMENT CONTROLS &                      The Community Redevelopment
PLAN IMPLEMENTATION                         Agency may determine that it is in
                                            the best interest of the City to
As per Chapter 163.362(5) and (6),          acquire such property for
F.S., all redevelopment plans must          development by the City or
“contain adequate safeguards that           disposition through competitive
the work of redevelopment will be           bidding. The CRA shall reserve such
carried out pursuant to the plan”           powers and controls through
and provide for controls and                disposition and development
restrictions or covenants to ensure         agreements with the purchaser or
development in accordance with the          lessee of the property as may be
plan.                                       necessary to ensure that
                                            development conforms to this Plan.
All new construction shall comply
with the City’s land development            Should any real property be owned,
regulations and its building codes.         leased or otherwise come under the
Proposals for new development shall         control of the City, the City’s
be reviewed by the CRA staff and            administrative staff will conduct
forwarded to the Community                  supervision and management. The
Redevelopment Agency for review             City shall enter into contracts,
for consistency with the DIP                leases or management agreements
Community Redevelopment Plan and            as necessary to insure the


                                                     DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                               Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                          Page 46
                                                                Chapter Five
                          Plan Objectives, Strategies and Implementation Program

preservation and maintenance of
any such real property, and shall
insure the greatest return feasible
to the Agency.




                                                    DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                              Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                         Page 47
           Chapter Six
Neighborhood Impact Element
                                                              Chapter Six
                                               Neighborhood Impact Element

Before adopting a community            In addition, when federal funds are
redevelopment plan for an area         used to purchase real property in an
which contains low-to-moderate         identified project, housing
income residents, Chapter              replacement and relocation must
163.362(3), F.S. requires localities   comply with the Uniform Relocation
to prepare a neighborhood impact       Assistance and Real Property
element describing in detail the       Acquisitions Policy Act of 1970, as
impact of the redevelopment upon       amended. These requirements
residents of the redevelopment area    affect the acquisition of both
and the surrounding area in terms of   owner- and tenant-occupied
several elements. These include        housing.
housing relocation, traffic
circulation, environmental quality,    Replacement housing is available
availability of community facilities   throughout the community. There
and services and the effect on         are numerous homes or apartments
school population.                     for rent at rates affordable to low
                                       and moderate income persons or
RELOCATION AND                         families. A review of listings of
REPLACEMENT HOUSING                    homes for sale in the Florida Living
                                       Network (www.fl.living.net, January
The Florida Statutes require all       19, 2007) indicates that there are
community redevelopment plans to       86 homes for sale in the 33712 zip
provide for relocation and             code in St. Petersburg at an asking
replacement housing when a             price of less than $150,000,
redevelopment project affects          nineteen of which have an asking
residential property. This             price of less than $100,000.
requirement was in place primarily     Throughout St. Petersburg,
to address relocations stemming        approximately 518 single-family
from a locality’s use of eminent       homes were listed for sale for
domain. Although the Florida           $150,000 or less, sixty four below
Statutes now prohibit the use of       $100,000.
eminent domain for economic
development purposes, there still      These are homes that are entered
may be instances where the City        into the multiple-listing service. A
condemns land for a public use         smaller number of homes can often
project, such as road widenings or     be located as for sale by owner.
stormwater retention.                  The St. Petersburg Housing
Consequently, the City has             Authority also manages affordable
developed a relocation policy to       housing units and rental vouchers.
implement when homeowners or
tenants are relocated as part of a     Given the small number of
redevelopment project.                 residences that may be impacted by
                                       the redevelopment plan, the large


                                               DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                         Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                     Page 48
                                                                Chapter Six
                                                 Neighborhood Impact Element

number of housing options in the         the redevelopment area and owner-
area and the expertise of the City in    occupants who choose to relocate
providing housing opportunities,         will be given assistance. The DIP
relocation and replacement housing       Housing Replacement and Resident
to support implementation of the         Relocation Plan is located in Exhibit
redevelopment plan is expected to        D.
be easily accommodated within the
existing support framework.              Programs to Assist Relocated
                                         Residents
Residents who are displaced will be
provided with full opportunity to        Purchase Assistance Funding is
occupy comparable replacement            provided to assist residents
housing that is safe and sanitary and    purchasing new or existing homes in
within the resident’s ability to pay.    the city. This is generally a
The CRA will remain responsible for      forgiven, or zero percent interest
any residential and commercial           loan, and requires only a two
relocation activities and will provide   percent investment by the resident.
relocation assistance and
counseling.                              Rehabilitation Assistance Funding is
                                         provided to completely rehabilitate
The City receives funding through        owner occupied homes. Depending
the following federal and state          on the income level of the resident,
programs, Community Development          loans may be forgiven or repaid at
Block Grant (CDBG), HOME                 zero percent interest.
Investment Partnership Program,
and the State Housing Initiatives        Specialty Rehabilitation Programs
Partnership Program (SHIP).              Funding is also available to remove
Additionally, the City has               lead based paint, provide mobility
committed general revenue funds to       improvements for disabled
establish a Housing Capital              residents, and address emergency
Improvement Program to fund              repairs.
specific housing initiatives. A
variety of opportunities exist to        Housing Replacement This program
construct new structures and             provides funding to replace housing
rehabilitate existing structures for     that, due to deterioration, would be
relocation in the surrounding            more costly to rehabilitate than to
neighborhoods.                           replace.

Through the variety of programs          Programs to Assist Developers
available, residents in rental
housing will be given the                Investor Sales Program Provides
opportunity to relocate to safe,         funding to developers to acquire
suitable housing in the vicinity of      property and construct housing.


                                                 DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                           Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                         Page 49
                                                                    Chapter Six
                                                  Neighborhood Impact Element

Upon completion, the developed           IMPACT OF REDEVELOPMENT
property must be sold to a qualified     ACTIVITIES
purchaser. This is a zero percent,
no payment loan for up to one year.      Florida Statutes and Pinellas County
                                         rules require an assessment of the
Blight Elimination Program Provides      impact of a redevelopment program
funding to purchase “blighting           on the infrastructure, environment
properties” in order to quickly          and neighborhoods within and
resolve problem properties and           surrounding a redevelopment area.
provide redevelopment
opportunities. If acquisition costs      In order to determine facility
exceed market value, the excess          impacts, we first must determine
project cost may be waived by the        the development potential in the
City.                                    DIP. Approximately 7.3 million gross
                                         sq.ft. of land is available for
Rental Housing Development               development in the DIP. 1 Currently,
Funding for the rehabilitation and       the DIP contains 1.7-million sq.ft. of
construction of affordable multi-        industrial, commercial or residential
family rental projects is available to   space. However, much of this
leverage first mortgage financing        consists of small scattered lots
from other sources. Assistance is        which may have to be assembled for
determined through application to        redevelopment.
the City’s Project Review Team.
                                         To estimate the total buildout
Lien Removal Program Provides an         during the forty-year life of the
incentive to developers that             redevelopment plan staff used three
purchase properties from tax deed        different scenarios – low, medium
sales or Lands Available for Taxes.      and high. The “Low” scenario is
The City will waive special              based on a 0.31 FAR, which is the
assessment and Code Enforcement          median FAR for approximately 250
Board Liens, contingent on the           existing industrial buildings in the
development of owner occupied            DIP. The “Medium” scenario of 0.50
housing.                                 FAR is based on recent construction
                                         development patterns, while the
Redevelopment will have a positive       “High” scenario of 0.75 FAR reflects
impact on those residents who
remain in the area. Physical             1
                                           This figure is based on the land assembly
improvement and expanded retail          calculations for the original DIP boundaries
services are expected to increase        in the 1998 Business Opportunity Plan (page
property values.                         47) in addition to the areas added as part
                                         of this redevelopment plan. Because the
                                         BOP calculations assumed all alleys would
                                         be vacated, the BOP numbers were reduced
                                         by approximately 10 percent reflecting the
                                         area occupied by alleys on each block.


                                                   DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                             Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                            Page 50
                                                                                  Chapter Six
                                                               Neighborhood Impact Element

the maximum permitted                                 One main feeds the area from 28th
development under the Industrial                      Street and I-275, while the other
Traditional zoning district.                          feeds the area from 19th Street at
                                                      its intersection with 5th Avenue
                Table 6-1                             South, running along 19th Street and
      Buildout Scenarios in the DIP*                  1st Avenue South.
 Scenario    Total SF          Net SF
 Low          2.22 M         498,219 sf
                                                      The sanitary sewer in the Dome
 Medium       3.50 M           1.79 M
                                                      Industrial Park is split into two
 High         5.20 M           3.48 M
* in millions of square feet unless otherwise noted
                                                      service areas, although the bulk of
                                                      its sewage is treated at the Albert
While development intensities                         Whitted Plant. Sewage in the
currently are not approaching the                     portion of the study area north of
“High” scenario, it is expected that                  the CSX Railroad and east of 22nd
as land becomes more scarce/                          Street flows to the north while
expensive new construction will                       sewage south of the CSX Railroad
have consistently higher FARs than                    and west of 22nd Street S flows
existing construction. Moreover, the                  under I-275.
forty-year life of the redevelopment
plan will no doubt see existing                       Water and sanitary sewer service
buildings reaching their useful life                  projections throughout the City are
and generating the need for                           based on the underlying
demolition and redevelopment. As                      development densities anticipated
a result, the DIP should see an                       by the comprehensive plan. Ninety-
increase in development intensity                     five percent of land in the Dome
ranging between the “Medium” and                      Industrial Park has a future land use
“High” scenarios at the time the                      designation of Industrial General. 2
redevelopment plan expires.                           Since this development emphasis
                                                      and intensity remains unchanged by
Infrastructure and Utilities                          the adoption of the Dome Industrial
                                                      Park, no additional impacts on
Traffic Circulation The plan will                     water and sewer facilities are
have a positive impact on the                         expected to occur.
current traffic circulation within the
Dome Industrial Park. Proper                          Stormwater Management The Dome
utilization of redevelopment sites,                   Industrial Park is divided into two
providing needed off-street parking                   basins, named Basin-B and Basin-D.
and road extensions and widening                      The stormwater collection and
will allow proper flow of traffic.                    conveyance in the DIP consists of
                                                      overland flow into enclosed storm
Water and Sanitary Sewer Drinking
water and fire protection in the DIP                  2
                                                        The IG designation calls for a mixture of
is conveyed by two 24-inch mains.                     light or heavy industrial and industrial park
                                                      uses with a floor area ratio of up to 0.75.


                                                                DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                          Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                                           Page 51
                                                               Chapter Six
                                                Neighborhood Impact Element

sewer systems. The major runoff         vacations require public notice and
collection systems are located along    City Council approval.
28th Street South, 22nd Street South,
20th Street south and 5th Avenue        Reclaimed Water Reclaimed water
South. There are no lakes or ponds      facilities are available on a limited
within the area.                        basis within the DIP community
                                        redevelopment area. A trunk line
The DIP community redevelopment         runs down 22nd Street South from
plan intends for stormwater for new     Emerson Avenue South but there are
development to be retained on-site      no east-west spurs. Reclaimed
or, alternatively, develop a regional   water is also available along 28th
system that would adhere to the         Street South south of its
stormwater quality and quantity         intersection with Fairfield Avenue
standards adopted in the Drainage       and is extended west from 28th
and Surface Water ordinance             Street South from 7th Avenue South.
(Chapter 16, Article 6).                As mentioned in Chapter Four, the
                                        City is not currently contemplating
Solid Waste The City of St.             extending the reclaimed water
Petersburg Sanitation Department        system beyond its current service
serves the residential and              area.
commercial clients within the Dome
Industrial Park. Depending on the       Other Utilities Electric, telephone,
condition of the alleys and type of     gas and cable television are
business, solid waste is picked up      provided by Progress Energy,
either from the alley or from the       Verizon, People’s Gas, Knology and
street. There is not curbside           Brighthouse respectively. All
recycling in the area, but several      utilities are available within the
recycling centers are in close          Dome Industrial Park and have
proximity.                              adequate capacity to serve new
                                        industry. GTE has indicated that
The DIP Community Redevelopment         they have the ability to serve the
Plan anticipates the closure of         target area with fiber optics, which
alleys in order to consolidate blocks   will be a significant asset and one of
to implement its economic               the factors that will make it
development strategy. It is not         competitive with suburban
expected that alley vacations will      industrial parks.
undermine solid waste levels of
service. Although no blocks have        Emergency Evacuation Facilities
been specifically identified for
consolidation, there is a public        It is not expected that the DIP
process and staff analysis of impacts   Redevelopment Plan will affect
that accompanies requests for alley     emergency evacuation facilities. No
vacations. Moreover, alley              evacuation facilities are located in


                                                DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                          Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                      Page 52
                                                              Chapter Six
                                               Neighborhood Impact Element

within the Dome Industrial Park        area will not impact the nearby
and, thus, will not be affected by     public schools.
redevelopment activities.
Moreover, no additional population     Provision of Park and Recreational
is planned for the DIP, so levels of   Facilities
service for existing emergency
evacuation facilities will not be      No public recreation land or
impacted.                              facilities currently exists in the
                                       Dome Industrial Park. Thus, the DIP
Environmental Quality                  Community Redevelopment Plan will
                                       not impact park or recreational
Environmental quality will improve     facilities.
as a result of redevelopment. In
order to redevelop a site, an
environmental assessment is            CONSISTENCY WITH OTHER
performed. If environmental            PLANNING EFFORTS
regulations require remediation, a
Brownfields designation may be         Most of the Dome Industrial Park
considered to bring additional         lies within the Central Neighborhood
resources and incentives to the        Planning Area. The portion of the
project. Streetscape improvements      DIP lying east of 22nd Street South is
will also enhance the health and       not within any neighborhood
appearance of the area. Finally,       association.
the DIP redevelopment program
aims to eliminate the deteriorated     Central Neighborhood Plan
building conditions which are a
concern for environmental quality.     The Central Neighborhood Plan was
                                       formulated in 1992 and included a
Effect on Educational Facilities and   broad area from Ninth Avenue North
School Population                      on the north, 34th Street on the west
                                       and Interstate I-275 on the east and
Implementation of the Dome             south. This area included residential
Industrial Park Redevelopment Plan     and commercial as well as industrial
will have little or no impact on the   uses. The DIP was identified as
City’s population or the population    portions of Zone 7 and all of Zone 8.
density pattern, thus there will be    Four principle areas of concern were
no impact on the public school         identified by residents and owners
system. No additional population is    within the zones. They include public
planned for the DIP so school levels   safety, maintenance and
of service will not be impacted. The   improvements, expansion constraints
potential relocation of some           and business enhancements.
families from the redevelopment




                                               DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                         Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                     Page 53
                                                         Chapter Six
                                            Neighborhood Impact Element

DIP Planning Efforts

As described in Chapter 3, several
of the planning studies that have
been undertaken in the DIP over the
years have identified common issues
and strategies to resolve them.
These include the Business
Retention and Development
Program, the Business Retention
and Economic Development Report,
the Central Neighborhood Plan, the
Business Opportunity Plan and the
Dome Industrial Park Plan. Major
issues identified in all these
planning efforts included public
safety, image and appearance,
infrastructure deficiencies, business
expansion and promotion and the
perception or existence of
environmental contamination.

This community redevelopment plan
incorporates the issues (if presently
unresolved) identified in these
earlier planning documents and
proposes strategies to address
them.




                                              DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                        Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                Page 54
           Chapter Seven
Compliance with Florida Statutes
                                                                     Chapter Seven
                         Compliance with Florida Statutes and Pinellas County Rules

The Florida Community Redevelopment Act (Chapter 163, Article III, F.S.)
specifies requirements for communities embarking on a redevelopment
program which involve such activities as declaring a blighted area, delegation
of redevelopment authority, establishing a community redevelopment agency,
preparing a redevelopment plan and implementation strategies, identifying
relocation strategies for residents affected by the redevelopment program and
conformance of the CRP with a locality’s comprehensive plan.

In approving the Dome Industrial Park Community Redevelopment Plan, St.
Petersburg City Council made the following findings per Chapter 163.360, F.S.:

      A feasible method for relocating families displaced from the community
      redevelopment area;

      The Dome Industrial Park Community Redevelopment Plan conforms to
      the general plan of the municipality as a whole;

      The Dome Industrial Park Community Redevelopment Plan considers
      utilizing community policing innovations, and providing adequate park
      and recreational areas and facilities that may be desirable for
      neighborhood improvement, with special consideration for the health,
      safety, and welfare of children residing in the general vicinity of the site
      covered by the plans, and;

      The Dome Industrial Park Community Redevelopment Plan will afford
      maximum opportunity, consistent with the sound needs of the county or
      municipality as a whole, for the rehabilitation or redevelopment of the
      community redevelopment area by private enterprise.

For each statutory requirement, the City of St. Petersburg and the Dome
Industrial Park Community Redevelopment Plan are compliant with Florida’s
Community Redevelopment Act. The table below cites the state or county rule
requirement and where in the Dome Industrial Park Community Redevelopment
Plan information addressing the requirement can be found.

 Florida                                                                         Plan
 Statute                      Compliance Requirement                             Page
              Establishing a Community Redevelopment Area and Agency
 163.355   City Council Finding of Necessity                                   Exhibit A

 163.356   Pinellas County delegation of redevelopment authority and           Exhibit A
           creation of community redevelopment agency
 163.357   City Council accepts redevelopment authority from Pinellas County   Exhibit A



                                                         DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                   Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                                  Page 55
                                                                               Chapter Seven
                           Compliance with Florida Statutes and Pinellas County Rules

 Florida                                                                               Plan
 Statute                         Compliance Requirement                                Page
                        Preparing a Community Redevelopment Plan

163.362(1)   Legal description of the boundaries of the community                    Exhibit B
             redevelopment area and the reasons for establishing such
             boundaries
163.362(2)   Show by diagram and in general terms:
                  approximate amount of open space to be provided and the           Chapter 2
                  street layout
                  zoning and other limitations on type, size height, number,        Chapter 2
                                                                                     Map 2-2
                  density and proposed use of buildings
                                                                                     Map 2-3
                  land acquisition, demolition and removal of structures            Chapter 5
                                                                                    Chapter 2
                  approximate number and type of dwelling units                     Map 2-1
                  property intended for use as parks, recreation areas, open        Chapter 4
                  space, streets, utilities and public improvements
163.362(3)   Neighborhood/housing element describing impacts on following:
                  relocation
                  traffic circulation
                  environmental quality                                              Chapter 6
                  availability of community facilities and services
                  effect on school population

163.362(4)   Identify specifically any publicly funded capital projects to be
             undertaken within the redevelopment district and how it will be         Chapter 5
             funded.
163.362(5)   Safeguards assuring redevelopment projects will be carried out
             pursuant to Dome Industrial Park Redevelopment Plan.                    Chapter 5

163.362(6)   Provide for retention of controls and establish any restrictions or
             covenants running with the land sold or leased for private use.         Chapter 5

163.362(7)   Provide assurances that there will be replacement housing for the
                                                                                     Chapter 6
             relocation of persons temporarily or permanently displaced from
             housing facilities.                                                     Exhibit E

163.362(8)   Provide an element of residential use in the redevelopment area if
             such use exists in the area prior to the adoption of the plan or if     Chapter 5
             the plan is intended to remedy a shortage of housing affordable to      Chapter 6
             residents of low or moderate income, including the elderly.             Exhibit E

163.362(9)   Provide detailed statement on the costs of redevelopment
             activities with specific reference to the following activities:
                                                                                     Chapter 5
                 Amount expended on publicly funded capital projects
                 Indebtedness to be repaid with increment revenues




                                                              DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                        Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                                       Page 56
                                                                         Chapter Seven
                          Compliance with Florida Statutes and Pinellas County Rules


     Florida                                                                          Plan
     Statute                         Compliance Requirement                           Page

                    Preparing a Community Redevelopment Plan (cont’d)

163.362(10)           Provide time certain for completing all redevelopment
                      activities funded with increment revenues. (Must be           Chapter 5
                      completing within 40 years after the fiscal year in which
                      the plan is approved or adopted.
  Pinellas County     Residential relocation strategy in compliance with
       Rules          provisions of Pinellas County Ordinance 93-94, Tenant
                      Relocation Plan, which addresses the following:
                           provide written notice to residential tenants who will
                           be displaced 60 days prior to loss of possession
                           provide advisory services, as appropriate, including     Chapter 6
                           counseling, referrals to suitable, decent, safe and      Exhibit E
                           sanitary replacement housing which is comparable and
                           within the tenant’s financial means; and
                           provide payment and/or reimbursement of actual
                           reasonable relocation expenses for actual reasonable
                           relocation expenses for displaced low and moderate-
                           income residential tenants of up to $1,000 per
                           household.
  Pinellas County     Evaluate the impact of the redevelopment plan upon public
       Rules          services and facilities, including but not limited to the
                      following:
                                                                                    Chapter 6
                            potable water and sanitary sewer
                            schools
                            roads
                            recreational facilities
                            stormwater management
                            emergency evacuation facilities




                                                            DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                      Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                                     Page 57
Exhibits
                                             Exhibit A
Legal Documents Adopting DIP Community Redevelopment Area
                                   Legal Documents for Adoption of DIP CRA



Findings of Necessity
St. Petersburg City Council
August 25, 2005
Resolution No. 2005-450

Delegation of Redevelopment Authority
Pinellas County
October 4, 2005
BCC Resolution No. 05-228

Acceptance of Redevelopment Authority
St. Petersburg City Council
October 20, 2005
Resolution No. 2005-551

Revised Findings of Necessity (Reduction in Acreage)
St. Petersburg City Council
Date: September 21, 2006
Ordinance No. 2006-481

Revised Delegation of Redevelopment Authority
Pinellas County Board of County Commissioners
Date: October 24, 2006
Resolution No. 06-198

Approval of DIP Community Redevelopment Plan
St. Petersburg City Council
Date: August 23, 2007
Ordinance No. 841-G

Approval of DIP Community Redevelopment Plan
Pinellas County
Date: November 29, 2007
Resolution No. 07-186




                                                 DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                           Community Redevelopment Plan
   Exhibit B
Legal Description
                             Legal Description for the DIP Community Redevelopment Area

BEGINNING AT A POINT at the intersection of the North right-of-way of First Avenue South and West
right-of-way of I-275 and following the West right-of-way of Interstate 275 to the South alley right-of-
way of the block bounded by Interstate 275, Fifth Avenue South, Emerson Avenue South and 20th
Street South; and

Proceeding West along the South alley right-of-way to the West right-of-way of 20th Street South and
then North along the West right of way of 20th Street South to its intersection with the South right-of-
way of 5th Avenue South; and

Proceeding West along the South right-of-way of 5th Avenue South to the East right-of-way of 22nd
Street South and then proceeding South along the East right-of-way of 22nd Street South until its
intersection with the North right-of-way of Interstate 275 and then proceeding Westerly and then
Southwesterly along the North right-of-way of Interstate 275 until its intersection with the West
right-of-way of 31st Street South; and

Proceeding North along the West right-of-way of 31st Street South until its intersection with the South
right-of-way of the CSX Railroad and then West along the railroad’s South right-of-way until
intersecting with the West right-of-way of 34th Street South, also known as U.S. Highway 19; and

Proceeding North along the West right-of-way of 34th Street South until its intersection with the
North right-of-way of Freemont Avenue South and then East along the North right-of-way of
Freemont Avenue South until its intersection with the East right-of-way of 32nd Street South; and

Proceeding South along the East right-of-way of 32nd Street South until its intersection with the North
alley right-of-way of the block bounded by Fairfield Avenue South, Freemont Terrace South, 31st
Street South and 32nd Street South, which is Block 19 of the Roosevelt Park Addition as recorded in
Plat Book 5, Page 52 of the Public Records of Pinellas County; and

Proceeding East along the North alley right-of-way of the aforementioned Block 19 until its
intersection with the East right-of-way of 31st Street South and then proceeding South along the East
right-of-way of 31st Street South to the North alley right-of-way of the blocks bounded by 31st Street
South, 7th Avenue South, 28th Street South and Fairfield Avenue South, which are Blocks 13, 14 and 15
of East Roselawn as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 32 of the Public Records of Pinellas County; and

Proceeding East along the North alley right-of-way of the aforementioned Blocks 13 thru 15 until its
intersection with the West right-of-way of 28th Street South and then proceeding North along the
West right-of-way of 28th Street until its intersection with the North right-of-way of 5th Avenue South;
and

Proceeding East along the North right-of-way of 5th Avenue South until its intersection with the West
right-of-way of 24th Street South and then proceeding North along the West right-of-way of 24th
Street South until its intersection with the North alley right-of-way of the block bounded by 4th
Avenue South, 5th Avenue South, 24th Street South and 23rd Street South, which is block 35 of the St.
Petersburg Investment Company Subdivision as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 16 of the Public Records
of Pinellas County; and

Proceeding East along said alley right-of-way until its intersection with the West right-of-way line of
23rd Street South; and

Proceeding North along the West right-of-way of 23rd Street South until its intersection with the
North right-of-way of First Avenue South and then East along said right-of-way until the POINT OF
BEGINNING.




                                                                         DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                                   Community Redevelopment Plan
                           Exhibit C
Business Incentives available for the DIP
                               Overview of Business Incentives available in the DIP

The following state and federal incentive programs are available to companies
located in the City of St. Petersburg. These summaries are for informational
purposes only and are not all inclusive. Businesses should obtain complete
program guidelines from the providers. Since programs and eligibility may
change please consult with the City of St. Petersburg Department of Economic
Development to ensure your continued eligibility.

                               State of Florida Programs

                                     Enterprise Zone
Florida's Enterprise Zone (EZ) Program encourages economic growth and investment in
distressed areas by offering tax advantages and incentives to businesses that are located in
and/or invest in these areas. The Governor's Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic
Development (OTTED) administers the program and Enterprise Florida helps market it to
businesses. The Florida Department of Revenue processes approved tax incentive applications
and provides technical assistance relating to eligibility requirements.

Jobs Tax Credit      Allows businesses, who collect and pay Florida sales and use tax, a
(State Sales & Use   monthly credit against their tax due on wages paid to new, full-time
Tax)                 employees who have been employed by the business for at least 3
                     months and are residents of an EZ or are Welfare Transition Program
                     participants. A new job must be created in order for the business to
                     earn a tax credit.

                     If less than 20 percent of permanent, full-time employees are residents
                     of an EZ, this incentive provides a credit of 20 percent of the monthly
                     wages paid to new eligible employees who are residents of an EZ. If 20
                     percent or more of permanent, full-time employees are residents of an
                     EZ, this incentive provides a credit of 30 percent of the monthly wages
                     paid to new eligible employees who are residents of an EZ. This credit is
                     limited to 24 months if the employee remains employed for 24 months
                     and is not available if the Jobs Tax Credit (State Corporate Income Tax)
                     is taken.

Jobs Tax Credit      Allows businesses, who collect and pay Florida Corporate Income tax, a
(Corporate Income    credit against their tax due on wages paid to new, full-time employees
Tax)                 who have been employed by the business for at least 3 months and are
                     residents of an EZ or are Welfare Transition Program participants. A new
                     job must be created in order for the business to earn a tax credit.

                     If less than 20 percent of the permanent, full-time employees of the
                     business are residents of an EZ, this incentive provides a credit of 20
                     percent of the monthly wages paid to new eligible employees who are
                     residents of an EZ. If 20 percent or more of the permanent, full-time
                     employees are residents of an EZ, this incentive provides a credit of 30
                     percent of the monthly wages paid to new eligible employees who are
                     residents of an EZ.




                                                             DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                       Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                                C-1
                               Overview of Business Incentives available in the DIP

                                     Enterprise Zone
                                         (continued)

Business             A refund is available for Florida sales taxes paid on the purchase of
Equipment Refund     qualified business equipment which is used exclusively in an EZ for at
(State Sales & Use   least 3 years. Business equipment must have a sales price of at least
Tax)                 $5,000 per unit. The refund is 97 percent of the Florida sales tax paid on
                     business equipment. If less than 20 percent of the full-time employees
                     are residents of an EZ, the maximum refund per application will not
                     exceed $5,000. If 20 percent or more of full-time employees are
                     residents of an EZ, the maximum refund per allocation will not exceed
                     $10,000. A new job must be created for the business to earn a tax credit.
Building Materials   A refund is available for Florida sales taxes paid on the purchase of
Refund               building materials used to construct real property located in an EZ. The
(State Sales & Use   total amount of the Florida sales tax refund must be at least $500. If
Tax)                 less than 20 percent of the business’ permanent, full-time employees are
                     residents of the ez, the maximum refund per application will be no more
                     than $5,000 or 97 percent of the Florida sales tax paid. If 20 percent or
                     more of the business’ permanent, full-time employees are residents of
                     the EZ the refund will be no more than the lesser of $10,000 or 97
                     percent of the state sales tax. A new job must be created in order for
                     the business to earn a tax credit.

Property Tax         New or expanding businesses within an EZ are allowed a credit on Florida
Credit               Corporate Income tax paid. This credit is calculated based on the
(State Corporate     amount of ad valorem taxes paid. The business must earn more than
Income Tax)          $5,000 and establish 5 or more new full-time jobs to take advantage of
                     this credit. If less than 20 percent of the business’ permanent, full-time
                     employees are residents of the EZ, the maximum refund of $25,000
                     annual credit can be claimed for 5 years. If 20 percent or more of the
                     business’ permanent, full-time employees are residents of the EZ the
                     maximum refund of $50,000 annual credit can be claimed for 5 years.
                     Any unused portion of the credit may be carried forward for 5 years. A
                     new job must be created in order for the business to earn a tax credit.

Community            Community Contribution Tax Credit encourages private sector donations
Contribution         to community redevelopment projects in EZ and to low-income housing
Tax Credit           projects. A tax credit of 50 percent of the donation is available to
                     entities paying state corporate income, or insurance premium taxes, or
                     as a refund against the Florida sales tax.

                     High Impact Performance Incentive Grant
The High Impact Performance Incentive Grant (HIPI) is a negotiated incentive used to attract
and grow major high impact facilities in Florida. Grants are provided to pre-approved
applicants in certain high-impact sectors (which has recently been expanded to include
financial services) designated by the Governor's Office of Tourism, Trade and Economic
Development. In order to participate in the program, a company must be in a designated high
impact sector; create at least 100 new full-time equivalent jobs (if a research and
development facility, create at least 75 new full-time equivalent jobs) in Florida in a three
year period; and make a cumulative investment in the state of at least $100 million (if a
research and development facility, make a cumulative investment of at least $75 million) in a
3-year period. They also must apply through the City’s Economic Development Department to


                                                             DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                       Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                                C-2
                               Overview of Business Incentives available in the DIP

Enterprise Florida prior to making a decision to locate or expand in Florida.

                      Qualified Defense Contractor Tax Refund
The Qualified Defense Contractor Tax Refund is a pre-approved tax refund program that
provides up to $5,000 per job created or saved in Florida that is defense related. Conversion
of defense jobs to civilian production, the acquisition of a new defense contract, or the
consolidation of a defense contract are eligible projects. If approved, an applicant may
receive refunds on taxes it pays related to the project.

In order to participate a company must derive at least 70 percent of its Florida gross receipts
from Department of Defense contracts in the last year and not less than 80 percent over the
preceding five years, demonstrate the jobs created or retained make a significant economic
contribution to the area economy, demonstrate that the tax refund is necessary to allow the
business to complete for the new contract or make a consolidation, and provide a resolution
from the county commission indicating the 20 percent required for local financial support will
be available each year as refunds are due.

                                       Special Areas

Certain urban areas are defined as “economically distressed” communities that are
experiencing conditions affecting its economic viability and hampering the self-sufficiency of
its residents including, but not limited to, low per capita income, low property values, high
unemployment, high under-employment, low weekly wages compared to the state average,
low housing values compared to the state or area average, high percentage of the population
receiving public assistance, high poverty levels compared to the state average, and high
percentage of needy families.

Qualified Target     This program induces target industries to locate new facilities or expand
Industry             existing facilities in Florida. Targeted industries include manufacturing
Tax Refund           facilities, finance and insurance services, wholesale trade, information
Program (QTI)        industries, professional, scientific and technical services, headquarter
                     facilities, management services and administrative and support services.

                     The program provides tax refunds (Corporate, Insurance premium,
                     Sales/Use, Intangible personal property, Emergency excise, excise taxes
                     on documents, Ad valorem) of $6,000 per job if the company locates in
                     the Enterprise Zone. Greater awards are available to companies paying
                     very high wages. To qualify for the QTI program, a company must create
                     at least 10 new jobs (or a 10 percent increase for expanding Florida
                     companies), pay an average of at least 115 percent of area wages, have
                     a significant positive impact on the community and have local support.
                     The business must file an application before deciding to locate or expand
                     in Florida.

Quick Response       Provides grant funding for customized training for new or expanding
Training (QRT)       businesses in Florida. Florida uses the customer driven program to
Program              attract new industries to the state. The program is performance based:
                     to receive reimbursement for training funds a company must first create
                     a new job and hire and train a new employee. Businesses can utilize
                     QRT funds to pay for instructors’ or trainers’ salaries, to develop
                     curriculum, to provide textbooks and manuals or to pay for materials and
                     supplies.


                                                              DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                        Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                                 C-3
                              Overview of Business Incentives available in the DIP


                    Florida businesses must meet several program requirements to receive
                    funding: businesses must produce an exportable good or service; must
                    create new, full-time, high quality jobs; and must need customized,
                    entry-level skills training not otherwise available at the local level.
                    Funding priority is given to certain businesses, including businesses that
                    created high skill/high wage jobs in qualified targeted industries that are
                    located in a distressed urban inner city, Enterprise zone or brownfield
                    area or rural area.

Incumbent           Florida business can apply for grant funding to fund customized
Workers Training    continuing education and training for employees. Funds can be used to
Program             provide direct training costs, instructors’ wages, curriculum
                    development and resource materials associated with training but not to
                    pay for trainees wages or training equipment.

                    Florida businesses applying for the grant must meet several
                    requirements. The businesses must be operating in Florida for at least
                    one year, have at least one full-time employee, demonstrate financial
                    viability and be current on all state tax obligations. Funding priority is
                    extended to businesses with 25 or fewer employees; located in a
                    distressed rural or urban inner-city area or Enterprise Zone; engaged in a
                    qualified target industry; propose a significant layoff avoidance strategy;
                    and propose a significant upgrade in employee skills.

Urban Job Tax       A new or expanding company that creates new full-time jobs in specified
Credit              industries including manufacturing (SIC 20-SIC 39) can receive a $500
                    credit per job. A new company must create at least 30 new jobs and an
                    existing business must have at least 15 more qualified employees than it
                    had one year prior to its date of application The incentive is a state
                    corporate income tax credit or state sales/use tax credit of $500 per job.
                    Credit is one time only for each new hire.

Economic            The “Road Fund” is a state grant to the City of St. Petersburg on behalf
Development         of the business. The grant used to alleviate a transportation problem
Transportation      that adversely impacts the company’s location or expansion decision.
Road Fund           The business must file an application before deciding to locate or expand
                    in Florida.

Brownfield           The bonus is available to encourage redevelopment and job creation
Redevelopment        within designated brownfield areas. A preapproved applicant may
Bonus                receive a tax refund equal to 20 percent of the average annual wage of
                     the new jobs created in a designated brownfield area up to a maximum
                     of $2,500 per new job created.

                           Federal Government Programs

                   HUBZone Empowerment Contracting Program
This program seeks to encourage economic development in historically underutilized business
zones - HUBZones - through the establishment of preferences for award of Federal contracts
to small businesses located in these areas. The program falls under the auspices of the U.S.
Small Business Administration. All Federal departments and agencies involved with


                                                             DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                       Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                                C-4
                               Overview of Business Incentives available in the DIP

procurement must factor into their contracting plans annual goals that have been established
for the HUBZone Empowerment Contracting Program.
For a business to qualify as a HUBZone a business must meet the SBA definition for “small
business”; be located in a HUBZone; be owned and controlled by at least one U.S. citizen, a
Community Development Corporation, or Indian Tribe; and have at least 35% of its employees
reside in a HUBZone.

                  Federal Non-Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credit

The program, administered by the IRS, is federal income tax credit of 10 percent of the
eligible renovation costs and is available to owners of commercial, nonresidential properties
not listed on the National Register and constructed prior to 1936. These buildings must be
certified as non-historic by the National Park Service and meet the following conditions after
renovation: 1) 50 percent or more of the existing external walls are retained in place as
external walls; 2) 75 percent or more of the existing external walls are retained in place as
internal or external walls; and 3) 75 percent or more of the existing internal structural
framework is retained in place.




                                                             DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                       Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                                C-5
              Exhibit D
Business Financing Programs
                      Overview of Financial Programs available for DIP Businesses

The following local, state and federal financing programs are available to
companies located in the City of St. Petersburg, Florida. These summaries are
for informational purposes only and are not all inclusive. Businesses should
obtain complete program guidelines from the providers. Many of these loan
programs may require collateral or other underwriting considerations. Most
programs require an application and/or other fees.

Since programs and eligibility may change please consult with the City of St.
Petersburg Department of Economic Development to ensure your continued
eligibility.

                        City of St. Petersburg Programs

                               Industrial Revenue Bonds

Tax-exempt industrial revenue bonds (IRBs) are a type of bond issued by state and local
governments that offer below-market-rate financing to qualified private enterprises. These
bonds are payable from and secured by the revenues of the project they finance.
Currently, small issue IRB uses are limited and are usually for manufacturing projects. The
program provides long-term, fixed rate loans of $1 million to $10 million for land, new or
existing buildings and new equipment. IRBs cannot be used for inventory, working capital or
refinancing of existing debt.

                                  Enterprise Bond Fund
The State of Florida also provides financial assistance through the Enterprise Bond Program.
The program offers tax-exempt, low interest bond financing to qualified manufacturing and
501(c) 3 non-profit organizations. The proceeds can go to finance manufacturing facilities
(land and building) and new equipment. (Proceeds may not be used to refinance existing
debt or for working capital.) This program was designed to improve low cost capital
availability to Florida’s growing and expanding businesses, including minorities and rural
communities, to allow them to be more competitive in the global and domestic market
place. Loan amounts range between $500,000 and $2,000,000. Eligible businesses must have
minimum annual sales of $3 to $5 million, a minimum net worth of $1 million and be highly
credit worthy. The project must also create or preserve higher wage jobs.

                       Section 108 Loan Guarantee Program
The loan program allows communities to transform a small portion of their CDBG funds into
federally guaranteed loans large enough to pursue substantial physical and economic
revitalization projects. In addition to the activities allowed under the Entitlement and State
CDBG programs, the Section 108 Program allows for limited new housing construction,
rehabilitation of publicly owned facilities and debt servicing of the guaranteed loan and
related public offerings. Again, all projects and activities must either principally benefit low
and moderate income persons, aid in the elimination or prevention of slum and blight,
and/or meet the urgent needs of the community. In many cases, the eligible entity may
apply for a federal guarantee of up to five times the entity’s latest approved CDBG
entitlement amount, minus any outstanding Section 108 commitments and/or principal
balances on Section 108 loans.



                                                               DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                         Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                                               D-1
                     Overview of Financial Programs available for DIP Businesses



                      Economic Development Initiative Grant
HUD awards EDI grants through a competitive process. EDI grants can be used in several
ways to help finance projects: providing a direct project grant; subsidizing the borrower’s
interest rate on the Section 108 loan; and serving as a debt service reserve or guarantee for
the Section 108 loan. This last use reduces the community’s risk of having to draw upon its
CDBG funds to repay the Section 108 notes if the funded project incurs financing problems.
              Brownfields Economic Development Initiative Grant
HUD also offers EDI grants under the BEDI which operates similarly to the regular EDI
program but is targeted to projects on Brownfield sites. The BEDI is designed to assist cities
with the redevelopment of abandoned, idled and underused commercial and industrial
facilities where expansion and redevelopment is burdened by real or potential
environmental contamination. A community must use BEDI grant funds in conjunction with
a new Section 108-guaranteed loan. Like the Section 108 loan proceeds, the BEDI monies
must go to projects that promise to increase economic opportunity for persons of low-and-
moderate income, or stimulate and retain businesses and jobs that lead to economic
revitalization. HUD has set a $2 million cap per BEDI award which are awarded through a
competitive process.


     Tampa Bay Black Business Investment Corporation Loan Programs
The Tampa Bay Black Business Investment Corporation, Inc. (BBIC) is a nonprofit corporation
serving as a public-private partnership between local government and the corporate
community. The ultimate goal of the BBIC is the long-term growth and success of African-
American owned business enterprises. The BBIC assists African-American business operators
in Hillsborough and Pinellas Counties through identifying and financing business in these
counties. To that end, the BBIC has created a capital fund supported by local financial
institutions and contributions to provide loans to viable African-American owned businesses.
For more information on its loan programs, contact Tampa Bay Black Business Investment
Corporation, Inc. at (727) 826-5785 or (813) 274-7925. Information is also available at the
TBBBIC website http://www.tampabaybbic.com

Small                The Small Office Home Office Loan Program provides small business
Office/Home          owners a $5,000 loan with a 7 year term, priced at 4.99 percent plus
Office Loan          prime, no pre-payment penalty, minimal paperwork, bank paid
Program              technical assistance, as needed for the borrower and a fast approval.
                     This is an SBA express loan product funded by Innovative Bank of
                     California and is a collaborative effort with the National Community
                     Reinvestment Coalition.

Micro Loan           The Micro Loan Program provides short-term, low cost, fixed rate loans
Program              of up to a maximum of $5,000. The business owner is required to
                     provide an equity contribution of at least 10 percent. Loan funds can
                     be used for working capital and the purchase of business assets. Funds
                     cannot be used for religious organizations, adult entertainment, bars,
                     lounges, refinancing of existing debt or by a business deriving more
                     than 10 percent of revenue from sales of alcoholic beverages.

Direct Loan          The Direct Loan Program provides low cost, fixed rate loans from
Program              $5,000 - $20,000. The business owner is required to provide an



                                                              DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                        Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                                                 D-2
                       Overview of Financial Programs available for DIP Businesses

                       equity contribution of at least 10 percent. Loan funds can be used
                       for working capital and the purchase of business assets. Funds
                       cannot be used for religious organizations, adult entertainment,
                       bars, lounges, refinancing of existing debt or by a business deriving
                       more than 10 percent of revenue from sales of alcoholic beverages.

Guaranteed Loan        The Guaranteed Loan Program provides low cost, fixed rate loans up to
Program                a maximum of 50 percent or $75,000 of the total requested loan
                       amount, whichever is less. The business owner is required to provide an
                       equity contribution of at least 10 percent.

                       Loan funds can be used for working capital and the purchase of business
                       assets. Funds cannot be used for religious organizations, adult
                       entertainment, bars, lounges, refinancing of existing debt or by a
                       business deriving more than 10 percent of revenue from sales of
                       alcoholic beverages.

SBA Express Loan       The SBA Express Loan Program provides a variable rate loan to all small
                       businesses owners in Hillsborough and Pinellas counties. The maximum
                       loan amount of $16,000 can be used for business assets to include
                       equipment, inventory and working capital.


                            State of Florida Programs
Florida                Venture capital (VC) funds seek high rates of return through equity
Venture Forum          investments in early stage, high-growth firms. VC funds concentrate
                       investments in certain industries and regions. Historically, investments
                       have been heavily clustered in four technology intensive sectors:
                       drugs, office and computing machines, communication and electronic
                       equipment and professional and scientific instruments. Since 1997
                       venture capitalists have focused on information technology industries,
                       including hardware, software and service providers.

                       State of Florida funding for venture capital is through the Florida
                       Certified Capital Company (CAPCO) Program. 1 The CAPCOs receive
                       their money from insurance companies, which obtain Florida tax
                       credits equal to the amount of dollars that CAPCO funds invest for
                       them. Those credits are pro-rated over 10 years after CAPCOs invest
                       the insurers' funds. The Florida Venture Forum, Inc. is Florida's oldest,
                       largest and most prestigious statewide support group for venture
                       capitalists and entrepreneurs. As an entrepreneurial networking group,
                       the Florida Venture Forum educates entrepreneurs and assists them in
                       identifying sources of venture capital.

                       Created in 1984 by a group of high-level business leaders and
                       academicians, the goal of the Florida Venture Forum is to help
                       ensure the success of Florida-based entrepreneurial ventures by
                       offering expert counsel and educational advice. Throughout the
                       year, the Florida Venture Forum provides programs on a statewide

1
    See the “Certified Capital Company Act” (Section 288.99, FS).


                                                                DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                          Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                                               D-3
                      Overview of Financial Programs available for DIP Businesses

                      basis. For more information, contact the Florida Venture Forum,
                      P.O. Box 961, Tampa, FL 33601 (813-335-8116) or visit
                      http://www.flvencap.org/.


Florida               State of Florida funding for venture capital is through the Florida
Certified             Certified Capital Company (CAPCO) Program. The CAPCOs receive
Capital               their money from insurance companies, which obtain Florida tax
Company               credits equal to the amount of dollars that CAPCO funds invest for
Program               them. Those credits, on taxes such as the state corporate tax, are pro-
                      rated over 10 years after CAPCOs invest the insurers' funds.

                         Federal Government Programs

                      Small Business Association Loan Programs

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) offers several loan programs that provide
financial aid to small businesses. Most lenders are familiar with U.S. Small Business
Administration (SBA) loan programs, so interested applicants could contact their local
lender for further information on the SBA loan application process. Information on SBA loan
programs, business management, counseling and training services are also available at the
City of St. Petersburg’s Assistance Center. A few of the most popular SBA loan programs
are: Basic 7(a) Business Loan, Micro-Loans, and the CDC/504 Program.
Basic 7(a) Business   All 7(a) loans are provided by lenders who are called participants
Loan Program          because they participate with SBA in the 7(a) program. 7(a) loans are
                      only available on a guaranty basis. This means they are provided by
                      lenders who choose to structure their own loans by SBA's requirements
                      and who apply and receive a guaranty from SBA on a portion of this
                      loan. The SBA does not fully guaranty 7(a) loans.

Micro-Loan            The MicroLoan Program provides very small loans to start-up, newly
Program               established, or growing small business concerns. The funds can be used
                      for typical business purposes such as working capital, machinery and
                      equipment, inventory and leasehold improvements. The business
                      owner is required to provide an equity contribution and have a
                      business plan. Under this program, SBA makes funds available to
                      nonprofit community based lenders (intermediaries) which, in turn,
                      make loans to eligible borrowers in amounts up to a maximum of
                      $35,000. In 2006, Pinellas County was served by the Clearwater
                      Neighborhood Housing Services. For more information call CNHS at
                      (727) 442-4155.

CDC/504 Loan          The CDC/504 loan program is a long-term financing tool for economic
Program               development within a community. The 504 Program provides growing
                      businesses with long-term, fixed-rate financing for major fixed assets,
                      such as land and buildings. A Certified Development Company is a
                      nonprofit corporation set up to contribute to the economic
                      development of its community. CDCs work with the SBA and private-
                      sector lenders to provide financing to small businesses.




                                                              DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                        Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                                                D-4
                     Overview of Financial Programs available for DIP Businesses

Small Business       The Small Business Investment Company (SBIC) program was created in
Investment           1958 to fill the gap between the availability of venture capital and the
Company              needs of small businesses in start-up and growth situations. SBICs are
                     privately owned and managed investment firms that make capital
                     available to small businesses through investments or loans. They use
                     their own funds plus funds obtained at favorable rates with SBA
                     guaranties and/or by selling their preferred stock to the SBA. SBICs are
                     for-profit firms whose incentive is to share in the success of a small
                     business. In addition to equity capital and long-term loans, SBICs
                     provide debt-equity investments and management assistance. The SBIC
                     Program provides funding to all types of manufacturing and service
                     industries. Some investment companies specialize in certain fields,
                     while others seek out small businesses with new products or services
                     because of the strong growth potential. Most, however, consider a
                     wide variety of investment opportunities.

                               New Market Tax Credits

The New Market Tax Credit (NMTC) Program provides investors with a 39 percent federal tax
credit over a seven-year period for making qualified equity investments in designated
Community Development Entities (CDEs). CDEs apply to the CDFI Fund for a competitively
awarded allocation of NMTCs. The credits will be awarded competitively based on a CDE's
performance, accountability, and record of success in providing assistance to disadvantaged
businesses or communities. Once a CDE secures an allocation of credits, it will use those
credits to attract Qualified Equity Investments from individual or corporate taxpayers.

An equity investment in a CDE may be any stock in a corporation and any capital interest in
a partnership. It can be exchanged for cash and substantially used to make Qualified Low-
income Community Investments. In return, investors receive a tax credit certificate from
the CDE to attach to their federal income tax forms, claiming a five- percent tax credit for
the first three years and a six-percent credit in the last four years. The CDE then uses the
investment capital generated from the sale of tax credits to provide loans, equity, and
other forms of credit to qualified low-income community businesses, including nonprofit
corporations and nonprofit corporations, in targeted distressed areas. CDEs must work with
businesses in a low-income community - a census tract with a 20 percent poverty rate, or
census tracts whose median household income is 80 percent or less of the state or MSA
median household income.




                                                             DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                                       Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                                                D-5
                                   Exhibit E
Housing Replacement and Resident Relocation Plan
                           Housing Replacement and Resident Relocation Plan


INTRODUCTION                             with an equal or better housing
                                         product. Recognizing that in some
The City of St. Petersburg has a         areas of the DIP, the payment of
standard policy and procedures for       fair market value for a residential
the acquisition of real property and     property will not be sufficient to
relocation of tenants. These             relocate that owner into
procedures guide the City’s              comparable housing, a replacement
acquisition program during the           strategy is important. Comparable
normal course of implementation of       in this case would be defined as
various projects and initiatives.        similar in size, bedroom count
These standards are best                 and/or value to the existing home.
summarized by an approach in
which the City offers fair market        Based on these objectives the City
value (as documented by                  will use the following approach:
independent appraisals) and a
relocation payment.                      Option 1 Purchasing property at
                                         appraised value is the City’s
The City of St. Petersburg is also a     standard process, with the added
recipient of federal funds. When         component of payment for
federal funds are used to purchase       relocation expenses (which will be
real property in an identified           discussed later). When the existing
project, housing replacement and         values are significantly lower than
relocation must comply with the          the replacement options available
Uniform Relocation Assistance and        to the seller, the City may use
Real Property Acquisitions Policy Act    Option 2 or 3.
of 1970, as amended. These
requirements affect the acquisition      Option 2 In this approach the City
of both owner- and tenant-occupied       would either build or buy
housing.                                 comparable housing (comparable
                                         being defined by size, bedrooms
MARKET VALUE OR                          and/or value). It requires the City
                                         to be involved further downstream
REPLACEMENT VALUE
                                         in the process ensuring the delivery
                                         of the actual replacement home
Under these conditions, the City is      (build or buy) and effectively a
willing to implement a housing           purchase and sale of properties. The
replacement plan that pays market        results, more than likely, are that
value or replacement value to the        the cost of the replacement solution
owner of homesteaded residential         will be more than the value of the
property, whichever is greater. This     property that the City is acquiring.
policy will not apply to commercial      In fact, the premise is that this
or tenant occupied property. The         condition exists and that is why the
basic objective is to replace the        City is using this approach.
residential property of a
homesteaded owner-occupied unit

                                                  DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                            Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                     Page E-1
                           Housing Replacement and Resident Relocation Plan

Option 3. Paying replacement cost        Efficiency unit           $1,000
is a variation of Option 2 but           One bedroom unit          $1,200
represents a cash transaction            Two bedroom unit          $1,600
instead of an active replacement         Three bedroom unit        $2,000
role for the City. The net effect is     Four bedroom unit         $2,400
the same basic cost as Option 2,
with the identification of a             This relocation payment is to
replacement cost value for the           provide a one-time relocation
purchased property defining the          payment, per tenant-occupied legal
transaction value. The advantage of      dwelling unit, estimated to be
this approach is the time/effort         sufficient to cover moving expenses,
savings on behalf of the City, as the    utility turn-on and first month’s
City would not be taking the             rent, and a security deposit for a
proactive steps needed in Option 2       comparably sized unit.
to actually replace the home.
                                         In addition to this relocation
It is the intent to use all three        payment per tenant in residential
options as appropriate to the unique     rental property, a relocation
relocation situation when legally        payment will be made to
available. Option 1 applies when the     homesteaded owner occupants that
market value and the replacement         are subject to involuntary
option are the same. Otherwise if        relocation. This relocation payment
the market values are less than          of $1,000 per property is a one-time
replacement choices, the City can        payment to help defray the
exercise the alternative of offering     expenses of moving, utility turn-on
the seller either Option 2 or Option     and other miscellaneous relocation
3.                                       expenses.

RELOCATION COSTS                         REQUIREMENTS FOR
                                         REDEVELOPMENT PLANS
Even when Federal funds are not
used, the City has paid relocation       By design of this Housing
assistance. Through City Council         Replacement and Relocation Plan
resolution establishing a residential    for the Dome Industrial Park
tenant relocation policy, this           Redevelopment Plan, the CRA
assistance has been paid on a sliding    provides assurances that there will
scale based on the number of             be replacement housing for the
documented bedrooms. The scale,          relocation of persons temporarily or
which has been used for projects         permanently displaced from homes
such as Wildwood, Enoch Davis and        within the redevelopment area. The
the Tangerine Avenue Community           plan complies with the provisions of
Redevelopment Area, is as follows:       Pinellas County Ordinance 93-94,
                                         The Tenant Relocation Plan (38-81 –
                                         38-86 of Pinellas County Code).


                                                  DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                            Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                     Page E-2
                           Housing Replacement and Resident Relocation Plan



At a minimum, the plan allows for:

$ Providing written notice to
  residential tenants who will be
  displaced 60 days prior to loss of
  possession;

$ Providing advisory services, as
  appropriate, including
  counseling, referrals to suitable,
  decent, safe, and sanitary
  replacement housing which is
  comparable and within the
  tenant’s financial means; and

•   Providing payment and/or
    reimbursement of actual
    reasonable relocation expenses
    for displaced low and moderate-
    income residential tenants of up
    to $1,000 per household.

In the case of these County
requirements the Dome Industrial
Park plan meets or exceeds the
objectives outlined.




                                                  DOME INDUSTRIAL PARK
                                            Community Redevelopment Plan
                                                                   Page E-3

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Industrial Park Business Plan document sample