CLIMATE ACTION PLAN The College

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					                 CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                             May 2010

Introduction

In January 2008, President R. Mark Sullivan committed The College of Saint Rose to the
American College and University President‘s Climate Commitment. This commitment was
announced as part of the College‘s January ―President‘s Day‖ program – an ―all-college‖
meeting of faculty, administration, and staff typically devoted to a particular theme(s) vital to the
College Mission. The theme of the January 2008 President‘s Day program was environmental
sustainability.

Subsequent to the President‘s Day program, a President‘s Climate Commitment Task Force
began the work of inventorying current efforts, developing baseline data, developing operational
ideas and plans, and launching short-term action plans. Key working groups of this process
included: waste minimization, transportation, facilities, curriculum, and greenhouse gas
inventory. The results of the planning activity are largely encapsulated in the plan, particularly
as detailed in Appendices I, II, and III, which are included herein. The membership of Task
Force participants is included in Appendix IV.


Plan Ele ments

Since January 2008, the College has initiated numerous mitigation strategies targeted specifically
to Scope I emissions. As part of this process, a ―green inventory‖ has been developed (Appendix
I) and has a related set of specific programs, policies, and plans (Appendix II). The College has
made considerable progress in understanding its pattern of GHG Emiss ions and has acted
affirmatively in both implementing strategies and in initiating plans and planning processes
which will lead to further action. In addition, a number of curricular, co-curricular, and
community education initiatives have been launched or enhanced (Appendix III).

The College‘s focus going forward will be to reduce total energy consumption considering
baseline data for electrical consumption (kWh/GSF), fossil fuel (BTU/GSF) and energy
consumption (BTU/GSF) which combines all electrical, na tural gas and oil usage for buildings
(not vehicle gas, diesel or other travel). Thus, mitigation actions will focus on total energy
consumption purchased electrically, gas and oil.

The College of Saint Rose is a growing institution. Since the year 2002, the Student Body has
grown 37%, from 3,341 to 4,587 enrolled students. Over that same period of time the physical
plant has also grown over 10% from total building square footage of 821,896sf in 2002 to
907,305sf today. Energy use in buildings is responsible for 60% of the total CO₂ production
globally. The College believes it can reach this five year goal by sustaining and extending
current initiatives as well as by planning and launching new initiatives. The College has made
many significant improvements to the physical plant over the past decade, event he in the past
five years. These improvements have included more efficient lighting, temperature controls,


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               CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                          May 2010

high performance windows, better insulation, more fuel efficient boilers and HVAC equipment,
etc. This also means that much of the low hanging fruit has been harvested and that moving
forward, reductions in carbon footprint will require a meaningful commitment by the College.

Commitments of the College’s Climate Action Plan include:

   1. The College will work aggressively to meet the emission target of 8% total energy
      consumption reduction below the five year average of 104,730 (BTU/GSF) by December
      2015.
   2. Sustain and extend initiatives in the areas of waste minimization, facilities management,
      energy use, transportation, and curricular/co-curricular/community education. In
      addition, the College is actively engaged in planning and launching new initiatives
      associated with these various areas.

       Appendices I, II, and III (below) detail the status, trajec tory, impact and/or potential
       impact of such initiatives.

   3. Key to this commitment is the inclusion of sustainability among the priorities of the
      2010-2015       Strategic Plan.         Implementation of the Climate Action
      Plan is included in this Strategic Plan. The S trategic Plan is the product of broad and
      inclusive campus input and is approved, ultimately, by the Board of Trustees.
   4. Finally, the Climate Action Plan is based on accountability and responsiveness given
      ―progress to plan‖ over time. This includes monitoring progress in meeting the
      institution‘s emission reduction target (#1, above) as well as in maintaining progress in
      implementing the various individual initiatives detailed in Appendices I, II, and III. As
      noted in these Appendices, moreover, accountab ility is supported by assigning plan
      responsibility to key and appropriate offices and administrations and/or task forces across
      campus. Significantly, there is broad support in the College of Saint Rose community for
      the many sustainability programs outlined in Appendices I, II, and III. Appendix IV, for
      example, suggests the breadth of depth of support for the plan. The College can tap an
      emerging environmental consciousness as it works to implement and refine this Climate
      Action Plan.




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                         CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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         Appendix I: How does the College of Saint Rose Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle?


Conservation Measure                                          Environmental Impact       Annualized Savings

Print Management System                                       Reduce Waste               $ 2,204.32

The Print Management System in computer labs and classrooms was implemented in the fall of 2007 saving an
estimated 30,000 sheets of paper per semester. Faculty members and instructors are encouraged to utilize
electronic alternatives to reduce the need for printing and photocopying. Some courses are one- hundred percent
paperless. Assignments are submitted electronically, online discussion boards are utilized and tests and quizzes are
administered and graded via computer.

Electronic Processes                                          Reduce Waste               Not Determined

The College continues to implement electronic processes to reduce related costs and conserve resources. The
Registrar‘s Office converted its paper based course registration lottery system into an electronic system thereby
reducing paper, printing and postage costs. All grade submissions to the Registrar are also electronic. The
Facilities work order request system was also converted to a web-based system. Human Resources moved to an
electronic job application process. The Safety and Security Department has made parking permit and vehicle rental
reservations available on- line. Time sheet submittal, bill payments and open enrollment are all accessible
electronically. The College has also implemented various web accessible self service systems that end users can
access information and complete data entry tasks while reducing the need for the printing of reports and other
paper documents.
Electronic Equipment Donation
and Recycling Program                                         Reduce Waste                 $ 3,000.00

When the College purchases new computers and other electronic equipment, it tries to reuse the older equipment
whenever possible. If they are not needed on campus, the old equipment is offered for donation to schools and non-
profit groups. Finally, if they cannot be donated, the College contracts with a certified recycling company to
recycle the equipment.

Waste Recycling Programs                                      Reduce Waste               Estimated 34 tons/year

Currently the College has recycling programs for paper and corrugated cardboard (in collaboration with BOCES
program), lead and acid based batteries, printer ink cartridges, fluorescent tube lights and waste oil. "Single -
stream" recycling has also been expanded to all buildings on campus. Dining Services also recycles fryer grease
for bio-diesel fuel.

Organic Waste Recycling                                       Reduce Waste               Not Determined

Recycling options for Dining Services organic waste are being investigated in coordination with Facilities, Risk
Management, BOCES and the Environmental committee and may eventually be composted and/or reused on or
off-campus.
Dining Services Procure ment                               Reduce Waste


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                         CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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                                                                                           Not Determined

Biodegradable alternatives have been introduced to reduce Styrofoam, plastic and paper waste from Dining
Services. Aramark contracts with food suppliers committed to buying as much local produce as possible. Dining
services has been tray- less since 2006.
                                                           Reduce Waste/Reduce
Responsible Buildings/Facilities                           Cons umption                Not Determined

All major construction and renovation projects include energy efficient windows.

Phased conversion of all standard hand paper towel dispensers to ―En Motion‖ dispensers (12 dispensers‘ annual
estimated savings - $2000).

Installation of water savings plumbing fixtures ex: water saver shower heads, metered hand washing faucets, low
flow toilets

Installation of humidity sensing exhaust fans in major construction and renovation projects.

Inclusion of motion sensor light switches in major construction and renovation projects (estimated 12% energy
savings).

Conversion of all primary main kitchen cooking appliances from electric to natural gas.

Purchase of ENERGY STAR certified products whenever possible ex: appliances, reflective asphalt roof shingles.

Inclusion of products and that contain recycled content for deferred maintenance upgrades including solid surface
countertops for restrooms and kitchens, carpet and floor tile.

Installation of high efficiency direct vent boilers during the deferred maintenance replacement process.

Installation of building envelope insulation has been included with all building-wide deferred maintenance
upgrades.

Installation of high velocity hand dryers in high usage restrooms is planned with the initial installation of these
units in the EAC first floor public restrooms. These units use minimal electricity to generate a high velocity of air.
These units will provide a cost reduction from the existing paper towel program, will eliminate storage needs, and
will reduce waste removal cost.
                                                              Reduce Waste/Reduce
Computer Procure ment                                         Cons umption                 Not Determined

The College purchases approximately ninety percent of its computers from Lenovo who has been ranked by
Greenpeace as the number one company out of fourteen global electronics manufacturers in regard to using
environmentally friendly manufacturing processes.
Furniture Procure ment                                     Reduce Waste/Reduce



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                         CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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                                                             Cons umption                Not Determined

The College purchases office furniture from Groupe Lacasse who has been recognized by Greenguard
Environmental Institute (GEI) for Indoor Air Quality Certification and Children & Schools Certification.
                                                            Reduce Waste/Reduce
Office Supply Procurement                                   Cons umption              Not Determined

Both Staples & Office Max have a long line of items that are environmentally friendly – high recycled content,
higher ease of recyclability, reduced energy consumption, remanufactured, refillable items, etc. Office Max also
uses bio-diesel trucks. The College is currently investigating a mandatory green supply list for commonly used
items.
                                                             Reduce Waste/Reduce
Paper Procurement                                            Cons umption               Not Determined

The College purchases our paper from Xpedx who in 2007 became the first and only US paper merchant to be
nationally certified for chain of custody to both Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) and Forest Stewardship
Council (FSC). The College is investigating the use of additional available certified products.
                                                              Reduce Waste/Reduce
Document Services                                             Cons umption                  Not Determined

IKON, the College‘s document management service provider, recycles toner cartridges and utilizes remanufactured
cartridges. Future plans include SFI and FSC printer certification.
                                                            Reduce Electrical
Network Refresh Project                                     Cons umption             $ 125.00

The network refresh project reduced initial power consumption in the Network Operations Center by 1 kilowatt.
Since the equipment is on 24 hours a day that equates to 24 kilowatts a day; saving the College the equivalent of
240 100-watt light bulbs operated for an hour a day. Continued efforts will reduce power consumption by an
additional 3 kilowatts.
                                                            Reduce Electrical
Server Reduction                                            Cons umption                 Not Determined

Energy cost savings of energy consumption and cooling requirements have been realized by reducing the number
of physical servers required from 50 to 5 while increasing the utilization levels of remaining servers by moving as
many server-based applications as feasible into virtual machines through the use of VMware.
Electrical Ampe rage Load                                    Reduce Electrical
Reduction                                                    Cons umption                  Not Determined

Core network switching amp load was reduced from 160-amps to 24-amps. A savings of 85% reduced amp load.
                                                       Reduce Fuel
Solar Powe red Heat                                    Cons umption               Not Determined

The College is working with an engineering firm to perform a study to determine the feasibility of using solar
energy to heat the swimming pool water. The study is expected to take place during the summer of 2009 with the
potential of installation during FY 2010, should the study generate positive outcomes.


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                         CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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                                                                                           40% energy reduction to
Lighting Conversions                                           Reduce Consumption         light major buildings

Converted to electronic lighting ballasts campus-wide.

Converted fluorescent tube lighting from T-12 to T-8 bulbs in all major buildings. Specify T-5 lamps for new
construction.

Phased conversion to mini- fluorescents from incandescent lighting campus-wide.

                                                                                          25-30% reduction in
Energy Management System                                       Reduce Consumption         consumption

Installed and expanded the computerized Energy Management System

Electrical Load-Shedding                                       Reduce Consumption         $ 12,000.00

Contracted with EnerNoc for an electrical load-shedding program.
Leadership in Ene rgy and
Environmental Design (LEED)                               Reduce Consumption              Not Determined

The Massry Center for the Arts will be a GOLD Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)
certified building by satisfying various requirements related to sustainability, water efficiency, atmosphere, use of
materials, indoor environmental quality and design innovation.
New York State
Energy Research and Development Authority                    Reduce Consumption             $ 58,000.00+

Received energy rebates from NYSERDA for systems in design of the Thelma P. Lally School of Education
                                                      Reduce Consumption/
LCD Computer Monitor                                  Reduce Harmful
Conve rsion                                           Emissions                   Not Determined

Conversion of CRT computer monitors to more energy efficient LCD monitors, which contain much less heavy
metals, making them less damaging to the environment. For example, CRT monitors typically contain more than
four pounds of lead while LCD monitors contain virtually no lead.
                                                          Reduce Consumption/
                                                          Reduce Harmful
Facilities Procure ment                                   Emissions                Not Determined

Introduced ―green seal certified‖ custodial cleaning products, ―Magic Salt‖, consisting of natural rock salt and an
organic mixture for application during inclement winter weather and ―Hudson River Gold‖, a locally produced
high BTU organic planting bed material. Phased conversion to micro fiber custodial wet mops which utilize 95%
less cleaning chemicals and water to operate through life span of mop head - an estimate annual savings of 36,000
gallons of water. More efficient floor scrubbers reducing water and chemical consumption by 50% are also being


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                         CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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phased in.

                                                              Reduce Harmful
Contract for Green Powe r                                     Emissions                   Not Determined

Through a contract with Integrys the College has committed to the purchase of Green-e certified wind REC's equal
to 10% of their annual electricity usage. This purchase supports the development of renewable generation and
avoids 407 metric tons of CO 2 per year. This contract entitles the College to participation in EPA's Green Power
Partnership which provides technical support and guidance on future green power purchasing.
                                                             Reduce Harmful
Alte rnative Transportation                                  Emissions                     Not Determined

The use of bicycles for Facilities and Safety & Security personnel on campus transportation continues to increase.
The "Shuttle-U-Home" program and increased foot and bicycle security patrols are also expected to reduce
emissions. Through an agreement with the Capital District Transportation Authority, campus community are
provided no cost access to specific bus routes. Reserved designated parking spaces are available for Car Pools and
Low Emission Vehicles.
                                                             Reduce Harmful
Electric Transportation                                      Emissions                  Not Determined

Global Electric Motorcars (GEM vehicles) are utilized by Facilities personnel.

Initiated the conversion of the Facilities gasoline powered utility work vehicles to electric power with the
replacement of a gas utility vehicle in FY 2009. Facilities will continue to purchase electric powered utility
vehicles as replacements are scheduled.
                                                             Reduce Harmful
College Transportation Fleet                                 Emissions                      Not Determined

New vans being added to the College fleet are E85 capable and future purchases will continue to transition away
from fossil fuels.

                                                                                           30% reduction in
Energy Recovery Units                                         Increase Efficiency         consumption

Installed Energy Recovery Units (ERUs) replacing standard rooftop Air Handling Units (AHUs) during
renovations and new construction.
Aramark "Green Thread"
Program                                                  Education                   Not Determined

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recognized ARAMARK as a leader in the cause to raise
awareness of environmental and conservation issues. The College participates in their ―Green Thread‖ program
which addresses long-term environmental stewardship programs and policies that are ―woven‖ through the
everyday operations including: sustainable food, green buildings, waste management, responsible procurement,
energy and water conservation as well as transportation.
College Council Forum                                       Education


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                       CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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                                                                                    Not Determined

The College is now a member of the College Council Forum, a listserve provided by the New York State
Association for Reduction, Reuse and Recycling Inc (NYSAR3). Through this forum, the College will be able to
share best environmental practices and access the collective knowledge and expertise of the environmental
professionals who make up the NYSAR3.




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               CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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           Appendix II: Climate Actions: Programs, Policies and Plans
Table of Contents
A. Waste Minimization and Energy Use Reduction
   1. Waste Recycling Programs
   2. Sustainability House
   3.   Reduce Your Use Residence Hall Energy Project
   4. Energy Efficient Appliances in Residence Halls
   5. Organic Waste Composting
   6. Print Management System
   7. Electronic Processes
   8. Electronic Equipment Donation and Recycling Program
   9. Dining Services Procurement
   10. Dining Services Trayless Policy
   11. Computer Procurement
   12. Office Supply Procurement
   13. Paper Procurement
   14. Document Services
   15. Network Refresh Project
   16. Server Reduction
   17. Electrical Load Shedding
   18. LCD Computer Monitor Conversion
   19. Contract for Green Power
   20. Energy Recovery Units
   21. Aramark ―Green Thread‖ Program
   22. College Council Forum Membership
   23. Board of Trustees/Cabinet Paper Reduction Initiative
   24. Measurement and Advertisement of Food Waste from Dining Hall
   25. Minimize Plasticware Use at Small Events
   26. Microwave Policy
   27. Refrigerator Policy



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                CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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   28. Laundry Policy
   29. Recyclmania
B. Transportation
   30. Alternative Transportation
   31. Parking Incentives
   32. College Transportation Fleet
   33. Familiarization with Public Bus (CDTA) Routes
   34. Electric Transportation
   35. Transportation Usage Survey
C. Facilities Policies and Procedures
   36. USGBC –LEED Certification (Gold)
   37. Building/Facilities Management
   38. Facilities Procurement
   39. Lighting Conversions
   40. Energy Audit
   41. Energy Management System
   42. Make-up Water Treatment System for Cooling Tower
   43. Policy Audit




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                CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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            Appendix II: Climate Actions: Programs, Policies and Plans
A. Waste Minimization and Energy Use Reduction

  1. Waste Recycling Programs
       Contact: John Bryant/Chuck Kimberling

         a) Description:
            Currently, the College has recycling programs for paper and corrugated cardboard,
            lead and acid based batteries, printer ink cartridges, fluorescent tube lights and waste
            oil. The recycling program has been expanded to student residence halls; each
            resident house has its own recycling bin and each room in each dor mitory has its
            own bin. Dining Services also recycles fryer grease for bio-diesel fuel. Recycling of
            office paper occurs in most administrative areas.
         b) Action Plan:
            The College intends to continue its recycling programs. We have purchased and
            placed ―single-stream‖ recycle containers at the exterior of every building on
            campus. In addition, each individual residential unit now includes a recycling
            container. This will expand to the installation of interior containers at all locations
            within the next 12 months. Extending recycling capacity to all faculty office areas is
            a priority in the next 24 months.
         c) Anticipated Impacts:
            These recycling programs will decrease the amount of waste deposited in landfills by
            approximately 28 tons per year. With greater student and employee participation in
            the program, it is anticipated to increase the amount recycled vs. landfill waste by an
            additional 20% or 5-6 tons of increased recycling over the next 12 months.


  2. Sustainability House
        Contact: Jen Richardson (Residence Life)

         a) Description:
            The Sustainability House is a residence house. All 14 residents of the house have
            made a commitment to living as sustainably as they can. For example, they limit
            their use of water, compost their organic waste, and recycle. In addition, residents
            are provided incentives to reduce appliance use, heating, and lighting. Windows are
            wrapped during winter months. Appliances that are not in use are unplugged.
         b) Action Plan:
            The College will continue its support of and work with the Sustainability House. In
            addition, the House will serve as a model to identify and implement ―best practices‖
            to be applied in the new ―Reduce Your Use Residence Hall Energy Project‖
            (reported as a separate item in the appendix).
         c) Anticipated Impacts:
            The living habits of the residents of the Sustainability House will decrease energy
            use and waste production. The College will use the House as a demonstration site to



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               CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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           develop, assess, and share best practices across campus. After one year of operation,
           the house is averaging savings of approximately 594 kWh each month (year-to-year
           comparisons). The ―Reduce Your Use‖ project will work to extend such gains to
           other similar housing units. Residents of the House typically are campus advocates
           and activists (e.g. support and lead Environmental Club activities such as
           ―Sustainability –The Musical‖). Energy savings ideas have been and will be used as
           a rationale for campus-wide policies restricting refrigerator and microwave use.


3. Reduce Your Use Residence Hall Energy Project
      Contact: Christina Zontini (Environmental Club)

       a) Description:
          This project will educate resident students about how much energy they have been
          using, and encourage them to reduce their energy use. Effort will be made to apply
          ―best practices‖ of the Sustainability House to other student resident halls.
       b) Action Plan:
          This project is currently I the development stage by members of the Environmental
          Club in collaboration with the Facilities Department. The residents of each house
          will receive information about the energy use of the house the previous year. The
          College will then challenge the students to reduce their use of energy, in order to
          reduce the total amount of energy used by the house.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          This project will reduce the use of energy. This will be measure by comparing year-
          to-year energy bills compiled by facilities and the Business Office.


4. Energy Efficient Appliances in Residence Halls
      Contact: John Bryant/Chuck Kimberling and Joe Pryba

       a) Description:
          When the College must replace the appliances in residence halls, it replaces them
          with energy efficient ones. This includes washers, dryers, refrigerators, microwaves,
          etc.
       b) Action Plan:
          The College will continue to replace old appliances in residence hall with energy
          efficient ones. The planned replacement of appliances is ten (10) per year campus
          wide.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          This will reduce energy use. By replacing existing appliances with new ―Energy
          Star‖ equipment, the average increase in efficiency is 30% per unit.


5. Organic Waste Composting
      Contact: Jen Richardson (Residence Life) and John Bryant/Chuck Kimberling (Facilities)



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               CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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       a) Description:
          Residents of the Sustainability House encourage other members of the campus
          community to use their composter.
       b) Action Plan:
          Until all resident students have means to recycle their organic waste, they will be
          permitted to use the composter at the Sustainability House. Current discussion by
          ARAMARK Facilities Department and Environmental Club relates to (a) increasing
          composting systems and capacities; and (b) utilizing composting for care of campus
          grounds.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          Composting will minimize organic waste.


6. Print Management System
      Contact: John Ellis (ITS)

       a) Description:
          The Print Management System in computer labs and classrooms was implemented in
          the fall of 2007, saving an estimated 30,000 sheets of paper per semester. Faculty
          members and instructors are encouraged to utilize electronic alternatives to reduce
          the need for printing and photocopying. Some courses are one- hundred percent
          paperless. Assignments are submitted electronically, online discussion boards are
          utilized and tests and quizzes are administered and graded via computer.
       b) Action Plan:
          The College will continue the Print Management System a nd encouraging instructors
          and students to use electronic documents as much as possible. Each semester the
          Academic Computing Committee reviews the Print Management System to
          determine if the student print quota is adequate for their academic needs. During the
          New Faculty Orientation program, new faculty members are advised of the student
          print quotas and they are encouraged to utilize alternatives to printing such as e-mail
          attachments, web site postings of content and use of the Blackboard learning
          management system. The Executive Director of Information Services meets
          regularly with the Student Association (SA) to discuss the Print Management
          System. While some students request increases to the print quota, the majority of SA
          representatives agree that it is important to maintain the current quota as a ―Green
          Initiative‖.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          The Print Management System reduces paper waste, and reminds the campus to be
          mindful of their use of resources. Prior to the implementation of the College‘s Print
          Management System in July of 2005, students printed an average of 153 pages per
          semester. Currently, students print an average of 82 pages per semester which is a
          reduction of about 46%.




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               CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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7. Electronic Processes
      Contact: ITS/John Ellis

       a) Description:
          The College continues to implement electronic processes to reduce related costs and
          conserve resources. The Registrar‘s Office converted its paper based course
          registration lottery system into an electronic system thereby reducing paper, printing
          and postage costs. All grade submissions to the Registrar are also electronic. The
          Facilities work order request system was also converted to a web-based system.
          Human Resources moved to an electronic job application process. The Safety and
          Security Department has made parking permit and vehicle rental reservations
          available on- line. The College has also implemented various web accessible self
          service systems so that end users can access information and complete data entry
          tasks while reducing the need for the printing of reports and other paper documents.
          The College has implemented Nolij Web which is an electronic document
          management and workflow system. Nolij Web allows users to add documents that
          are already in electronic formats or to electronically scan paper based documents.
          Users can then store, retrieve, send and manage documents based on business rules.
          These documents can be automatically directed to other users or departments based
          on workflow criteria. To date Undergraduate Admissions, Graduate Admissions, the
          Registrar‘s Office and Health Services have been brought up live on Nolij Web. The
          College went with electronic submission of regular employee timesheets
          (approximately 130 sheets every payday). The College has also implemented the E-
          Bill (approximately 20,000 bills sent out annually). The HR Department‘s transition
          to an electronic job application process saves a significant amount of paper
          (employee       resumes/applications      and     copies    circulated    to     hiring
          managers/committees). In calendar year 2009, Human Resources saved the College
          32,718 pieces of paper by accepting applications and resumes for all of its staff,
          administrator, and faculty positions electronically. Similarly, the transition to
          electronic open enrollment saves paper (estimate process saves approximately 2400
          pieces of 8.5x11 paper and 600 large envelopes annually).
       b) Action Plan:
          The College will continue the current electronic processes, and encourage the
          transition to electronic processes in other departments. The next areas that are being
          looked at to utilize NOLIJ are the Financial Services area and The Career Center.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          Electronic processes reduce paper waste and reduce related costs. Paper storage
          needs and costs are dramatically reduced, even eliminated, when files are kept
          electronically, eliminating the need for thousands of student, vendor and donor
          records to be kept stored in file cabinets. Now that Graduate Admissions is utilizing
          NOLIJ in its admission process the need to copy and have multiple file folders has
          been eliminated. Faculty reviewers can be in their office or anywhere with web
          access and review applicants when it is convenient for them rather than having to go
          to Graduate Admissions and go through file folders. The process has been




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              CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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          streamlined while staying true to the original intent of the admission process of
          recruiting the best students for the various graduate programs.


8. Electronic Equipment Donation and Recycling Program
      Contact: Mike Stratton

       a) Description:
          When the College purchases new computers and other electronic equipment, it tries
          to reuse the older equipment whenever possible. If they are not needed on campus,
          the old equipment is offered for donation to schools and non-profit groups. Finally,
          if they cannot be donated, the College contracts with a certified recycling company
          to recycle the equipment.
       b) Action Plan:
          The College will continue to follow this procedure.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          Reusing and recycling electronic equipment reduces waste.

   2008-2009 Fiscal Year
   Electronic Equipment    Units Donated                Units Sent to Certified Recycler
   Computers               162                          55
   Monitors                15                           15
   Laptop Computers        27
   Macintosh Computers     22
   Televisions             2                            5
   Overhead Projectors                                  4
   Network Switches                                     5
   Printers                                             2
   Cassette Tape Decks                                  1
   Speakers                14
   Digital Cameras                                      1
   Touch Screen Displays                                6
   Media Processors                                     6
   A/C Power Controls                                   6
   Distribution Blocks                                  6
   CD/Tape/Radio Units                                  1
   Slide Projectors                                     1


9. Dining Services Procure ment
      Contact: Rich Meigel

       a) Description:


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               CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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          Biodegradable alternatives have been introduced to reduce Styrofoam, plastic and
          paper waste from Dining Services. Aramark contracts with food suppliers
          committed to buying as much local produce as possible.
       b) Action Plan:
          This procurement will continue for the foreseeable future. Procurement policy of
          cleaning supplies is being researched relative to developing similar reduction
          possibilities.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          This procurement reduces waste. Biodegradable alternatives will increase the speed
          of degradation at the landfill. Buying local produce sustains local farmers.
          Examples of impacts currently occurring:
        Biodegradable plates replacing foam/plastic ---- 107,500 less Styrofoam or plastic
          plates going to the landfill per year
        Natural unbleached napkins replacing bleached ---- 871,200 less bleached or treated
          napkins going to the landfill per year
        Biodegradable forks, knives, spoons replacing individually wrapped plastic ware ----
          208,900 less plastic forks, knives, spoons and wrappers going to the landfill
        Ketchup, mustard dispensers replacing bottles ---- 34,492 less plastic bottles vs. 545
          poly bags going to the landfill
        Sugar dispenser replaces sugar packets ---- 72,000 less paper packets vs. 312 bags
          going to the landfill.


10. Dining Services Trayless Policy
       Contact: Rich Meigel

       a) Description:
          The dining halls have been trayless for nine (9) semesters. This lends to reduce the
          amount of food waste.
       b) Action Plan:
          The College continues to remain trayless.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          Plan to see a reduction in water, chemical, and food waste. The estimated water
          savings is 1/3 to 1/2 gallon of water per tray. The estimated food savings is 6oz per
          person each day (about 3800 lbs a week), and 1.8 cents per gallon of water heated.


11. Computer Procure ment
      Contact: John Ellis (ITS)

       a) Description:
          The College purchases approximately 90% of its computers from Lenovo which has
          received gold level ratings from the Electronic Product Environmental Assessment
          Tool (EPEAT). EPEAT is a ―procurement tool designed to help purchasers in the
          public and private sectors evaluate, compare and select electronic products (currently


                                              16
               CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                           May 2010

          desktop and notebook/laptop computers and monitors) based on their environmental
          attributes.‖ EPEAT is managed and operated by the Green Electronics Council. The
          remaining 10% of computers purchased by the College are Macintosh computers
          which are manufactured by Apple. Apple also received gold level ratings from
          EPEAT.
       b) Action Plan:
          The College will continue to purchase approximately 90% of its computers from
          Lenovo with the remaining 10% of computer purchases coming from Apple. The
          College will monitor both companies to make sure that they continue to engage in
          green business and manufacturing practices. If it is determined that their green
          efforts are not adequate, the College may decide to purchase its computers from
          other companies.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          This procurement will reduce waste and consumption. Lenovo‘s corporate
          sustainability          report        can          be            found            at:
          http://www.lenovo.com/social_responsibility/us/en/FY2009_Lenovo_Sustainability_
          Report.pdf
          Highlights of the report include:
        Lenovo prohibits the use of ozone-depleting substances in its products, processes and
          the processes of its suppliers.
        Lenovo ThinkCentre desktop computers contain 30% post-consumer recycled plastic
          resin
        Lenovo ThinkVision monitors are Energy Star EPEAT Gold certified.

           All of Apple Computers‘ products with the exception of its power cords are now
           PVC and BFR free. Lenovo has pushed back its goal of eliminating PVC‘s and
           BPR‘s until later in 2010.


12. Office Supply Procurement
       Contact: Pat Buckley (Purchasing)

       a) Description:
          Both Staples and Office Max have a long line of items that are environmentally
          friendly – high recycled content, higher ease of recyclability, reduced energy
          consumption, remanufactured, refillable items, etc. Office Max also uses bio-diesel
          trucks. The College is currently investigating a mandatory green supply list for
          commonly used items. Currently the campus community is (s/b) purchasing off the
          contracted list of commonly used office supplies to ensure they are getting the lowest
          possible price for the item they are looking for. They can also perform a search on
          that item and receive several options and prices to select from. Departments are set
          up as the Department head has requested; however, they can have layers of approval
          to ensure that only contracted items are purchased to lower the cost of office
          supplies. No equipment or furniture can be order on- line.
       b) Action Plan:


                                              17
               CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                           May 2010

          The College will continue to pursue purchasing more environmentally responsible
          office supplies. Moving forward, with the approval of the VPFA, we will institute a
          ‗green‘ inventory list of commonly used office supplies. This will be I place by
          Summer 2010. There will not be an option to go off this list without approval of the
          purchasing department and with approval of the VPFA. We can have the system
          substitute all requests with ‗green‘ items‘ when they are available for the item in
          question. This will be communicated to the campus community when it is available
          in April; if approved by VPFA.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          The College‘s purchase and use of environmentally responsible office supplies will
          reduce both waste and consumption. Chosen supplier will be able to forward reports
          quarterly showing the number of trees saved, metal saved, emissions reduced, etc.


13. Paper Procurement
       Contact: Pat Buckley (Purchasing)

       a) Description:
          The College purchases its paper from Xpedx who in 2007 became the first and only
          US paper merchant to be nationally certified for chain of custody to both Sustainable
          Forestry Initiative (SFI) and Forest Stewardship Council (FSC). The College is
          investigating the use of additional available certified products.
       b) Action Plan:
          The College will continue to purchase its paper from Xpedx, and investigate other
          certified products. An RFP went out for paper recently. Presentations from three (3)
          paper suppliers will take place on 3/25/10. The findings will be reviewed with the
          VPFA shortly thereafter.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          By purchasing paper from Xpedx, and products from other certified companies, the
          College is reducing both waste and consumption. Supplier will begin reporting
          reduction of waste, consumption, emissions, etc. on a quarterly basis.


14. Document Services
       Contact: Pat Buckley (Purchasing)

       a) Description:
          IKON, the College‘s document management service provider, recycles toner
          cartridges and uses remanufactured cartridges. IKON is also investigating becoming
          Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) and Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) printer
          certified.
       b) Action Plan:
          IKON will continue these procedures. A chain of custody must be identified and
          certified for the paper ordered. In working with our paper supplier, the copy center




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               CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                         May 2010

           will learn the steps required to close the loop and become certified. Additional
           paperwork and storage locations need to be completed by the copy center.
        c) Anticipated Impacts:
           These procedures will reduce waste and consumption. Our paper supplier will be
           able to report on the reduction of waste & consumption. This can be put in place
           once the paper RFP is finalized…s/b April 2010.


15. Network Refresh Project
       Contact: John Ellis (ITS)

        a) Description:
           The network refresh project reduced initial power consumption in the Network
           Operations Center by one kilowatt. Since the equipment is on 24 hours per day,
           which equates to 24 kilowatts per day; this saves the College 240 100-watt light
           bulbs operated for an hour a day.
        b) Action Plan:
           Continued efforts will reduce power consumption by an additional 3 kilowatts. The
           next phase of the network refresh will look at reducing the number of network core
           switches and making sure they are as energy efficient as possible.
        c) Anticipated Impacts:
           This project reduces energy use. Without having the network operations center
           separately metered and isolated from the rest of the campus, the measurements are
           based on anticipated savings from the vendors.


16. Server Reduction
       Contact: John Ellis (ITS)

        a) Description:
           Energy cost savings of energy consumption and cooling requirements have been
           realized by reducing the number of physical servers required from 50 to 5 while
           increasing the utilization levels of remaining servers by moving as many server-
           based applications as feasible into virtual machines through the use of VMware.
        b) Action Plan:
           With the recent changes in the Network Operations Center (NOC) in Saint Joseph
           Hall, servers will now be on a new power management plan. This plan operates
           based on the demand for server resources. Servers will be turning off and on,
           without human interaction, in the racks found in the NOC. This will be the normal
           operating procedure as demand for computing resources decreases at night and
           resumes in the morning. It will not be uncommon during certain times to find 4-6
           servers powered off during non peak times. This plan is targeted to save large
           amounts of electrical power used by the NOC during off hours.
        c) Anticipated Impacts:




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              CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                          May 2010

           Server reduction minimizes energy use. Currently ITS configured four servers to
           shut down under light usage in order to conserve electricity. The following
           calculations are based on the industry standard of commercial electrical rates of
           $0.11 per KWh.
           Each server utilizes 0.443 KWh
                   Since each server is on 24 hours a day that equals 10,632 W/hours per server
                   10,632 W/hours * 30 days a month = 318,960 W/ hours per server
                   318,960 W/ hours = 318.96 KWh per server per month
                   318.96 KWh * $0.11 = $35.09 per server per month to operate
           Since ITS has reduced the electrical load by four servers, the yearly estimated
           savings are approximately $1,684.32.
            This is only the first step in conserving power. The expectation is that ITS will
           reduce the power used by servers in the future with more dynamic resource
           scheduling of tasks and powering down more servers.


17. Electrical Load Shedding
       Contact: John Bryant/Chuck Kimberling

       a) Description:
          The College contracted with EnerNoc for an electrical load-shedding program. This
          service takes the majority of our electrical load off of the grid during peak times
          when power usage is at its greatest to assist National Grid in preventing brown-out
          situations.
       b) Action Plan:
          We will explore the possibility of peak demand load curtailment in order to reduce
          power grid consumption during times of highest demand as defined by the utility
          supplier.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          Electrical load shedding reduced energy use.          Cost avoidance is the only
          measurement of impact.


18. LCD Computer Monitor Conve rsion
      Contact: Mike Stratton

       a) Description:
          The College is converting CRT computer monitors (4+ lb. lead) to more energy
          efficient LCD monitors (virtually no lead).
       b) Action Plan:
          The College will continue this conversion. 1,085 CRT monitors have been replaced
          with LCD monitors over the past four years. It is projected that the remaining 125
          CRT monitors will be replaced within the next two years.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:




                                              20
              CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                         May 2010

           This conversion will reduce both consumption and harmful emissions. On average,
           the CRT monitors consumed 313 kilowatts of electricity per year compared to LCD
           monitors which consume an average of 73 kilowatts of electricity per year. The old
           CRT monitors were sent to certified electronics recycler companies. So far, the
           conversion of CRT monitors with LCD monitors reduces the consumption of
           electricity by approximately 260,400 kilowatts per year. Once all of the CRT
           monitors are replaced with LCD monitors, the College will consume approximately
           266,400 fewer kilowatts of electricity per year.


19. Contract for Green Powe r
       Contact: John Bryant/Chuck Kimberling

       a) Description:
          Through a contract with Integrys, the College has committed to the purchase of
          Green-e certified wind REC‘s equal to 10% of its annual electricity usage over a ten
          year period. This contract entitles the College to participation in EPA‘s Green
          Power Partnership which provides technical support and guidance on future green
          power purchasing.
       b) Action Plan:
          The College may commit to increasing the total percentage, or contract duration for
          purchased power from sustainable sources, but this depends on financial
          commitments.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          This purchase reduces harmful emissions and supports the development of renewable
          generation and avoids 407 metric tons of CO2 per year.


20. Energy Recovery Units
       Contact: John Bryant/Chuck Kimberling

       a) Description:
          During renovations and new construction, standard rooftop Air Handling Units
          (AHUs) have been replaced with Energy Recovery Units (ERUs). C urrently, two
          were installed on campus (one at Massry Center and one at EAC).
       b) Action Plan:
          We are currently exploring a replacement unit for CAC that is more energy efficient
          than conventional roof-top air conditioning units. These units will be considered for
          any new construction and major renovation-driven replacements.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          This conversion increased energy efficiency. No measurements are available, since
          the energy recovery units are in new applications; however they typically reduce
          energy use by 30%.




                                              21
               CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                          May 2010

21. ARAMARK “Green Thread” Program
      Contact: John Bryant/Chuck Kimberling

        a) Description:
           The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recognized ARAMARK as a
           leader in the cause to raise awareness of environmental and conservation issues. The
           College participates in their ―Green Thread‖ program which addresses long-term
           environmental stewardship programs and policies that are ―woven‖ through the
           everyday operations including: sustainable food, green buildings, waste
           management, responsible procurement, energy and water conservation, as well as
           transportation.
        b) Action Plan:
           The College will continue its participation in the ―Green Thread‖ program.
           ARAMARK will continue to partner with the College‘s sustainability plan to ensure
           that it meets their commitments.
        c) Anticipated Impacts:
           ARAMARK‘s corporate commitment provides strong leadership from a prime
           vender in implementing a wide array of initiatives.


22. College Council Forum Membership
       Contact: John Bryant/Chuck Kimberling

        a) Description:
           The College is a member of the College Council Forum, a listserve provided by the
           New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse and Recycling Inc (NYSAR3).
        b) Action Plan:
           The College will continue its participation in the College Council Forum.
        c) Anticipated Impacts:
           Through this forum, the College will be able to share best environmental practices
           and access the collective knowledge and expertise of the environmental professionals
           who make up the NYSAR3.


23. Board of Trustees/Cabinet Paper Reduction Initiative
       Contact: Deb Liberatore (Assistant to the President)

        a) Description:
           In support of the regular Board of Trustees meetings, the College makes copies of
           numerous documents for each Board Member and Administrator attendee. For
           example, it is estimated that approximately 11,000 pages of documents were printed
           in support of the Board of Trustees meetings last year. Approximately one half of
           these pages were printed on both sides of each page.
        b) Action Plan:




                                              22
               CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                            May 2010

          The Board of Trustees approved a plan for the College to begin piloting a project to
          use its Learning Management System, Blackboard, to disseminate Board Meeting
          documents electronically in order to reduce the need for printed documents. Board
          members can bring their own laptop computers to the Board Meetings or borrow a
          College laptop computer for the meetings. So far, five of the Board Committees have
          committed to using the Blackboard system to disseminate their documents rather
          than have the documents printed.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          It is expected that most Board Members will easily switch to the electronic version
          of the documents dissemination. The pilot test should result in a reduction of several
          thousand printed pages per board meeting and several hundred pages per each
          separate standing Committee meeting. The more important anticipated outcome
          though will be the successful demonstration that technology resources can be
          efficiently utilized to reduce the College‘s needs to print paper documents.


24. Measure ment and Advertisement of Food Waste from Dining Hall
      Contact: Rich Meigel (ARAMARK)

       a) Description:
          Employees of ARAMARK will measure the food waste from the dining hall, and
          provide this information to the students as a way of increasing awareness – we hope
          – changing behavior such that food waste is reduced in the future.
       b) Action Plan:
          Food waste from the dining hall will be measured. The students will be told how
          much food is being wasted, and encouraged to reduce their food waste. The program
          will be initiated by the Director of Dining Services; the plan for Education will be
          put into newsletters and flyers to the students to go out via student email blast and
          postings in the dining room.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          This will reduce the amount of food waste in dining hall. The food waste will be
          weighed daily and posted weekly in the dining hall


25. Minimize Plasticware at Smalle r Events
       Contact: Rich Meigel

       a) Description:
          Dining Services will minimize plasticware from events.
       b) Action Plan:
          Dining Services will use biodegradable plates, utensils, and napkins in Catering and Retail
           locations.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          There will be less plastic sent to landfills in the College‘s waste stream.




                                                23
               CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                           May 2010

26. Microwave Policy
       Contact: Jen Richardson and Joe Pryba (Residential Life Office)

        a) Description:
           The College will enforce a policy that minimizes the number of microwave ovens on
           campus.
        b) Action Plan:
           Starting Fall 2010, resident students will not be allowed more than one microwave
           oven per house.
        c) Anticipated Impacts:
           This policy will reduce energy consumption and food waste.


27. Refrigerator Policy
       Contact: Jen Richardson and Joe Pryba (Residential Life Office)

        a) Description:
           The College with reduce the maximum size for individual student refrigerators.
        b) Action Plan:
           The College will investigate the most energy efficient mini refrigerators sold by local
           retailers. Starting in Fall 2010, incoming students will be notified what brand/make
           of refrigerator they may have in their rooms, and where they can buy them.
        c) Anticipated Impacts:
           This policy will reduce energy use.


28. Laundry Policy
       Contact: Residential Life and Purchasing Offices

        a) Description:
           Currently the College is under contract with Statewide/MacGray for laundry services
           for our residents on campus. Statewide/MacGray supplied the College with high
           efficiency front loading washers which use 16.5 gallons less water for every cycle
           run, including 1.5 gallons less water to be heated per cycle. The larger drum
           capacity – 33% larger because there is no agitator to take up the middle of the drum
           – means more clothes per wash. These high efficiency washers spin faster thus
           increasing the water extraction and decreasing the dryer time needed. The combined
           greater efficiency saves water and energy. At this time we are not looking into
           placing card swipes on these machines.
        b) Action Plan:
           The College will continue to use ‗high efficiency‖ machines.
        c) Anticipated Impacts:
           Current machines reduce water waste and energy consumption.




                                               24
                 CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                             May 2010

  29. Recyclemania
         Contact: Facilities and Residence Life

          a) Description:
             The College will participate in Recyclemania. This program is designed to increase
             awareness of and participation in recycling initiatives via student participation in a
             national competition. Note that this is designed to be a ―student championed‖ and
             student driven competition.
          b) Action Plan:
             The College will weigh its recyclables each week. Going forward, early enrollment
             in the program along with student group partnering with groups such as the Student
             Association and Waste Minimization Committee will increase awareness through
             broad advertising. These activities should trigger student participation. The College
             will finalize baseline numbers to support full participation in Recyclemania.
          c) Anticipated Impacts:
             Student initiative in collaboration with Facilities should foster a competitive
             atmosphere in which we can demonstrate a steady annual increase in amount
             recycled campus-wide. These activities should foster a heightened awareness and
             greater level of participation in recycling programs.

B. Transportation

  30. Alte rnative Transportation
          Contact: Steve Stella

          a) Description:
             The use of bicycles for Facilities and Safety and Security personnel on-campus
             transportation continues to increase. When weather permits, the bikes are used on
             every shift. The ―Shuttle-U-Home‖ program and increased foot and bicycle security
             patrols are also expected to reduce emissions. An agreement was put in place with
             Albany Medical Center for the use of the Shuttle-U-Home Program by its students
             for the Fall 2009 and Spring 2010 semesters. We have provided 446 rides for this
             academic year to Saint Rose students. To date, we have provided 263 rides to AMC
             students.
             The primary means of patrol at Saint Rose is foot patrol (zero emissions). Our fleet is
             well maintained and kept to standards. Whenever vehicles are replaced, we are doing
             so with E-85, flex fuel vehicles. Through an agreement with CDTA, students,
             faculty and staff are provided with no cost access to CDTA bus routes #4, #9, #10,
             #11, #12, #63. A valid College ID is required for each boarding. College members
             with valid parking permits may also apply for a Car Pool Permit. This permit will
             allow vehicles with more than one occupant to park in reserved designated parking
             spaces in the Massry Parking Lot. If this program is well received, future Car Pool
             Permit parking spaces will be designated. There are currently five (5) spaces in
             Massry parking lot dedicated to Car Pool. College members with valid parking
             permits may also apply for Low Emission Vehicle Permit. This permit will allow



                                                  25
               CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                          May 2010

          vehicles that qualify as a low emission vehicle to park in reserved designated parking
          spaces in the Massry Parking Lot. Vehicles that qualify are hybrids or vehicles that
          have an EPA rating of over 35 mpg. There are currently five (5) spaces in Massry
          parking lot dedicated to Low Emission Vehicles. Additional work is needed to
          develop a means to approximate the impact of the measures described above.
       b) Action Plan:
          Focus will be on implementation and evaluation of alternative transportation
          measures.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          Reduction in fuel use by Safety and Security Staff, facilities, and students.

31. Parking Incentives
       Contact: Marcus Buckley, VP for Finance and Administration

       a) Description:
          Designated parking spaces currently exist to support and accommodate carpooling
          and low emission vehicle parking.
       b) Action Plan:
          Preferential parking program will be continued and, as appropriate, expanded or
          modified. Efforts are needed to publicize these options more broadly and to expand
          these options as appropriate and feasible.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          Faculty, administrators and staff have an incentive (preferred parking permits) to
          carpool and/or to drive low emissions vehicles.


32. College Transportation Fleet
       Contact: Purchasing/Security/Ken Scott (Transportation Committee)

       a) Description:
          The College fleet will consider increasing its use of vehicles with fewer emissions.
       b) Action Plan:
          New vans being added to the College fleet are E85 capable and future purchases will
          continue to transition away from fossil fuels. The College will investigate both
          purchasing hybrid vehicles and altering its rental agreement with Enterprise to obta in
          hybrid rental vehicles. Alternative fuel vehicles are always considered for
          replacement purposes. However, the vehicle must meet the desired
          performance/utility parameters for use by the College. Purchasing is currently
          working with Enterprise Rental to negotiate a rate for hybrids and ensure that hybrids
          will be available for College rental. This will be communicated to the campus
          community and on the College website under the purchasing department. This will
          be on the website by Summer 2010.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          This transition in the College transportation fleet will reduce harmful emissions. The
          primary means of reducing emissions is ensuring that the existing fleet is maintained



                                              26
               CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                            May 2010

           to OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) standards. Enterprise will provide
           reports indicating the number of hybrid rentals and the reduction of harmful
           emissions calculated.


33. Familiarization with Public Bus (CDTA) Routes
      Contact: Jeff Knapp, Human Resources

        a) Description:
           The College will familiarize both students and emp loyees with public bus routes
           through the Golden Knight Card Office. The College has prepared GKC flyers that
           outline the fact that students, faculty, and staff can ride specific bus routes free with
           their GK ID card. During Orientation and personal safety presentations, GKC flyers
           are distributed to parents. Students receive a flyer when they get their ID cards, at
           which time the program is explained to them in detail. Residential Life is given
           flyers each August for the RAs to place in every dorm room. The information is also
           provided in the Guidebook given to each student at Orientation. Information about
           the bus routes that are free for our students and a link to the CDTA site for schedules
           is on the website for the Golden Knights ID card office.
        b) Action Plan:
           Every year, approximately 900 first year and transfer students are familiarized with
           the public bus routes by the director of community service. Also, information about
           the public bus routes are made available every year at the benefits fair. The Golden
           Knights ID Card Office will be putting out a letter to our campus community
           advising them that they will now be swiping their card each time they ride a CDTA
           bus. This will enable CDTA to report actual ridership counts moving forward.
        c) Anticipated Impacts:
           Increased use of public transportation yields decreased harmful emissions.

34. Electric Transportation
       Contact: Purchasing and Facilities

        a) Description:
           Global Electric Motorcars (GEM vehicles) are utilized by Facilities personnel. The
           conversion of the Facilities gasoline powered utility work vehicles to electric power
           was initiated with the replacement of a gas utility vehicle in FY 2009.
        b) Action Plan:
           Facilities will continue to purchase electric powered utility vehicles as replacements
           are scheduled. One new electric vehicle every two years, depending upon funding
        c) Anticipated Impacts:
           The use of GEM vehicles and the conversion of utility work vehicles will reduce
           harmful emissions. Emissions are eliminated with each fossil fuel vehicle replaced.

35. Transportation Usage Survey
       Contact: Ken Scott and the Transportation Committee



                                                27
                 CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                              May 2010


          a) Description:
             The College will create a survey for commuters, in order to develop baseline data in
             calculating carbon footprint and to support alternative transportation options.
          b) Action Plan:
             The transportation committee will draft the survey by Fall 2010 and present it to the
             administration. It is anticipated that this survey will be administered in 2010-2011.
          c) Anticipated Impacts:
             Based upon survey results, an action plan will be developed to reduce the impacts
             associated with commuting. Plan implementation is anticipated by Fall 2011.


C. Facilities Policies and Procedures

  36. USGBC –LEED Ce rtification (Gold Status)
        Contact: Marcus Buckley, VP for Finance and Administration

          a) Description:
             The USGBC has certified the new Massry Center for the Arts for Gold Status. This
             46,000 sq. ft., $14 million facility includes a geothermal environmental control
             system that heats, ventilates and cools the building without burning fossils fuels or
             requiring a noisy tower. The facility, which serves the entire campus as well as the
             broader community, is 48 percent more energy efficient than a comparable,
             conventionally constructed building.

  37. Buildings/Facilities Management
         Contact: John Bryant/Chuck Kimberling

          b) Description:
             ―Responsible Buildings/Facilities‖ currently includes: all major construction and
             renovation projects include energy efficient windows, phased conversion of all
             standard hand paper towel dispensers to ―En Motion‖ dispensers, installation of
             water saving plumbing fixtures, installation of humidity sensing exhaust fans in
             major construction and renovation projects, inclusion of motion sensor light switches
             in major construction and renovation projects, conversion of all primary main
             kitchen cooking appliances from electric to natural gas, purchase of Energy Star
             certified products whenever possible, inclusion of products that contain recycled
             content for deferred maintenance upgrades, installation of high efficiency direct vent
             boilers during the deferred maintenance replacement process. Installation of
             building envelope insulation has been included with all building- wide deferred
             maintenance upgrades. Installation of high velocity hand dryers in high usage
             restrooms is planned with the initial installation of these units in the EAC first floor
             public restrooms. These units use minimal electricity to generate a high velocity of
             air. The College has been awarded a ―Gold‖ LEED rating for its Massry Center for




                                                  28
              CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                          May 2010

          the Arts. This is a primary academic building for Music and Art History as well as
          housing a major music performance center and an Art Gallery.
       c) Action Plan:
          The College will continue to follow these procedures. Several more of these units
          will be replaced this summer with high efficiency direct- vent units. We will continue
          to install high velocity hand dryers in our most heavily used public restrooms.
       d) Anticipated Impacts:
          These procedures will reduce both waste and energy use. The College replaced
          heating units in eight locations during the summer of 2008. Data shows that these
          high efficiency units have resulted in a 30% reduction in fuel use.

38. Facilities Procure ment
       Contact: John Bryant/Chuck Kimberling

       a) Description:
          Facilities has introduced ―green seal certified‖ custodial cleaning products, ―Magic
          Salt,‖ consisting of natural rock salt and an organic mixture for application during
          inclement winter weather, and ―Hudson River Gold,‖ a locally produced high BTU
          organic planting bed material. Facilities has also been converting to micro- fiber
          custodial wet mops that use 95% less cleaning chemicals and water to operate
          through the life span of the mop head.
       b) Action Plan:
          The facilities department will continue their use of the products mentioned above,
          and will also continue the mop conversion. Facilities will also specify more efficient
          floor scrubbers to reduce water and chemical consumption. These units will be
          specified as replacements when others reach their end of life.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          These procedures will reduce consumption and harmful emissions. The micro- fiber
          mops will save approximately 36,000 gallons of water per year. The new floor
          scrubbers reduce water and chemical consumption by 50%.


39. Lighting Conversions
       Contact: John Bryant/Chuck Kimberling

       a) Description:
          The College converted to electronic lighting ballasts campus-wide, and has
          converted fluorescent tube lighting from T-12 to T-8 bulbs in all major buildings.
          The College has specified the use of even more efficient T-5 lamps in recent new
          construction and will continue to do so moving forward.
       b) Action Plan:
          The College will continue its phased conversion to compact fluorescents from
          incandescent lighting campus-wide. On average, three new compact fluorescent
          bulbs are installed per week. We anticipate to be 100% converted in the next 12
          months.



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              CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                           May 2010

       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          This will result in a 40% energy reduction to light major buildings.

40. Energy Audit

      Contact: John Bryant/Chuck Kimberling

       a) Description:
          An energy audit would show the College where it is the least energy efficient,
          assisting the College in prioritization of sustainability projects.
       b) Action Plan:
          The College will investigate their options in regards to obtaining an energy audit.
          The College will use the report from this audit to guide its sustainability projects; the
          College is interested in carrying out the following projects: replacing windows,
          lowering building temperatures, installing programmable thermostats, and installing
          more automatic lighting systems. This will likely be completed in the next 12
          months (2010-2011).
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          The report from an energy audit will give the College knowledge of where it can
          improve its energy efficiency. This analysis will provide impetus and focus to future
          Climate Action Plan programming, above and beyond the current initiative.


41. Energy Management System
       Contact: John Bryant and Chuck Kimberling

       a) Description:
          The College uses an energy management system that has the capability to reduce
          energy consumption by 25-30%.
       b) Action Plan:
          The College will continue to use this system. There is a budget initiative submitted
          to incorporate the remaining 30 buildings on campus into the energy management
          system. The energy audit will surely point out the need for this initiative as well.
          The plan is to fully utilize the capacity of this system.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          Use of this system will reduce consumption by 25-30%.


42. Make-Up Water System for Cooling Towe r
      Contact: John Bryant

       a) Description:
          There is a potential that HVAC cooling towers are inefficient consumers of water
          and energy.
       b) Action Plan:



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               CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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          The College is currently investigating systems for increasing efficiency of these
          systems.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          Potential exists for water and electricity savings.


43. Policy Audit
        Contact: Marcus Buckley, VP for Finance and Administration

       a) Description:
          We have reviewed existing polices to ensure that the ―best practices‖ adopted are
          sustainable and included in all operating practices, statements a nd specifications.
       b) Action Plan:
          A review of policies, procedures and best practices has been completed by all of
          Finance and Administration and a ―Sustainability Policy‖ is being drafted.
       c) Anticipated Impacts:
          The policy audit will help lower the carbon footprint of the College by enabling
          assessment, program planning, and program coordination.




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                CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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        Appendix III: Curriculum and Other Educational Experiences
Table of Contents
A. Curriculum
    1. Art 240 – Graphic Design II
    2. Biology 236 – Environmental Technology
    3. Biology 280 - Microbiology
    4. Biology 112 – Environmental Science
    5. Biology 242 – Terrestrial Ecology
    6. Business 101 – Contemporary Business
    7. Chemistry 105 – Environmental Chemistry
    8. Computer Information Systems 111 – Introduction to Computer Science –
        Interdisciplinary Project
    9. English 105 – Rhetoric and Composition
    10. English 106 – Texts and Contexts
    11. English 227 – Women Reshaping Human Rights
    12. Environmental Affairs 112 – Environmental Science
    13. Environmental Affairs 160 – Fire Ecology and Management
    14. Environmental Affairs 357 – Environment and Development
    15. Earth Science 103 – Meteorology
    16. Earth Science 190 – Introductory Geology
    17. Earth Science 210 – Aqueous Systems
    18. Earth Science 340 – Glaciers and Climate Change
    19. Earth Science 420 – Hydrogeology
    20. Educational Psychology 370 – Educational Psychology/Instructional Psychology
    21. Educational Psychology 535 – Psychology of Diversity
    22. History 228 – US Environmental History
    23. MBA 586 -- Globalization and International Business
    24. Philosophy 303 – Environmental Ethics
    25. Political Science 237 – Environmental Politics
    26. Religious Studies 210 – Religion and Sustainability



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              CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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    27. Science 100 – Fundamentals of Science I
    28. Science 200 – Fundamentals of Science II
    29. Science 350 – Topics in Science Education
B. Other Educational Experiences
     30. Geology Club
     31. E-Learning Course Offerings
     32. Focus the Nation
    33. Project Learning Tree
    34. Year of Asia; Year of Environment and Sustainability
    35. President‘s Day Programming
    36. Environmental Club Programming
    37. Alternative Spring Break with Heifer International
    38. Massry Center for the Arts – Geothermal Heating/ Gold Status LEED
    39. Faculty Research
    40. Provisions: Pedagogical Innovations
    41. Summer Teaching Workshops




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             CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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       Appendix III: Curriculum and Other Educational Experiences
A. Curriculum

    1. Art 240 – Graphic Design II
          Contact: Andrea Kohl, Assistant Professor of Graphic Design
       Description:
       The development of a concept and its communication is stressed in this graphic design
       foundation course. Students learn about the impact of the graphic design profession on a
       sustainable development. They study sustainable business practices and concept
       development with focus on packaging design.
       Students Impacted:
       Approximately 15 students per class offered.

    2. Biology 236 – Environmental Technology
          Contact: Harvey Alexander, Professor of Biology
       Description:
       Practical applications and techniques used to integrate environmental knowledge with
       business, law, and public policy. Topics such as land use, pollution controls, protective
       resource use and allocation activities will be surveyed.
       Students Impacted:
       Approximately 20 students per class offered.

    3. Biology 280 - Microbiology
          Contact: Kari Murad, Associate Professor of Biology
       Description:
       This course touches on the following topics over the course of the semester: CO2 and
       CH4 levels in regards to global warming, bioremediation of lands and waters, the role
       of decomposition in oil production and CH4 as an alternative energy source.
       Students Impacted:
       Approximately 20 students per class offered.

    4. Biology 112 – Environmental Science
          Contact: Harvey Alexander, Professor of Biology
       Description:
       A non- major-level course which studies the scientific basis for environmental issues,
       such as sustainability, that impact society.
       Students Impacted:
       Approximately 20 students per class offered.




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          CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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5. Biology 242 – Terrestrial Ecology
      Contact: Harvey Alexander, Professor of Biology
   Description:
   This course provides an introduction to the interactions between plants, animals and
   their environment. Topics include the relationships between soils, climate, and other
   factors which determine community structure.
   Students Impacted:
    Approximately 20 students per class offered.

6. Business 101 – Contemporary Business
      Contact: Simona Sung, Professor of Business Administration
   Description:
   This course is designed to give the non-Business major an overview of basic business
   concepts such as marketing, finance, management, globalization, and human resource
   management. Also covered are problems of managing in a rapidly changing business
   environment, social responsibilities, environmental issues and ethics.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 20 students per class offered.

7. Che mistry 105 – Environmental Chemistry
      Contact: Paul Benzing, Assistant Professor of Environmental Science
   Description:
   This is an introductory course for non-science majors who are interested in
   understanding the chemistry behind the major environmental issues facing us today.
   Some of the topics that might be included are air and water pollution, acid rain, ozone
   depletion, global warming, pesticides and herbicides, recycling, energy sources such as
   fossil fuels and nuclear power, radiation exposure, and other topical issues as they arise.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 20 students per class offered.

8. Computer Information Systems 111 – Introduction to Compute r Science –
   Inte rdisciplinary Project
      Contact: Helen Albanese, Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems
   Description:
   The interdisciplinary project embedded in this course involves web design and
   sustainability. The students design a web-based research project of awareness of the
   environment. The students choose from topics such as solar energy, recycling, nuclear
   energy, biofuels, carbon footprint, hydrogen fuel cells, hybrid cars, global warming, etc.
   At least one team each semester will be encouraged to submit their work to the
   Undergraduate Research Symposium.
   Students Impacted:


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          CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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   Approximately 20 students per class offered.
9. Englis h 105 – Rhetoric and Composition
       Contact: David Morrow, Assistant Professor of English
   Description:
   The content of one version of our required first- year writing course—covering oral
   communication and research skills, with an emphasis on informative and persuasive
   writing and speaking—focuses entirely on climate change and sustainability. The class
   works on fiction, nonfiction, websites, and films devoted to environmental issues, and
   visits a food co-op and an organic farm.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 15 students per class offered.

10. Englis h 106 – Texts and Contexts
       Contact: David Morrow, Assistant Professor of English
   Description:
   This is a topics course that covers a range of literary texts, helping students to develop
   the tools necessary to perform close reading of and to write clearly about literature.
   One version of this topics course for non-English majors focuses on climate change and
   sustainability. Students read work by Rachel Carson, Bill McKibben, George Monbiot,
   Rebecca Solnit, Van Jones, T.C. Boyle and others, and study documentary and feature
   films.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 20 students per class offered.

11. Englis h 227 – Women Reshaping Human Rights
       Contact: Vaneeta Palecanda, Assistant Professor of English
   Description:
   Concentration on a variety of works produced by women in the modern era. May
   include text genres such as the novel, drama, poetry, nonfiction prose, film, music.
   Course attends to the ways in which the variety of women‘s experiences (informed by
   ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, work, education, physical ability) shape their artistic
   production. Assignments related to sustainability are embedded in this course.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 20 students per class offered.

12. Environmental Affairs 112 – Environme ntal Science
       Contact: Paul Benzing, Assistant Professor of Environmental Science
   Description:
   A non-major level course which studies the scientific basis for environmental issues that
   impact upon society. May not be used for credit toward a Biology major, minor, or
   Childhood Education Science concentration.



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          CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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    Students Impacted:
    Approximately 20 students per class offered.
13. Environmental Affairs 160 – Fire Ecology and Management
      Contact: Paul Benzing, Assistant Professor of Environmental Science
   Description:
   Wildland fire is one of a myriad of ecological processes critically important to
   ecosystem dynamics and biodiversity conservation. This course will provide students
   the opportunity to study the science and application of wildland fire in a local, globally-
   rare and fire-dependent setting, the Albany Pine Bush Preserve. Course includes the
   study of fire physics, fire behavior, fire chemistry, wildland fire policy, and fire effects
   on soils, wildlife, vegetation and ecological community dynamics.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 20 students per class offered.

14. Environmental Affairs 357 – Environme nt and Development
      Contact: Paul Benzing, Assistant Professor of Environmental Science
   Description:
   This course studies the relationship between environmental economics and development
   theory by quantifying the impact of a firm on its community and environment. Effects
   quantified range from the positive impact of jobs, salaries and voluntary services to the
   negative impact of pollution, congestion and resource drawdown. Analysis based on
   U.S. and international issues. Several fields are integrated such as social auditing,
   environmental accounting, environmental sciences, as well as ethical and legal issues.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 20 students per class offered.

15. Earth Science 103 – Meteorology
      Contact: Ann Zeeh, Associate Professor of Biology, Chair, Science Department
   Description:
   Properties of the atmosphere and the effect of weather and climate upon life on earth.
   Wind, storms, clouds, precipitation, climate and weather forecasting will be covered.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 20 students per class offered.

16. Earth Science 190 – Introductory Geology
      Contact: Jacqueline Smith, Assistant Professor of Geology
   Description:
   Introductory Geology is a study of the physical features and interconnected systems of
   the earth, including plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, the rock cycle,
   groundwater, surface water, glaciers and climate change, and geologic time. Field trips
   allow students to apply classroom teaching to real-world geologic phenomena such as


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         CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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   rocks as recorders of past environments, streams as agents of erosion, and groundwater
   as a resource. A two-week sequence of field trips to the Albany Landfill and the
   Albany Pine Bush Preserve (in which the Landfill is located) highlights the
   vulnerability of groundwater resources and the need to strike a balance between human
   needs (e.g., waste disposal) and protection and preservation of natural systems.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 24 students per class offered.

17. Earth Science 210 – Aqueous Systems
      Contact: Jacqueline Smith, Assistant Professor of Geology

   Description:
   Aqueous Systems focuses on surface and subsurface hydrogeology and physical
   oceanography. The hydrogeology part covers the hydrologic cycle, streams, the water
   table, aquifers and their depletion and recharge, local and regional groundwater flow,
   and the basics of water geochemistry and environmental pollution. The physical
   oceanography includes discussions of ocean basins, waves, tides, currents, coastal
   change, sea level, glaciers and oceans, and environmental issues facing the oceans.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 10 students per class offered.

18. Earth Science 340 – Glaciers and Climate Change
      Contact: Jacqueline Smith, Assistant Professor of Geology

   Description:
   Glaciers and Climate Change explores the fundamental role of glaciers in shaping
   landscapes and altering sea level, examines the past and present relationship between
   glaciers and climate, and considers future climate change. The course focuses on the
   geologic record of the Ice Ages as recorded in glaciers, glacial deposits, and marine and
   lake sediments of the Quaternary Period, and looks at the ways in which past climate
   change informs our understanding of future climate. Labs are largely field-based and
   focus on the geologic record of the last glaciation preserved in the Capital Region.
   Students Impacted:
    Approximately 10 students per class offered.

19. Earth Science 420 – Hydrogeology
      Contact: Jacqueline Smith, Assistant Professor of Geology, Chair, Science
      Department

   Description:
   Hydrogeology provides and in-depth study of the hydrogeologic cycle (evaporation,
   precipitation, runoff, and stream flow), properties of aquifers, principles of groundwater
   flow, soil moisture and groundwater recharge. Topics include groundwater flow to
   wells and regional groundwater flow, geology of groundwater occurrence and the future



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          CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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   of groundwater supplies, water chemistry, and water quality. Students study the causes
   and effects of, and remediation strategies for, groundwater contamination.

   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 10 students per class offered.

20. Educational Psychology 370 – Educational Psychology/Instructional Psychology
      Contact: Aviva Bower, Associate Professor of Educational Psychology
   Description:
   A study of various aspects of the instructional setting including individual, group, and
   cultural differences; learning and instructional theories; motivation; assessment and
   evaluation; and classroom management. Instructional technology skills are developed
   and integrated throughout the course as supported by principles of educational
   psychology. Specific to sustainability, this course models both a blog focused on urban
   green education projects and a wiki project focused on interviewing ―elder‖ gardeners.
   Students study a unit plan on water conservation and analyze in terms of 7 keys aspects
   of constructivism.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 20 students per class offered.

21. Educational Psychology 535 – Psychology of Diversity
      Contact: Aviva Bower, Associate Professor of Educational Psychology
   Description:
   This course is designed to examine theories in educational psychology and related
   disciplines that help to frame the cognitive and emotional experiences of diverse
   learners and educators. Diversity in this course comprises ethnicity, linguistic diversity,
   class, gender, and sexuality but may also include religion, gender orientation, region,
   nation, and other dimensions of identity. The relationship of educators to their own
   cultural backgrounds (ethnicity, gender, class, etc.) and to their students will be
   explored. Diversity will be viewed largely as a set of resources that learners and
   educators bring to the learning environment; how these resources can be incorporated
   into practice will be a core focus of the course. A student initiated protest against
   cafeteria food as unsustainable practice is used to understand Paulo Freire‘s critical
   pedagogy.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 20 students per class offered.

22. History 228 – US Environmental History
      Contact: Risa Faussette, Associate Professor of History/Political Science
   Description:



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          CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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   Historians usually view the environment as a neutral stage upon which the people and
   events of the past walked. This course argues that the natural world – plants and
   animals, soil and water, climate and weather – plays a pivotal role in the shaping (and
   limiting) of human agency and the social, economic, and political landscapes that the
   peoples of the United States have negotiated for themselves. This survey of U.S. history
   brings the environment and competing environmental ideologies to the foreground,
   paying special attention to obscured or buried relationships between land/resource
   management and the class-, race-, and gender-specific consequences of such decisions.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 20 students per class offered.

23. MBA 586 -- Globalization and International Business
       Contact: Janet Spitz, Associate Professor of Business Administratio n
   Description:
   Globalization enables organizations to enormously expand their resource base for
   additional sources, markets or alternative headquarters. Businesses as well as non-
   profits have not been hesitant to seek this competitive edge, creating regions with an
   unpredictable mix of economic interests, cultural, religious and political influence,
   citizen interests and action, and regional trade alliances. How business seeks to manage
   these factors is explored in this project course with emphasis on the international
   context of challenges, successes, and change. Lively class discussion welcomes each
   student‘s views on the dynamic global economy. Class lectures and leadership include
   a module on global sustainability issues.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 20 students per class offered.

24. Philosophy 303 – Environmental Ethics
       Contact: Laura Weed, Professor of Philosophy/Religious Studies
   Description:
   This course discusses the moral issues arising from a consideration of the relationship
   between human beings and their environment, including: the comparison of Western
   and non-Western attitudes toward nature, anthropocentrism, holism, pollution, animal
   rights, and interspecies relations.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 20 students per class offered.

25. Political Science 237 – Environmental Politics
       Contact: Ryane McAuliffe Straus, Assistant Professor of Political Science
   Description:
   This course examines how various governmental agencies at the federal, state, and local
   levels regulate the environment. The course is a preparatory course designed for majors



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          CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                     May 2010

   and Social Studies concentrators, emphasizing enhanced development of analytical and
   research skills.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 20 students per class offered.


26. Religious Studies 210 – Religion and Sustainability
       Contact: Laura Weed, Professor of Philosophy/Religious Studies
   Description:
   RLS 210 takes a look at the religious and philosophical underpinnings of locally
   sustainable living; how the individual lives in awareness of and dependent upon his/her
   immediate environment by growing one‘s own food, buying locally, supporting
   cooperatives, encouraging organic and fair trade.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 20 students per class offered.

27. Science 100 – Fundame ntals of Science I
       Contact: Mary Cosgrove, Problem Based Learning Coordinator
   Description:
   Science 100 is completely dedicated to the education of our students about our reliance
   on fossil fuels and the effect of this reliance on the environment, including climate
   change. We investigate how generators work and the purpose of a steam and water
   turbine. We also investigate alternate energy sources, including a tour of our LEED
   Gold certified building and learning about geothermal heating and cooling, LEED
   certification, solar power, nuclear power and hydroelectric power. In the future, the
   course will also include a tour of a hydroelectric plant.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 150-160 students annually

28. Science 200 – Fundame ntals of Science II
       Contact: Mary Cosgrove, Problem Based Learning Coordinator
   Description:
   This course is a continuation of SCI 100 and serves as the scientific foundation in
   biology and geology/earth sceicen for Special Education and Childhood Education non-
   science concentrators through a science laboratory course. Students utilize concepts
   and processes taught in the lecture and in the laboratory setting for the purpose of
   problem solving in a problem-based workshop. Biology topics include ecosystems and
   niches, biodiversity, evolution, cells, and genetics. Geology topics include plate
   tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, the rock cycle, groundwater, surface water, glaciers,
   and climate change. A two-week sequence of field trips to the Albany Landfill and the
   Albany Pine Bush Preserve (in which the Landfill is located) highlights the
   vulnerability of groundwater resources and the need to strike a balance between human


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              CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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        needs (e.g., waste disposal) and protection and preservation of natural systems. A
        three-week sequence of two field trips to Five Rivers Environmental Education Center
        and one week of laboratory work integrates studies of geological stream processes,
        ecological niches within the stream, and biological diversity among macroinvertebrates
        found in the stream.
        Students Impacted:
        Approximately 150-160 students annually
    29. Science 350 – Topics in Science Education
           Contact: Kari Murad, Associate Professor of Biology
       Description:
       This is a service- learning class which focuses around the theme of environmental
       sustainability. We look at local and global issues covering the Hudson River,
       alternative energy, hunger-agriculture connections, composing and biodiversity.
       Students Impacted:
       Approximately 20 students per class offered.

B. Other Educational Experiences

    30. Geology Club
        Description:
        Based on interest from Geology majors, Earth Science Adolescence Education majors,
        and Childhood Education - Earth Science concentrators, a new Geology Club has been
        formed. The Geology Club will organize field trips and on-campus activities open to
        all students. The existence of Geology Club will facilitate on-campus programming as
        well as affiliation with student chapters for such professional groups as the Geological
        Society of America.
        Students Impacted:
        Approximately 15-20 active student members


    31. E-Learning Course Offerings
       Description:
       In the past five years or so, the College has greatly expanded its utilization of ―e-
       learning‖ courses—both hybrid and entirely on-line. Such offerings reduce the need to
       heat and light classroom space, reduce transportation costs, reduce the need for print
       materials to support instruction, and contribute to efficient use of existing faculties. In
       2005-2006 there were approximately 12 courses taught in this mode. For 2009-2010,
       172 courses will be offered in ―e-learning‖ format. In addition, the College has
       developed three entirely ―on-line‖ professional certificate programs and one graduate
       degree entirely on- line. The College will continue to identify opportunities to expand
       such offerings consistent with our mission, faculty interest, and institutional capacity.
       Students Impacted:
       Approximately 2,000 annually (undergraduate, graduate)


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         CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                    May 2010


32. Focus the Nation
   Description:
   ―Focus the Nation: A nationwide effort to address global warming solutions‖ was held
   on January 31, 2008 and included an evening presentation given by Rev. Fletcher
   Harper (Executive Director of GreenFaith). Discussions about environmental justice,
   stewardship and greening practices in religious communities were held in the Hubbard
   Interfaith Sanctuary and was free and open to the public.

   Campus activities included:
     Webcast: ―The 2% Solution - Global Warming Solutions for America‖
     Valuing the environment or a cherished tradition? An open forum about Halloween
      toilet papering at St Rose
     Sustainable Practices for Students, Candice Redden, College of Saint Rose R. A.
     Idea Forum: An open exchange of green ideas for our campus led by The
      Environment Club and Prof. Paul Benzing
     Wind Power, Questions and Answers, Dan Bernadette - Regional Expert
     Panel discussion: ―Local Green Businesses‖ with Katie Centanni, Honest Weight
      Food Co-op, David Hess-RPI Professor, Nancy Gold - Tough Traveler Inc.
     Local Foods & Environment: Christopher Kemnah, Otter Hook Farms
     The Scientific Basics of Climate Change, Saint Rose Professor Jacquie Smith
     Sustainability Art and Design Exhibition by students and faculty of the Saint Rose
      Art Department
     Film: An Inconvenient Truth, Showing at noon, 2.00pm, 4.00pm
   Impact:
   Approximately 300 students, faculty and staff participated in these events.

33. Project Learning Tree
      Contact: Mary Cosgrove, Problem Based Learning Coordinator
   Description:
   Annually the College partners with the New York State Department for Environmental
   Conservation (NYS DEC), the City of Albany and the Albany Fund for Education in
   order to train St. Rose students and City of Albany School District‘s elementary
   teachers in Project Learning Tree. During the week of Earth Day, approximately 150
   trees will be planted.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 18 students (from SCI 100 and SCI 200)
   Community Impact:
   Approximately 27 Albany City School District teachers trained in environmental
   curriculum using trees a ―window‖ for teaching environmental sustainability.

34. Year of Asia (2010-2011); Year of Environment and Sustainability (2011-2012)



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         CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                     May 2010

      Contact: Laura Weed, Professor of Philosophy/Religious Studies,                David
      Szczerbacki, Provost/VPAA

   Description:
   The College periodically organizes curricular and co-curricular programming around
   contemporary themes. For 2010-2011, for example, is the ―Year of Asia.‖ Current (and
   preliminary) discussion exists relative to naming 2011-2012 as the ―Year of
   Environment and Sustainability.‖ The Year of Asia program includes the College‘s
   participation in ―Bring the Change,‖ a nationwide program designed to raise awareness
   of economic and environmental excess. Our focus will be on the Afghan well project.
   Community Impact:
   Campus activity will include open lectures and workshops, curriculum-course specific
   activity, and a President‘s Day program devoted to assessing programs made with the
   Climate Action Plan. Such programming raises overall consciousness of sustainability
   issues and creates the potential for action and change.

35. President’s Day Programming
      Contact: David Szczerbacki, Provost/VPAA

   Description:
   The 2008 President‘s Day theme was ―Sustainability: Developing a Green Saint Rose
   Campus.‖ President R. Mark Sullivan announced the signing of the President‘s climate
   commitment document and affirmed the College‘s commitment to sustainability as a
   strategic objective. In addition, there were several presentations which addressed topics
   of sustainability. Topics presented include:
        ―Seeing Things Whole: The Promise and Challenge of Sustainability in Higher
           Education‖ by Dr. Tom Kelly (the first Director of the University Office of
           Sustainability (UOS) and Chief Sustainability Officer at the University of New
           Hampshire)
        ―Sustainability Issues Specific to The College of Saint Rose‖ by Dr. Tom Kelly
        ―Community- Based Teaching and Learning on the Enviro nment‖ by Ken Scott
           and Mary Cosgrove
        ―Environmental Awareness Across the Curriculum: The Whys and Hows‖ by
           David Morrow and Andrea Kohl
        ―Becoming Familiar With The Basics of Climate Change‖ by Jacqueline Smith
           and Stephanie Maes
   Community Impact:
   Approximately 175 faculty, administration and staff participated in this President‘s Day
   program.

36. Environmental Club Programming
      Contact: Christina Zontini, Environmental Club President
   Description:


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          CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                      May 2010

   The Environmental Club is a student-run organization that promotes sustainability. The
   club‘s most regular event is called Do It in the Dark. During this event, no lighting,
   speaker systems, etc. are used; attendees are provided with glow-in-the-dark jewelry
   and acoustic music. There are also tables set up during this event offering vegan pizza
   and information about sustainability. The club also regularly participates in service
   projects, such as helping maintain the Albany Pine Bush. Every fall, the student
   association hosts Harvest Fest; the environmental club takes advantage of this
   opportunity to provide an activity, such as making ice cream. In addition, the Club
   worked with ―Week of Welcome‖ staff to establish (in 2008) a program where new
   students receive a ―sustainability kit‖ during ―move- in Day‖ (e.g. water bottle, recycling
   information, CFL light bulbs). Organic Appreciation Day was celebrated by the club in
   Fall 2009 by offering the campus samples of organic and vegan products. The club
   hopes to host this celebration every fall. Typically, when there is a sustainability-
   related film playing at a local theater, the club advertises and arranges transportation to
   the theater. This year, however, there were none in the theater, so the club hosted a
   showing of the movie Wall-E. During Fall 2009, the club co-sponsored a guest speaker
   who discussed wind power. In Spring 2010, the club sponsored the performance of
   Sustainability: The Musical, written by a member of the club. Also in Spring 2010, the
   club visited the Regional Food Bank in celebration of Social Justice Week at the
   College.
   Students Impacted :
   Students, faculty, staff and administration have full access to programming activity of
   the club – Approximately 50 active club members. Many activities draw hundreds of
   students. ―Move- in Day‖ impacts approximately 900 students each August.

37. Alte rnative Spring Break with Heifer International
       Contact: Kari Murad, Associate Professor of Biology
   Description:
   Each year during spring break, a group of students visits a Heifer Ranch in Arkansas.
   Among other issues, the students are educated about care of the earth, sustainability,
   environmental justice, and earth and human stewardship.
   Students Impacted: Approximately 15 students and 2 faculty/staff each year.

38. Massry Center for the Arts – Geothermal Heating/ Gold Status – U.S. Green
    Building Council, Leadership in Ene rgy and Environme ntal Design

       Contact: Marcus Buckley, VP for Finance and Administration
   Description:
   In the Fall 2009, the College‘s new Massry Center for Performing Arts (opened in
   2008) received LEED Gold Certification. This is a 46,000sq.ft, $14 million facility. A
   centerpiece of the Massry Center‘s energy efficiency is its geothermal environmental
   control system that heats, ventilates and cools the building without burning fossil fuels
   or requiring a noisy tower. Saint Rose received technical assistance and $137,650 in
   financial support from the New York State Energy Research and Development


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          CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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   Authority (NYSERDA) to develop the geothermal system, which is expected to make
   the building 48 percent more energy efficient than a comparable, conventionally
   constructed building. Interactive, touch-screen information kiosks will likely be
   installed in 2010-2011 which will provide detailed examples about the facility‘s
   sustainability features—including construction, design and operating policies and
   programs. The general public, K-12 students groups, and College of Saint Rose courses
   (e.g. SCI 100; SCI 200) will have access to this educational resource. Among its Earth-
   friendly components in the building to be featured in this educational project are the
   following. The building:
              is heated and cooled by a geothermal HVAC system that originates in 40
                 wells, each reaching 450 feet beneath the Earth‘s surface. The system cost
                 approximately $300,000 more than a conventional HVAC. Estimated
                 payback time: 3.3years;
              uses no fossil fuel in heating or ventilation, and 35 percent of its electricity
                 is supplied by wind or water power;
              used a significant quantity of recycled building material in its
                 construction, including 78 percent of steel frame, 70 percent of the
                 wallboard and 15 percent of the concrete;
              recycled 98 percent of the waste generated in its construction, with asphalt
                 from the old parking lot from the ground up and used new parking lot and
                 bricks and drywall hauled to the Port of Albany for recycling;
              harvests natural light and automatically increases and reduces lighting in
                 classrooms and practice rooms in proportion to the level of natural light;
              uses American cherry and Patagonian cherry wood on doors and floors,
                 grown on tree farms meeting renewable resource standards set by the
                 Forest Stewardship Council; and
              uses water-saving low- fixtures throughout.
   Students Impacted:
   Approximately 500 students (SCI 100, SCI 200, etc.) directly e xperience the faculty‘s
   innovation via curricular modules.
   Community Impact:
   K-12 students and groups; community awardees at concerts, art gallery exhibits,
   prospective student open houses/auditions, (many thousand annually)

39. Faculty Research
   Description:
   In addition to the number of courses and projects related to sustainability, faculty
   members at the College have also shown a significant interest in environmental
   sustainability. Through various forms of professional development (e.g. mini- grants,
   reassigned time grant), faculty members have demonstrated their interest and dedication
   to environmental sustainability. Current examples include:

     a. Harvey Alexander, Professor of Biology
        Dr. Alexander accomplished many projects during a recent sabbatical leave. This
        includes research pertaining to the Albany Pinebush, gathering data for review of


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     CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                   May 2010

     the species‘ distribution, systematics, life history, conservation status, etc., of the
     inland barrens buckmoth. He also spent a few weeks with Dr. Charles Reith, in
     Washington, D.C. working on ways to integrate contemporary environmental
     problems into ecology courses.
b.   Paul Benzing, Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies
     Dr. Benzing‘s long-term goal is to establish an organization, supported primarily
     by undergraduate research assistants, to support watershed monitoring efforts
     across our region. Initial efforts focused on phosphorus pollution in Vlomanskill.
     One undergraduate research student worked with Professor Benzing to create a
     database that serves as the foundation of what will be a growing dataset. The
     project will be expanded with the help of another undergraduate research student
     who will utilize the initial dataset to identify problem areas within our local
     watersheds where phosphate levels are high, and begin to identify sources and
     ecological impacts.
c.   Aviva Bower, Associate Professor, Educational Psychology
     Dr. Bower intends to continue her exploration of Environmental Psychology.
     Through research she hopes to understand how young adults become
     environmentalists. More specifically, environmental beliefs among college
     students, environmental risk perception, and how information about the
     environment is communicated. This research will contribute to Dr. Bower‘s
     teaching preparation, help to frame empirical investigation of beliefs and
     experiences of Saint Rose students evolved in the Environmental Club, and
     support the College‘s new Environmental Policy.
d.   Brian Jensen, Associate Professor of Biology
     Dr. Jensen‘s current project involves establishing a deeper range of backup
     locations for specific activities in his marine ecology course. Additional locations
     allow students the opportunity to continue learning about important
     environmental events through field laboratory field activities even during poor
     weather conditions in Cape Cod, Massachusetts.
e.   Andrea Kohl, Assistant Professor of Graphic Design
     Professor Kohl published two articles in the Summer 2009 edition of Designer,
     ―Cradle to Grave: Remaking the Way We Make Things‖ and ―Design Challenge:
     Tips for Sustainable Graphic Design Solutions.‖
f.   Stephanie Maes, Assistant Professor of Geology
     Dr. Maes is in the process of completing a project which seeks to interpret
     anomalous magnetic fabrics in Karoo sills and dikes in South Africa. In order to
     accomplish this, Dr. Maes and two undergraduate students traveled to South
     Africa to collect geologic specimens. Currently thin sections of the samples are
     being prepared and a mineral fabric analysis of the pre-existing sections. Testing
     of new thin sections will occur shortly after and will occur at the University of
     Minnesota.
g.   Jacqueline Smith, Assistant Professor of Geology
     Dr. Smith contributed to the scientific understanding of global climate change by
     reconstructing the history of ice ages in the tropical Andes. This ongoing project
     investigates ways in which both climatic changes and tectonically-driven changes



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         CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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        to the physical setting of glaciers affect the depositional record of glaciations
        preserved on the landscape. Dr. Smith will return to the Peruvian Andes in June
        2010 to continue her investigation; she will be accompanied by two
        undergraduate Geology majors who will participate in the field research. In 2009,
        Dr. Smith co-taught a three-week undergraduate geology field course titled
        ―Impacts of Global Environmental Change‖ with Dr. Donald Rodbell (Union
        College) in the Cordillera Blanca range of the central Peruvian Andes, through the
        Geology Department at Union College. Her goal was (and is) to teach students
        how to conduct geological field research on topics of environmental change by
        helping them plan and complete their own research projects in the Andes.
     h. Janet Spitz, Associate Professor of Business Administration
        Dr. Janet Spitz is conducting a multi- year empirical study on the support for
        sustainability for the global business community through the ―lens‖ of several
        thousand faculty and students in the United States and Australia. Dr. Spitz‘s
        research dissemination plan includes the inclusion of findings in her course work
        (e.g. MBA 586) as well as presentations at leading professional association
        meetings (e.g. American Economics Association; Allied Social Sciences Annual
        Meetings).

40. Provisions: Pedagogical Innovations
       Contact(s): Kim Middleton-Meyer, Associate Professor of English;
                         Megan Fulwiler, Associate Professor of English
   Description:
   The College‘s ―Provisions‖ program offers on- going discourse (3-4 lunch sessions per
   semester) relative to pedagogical innovation. In Fall 2009, a panel presentation featured
   the topic of ―Teaching Sustainability;‖ panelist included Andrea Kohl, Assistant
   Professor of Graphic Design, and David Morrow, Assistant Professor of English.
   Topics included, respectively, ―Teaching Sustainable Graphic Design‖ and ―Models of
   Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies Programs.‖ Approximately 30 faculty, students
   and staff attended. Similar sessions on the topic are planned for the future.

41. Summe r Teaching Workshops
       Contact(s): Richard Thompson, Dean, School of Mathematics and Sciences and
       Director, Institute for Science and Mathematics Education
   Description:
   The College has offered in-service Summer Teacher workshops for the past four years.
   These single-day programs, serving 15-20 teachers each, have focused on hands-on,
   inquiry-based techniques for improving mathematics and science teaching at the
   elementary school level. With each participant teaching at least 20 students per year
   since attending our workshops, an estimated 3,000-4,000 elementary school students
   have benefitted from our summer programs. The summer workshops have focused on
   topics as Hudson River ecology, solid waste management and ground water
   contamination, endangered species and habitats, and alternative energy sources. The
   teachers involved in these workshops are from inner-city and ―high needs‖ districts.



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      CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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The College of Saint Rose has recently received a gift of $45,000 from Time Warner
Cable, or $15,000 per year for three years to create the Time Warner Cable Teacher
Training Center. This center would combine and coordinate all of the College‘s math
and science teacher professional development programs for the 2010-2013 period. The
Time Warner Cable Teacher Training Center will enable the College to take a much
more focused, in-depth approach to improving math and science education in our
regional schools. These programs will focus on inquiry-based, active learning
techniques. As stressed in Time Warner Cable‘s new program, Connect a Million
Minds, engaging, hands-on experiences are critical for building student interest and
ability in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) disciplines. Our
teachers will need to be trained to deliver experiences to their students. Through the
Time Warner Cable Teacher Training Center, these programs will make a significant
difference in STEM education in New York‘s Capital Region and beyond.




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               CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
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                        Appendix IV: Planning Participants
A wide cross-section of faculty, staff and students participated in the development of the
Climate-Action Plan. Much of the work was completed in the context of these committees:
Waste Minimization, Transportation, Curriculum, and Green House Gas Emissions. In addition,
key offices such as Facilities, Residential Life, Community Service, and Security have played
leadership roles. The student Environmental Club has provided invaluable ideas, leadership and
energy. This organizational and leadership infrastructure will guide plan implementation,
assessment and evaluation.

The following individuals are acknowledged for their work in designing the Climate Action
Plan:

    Helen Albanese, Assistant Professor of Computer Sciences
    Paul Benzing, Assistant Professor of Environmental Science
    Cailin Brown, Assistant Professor of Communications
    Mary Cosgrove, Math and Science Problem-Based Learning Coordinator
    Andrea Kohl, Assistant Professor of Graphic Design
    Stephanie Maes, Assistant Professor of Geology
    David Morrow, Assistant Professor of English
    Kari Murad, Associate Professor of Biology
    Megan Overby, Assistant Professor of Communication Sciences & Disorders
    Vaneeta Palecanda, Assistant Professor of English
    Jacqueline Smith, Assistant Professor of Geology
    Janet Spitz, Associate Professor of Business Administration
    Laura Weed, Professor of Philosophy/Religious Studies

    John Bryant, Assistant Vice President for Facilities
    Marcus Buckley, Vice President for Finance and Administration
    Patricia Buckley, Director of Purchasing & Auxiliary Services
    Shannon Crisafulli, Assistant to the Vice President for Finance and Administration
    Reverend Christopher DeGiovine, Dean of Spiritual Life
    Joanna Dickerson, Assistant Director of Human Resources
    John Ellis, Executive Director of Information Technology Services
    Paul Freemantle, Faculties
    Colin Jaquays, Department of Physical & Biological Science Lab Manager
    Judith Kelly, Registrar
    Jeffrey Knapp, Assistant Vice President of Human Resources & Risk Management
    Charles Kimberling, Director of Facilities
    Laurie Luizzi, Executive Secretary to the Vice President of Finance and Administration
    Nancy MacDonald, Director of Facilities Planning and Space Management
    Meredith McLane, Area Coordinator, Residence Life
    Rich Miegel, Director of Dining Services
    John Pavelock, Director of Risk Management and Environmental Safety
    Sean Peters, CSJ, Director of Mission Experience


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              CLIMATE ACTION PLAN: The College of Saint Rose
                                         May 2010

    Corey Polesel, Security Supervisor
    Joseph Pryba, Assistant Director of Residence Life
    Jennifer Richardson, Director of Residence Life
    Steve Stella, Director of Safety & Security
    Julie Tenan, Coordinator of Field Placement and Advisement

Students:
    Carley Farnan
    Joshua Garmley
    Shanna Losee
    Thomas Lusardi
    Christina Molnar
    Megan Rockafellow
    Caitlin Pixley
    Christina Zontini

Special Acknowledgement: The following individuals have provided significant research and
report preparation work for the Climate Action Plan:

    Michelle Surprise, Graduate Assistant
    Alicia Whitehead, Graduate Assistant
    Claire Vandenbergh, Administrative Secretary/VPAA
    Bonnie Pogge, Assistant to the Provost/VPAA
    Jeanine Laukaitis, Executive Secretary/VPAA




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