Business Networking Websites by dkr15656

VIEWS: 4 PAGES: 5

More Info
									Are Social Networking Websites The Next Big Thing For Business Marketing? 
 
Are social networking websites (SNW’s) the next big thing for business?  The quick answer is, “maybe.”  
Unfortunately, As a business medium, social networking is still so new that there is very little empirical 
data about the topic, just those figures from the SNW’s themselves, though comScore.com has sought 
to verify some of it over the last year.  Most recently comScore.com stated that Facebook.com displayed 
1.5% of all display ads which ranked it as fifth in the world for the month of November 2007.  Fox 
Interactive Media (parent of MySpace.com) claimed the #2 slot for the same time period with 16.3% i . 
 
Social networking websites, for the uninitiated, are sites that serve as collection points and trading posts 
of the “regular Joe’s” equivalent of sports trading cards.  However, in these cases your card is called your 
“space” or your “profile.”  Profiles can include a picture, physical statistics, home address, educational 
history, hobbies, interests, habits, even current mood.  Among the most common sites are 
Facebook.com, MySpace.com, Xanga.com, Bebo.com, Classmates.com, and hi5.com, each more popular 
within certain geographies and demographics than the others. ii 
 
There are many ways businesses can take part in SNW’s.  They can strictly advertise with inline text 
attached to emails or invites or publish banner ads.  They can use their company’s profile to facilitate or 
supplant other internet marketing campaigns—usually videos and they can host a “group” or chat room 
specifically for their customers or their employees.  This can serve as merely a buzz generator or as a 
market research/customer service scheme to get candid feedback.  Corporations can also simply choose 
to monitor content related to them or their industry as a form of managing matters of liability, libel, or 
competitive intelligence. 
 
Many major corporations have begun taking part in SNW’s.  So who is doing well and who isn’t?  As 
previously mentioned, reliable data is scarce as to whether any overt business presence on SNW’s is 
generating positive returns, so the definition of “doing well” must be fluid and matched with common 
sense.  The following represent some of my findings in both Facebook.com and MySpace.com, North 
America’s most popular SNW’s. 
 
Jeep 
Jeep is doing well.  The discussion board has 498 topics being discussed with anywhere from one to 
1000 posts by nearly as many different people.  The content ranges from “Did you name your Jeep?,” to 
“What is the best engine of all time?,” to “I hate the new 4 door Jeep.  What the !@#$?”  These metrics 
are good for providing proof of customer (or at least public) interaction, but it is arguable that they are 
influencing buying behavior or brand loyalty. 
 
To my surprise, what I found most effective about Jeep’s group was the corporate provided content.  
Jeep actually had six different videos of their product in action.  Some of these were footage of third 
party test drivers and others were actors in commercials.  The best of these was an interactive episode 
where the viewer was one of four friends on a camping trip with the other guy’s new Jeep Liberty where 
the viewer got to choose different storylines.  I chose to go on a treasure hunt and ended up ripping the 
front door off of a haunted cabin at 3 a.m. using a chain and the Liberty’s front bumper.  It was very well 
done, mostly because it was emotionally focused.  The feeling of a hard sell was pleasantly absent; it 
wasn’t about the Jeep product itself, but rather the great time I could have in the woods with my three 
outdoorsy (yet glamorous) friends creating memories.  Altogether it was an entertaining and compelling 
experience. 
 
Since my first visit to their profile four weeks ago, Jeep has modified their profile so that it forwards to 
their website (www.jeep.com) and increased its Jeep group membership to 18,108, up from 17,347.  
That is an add rate of just over 27 fans per day.  Wisely, Jeep has devoted a subpage on its corporate 
website to the “Jeep Community” under the title Jeep Experience.  At the bottom of this page are links 
to both the Jeep Facebook.com and MySpace.com profiles.  They are offering three different, but highly 
interactive portals for their fans to celebrate the cultural icon that is Jeep.  I think this works very well 
considering the enthusiasm of Jeep owners and experiential nature of Jeep products.  It may be that 
potential customers who are sitting on the fence are swayed by the concentration of positive vibes 
emanating from these marketing tools.  It would be easy to believe that at the very least these venues 
provide easy access to high margin profit tools such as Jeep Gifts and Gear.  Jeep advertises its consumer 
products on all three sites.  It is an easy way to shop for the Jeep‐aholic.  Jeep sells branded kayaks, 
tents, clothing, baby strollers, and even large cedar trunks for storing your outdoor gear in the off 
season.  Perhaps lesson number one would be that SNW’s can be an effective storefront for those 
hoping to rationalize a large purchase with a great deal of positive peer pressure, and additionally, a 
means of gaining greater share of the customer’s wallet through the sale of ancillary supporting goods. 
 
Victoria’s Secret 
Victoria’s Secret is doing well with 347,951 Facebook members and 202,104 MySpace members.  This is 
one of the most subscribed corporately sponsored groups on the internet.  Their group is actually 
named PINK because that is the title of the division that hosts it.  PINK is a specific line that caters to the 
high school and college demographic.  You may be thinking “of course the Victoria’s Secret group is the 
most subscribed,” but it is not what you think.  It is not a place of pinups.  In fact, it isn’t even assembled 
as a catalogue, which is likely the reason that in reviewing hundreds of profiles and posts I found only 
two males that took the time to participate in the discussion board. 
 
PINK is geared much more to pajamas, t‐shirts, and handbags than intimate apparel.  It is more or less 
Victoria’s Secret’s guide to college freshmen fashion.  It has printable coupons for college wear, contest 
opportunities, and fashion debate.  It has 1111 different discussions happening, some of which are 
approaching 10,000 posts.  Few of the topics cover the pros and cons of their products, but instead they 
focus more on directly interactive topics such as “Describe the girl who posted before you in one word” 
and “Who of the five people who posted above you could be Miss America?”   The tone for the group 
was that of a teenager’s dream of daily, positive affirmation.  Though the discussion revolved little 
around PINK products it was evident from the uploaded pictures that these are “superfans” who are 
always eager to sample new products.   
 
Both the PINK profiles (Facebook & MySpace) crosslisted to the opposing SNW.  Relative to the Jeep 
profiles they are limited in their interactivity, with their content being much more user driven.  My 
impression is that the roles of the PINK profiles are more about loyalty building, rather than driving sales 
directly. 
 
I assume that Jeep and PINK see themselves as successful as far as SNW’s are concerned because their 
efforts are receiving real attention from an important demographic—the 15‐30 year old demographic.  
Consider this:  Facebook.com claims to have over 61 million active users and MySpace.com claimed 106 
million users total in September of 2006iii .  Extrapolating their customer add rate to today would suggest 
300 million accounts.  More than half of Facebook’s active users are claimed to return to their profile 
daily with an average visit being 20 minutes.  (Anecdotal evidence suggests that the true amount of time 
spent is heavily skewed with an active core of patrons spending multiple hours logged in each day and 
many more users merely checking in a few times a week.)  You may be asking yourself the question, 
“Who has time for all this online socializing, in addition to their normal everyday obligations?”  The only 
answer I came up with is those young people without obligations to employers, dependents, nor, for the 
most part, significant others, who are seeking interaction and friends. In other words, high school and 
college students.  This makes sense, given the purposes for which these two SNW’s were created. 
 
What was clearly going well for Jeep and PINK was that they had provided an authoritative voice in the 
medium.  They provided an official presence, or home base if you will, that allowed them to control 
content for propriety, but still allowed free expression of ideas and frustration if necessary.  They were 
as “in charge” of their brands and images as they could possibly be in a semi‐freeform medium.  This I 
think is and will be the biggest motivating factor for most businesses to participate in SNW’s, public 
relations and damage control. 
 
Who Might Be Struggling? 
 
Dick’s Sporting Goods 
Dick’s Sporting Goods has chosen to use only a private group for its employees.  This restriction results 
in a pop‐up window for people who are looking for a Dick’s Sporting Goods group, which declares you 
need to have an official Dick’s Sporting Goods email address to join the group.  Of course, the seekers 
don’t have one, so they are left to peruse the other dozen or so groups that use the Dick’s logo to 
distinguish their group, but maintain names such as “Dick's Sporting Goods Could Burn To The Ground 
and I Wouldn't Care” and “Dick's Sporting Goods Store needs to die!!!!” 
 
Possibly the scariest aspect about these groups is that they all unabashedly use the Dick’s logo.  Even 
though the above mentioned sites are clearly not from the parent corporation of Dick’s Sporting Goods, 
others are much more subtle.  Some are run by local store employees for the benefit of the other store 
employees with whom they work, others are done just as a hobby, but include a great deal of 
commiserating about poor work conditions, mundane tasks, and vocalized desires to physically harm 
both good and bad customers.  Crass language was plentiful in all these groups regardless of disposition 
towards the company. 
 
What I would recommend to Dick’s, and others in the same situation, would be to begin 
hosting/moderating an official Dick’s group that is open to the public.  SNW’s provide a concentrated 
portal for various messages to be disseminated.  If these messages constitute misinformation or misuse 
of your logo then you should defend yourself, otherwise some of these imposter groups will gain 
credibility, or at the very least, dilute your brand and tarnish your image. 
 
Wal‐Mart Stores 
Wal‐Mart has the same problem with critics on SNW’s it has everywhere else.   Vocal anti‐Wal‐Mart 
groups outnumber the vocal pro‐Wal‐Mart groups about five to one, though none for either side seems 
to be able to muster more than 2000 members.  Reportedly, Wal‐Mart attempted a Facebook profile, 
but used it to dispense fashion advice which didn’t ring true with visitors iv .  Wal‐Mart made its name 
with low prices, not trend setting.  It was considered a failure by critics.  It seems to be content letting its 
loyalists fight some of the battle for them when it comes to SNW. 
 
Who Is Destined To Benefit From SNW’s? 
 
Those offering emotional goods more than rational goods it seems.  People selling something that 
qualifies as cool, keeping in mind that “cool” is defined  by the key demographic active in SNW’s, that 
being the 15‐25 year old demographic.  Cardinal points to keep in mind would be that you need to be in 
control of the product to bring credibility to the forum or advertising you are facilitating, that damage 
control may be the only reason to be involved with an SNW, that people are at those types of sites to be 
social and not to be sold to.  So if you offer content, it had better be entertaining, uplifting, or awe 
inspiring otherwise you risk generating bad will. 
 
Good Candidates For SNW Activity 
Examples of good candidates for SNW activity would be Apple Computers and ESPN X‐Games.  More 
generally, iconic restaurants and nightclubs in local and national markets, annual events relevant to the 
15‐25 year old demographic such as regional music fests, local and national sports teams, Spring Break 
travel agencies and destinations, bands, movies, fashion houses, “cool” automobile manufacturers and 
aftermarket modification suppliers, video game developers, chefs, and charitable establishments.  In 
essence, purveyors of leisure products and services, Dick’s Sporting Goods’ lackluster performance 
notwithstanding. 
 
Which Groups Will Not Benefit As Much From SNW Activity? 
Anyone catering to the over 55 crowd will see more challenges than most, though Facebook claims this 
demographic to be one of their faster growing segments.  As of early 2007, people not on the internet 
included two‐thirds of people over 65 and one‐third of people age 55‐64. 
 
Businesses selling commodities (or near commodities) will likely struggle.  Businesses that are so small 
that they cannot afford the time to police their group or keep their content updated and relevant will be 
overlooked.  Business to business models will likely find this venue to be irrelevant.  
 
Content dissemination by a business is difficult in an SNW, not just because the users of the medium 
aren’t looking to be fed, but also because the users are busy producing so much of their own content.  
Over 82,804 videos were uploaded on March 10, 2008 to MySpace.com alone.  If one of those videos 
was made by your firm it is unlikely that anyone watched it, especially if your business didn’t want your 
name to be the most prominent word in the title.  In fact, I found it quite difficult at times to retrace my 
steps to locate specific groups and videos in my research due to the vast number of the groups and 
picture archives.  None of their respective search functions is as sophisticated as Google’s, so even if 
your customers know exactly what to look for they may have trouble locating the file.  
 
Another Way An SNW Can Work For You 
 
It is becoming a popular practice for employers to scan SNW’s for profiles of job applicants going 
through the hiring process.  To date this has primarily been a method of elimination for candid 
undesirables, but many companies are also using SNW’s as a resource for finding candidates with 
abilities in high demand.  For instance, a Facebook search for “software Java” resulted in a group 
entitled JAVA hosted in England.  While it was originally created as a collective‐minds/community help 
desk, it also serves as a job posting board for people in need of JAVA experts.  Defense contractors and 
special project teams looking for a few good programmers are also benefitting from the free 
opportunity to reach 3,600 international JAVA lovers.  This doesn’t carry to the extreme end of the 
spectrum however, because even though MENSA has a its own group I didn’t find any job ads on its 
page looking for geniuses, and notably, many members indicated that their membership in MENSA had 
never helped them get a job.  The process can certainly work in reverse for a genius looking for just the 
right job.  Companies wanting applicants to apply with their eyes wide open can post videos or 
statements by current employees about what the job is really like.  This may be a more politically correct 
venue for managers to authorize more candor on the employee’s part than what might be desired on 
the corporate website, which in the end may save both parties valuable time. 
 
Conclusion 
In conclusion, it is my opinion that social networking websites are not built to facilitate business.  
Though inevitably a lucky few will make their fortune marketing through them, SNW’s should be looked 
at as simply an affordable venue to reach a very specific group of people for the purpose of engaging 
customers in candid, true‐to‐yourself interaction.  SNW’s are places better suited for gathering customer 
input than delivering taglines or propaganda. 
 
Time and data will tell if these predictions and recommendations are correct, but for now, for most 
businesses, I would put my advertising dollar into my own website, Google AdSense, and AdWords, and 
leave the social networks and blogospheres to the PR department. 
                                                            
i
  http://www.comscore.com/press/release.asp?press=2045, accessed 2/13/08 
ii
   For some, a noticeably absent name from the list above is LinkedIn.com.  LinkedIn.com is the most prominent 
business networking site, with its focus being facilitation of exchange of personal contacts, or in other words, let’s 
be explicit in sharing who we know individually so that we can collectively benefit from one another’s 
interpersonal resources.  Because LinkedIn.com has a specific, business oriented mission it doesn’t play in the 
same field that the purely recreational/social sites do, and is therefore not addressed in this paper 
iii
     http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/09/08/myspace_threatens_record_labels/, "MySpace music deal poses 
multiple threats", The Register, 2006‐09‐08, accessed 2/14/08 
iv
    http://social‐media‐optimization.com/?s=wal‐mart+facebook, A Failed Facebook Marketing Campaign, October 
11, 2007, accessed 1/06/08 

								
To top