Docstoc

Golden Gate Estates Naples Florida - DOC

Document Sample
Golden Gate Estates Naples Florida - DOC Powered By Docstoc
					        EXHIBIT 25]
DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




         Exhibit 25
        Page 1 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

A.    GOLDEN GATE CANAL SYSTEM

The Golden Gate Canal System is a large watershed area located in the west central portion of Collier
County. The basin was created by the construction of numerous canals by the Gulf America Corporation
(G.A.C.) in the 1960's for the purpose of draining the land for residential purposes. The total area of the
Golden Gate Canal System is approximately 110 square miles. Identifiable sub-basins and water control
structures in the basin are illustrated in Table 7.1.


                                              Table 7.1
                       Golden Gate Canal Basin – Sub-basins, Canals & Structures
         Sub-basin              Primary Canals & Structures             Secondary Canals & Structures
 GG #6                     GG Main Canal, Weir GG #6
 GG #7                     GG Main Canal, Weir GG #6                   GG Main Branch Canals
 GG #5                     GG Main Canal, Weir G G#5                   GG Main Branch Canals
 GG #4                     GG Main Canal, Weir GG #4
                           Corkscrew Canal- Cork #1, Cork #2,
 Corkscrew Canal N         Cork #3
 Twin Eagles               Cocohatchee - Twin Eagle Structure          Corkscrew Branch Canal
 Orange Tree               Orange Tree Canal
 Curry                     Curry canal
 Corkscrew Canal S         Corkscrew Canal                             Corkscrew Branch Canal
 Cypress E                 Cypress Canal
 GG #3                     GG Main Canal – Weir GG #3                  GG Main Branch Canals
 Cypress W                 Cypress Canal – Weir Cypress #1
 951N                      CR 951 Canal
 I-75 #3                   I-75 Canal, Weir I-75 #3                     I-75 Canal Branches
                                                                      Harvey Canal – Weirs -   D1C-
 Harvey                                                               00-S0150 (Harvey 2), D1C-00-
                                                                      S0120 (Harvey 1)
 I-75 #2                   I-75 Canal – Weir I-75 #2                   I-75 Canal Branches
 Airport S                 Airport Rd Canal – Weir CR #31 N
 I-75 #1                   I-75 Canal – Weir I-75 #1                   I-75 Canal Branches
 GG #2                     GG Main Canal, Weir GG #2
                                                                      All GG City Canals north of Santa
 Green                     Green Canal                                Barbara Sub-basin
 951 S                     CR951 Canal - CR951 #1
                                                                      All GG City Canals south of Green
 Santa Barbara                                                        Canal Sub-basin
                                                                      GG Main Branch Canals – Weir
 GG #1                     GG Main Canal, Weir GG #1                  MGG-14-S0100
 City Gate




                                                Exhibit 25
                                               Page 2 of 67
        EXHIBIT 25]
DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




         Exhibit 25
        Page 3 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION


The area encompassed by the Golden Gate Canal System contains a variety of land uses including
agriculture, residential estates, urban residential, and commercial. Of notable interest within this drainage
system is the four square mile residential development of Golden Gate City. This residential area was
initially developed in the mid 1960's and contains the highest concentration of dwellings within the
system. There are also several large planned unit developments (PUD's) in varying stages of completion
within this system’s drainage area. These PUD's are designed to incorporate a stormwater management
plan, based on the latest design storm standards as required by the local regulatory agencies, as a part of
their construction standards.

Previous Studies
An examination of the Collier County Stormwater Management Department files revealed that many
studies have been prepared for the G.A.C. canal system. However, because of the locations and control
elevations of the various weirs, the G.A.C. system is divided into two major drainage basins, the Golden
Gate Canal Basin and the Faka - Union Canal Basin System. The needs and proposed management plans
for these two basins are addressed in the studies and their differences are often described in detail.

"The Big Cypress Watershed, A Report to the Secretary of the Interior" by the Everglades - Jetport
Advisory Board in April 1971, is a very generalized report that mainly describes the overall nature of the
southwest Florida wetland area known as the Big Cypress. This report mentions the encroachment of
drainage canals and residences into the wetland areas east of Naples and describes some of the effects of
the resultant pollution sources but does not enter into any significant discussion of the drainage system
design or efficiency.

A report entitled "Hydrologic Study of the G.A.C. Canal Network, Collier County, Florida" was prepared
by the firm of Black, Crow and Eidsness, Inc. in October, 1974. This report presented an evaluation of
the general surface and groundwater hydrology of the Golden Gate Estates area, including a detailed
analysis of the flood characteristics for the canal network. It also presented a discussion of certain
environmental factors such as weed growth within the canals, over-drainage of shallow ground water, and
point discharge of surface waters into the estuarine zone. Some of the recommendations, such as a
redesign and reconstruction of some of the water level control structures and an improved canal
maintenance program, have been incorporated into the canal system.

"Phase 1, Golden Gate Estates Redevelopment Study, Collier County, Florida" was prepared by the
Golden Gate Estates Study Committee in June, 1976. This report compiled a detailed history of the
development of drainage facilities within the Golden Gate Estates and recommended that the canal system
be modified to raise the water levels, reduce the rate of fresh water runoff, limit the areas available for
residential development, and restore as much of the natural hydro period as possible to make the land
more productive and less susceptible to brush fires.

The "Proposed Boundary for the Big Cypress Basin, South Florida Water Management District" report
was prepared by Black, Crow and Eidsness, Inc. in September, 1976. The purpose of this report was to
review the available published literature concerning the Big Swamp of Southwest Florida. The objective
of the literature review was to obtain pertinent information related to the hydrology, ecology, and
physiographic nature of the Big Cypress, such that detailed boundaries of the Big Cypress Basin could be
delineated. The major value of this report was to assist in the design and implementation of a water
management program for the sub-basin, and provide an overall understanding of the total surface and
ground water systems within the Big Cypress area.




                                                Exhibit 25
                                               Page 4 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

The "Golden Gate Water Management Study" report prepared by Johnson Engineering, Inc. in December,
1981, evaluated the feasibility of:

      1.      Diverting a portion of the normal outflow from the Main Golden Gate Canal into other
              areas for water conservation purposes and/or

      2.      Retaining increased amounts of surface water in the Main Golden Gate Canal system.

Several additional objectives were emphasized. One was to improve the response of the canal system to
summer flooding situations without subsequent depletion of ground water levels in the winter (basically
additional retentive capacity in the canals). An environmental objective was to recreate a system that
would more naturally respond to rainfall and therefore reduce the large surges of outflow into Naples
Bay. This report recommended that an increased canal maintenance program be developed, four primary
weirs on the Main Golden Gate Canal be modified, and that the County begin the public acquisition of
selected detention sites. Since the report was written, a canal maintenance program has been upgraded
and the four primary weirs within the study area plus Weir No. 1 have been modified.

The "Regional Water Resources Study, Big Cypress Basin Program No. 2201" was completed by the firm
of Gee and Jensen Engineers-Architects-Planners, Inc. in November 1980. This report was primarily
concerned with the groundwater resources of western Collier County, but in the discussion of
groundwater, the effects of the drainage of surface water were detailed. The recommendations of this
report were to raise the control elevations of some of the drainage systems to increase groundwater
storage, reduce runoff losses, and increase freshwater head in the surficial aquifer for maintenance of the
fresh/salt water interface offshore. This report also presented a good explanation of the effects that the
Main Golden Gate Canal system has had on the surrounding land.

Beginning in the early eighties, the Big Cypress Basin has undertaken an aggressive capital improvement
program to enhance the water management functions of the primary canals and water control structures in
the County. A comprehensive Big Cypress Basin Watershed Management Plan for the approximately
1200 square-mile area of western Collier County was developed and is being continually updated to
support the capital improvement program. Each capital improvement project design is based on a
hydrologic-hydraulic and environmental assessment that quantifies the impacts/benefits on flood flow
conveyance, groundwater recharge and wildlife habitats resulting from the construction and operation of
each project.


Historical Background
Prior to the construction of the G.A.C. canal network, the land in the eastern portion of the drainage basin
was a mixture of wetlands and uplands with almost no residential dwellings. The principal land uses were
limited agricultural sites and vast acreage of undeveloped wilderness. As the canals were constructed, a
roadway system was also constructed by the G.A.C. to provide access to the land for development
purposes. The community of Golden Gate City was the only area developed at a planned urban density.

The I-75 Canal Sub-basins were created by the excavation of the G.A.C. canal network in the 1960's. The
northern boundary had been previously established by the construction of CR 846 (Immokalee Road).
The eastern boundary was then created by the construction of CR 951 (Collier Boulevard). The land
within this sub-basin had historically drained in a southwesterly direction and the canal network was
constructed to follow this approximate pattern.




                                                Exhibit 25
                                               Page 5 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

The Green Canal Sub-basin was created by the excavation of the G.A.C. canal network in the 1960's,
including the northern area of Golden Gate City. The eastern boundary was created by the construction of
CR-951. The land within this sub-basin had historically drained in a southwesterly direction and the
canal network was constructed to follow this approximate pattern.

The Airport Road Canal South Sub-basin was initially created by agricultural interests using the fill
material from the canal to construct the beginnings of what is now known as Airport Pulling Road. The
eastern basin boundaries were established by the construction of the Golden Gate Canal system in the
1960’s. The natural drainage flow was to the south and southwest, primarily into the Gordon River
Basin. Construction of Airport Pulling Road directed the flow south into what is now known as the Main
Golden Gate Canal.

Prior to the construction of the Orange Tree Canal Sub-basin portion of the G.A.C. canal network, the
land was a mixture of undeveloped wetlands and uplands with almost no residential dwellings. As the
canals were constructed, a roadway system was also constructed by the G.A.C. to provide access to the
land for development purposes. The Orange Tree development was originally proposed to be an
urbanized area similar to Golden Gate City (described in the Main Golden Gate Canal Basin section).
The G.A.C. development efforts were not undertaken within Orange Tree and only since 1992 has the
development been initiated utilizing current urban design standards and golf course design. The lake
systems within the Orange Tree development, which forms the headwaters of the basin, are maintained by
the private developer/homeowner associations.

Prior to the construction of the 951 Canal Central Sub-basin portion of the G.A.C. canal network, the land
was a mixture of undeveloped wetlands and uplands with almost no residential dwellings. As the canals
were constructed, a roadway system was also constructed by the G.A.C. to provide access to the land for
development purposes. The existing CR-951 roadway is being improved to a 6-Lane road in most places
and the canal reshaped to preserve existing capacity.

Description of Existing Facilities
The existing facilities within this basin consist of approximately 72 miles of primary canal and 23 miles
of secondary canal. There are 16 water level control structures and 4 pump stations on the primary canal
system and 3 water level control structures on the secondary canal system. The water level control
structures are known as weirs and will be identified by this title for the remainder of this report.

Existing Condition/Capacity of Facilities
The basic design conveyance capacity for the entire G.A.C. canal network was based on a 10-year
recurrence-interval peak storm event. The Golden Gate Canal System is a very vital part of the water
management system for Collier County. Major maintenance programs for this basin's secondary canal
network are being performed by the Collier County Road Maintenance and the operation and maintenance
of the primary canal network by the Big Cypress Basin to control and remove the excessive
accumulations of aquatic vegetation and sediment when they begin to hinder the flow of stormwater
through the system.

A weir modification program has been in operation for the primary system by the Big Cypress Basin.
The main goal of this renovation program is to provide the ability to maintain a higher normal flow water
elevation, especially for the winter “dry” season, but allow for greater flexibility in releasing excessive
amounts of stormwater in the summer “wet” season to prevent flooding.

Due to the growth of the residential development the overall condition of the existing facilities in the
Golden Gate Main Canal Basin is not adequate to provide a level of service to pass the 10 year design


                                                Exhibit 25
                                               Page 6 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

storm runoff for this basin. The Big Cypress Basin continues to evaluate the weir and channel
configurations so that the efficiency of the system will be improved as a water management tool to better
meet the needs for this area. One known area of concern for flooding is the north half of the Orange Tree
development area (Waterways, Orange Blossom Ranch). This is a private drainage system.

The overall condition of the existing facilities in the Cypress Canal Sub-basin is adequate to pass the
design storm runoff for this basin. Big Cypress Basin continues to evaluate the weir and channel
configurations so that the efficiency of the system will be improved as a water management tool to better
meet the needs for this area. However due to the topography and existing wetlands in the Rock
Road/Acremaker Road area, chronic flooding problems need to be addressed.

The overall condition of the existing facilities in the Harvey Canal Sub-basin is not adequate to pass the
25 year 3 day event design storm runoff for this basin. The County continues to evaluate the weir and
channel configurations so that the efficiency of the system will be sufficient as a water management tool
to better meet the needs for this area.

Discharge from the upper 4 square miles of the Harvey Sub-basin is now directing additional flow
towards the I-75 canal. Evaluation of the impacts for the additional flow to the I-75 canal should be
performed. This may involve modification of the construction and operation of the existing I-75 canal
weir 3. The condition and capacity of the facilities within the I-75 Canal Basin varies from adequate to
inadequate.

The condition and capacity of the facilities within the Green Canal Sub-basin are not adequate. The
downstream 2 miles of primary canal are somewhat restrictive since they were never excavated to their
full planned cross sectional area.

The Airport Road South Canal is in fair condition to handle the storm runoff from this drainage sub-basin.
The overall condition of the existing facilities in the Corkscrew Canal Basin, Orange Tree Canal Basin,
and the 951 Canal Sub-basins are adequate to pass the design storm runoff for the basins.

With the recent reconstruction of the 951 Canal North by the Big Cypress Basin, the canal provides
sufficient capacity for the 25-year/3-day design storm. The Big Cypress Basin is responsible for the
operation and maintenance of this canal.

Proposed Improvements
As mentioned in many of the above listed studies and reports, there is a need to improve the Golden Gate
Canal Basin system so that it can function as a more efficient total water management tool. Continued
land development has cause a cumulative loss of storage capacity within the Basin, resulting in the need
to increase the flow capacity of the main receiving canals, when needed. Most of the planned
improvements involve the modification of some of the weirs so that they will have a raised control
elevation for low flow discharge and also have a built in capacity to discharge more stormwater when
necessary during periods of high flow to prevent flooding. Five weirs have already been modified on the
Main Golden Gate Canal, (with two of them currently being modified again as described above) with
further modifications to the weirs and canal segments possible. The design and construction of weir and
channel segments, if needed, are included in the capital improvement program of the County or the Big
Cypress Basin.

Due to urban growth and the scheduled extension of Vanderbilt Beach Road the drainage conditions in
the Cypress Canal Basins should be improved.



                                                Exhibit 25
                                               Page 7 of 67
                                        EXHIBIT 25]
                                DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

The County plans to evaluate the weir and channel configurations in the Harvey Canal to assure that the
efficiency of the system will be sufficient as a water management tool to better meet the needs for this
area.

The Big Cypress Basin has completed replacement of culverts at canal crossings and modified several
canals, which has increased the conveyance capacity and reduced maintenance requirements for the
primary stormwater facilities within the Corkscrew Canal Sub-basins.

As part of the ensuing roadway improvements of Oil Well Road (CR 858), Randall Boulevard, CR 951
and Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension, numerous improvements to the drainage connection involving
enlarged bridges, retention ponds, swales and some relocation of canals will be implemented. A weir
reconstruction is planned at the CR 951 crossing of Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension in the 951 North
Canal Sub-basin.


B.    EAST NAPLES (DISTRICT NO. 6) BASIN SYSTEM

The East Naples (District No. 6) Basin System is a highly developed drainage area in the west central
portion of Collier County. It was identified by a previously established political boundary designation
that has since been disbanded and contains 6 separate drainage sub-basins as described in Table 7.2.


                                              Table 7.2
                         East Naples Basin – Sub-basins, Canals & Structures
       Sub-basin          Primary Canals & Structures          Secondary Canals & Structures
                                                         Rock Creek and 6 Branch Canals/ Ditches,
                                                         Weirs- RCB-04-S0110, RCB-00-S0105,
 Rock Creek                                              RCB-02-S0110, RCB-00-S0160

 Winter Park Outlet                                        Main Winter Park Canal
                                                           Weirs- HCB-00-S0130, HCB-00-S0200,
                                                           HCB-01-S0100, HCB-02-S0100, WPO-00-
 Haldeman Creek                                            S0100, WPO-02-S0100, HCB-02-S0110
                                                           Lely Main Canal and 17 Branch Canals,
                                                           Weirs- LCB-00-S0070, LCB-00-S0080,
                                                           LCB-17-S0100, LCB-00-S0150, LCB-07-
 Lely Main Canal                                           S0100, LCB-15-S0130, LCB-01-S0148
                                                           15 Branch Canals/ Ditches, Weirs- LMB-
 Lely Manor Canal                                          02-S0085
                                                           Eagle Creek and 3 Branch Canals/ Ditches,
 Eagle Creek                                               Weirs- C4C-00-S0110, C4C-00-S0170




                                               Exhibit 25
                                              Page 8 of 67
        EXHIBIT 25]
DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




         Exhibit 25
        Page 9 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

It is important to keep in mind that District No. 6 Basin (East Naples Basin System) is not a single
drainage basin and that it contains individual sub-basins that are described in the following sections. This
area has been extensively developed with PUD's that have created a considerable portion of the drainage
facilities within the various basins. However, due to the age differences of the developments, not all of
the drainage systems have been designed to work in unison or designed for the same design storm
standard. This area also contains large tracts of agricultural land use in its southern portion that are
rapidly being designed for development into urban residential and golf course communities.

Previous Studies
There are four studies in the Collier County Stormwater Management Department files that provide
information and recommendations on the needs and proposed corrective actions for the District No. 6
System with a primary focus on the Lely Canal Basin - Main, water management system. The first study,
"Master Plan for Water Management District No. 6, Collier County, Florida" was prepared by Black,
Crow and Eidsness, Inc. in February 1974. This report discussed the drainage problems and also
addressed the environmental concerns that were being caused by the present method of dumping the
freshwater from the Lely Canal directly into the saltwater areas. A series of spreader swales were
proposed along with several water level control structures to provide a controlled discharge into the
estuaries and prevent the over drainage of some upstream wetland preservation/conservation areas.

The engineering report, "Proposed Lely Canal Water Control Structure, Collier County, Florida" was
prepared by CH2M Hill in December, 1978. This report proposed that a water level control structure be
constructed on the Lely Canal at the US 41 bridge crossing. The structure would provide flooding and
drainage control and conveyance of surface floodwater to the estuarine zone as well as conservation of
surface and groundwater in the drainage areas through modulation of flow and subsequent storage of
surface and groundwater in the dry season.

The "Lely Outfall Surface Water Management System (Preliminary Design)" report was prepared by
CH2M Hill in December, 1979, as a follow up to their previous report. This new report described the
proposed Lely Canal improvements and spreader waterway including the general layout and design of the
facilities, environmental and maintenance factors in the system performance and costs of construction and
maintenance of the facilities.

The "Master Plan Update for Water Management District No. 6" prepared by Wilson, Miller, Barton,
Soll, and Peek, Inc. in October, 1985 outlines a plan to provide a mechanism of flood control for the
existing and future developments in the area. More comprehensive stormwater management modeling
and engineering design work were performed in order to initiate the environmental permitting process in
1999 by Law Engineering and Environmental Services, Inc. and in 2003 by Agnoli, Barber and Brundage,
Inc. for development of the Lely Area Stormwater Improvement Project (LASIP). Portions of the plan
are presently under construction.

7.2.1   DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

The information contained in this section was compiled from numerous engineering and planning reports
and the Collier County Stormwater Management Master Plan (Master Plan) that was prepared as an initial
product of the 1988 Growth Management Plan.

Collier County is a large land area of approximately 2000 square miles in southwest Florida. The
topography is extremely flat ranging from a high elevation of approximately forty (40) feet above sea
level in the unincorporated community of Immokalee in the northeastern portion of the County to the
back of a low coastal dune system at approximately four (4) feet at the coastline along the western and


                                               Exhibit 25
                                              Page 10 of 67
                                        EXHIBIT 25]
                                DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

southern portions of the County. The typical ground slope is approximately one (1) foot per mile in the
western half of the County and less than that in the eastern half of the County. Additionally the area
receives an average rainfall of about 53 inches with 37 inches during the wet season ( June through
October ). Due to the lack of relief, abundant rainfall, highly permeable soils, and proximity to sea level
the ground water table is very close to the ground surface. The flat topography results in large areas of
sheetflow across natural ground, but canals, road construction, agricultural operations, and urban
development have greatly altered this sheetflow in the western portion of the County.

Collier County, due to the Immokalee ridge in the northeast, is basically its own drainage watershed. The
shallow topography, with the Immokalee high located in the northeastern portion of the County near the
Lee County and Hendry County boundaries, creates a series of drainage basins with very little exchange
of stormwater crossing county lines. Additionally, in some locations agr icultural and development
activities have constructed earthen berms along their property lines that correspond to the County lines
that further define the drainage basin boundaries. The eastern half of the County is predominantly
federally owned wetlands that receives sheet flow as a part of the Everglades system, but this remains in
the eastern half of the County and continues the flow in a southeasterly direction.

The following information describes the various drainage basins in Collier County and prov ides some
information on the amount of effort that has been undertaken to identify past flooding and other
stormwater related concerns. Information in this document was compiled from previous studies, reports
and investigations. The accuracy of the previous studies, reports and investigations was not verified.
Recent changes to the flow ways caused by land development and maintenance activities may not be
accurately reflected in the drainage basin information provided in this plan.

Due to the low gradient terrain and wetland hydrologic features, construction of canals along section lines
and roads, drainage is not uniform and implementation of a uniform level of service for flood conveyance
in all areas of Collier County is not feasible. The County generally considers a 25 year 3 day rainfall
event as the design storm for area west of Collier Blvd. (CR 951) and a 10 year 1 day rainfall event as the
design storm for the Golden Gate Estates areas east of Collier Boulevard (CR 951).

Because the soils are so porous the canals drain preserves and shallow aquifers as well as residential
developments. The shallow aquifers are utilized by suburban and rural residents for potable water.
Additionally the large fresh water discharges during the wet season have been found detrimental to the
estuaries. For these reasons there have been many adjustable water level controls installed in the canal
systems to improve functionality.

The map on page 7-7 illustrates the major drainage basin systems and sub-basins in Collier County. The
boundaries of the basins were established by the Big Cypress Basin (BCB) of the South Florida Water
Management District (SFWMD). Subsequent sections of this report discuss relevant information about
the systems. The descriptions of the pertinent drainage characteristics of the County will be categorized
under the following major basins:

        1. Golden Gate Canal System
        2. East Naples (District 6) Basin System
        3. Cocohatchee - Corkscrew Basin System
        4. Gordon River Basin System
        5. Henderson Creek - Belle Meade Basin System
        6. Faka - Union Canal Basin System
        7. Coastal Basins Systems
                a) Wiggins Pass Coastal Basin


                                              Exhibit 25
                                             Page 11 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

                 b) Naples Shore Coastal Basin
                 c) East Naples Coastal Basin
                 d) Belle Meade Coastal Basin
                 e) Southern Coastal Basin
        8. Fakahatchee Strand Basin System
        9. Okaloacoochee Slough - Barron River System
        10. Interior Wetland Systems (area east of the shaded Major Basins of the map)
        11. Imperial River Basin and other areas out flowing directly into adjacent counties

Historical Background
The Rock Creek Sub-basin is one of the older developed urban regions east of Naples Bay. The historical
basin boundary for Rock Creek has been reduced by the construction of the various roads and the G.A.C.
canal network. This region has experienced years of development activity with piecemeal drainage
conveyance channels excavated by individual development and road construction activities.

The Eagle Creek Canal Sub-basin contained large areas of undeveloped uplands and wetlands as well as
former agricultural lands. A key feature is the Rattlesnake Hammock slough that serves to transport
surface water in a southwesterly direction along the western edge of this basin. This sub-basin is
currently undergoing extensive development activity and new developments are being proposed for the
remaining undeveloped lands. The sub-basin boundaries were created by the construction of roads and
earthen berms from adjacent development.

Prior to the construction of any drainage systems in Collier County, the Lely Main Canal Sub-basin and
the Lely-Manor Canal Sub-basin were not identifiable as separate systems but were a part of a large
coastal outfall system for waters flowing from the northeast. With the construction of US 41 to the south,
CR 951 (Collier Boulevard) to the east and CR 856 (Radio Road) to the north, the upstream boundaries of
the Lely Main Canal Sub-basin were established and the historical sheet flow of surface water was altered
greatly. As the large residential and recreational developments began to be built in this basin; small,
shallow drainage canals were excavated to drain the land surface. Many of these older developments
allowed residential structures to be built at natural grade elevations and did not consider the contributory
drainage effects from off-site lands. This created flooding situations when the small canal systems were
not able to sufficiently pass the volumes of water that occurred within the limits of the entire Lely Main
Canal Sub-basin.

The Haldeman Creek Sub-basin was created by the construction of residential developments as the Naples
community began to expand eastward in the 60’s and 70’s. Haldeman Creek is a natural channel that has
been dredged and altered years ago. A lack of maintenance has allowed the channel to become restricted
by sediments southwesterly of US 41. Upstream of US 41, the channel depth was generally terminated
when developers encountered hard rock strata which results in a varying channel profile.

The Winter Park Outlet Sub-basin is another drainage basin that was created by development activities.
In similar fashion to the Haldeman Creek Sub-basin, the Winter Park Outlet Sub-basin channel is very
small and shallow with older residences adjacent to it. This sub-basin has seen newer development
activities in the headwaters that incorporate modern stormwater design practices.

Description of Existing Facilities
The existing facilities within this system consist of approximately 40 miles of secondary canals. There
are 3 adjustable water level control structures on the secondary canal system. The water level control
structures are known as weirs and will be identified by this title for the remainder of the report.



                                               Exhibit 25
                                              Page 12 of 67
                                        EXHIBIT 25]
                                DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

Existing Condition/Capacity of Facilities
Many of the drainage control facilities within the Rock Creek Sub-basin have been in existence for many
years as a result of various development projects. The maintenance of the public drainage facilities is
performed by the Collier County Road Maintenance and primarily consists of the control and removal of
vegetation when this becomes excessive and hinders the flow of stormwater through the system. Some
sediment removal work is also done to return the channel to its approximate original cross section when
excess sediment accumulations and becomes a problem. The lower end of the Rock Creek channel
should be for evaluated for sediment and debris removal.

Within the Eagle Creek Sub-basin the roadside ditch along the north side of US 41 and the Lely
Subdivision, a resort community lake system, are the primary collectors of runoff for this sub-basin. This
roadside ditch along US 41 has been in existence for many years and periodically receives maintenance
work to remove flow restrictions prior to discharging into the Eagle Creek Sub-basin. The Eagle Creek
channel was reconstructed as a part of the Lely Resort Community PUD from US 41 to the point where it
enters the limits of the Eagle Creek PUD near Price Street. As a part of the Eagle Creek PUD drainage
development work, the Eagle Creek channel was widened and a water level control structure (C4C-00-
S0110) was installed at the Tower Road crossing. These improvements within the Eagle Creek Sub-basin
provided a salinity barrier and a means to control fresh water discharge into Henderson Creek. The
maintenance of the public drainage system within this sub-basin is performed by the Collier County Road
Maintenance and primarily consists of the control and removal of aquatic vegetation when this becomes
excessive and hinders the flow of stormwater through the system. Some sediment removal work is also
done to return the channel to its approximate original cross section when excess sediment accumulations
become a problem. Maintenance of the private drainage facilities is the responsibility of the owners.
Additionally, the maintenance personnel of the Eagle Creek development maintain the portion of the
Eagle Creek Sub-basin that flows through their property. As a whole, the drainage systems within this
sub-basin are good, but need improvements in some sections to allow for the adequate passage of desired
design flows.

Most of the existing secondary drainage facilities within the Lely Main Canal sub-basin are within the
older developed areas and are not adequate to provide an acceptable degree of flood protection. The
newer developments, and those now being proposed, have been designed using current water
management design standards and provide adequate protection for their internal drainage needs.
However, the overall canal system needs improvement to increase the efficiency of the water
management capabilities and provide increased flood protection for the entire sub-basin. Improvements
completed in 2007 to the Secondary canal adjacent to the Avalon School will provide increased flood
protection to the area. The maintenance of the public drainage facilities within this sub-basin is
performed by the Collier County Road Maintenance and primarily consists of the control and removal of
aquatic vegetation when this becomes excessive and hinders the flow of stormwater through the system.
Some sediment removal work is also done to return the channels to approximate original cross section
when excess sediment accumulations become a problem. Maintenance of the private drainage facilities is
the responsibility of the owners.

The condition and capacity of the drainage facilities within the Lely Manor Canal Sub-basin are not
adequate to provide a desirable degree of flood protection. Many of the canals need to be improved to
increase the hydraulic efficiency of the system. Maintenance is systematically performed by the Collier
County Road Maintenance and primarily consists of the control and removal of aquatic vegetation and
sediments when this becomes excessive and hinders the flow of stormwater through the system.

The condition of the facilities within the Haldeman Creek Sub-basin varies considerably depending on the
age and location. Maintenance is performed by the Collier County Road Maintenance and/or the various


                                              Exhibit 25
                                             Page 13 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

homeowner associations of the residential developments. The maintenance primarily consists of the
control and removal of aquatic vegetation and sediments when this becomes excessive and hinders the
flow of stormwater through the system. Most of the water management facilities that have been
constructed in accordance with the newer developments are sufficient to pass the design storm flows. The
drainage facilities for the older developments, which often form the main canal connectors to Haldeman
Creek, are generally of insufficient capacity. The lower portion of Haldeman Creek down stream on US
41 was dredged in 2007 and an approved MSTU was established to maintain the tidal canals and
waterways to its outfall in Naples Bay.

The condition of the channels within the Winter Park Outlet Sub-basin varies considerably depending on
the age, location, and degree of involvement in maintenance. Maintenance is performed by the Collier
County Road Maintenance and/or the various homeowner associations of the residential developments.
The maintenance primarily consists of the control and removal of aquatic vegetation and sediments when
this becomes excessive and hinders the flow of stormwater through the system.

Proposed Improvements
The comprehensive stormwater management improvement project known as the Lely Area Stormwater
Improvement Project (LASIP) began implementation in 2006. This $60+ million project is anticipated to
be completed over the next eight to ten years providing substantial flood protection and stormwater
quality improvement in the Lely Main Canal Sub-basin and the Lely Manor Canal Sub-basin. Major
improvement to the secondary canal system will be constructed as part of the LASIP project including the
construction of three (3) spreader lakes.

The stormwater management five-year capital improvement program includes improvements to the Lake
Kelly outfall (AKA Bayshore & Thomason Canal) in the Haldeman Creek Sub-basin and to the North
Road and Gail Boulevard canal in the Rock Creek Sub-basin.


C.    COCOHATCHEE – CORKSCREW BASIN SYSTEM

The Cocohatchee – Corkscrew Basin System encompasses a large basin of land in the north and
northwestern portions of Collier County and southern Lee County. The western portion of the region is
within the urban designated area and is undergoing rapid development activity for both residential and
commercial usage. The eastern portion of the region is generally undeveloped or used for rural and
agricultural activities. There are extensive areas of wetlands within this region that also include portions
of the Corkscrew Regional Ecosystem Watershed (CREW) acquisition project being undertaken by the
South Florida Water Management District. The prominent drainage features of the Cocohatchee -
Corkscrew Basin System are described in Table 7.3.




                                               Exhibit 25
                                              Page 14 of 67
                                    EXHIBIT 25]
                            DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




                                          Table 7.3
                 Cocohatchee-Corkscrew Basin – Sub-basins, Canals & Structures
      Sub-basin         Primary Canals & Structures         Secondary Canals & Structures
SR 82 E
Lehigh SE
Wildcal Farms
Corkscrew Marsh N
Pipers Ranch
Immokalee N                                           Canal, CSB-05
Panther Island E
Corkscrew Marsh S
Lake Trafford
Bird Rookery Swamp
Corkscrew SW                                          Canal, CCB-05
Hogan Island
Corkscrew E                                           Canal, CSB-04
                       Cocohatchee Canal, weir
Coco #3                Coco #3
Mule Pen Quarry        Cocohatchee Canal
Mirasol                Cocohatchee Canal, Weir
Quail Creek            Cocohatchee Canal              Canal, CRB-06
                       Cocohatchee Canal, Weir,      Palm River Canal - Weir - PLM-00-S0100
Palm River             Coco #1                       (Palm River)
                       Cocohatchee Canal, Weir
Coco #2                Coco #2

                                                    West Branch Cocohatchee River Weir -
                                                    WBC-00-S0110 (Coco West); East Branch
                       Cocohatchee Canal - CRB-
Pine Ridge Canal                                    Cocohatchee River Weir - EBC-00-S0110
                       00-S0140 (Coco-1)
                                                    (Coco East); Pine Ridge Canal Weir -
                                                    PRC-00-S0110 (Pine Ridge 2)

Airport N              Airport Rd Canal - CR-31N
Old 41
Spanish Wells                                        Canal, CRB-00
Sterling Oaks                                        Canals, WWB-00, CRB-00
Colliers Reserve


                                         Exhibit 25
                                        Page 15 of 67
                         EXHIBIT 25]
                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

                                    Pine Ridge Canal Weir - PRC-00-S0180
Orange Blossom                      (Pine Ridge 1); Canal, WCB-00




                          Exhibit 25
                         Page 16 of 67
        EXHIBIT 25]
DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




         Exhibit 25
        Page 17 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

Previous Studies
Beginning in the early seventies, two major engineering studies were prepared for this drainage basin
area. The first report, "Master Plan, Water Management District No. 7 including the Cocohatchee and
Gordon River Basins, Collier County, Florida" by Black, Crow and Eidsness, Inc. in March, 1975,
identified the drainage needs for the northern and western portions of the County. A second study,
"Cocohatchee Canal Salinity Control Structure Hydrologic Report" by Gee and Jensen Engineers-
Architects-Planners, Inc. in October, 1981, specifically addressed the size of the main canal watershed
and the need to construct a water level control structure near the western end of this canal to prohibit the
intrusion of salt water into the freshwater system and groundwater. Both of these reports were principally
concerned with the drainage of stormwater from the basin and did not address the environmental effects
to the downstream receiving waters that now need to be considered in the basin design process.

In addition to the two above mentioned studies, a series of studies relating to groundwater sources in this
area were prepared by Missimer and Associates, Inc. A first study, entitled "Groundwater Resources of
the Cocohatchee Watershed, Collier County, Florida", was principally concerned with the Coral Reef
Aquifer and discussed the effects that the Cocohatchee River Main Canal had on the available
groundwater. This report showed that the canal lowered the groundwater levels and proposed that a water
level control structure be constructed to increase the storage of groundwater and decrease the intrusion of
salt water into the aquifer system.

A second report by Missimer and Associates, Inc. entitled "Hydrogeologic Information on the
Water-Table Aquifer Adjacent to the Proposed Control Structure on the Cocohatchee Canal, Collier
County, Florida", took a more detailed look at the effects of the construction of a water level control
structure proposed in the "Groundwater Resources of the Cocohatchee Watershed" report. While this
report presented the same favorable discussion on the effects of the water level control structure as a
salinity control structure and the benefits of increasing the groundwater storage, it also described some of
the downstream effects that could be expected to occur, especially the increase in salinity of the
Cocohatchee River during the dry season. This report also encouraged the use of additional upstream
water level control structures to help in the recharge of the Coral Reef Aquifer during the dry season.

As a part of the capital improvement of the Cocohatchee canal and water surface control structures the
Big Cypress Basin conducted four comprehensive hydrologic and hydraulic (H&H) assessments. A
detailed H&H assessment “Preliminary Engineering Feasibility Study for replacement of the Palm River
Weir” was also performed by BCB in 1988. The structure is presently operated and maintained by Collier
County.

Historical Background
The major stormwater management facility within the Cocohatchee – Corkscrew Basin is the canal along
the north side of Immokalee Road (CR 846). This canal was dug many years ago as a linear borrow pit to
provide fill material for the construction of the road connecting Naples and Immokalee. The canal was
not sized for any specific conveyance capacity, and for the most part was just scraped down to the rock
layer. During the course of road construction, cross culverts were periodically installed to allow for
sheetflow from the north to south through existing wetlands. Agricultural activities in the upland areas
have for years utilized dikes and pumps to protect fields from flooding. The large Corkscrew Swamp
wetland area is still a major source of water resources for the entire basin.

The Corkscrew marsh receives stormwater runoff from the Immokalee high area. Various attempts have
been made in the past to utilize some of the land for agriculture, but the continual presence of large
amounts of surface water has kept most of the basin undeveloped.



                                               Exhibit 25
                                              Page 18 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

The Pine Ridge Canal Basin was established many years ago by the construction of a railroad and US 41.
During the development of the Pine Ridge subdivision, the canal, then known as the North Naples
Drainage Canal, was excavated to provide drainage relief. This canal was greatly modified in 1993 by
construction activities within the Pelican Marsh PUD. Portions of the canal have now been connected to
small lakes or enclosed in pipes and covered with a restored wetland system as part of the development’s
environmental mitigation measures.

Within the Pine Ridge Canal Basin, the West Branch Cocohatchee River utilizes a natural channel that
was once part of the south branch of Horse Creek to convey surface water northward into the
Cocohatchee River Basin. The boundaries of the basin were established by agricult ural operations in the
area many years ago. Recent developments have converted the agricultural fields into residential or
commercial properties.

Within the Pine Ridge Canal Basin the East Branch Cocohatchee River utilizes an ill-defined natural
channel that was also once part of the south branch of Horse Creek to convey surface water northward
into the Cocohatchee River Basin. The boundaries of the basin were established by agricultural
operations in the area many years ago. Recent developments have converted the agricultural fields into
residential or commercial properties.

The boundaries of the Palm River Canal Basin were established by the development of the residential
communities of Palm River Estates and Imperial Golf Course Estates. As Palm River Estates was
developed, the southern branch of a natural stream, Horse Creek, was canalized through the middle of the
development to create what is now called Palm River. The northern branch of Horse Creek has also been
somewhat canalized, though on a much smaller scale, and forms the dividing drainage channel between
Palm River Estates and Imperial Golf Course Estates. A small weir structure made from sheet piles was
re-constructed in 1989 on the Palm River to restrict salt water intrusion.

The major stormwater management facility within the Airport Road Canal North Basin is the canal along
the east side of Airport-Pulling Road (CR 31). This canal was dug years ago as a linear borrow pit to
provide fill material for the construction of the original road and drain the land east of the road. The basin
boundaries were established through agricultural and other construction operations. Much of the area has
developed from agricultural operations into residential or commercial developments.

Description of Existing Facilities
The existing facilities within this basin consist of approximately 14 miles of primary canal and 14 miles
of secondary canal. There are 5 water level control structures on the primary canal system and 5 on the
secondary canal system, and 1 pump station of the secondary system. The water level control structures
are known as weirs and will be identified by this title for the remainder of this report.

Existing Condition/Capacity of Facilities
As a part of the Corkscrew Regional Ecosystem Watershed (CREW) a comprehensive management plan
was developed for portions of the Cocohatchee – Corkscrew Basin System. The plan outlines hydrologic
and ecologic management of the CREW area.

The Corkscrew Marsh drainage basin’s major land feature is the Corkscrew swamp and is almost entirely
controlled by natural wetland drainage systems resulting in very little maintenance required to be
performed by Collier County Road Maintenance. Some minor drainage swales and canals in Immokalee
are maintained for aquatic vegetation control and sediment removal when necessary. The natural systems
adequately handle the volumes of stormwater runoff. Aquatic vegetation control is performed at Lake
Trafford by the Big Cypress Basin.


                                                Exhibit 25
                                               Page 19 of 67
                                        EXHIBIT 25]
                                DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION


The Cocohatchee River Main Canal (Immokalee Road Borrow Canal) has been in existence for many
years. The operation and maintenance of this primary canal is performed by the Big Cypress Basin.
Operation and maintenance of the secondary canals is performed by Collier County Road Maintenance
and primarily consists of the control and removal of aquatic vegetation when the flow of stormwater
through the system becomes hindered. Some sediment removal work is also done to return the channels
to their approximate original cross section when excess sediment accumulations become a problem. The
freshwater portions of the Cocohatchee River Main Canal have been enlarged by the Big Cypress Basin to
be of generally sufficient size to pass the design storm runoff (25-year, 3-day event).

Due to the relatively small area of the Pine Ridge Canal Sub-basin drainage and the favorable gradient of
the existing canal and structures, the facilities are of generally sufficient size to pass the design storm
runoffs. Outside the boundaries of the Pelican Marsh PUD, the maintenance of this canal is performed by
the Collier County Road Maintenance and primarily consists of the control and removal of aquatic
vegetation when this becomes excessive and hinders the flow of stormwater through the system. The
County operates and maintains the five adjustable water level control structures and one pump station.

The condition of the drainage facilities within the Palm River Canal Sub-basin is poor. The outlet end of
the primary canal is subject to tidal influence and thus the water level fluctuates accordingly. The sheet
pile water level control structure uses stop logs to regulate the upstream water elevations. The operation
and maintenance of this weir and canal is performed by Collier County Road Maintenance.

The condition of the West Branch Cocohatchee River drainage system is adequate to meet the drainage
needs of this basin and therefore no major work is proposed for improvements. The operation and
maintenance of this drainage system is performed by the Collier County Road Maintenance. This
consists of the control and removal of aquatic vegetation near the water level control structures when this
becomes excessive and interferes with the operation of the structures as well as performing routine
maintenance on the downstream structure.

The condition of the East Branch Cocohatchee River drainage system is adequate to meet the drainage
needs of this basin and therefore no major work is proposed for improvements. The operation and routine
maintenance of the water level control structure within this drainage system is performed by Collier
County Road Maintenance.

The Airport Road North Canal is in good condition to handle the storm runoff from this drainage basin.
The canal was renovated during the 4-lane upgrade construction of the Airport-Pulling Road. The
operation and maintenance of the primary canal and structure is performed by the Big Cypress Basin.
Operation and maintenance of the secondary canals, structure and pump station is performed by Collier
County Road Maintenance.


Proposed Improvements
In conjunction with the previously mentioned engineering studies, the Big Cypress Basin made
improvements to the Cocohatchee River Main Canal. These improvements are complete and no
additional capital work is currently proposed. These facility improvements have also been coordinated
with ongoing roadway improvements to CR 846 by the County.

The Stormwater Management Department completed the North Livingston Road Master Plan that
identified needed improvements in both the Palm River Canal and Old 41 Sub-basins. The design and
construction of these improvements will occur over the next few years as funding is provided and some


                                              Exhibit 25
                                             Page 20 of 67
                                        EXHIBIT 25]
                                DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

drainage easements are obtained and dedicated to the County. The replacement of culverts under a
pedestrian walkway across Fish Branch Creek adjacent to Lake Trafford Road that is scheduled for 2007
will reduce flooding in the area. The Big Cypress Basin dredged Palm River below the weir and to the
confluence with the Cocohatchee River to remove accumulated sediment in 2005.


D.    GORDON RIVER BASIN SYSTEM

The Gordon River Basin System is an approximately 8.4 square mile drainage basin immediately east of
the City of Naples and is divided into three identifiable sub basins. This basin encompasses the northern
Gordon River drainage area and has been altered in size by the construction of roads and development
sites. The area has a multitude of land uses within its boundaries including wetlands, recreation (golf
courses), residential, and commercial. Included within this basin are The Commons, River Reach,
Wilderness, Moorings Park, Moorings Park Estates, Forest Lakes Homes, part of the Grey Oaks PUD's,
the J. & C. (Pine Ridge) Industrial Park, the Poinciana Village subdivision, the Wilderness, Hole in the
Wall, Royal Poinciana, and the Country Club of Naples golf courses. Identifiable sub basins and water
control structures in the basin are illustrated in Table 7.4.


                                            Table 7.4
                        Gordon River Basin – Sub-basin, Canals & Structures
                             Primary Canals &
       Sub-basin                                            Secondary Canals & Structures
                                 Structures
                                                     Pine Ridge Industrial Park system, including
 Gordon River N                                      3 Weirs- GRE-09-S0100, GRE-10-S0100,
                                                     GRE-12-S0100
                                                       Gordon River Extension and 8 Branch Canal/
 Gordon River Central                                  Ditches, and 5 Weirs- GRE-01-S0245, GRE-
                                                       01-S0225, GRE-05-S0110, GRE-01-S0150

                                                       Gordon River Extension Weir - GRE-00-
 Gordon River S
                                                       S0100




                                              Exhibit 25
                                             Page 21 of 67
        EXHIBIT 25]
DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




         Exhibit 25
        Page 22 of 67
                                        EXHIBIT 25]
                                DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

Previous Studies
Several studies have been performed to analyze the drainage problems and propose solutions for this
basin. One study, "Master Plan, Water Management District No. 7, Including the Cocohatchee and
Gordon River Basins, Collier County, Florida" by Black, Crow and Eidsness, Inc. in March, 1975,
presents a detailed engineering study of the drainage needs for this basin. This report incorporates a
series of excavated channels and water level control structures to effectively remove excess stormwater
during periods of wet weather yet maintain a high groundwater elevation throughout the year to help
replenish the Coastal Ridge aquifer that is a vital source of potable water for the City of Naples. A more
recent study, "Gordon River Watershed Study" by CH2M Hill in February, 1980, considered these same
problems and solutions but evaluated them more from an economic standpoint.

Several studies have also been completed, which considered the environmental impacts of any
modification to the Gordon River watershed. "An Environmental Evaluation of the Gordon River of
Naples, Florida and the Impact of Developmental P lans" by Howard T. Odum, Charles Littlejohn, and
Wayne C. Huber in September, 1972, evaluated the work performed by a natural system and made
suggestions for maintaining and/or restoring the area to its natural state and limiting the types of
development to be allowed in the future. Two studies, "Hydrological Effects of the Proposed Gordon
River Canal, Naples, Florida" by Bertan W. Morrow and John A. Stevens in October, 1971, and
"Hydrological Study of the Effects of the Proposed Gordon River Canal, Naples, Florida" by Black, Crow
and Eidsness, Inc. in 1971, discussed the effects that the construction of the Gordon River Extension
canal system would have on the Coastal Ridge aquifer, which is a primary potable water source for the
City of Naples.

The Gordon River Basin Study – Phase IV was produced by Wilson, Miller, in 2001. The study included
existing conditions and whether there is a need for improvements to the Basin’s stormwater management
system. Sixteen problem areas were identified in the study with twenty-two identified improvements.

Historical Background
The Gordon River has had an important part in the development of the City of Naples. The land near the
mouth of the Gordon River Extension consists of mangrove estuarine systems that have helped to limit
the extent of development in these areas. The upstream historical drainage basin extended much farther
to the east, but the construction of roads (principally Airport Road) with the accompanying roadside
canals created separate drainage basins that reduced the runoff to the Gordon River Extension system.

Description of Existing Facilities
The existing facilities within this basin consist of approximately 18 miles of secondary canal. There is 8
water level control structure on the secondary canal system.

The existing drainage facilities within the Gordon River Extension Basin have been built by a varied
group of developments. As a result, the overall drainage network is difficult to describe and is not
efficient in the removal of stormwater. There are approximately 18 miles of secondary canals within this
drainage basin. There is 1 water level control structure which functions as a salinity barrier located
downstream of Golden Gate Parkway near the mouth of the basin. There are 3 weirs within the Pine
Ridge Industrial Park. Additionally, there are 5 associated with the drainage ditch along the west side of
Goodlette-Frank Road. These structures were installed to provide storage and treatment for the
appropriate water quality volume for the Goodlette-Frank four lane and Pine Ridge Road six lane
improvements. The newly completed Goodlette-Frank Road six lane improvements provided a new water
quality treatment system for the entire roadway separate from the west side ditch. This presents an
opportunity to analyze the ditch for possible new functions related to management of runoff from
residential areas between US 41 and Goodlette Frank Road.


                                              Exhibit 25
                                             Page 23 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION


One of the drainage feature considerations that must be addressed is the stormwater runoff discharged
from the City of Naples that is located along the western side of this basin. A roadside ditch along the
west side of CR 851 (Goodlette-Frank Road) receives drainage from both Collier County and the City of
Naples jurisdictional areas.

Existing Condition/Capacity of Facilities
As mentioned previously, the condition of most of the drainage facilities within this basin produces an
inefficient stormwater removal system. Since almost all of these facilities have been built by various
private interests through a number of years of development, there is no uniformity to their design. The
maintenance of the tertiary system is primarily is the responsibility of these private owners and past
efforts to obtain County maintenance agreements have met with poor response. As a result, many of the
existing facilities are inadequate in size and choked with vegetation in many places and are generally
insufficient to pass the design storm runoffs.

Proposed Improvements
A recently completed multi-year joint planning effort by the County, the City of Naples, and the Big
Cypress Basin identified the existing stormwater facilities within the basin and developed a set of
alternatives analyses to determine what stormwater management improvements are needed within the
Gordon River Basin. The Twin Lakes and West Lakes capital improvement projects were completed in
2006, and the 14th Street outfall improvements were completed in 2007. These drainage improvement
projects increased flood protection and enhanced water quality before discharging into the Gordon River.

In 2004 the County acquired a vacant parcel of land of approximately 50 acres in size near the southern
(downstream) end of the Gordon River Basin. This land will be utilized to construct a stormwater
management facility that will benefit the entire basin and provide improved stormwater quality and
attenuate neighborhood flooding in a passive park setting. Upon completion of the construction of the
identified improvements, the Gordon River Basin is anticipated to have better flood protection and
improved water quality discharge.

In 2006 the County acquired approximately 80 acres of property located south of Golden Gate Parkway,
adjacent to the Naples Zoo and the Conservancy of Southwest Florida. The property is called the Gordon
River Greenway Park and will become a passive park that will incorporate the greenway trail system and
contain water quality ponds to improve water before discharging to the Gordon River. Design is expected
to begin in 2008.


E.    HENDERSON CREEK - BELLE MEADE BASIN SYSTEM

The Henderson Creek – Belle Meade Basin system is a medium sized drainage area of approximately 49
square miles and is located in the south central portion of Collier. The historic hydrology of the basin has
been drastically altered by road and drainage developments during the last forty years. The construction
of I-75 has severed natural wetland flow ways to the south resulting in adverse ecologic impacts to the
estuaries of Rookery Bay and neighboring coastal waters. There is very extensive development along the
western edge of the basin adjacent to CR-951 and along the US-41 border. The existing rock pits near the
US-41 and CR-951 intersection have been used as a potable water supply source for the City of Marco
Island for over 20 years. Identifiable sub-basins and adjustable water control structures in the basin are
illustrated in Table 7.5.




                                               Exhibit 25
                                              Page 24 of 67
                                     EXHIBIT 25]
                             DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION


                                            Table 7.5
              Henderson Creek Basin – Belle Meade – Sub-basins, Canals & Structures
      Sub-basin          Primary Canals & Structures          Secondary Canals & Structures
Belle Meade NE                                            I-75 Canal
Belle Meade NW                                            I-75 Canal
Century Park                                              I-75 Canal
Belle Meade SW1
Belle Meade Central
Henderson N
                     Henderson Creek - HEN CR #2

Belle Meade SW2                                          Henderson Creek Branch Canals,
                                                         Tamiami Canal, Weir - HEC-03-S0110
                                                         Henderson Creek and Branch Canals,
Henderson S                                              Tamiami Canal, Weirs- HEC-00-
                     Henderson Creek - HEN CR #1         S0120, HEC-04-S0100
                                                         Tamiami Canal and Branch
Henderson E
                                                         Canals/Ditches
                                                         Tamiami Canal and Branch
Duda                                                     Canals/Ditches
Belle Meade SE                                           Tamiami Canal




                                          Exhibit 25
                                         Page 25 of 67
        EXHIBIT 25]
DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




         Exhibit 25
        Page 26 of 67
                                        EXHIBIT 25]
                                DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

Previous Studies
The "Belle Meade - Royal Palm Hammock Water Management Plan", prepared by CH2M Hill in July,
1982 discusses the possible development of, and the environmental effects upon, the wetland wilderness
within this basin. A detailed water management plan was developed, which emphasized the need to
preserve large portions of this wetland and adapt the method of development to conform to the wetland
environment.

In 1990 Johnson Engineering, Inc. prepared a water management plan for the Henderson Creek basin as a
part of the design efforts to 4-lane CR 951. The report, "Watershed Analysis Henderson Creek Basin",
identified a need to modify the existing channel capacity by enlarging the cross section, reconstructing
many of the culverted road crossings, possibly constructing an additional weir, and modifying the existing
weir adjacent to US 41. When the road was 4-laned, the canal was not extensively modified due to
environmental permitting and right-of-way constraints.

In 2006, the Big Cypress Basin, in coordination with the County and DEP developed a comprehensive
stormwater master plan for the Belle Meade Basin. The goal of this master plan was to bring the right
amount of water at the right time to Rookery Bay and adjacent estuarine water bodies by restoring the
remnant historic flow ways. The study, which involved detailed hydrologic modeling and environmental
assessment of the existing conditions and a range of alternative strategies culminated in laying out a plan
of seven strategic plan elements.

Historical Background
The majority of the Henderson Creek Basin is identified as wetlands. This land is extremely flat and any
surface runoff is naturally directed toward the southwest where it enters the Rookery Bay estuary via
Henderson Creek. The boundaries of this basin were established by the excavation of the Main Golden
Gate Canal and the Faka Union Canal Systems and the CR-951 borrow canal. The water management in
the interior of the basin consists of an extensive patch work of ditches, dikes and pumps controlled by
agriculture operation. Small areas of development in the southern portion of the basin close to U.S. 41
have individual drainage networks that generally direct water south to the canal along the north side of
U.S. 41

Description of Existing Facilities
There are 4 major constructed drainage facilities within this basin. They consist of approximately 7 miles
of primary canal, 14 miles of secondary canal, 2 primary water level control structures, and 3 secondary
water level control structure. The northern most facility is the I-75 (Alligator Alley) borrow canal. It is
considered a secondary canal and directs some flow westward to the CR 951 borrow canal, while also
allowing additional flow to pass beneath I-75 and continue in a southwesterly direction toward Henderson
Creek. The CR 951 borrow canal, which forms the western boundary, is considered a primary canal and
collects water from the basin and directs it southward into Henderson Creek. The one primary water level
control structure is located in this canal immediately upstream of the US 41 crossing. The remaining
facilities are secondary and consist of the US 41 borrow canal which intercepts the flow of water and
outlets either through the Henderson Creek water level control structure or a secondary water level
control structure, which eventually discharges into the eastern branch of Henderson Creek.

Existing Condition/Capacity of Facilities
The canals within the Henderson Creek - Belle Meade Basin System were constructed as road borrow
canals and have been in existence for many years. The primary canals and structures are maintained by
the Big Cypress Basin, while the secondary canals and structures are maintained by the Collier County
Road Maintenance. The maintenance primarily consists of the control and removal of aquatic vegetation
and sediments when this becomes excessive and hinders the flow of stormwater through the system.


                                               Exhibit 25
                                              Page 27 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

While most of the canal system is well maintained, it is of insufficient size to rapidly pass the volumes of
surface water that enter the system during periods of excessive rainfall. The three existing water level
control structures are in excellent condition, and are capable of passing the design storm flows of an
improved canal system.

The drainage canal system within the sub-basin in the south eastern portion of the Henderson Creek –
Belle Meade Basin system are insufficient to provide the flood protection needs for the residents and
businesses. The Collier County Road Maintenance performs the maintenance of the US 41 borrow canal.
This maintenance primarily consists of the control and removal of aquatic vegetation when this becomes
excessive and hinders the flow of stormwater through the system. Some sediment removal work is also
done to return the canal to its approximate original cross section when excess sediment accumulations
become a problem. The agricultural outlet ditches are maintained by the agricultural operations and are in
various stages of constriction.

The existing canals in the Henderson East and Belle Meade SW2 Sub-basins are generally adequate to
meet the drainage requirements within the basin. To insure that the system is adequately maintained, the
Collier County Road Maintenance performs the maintenance of the canals and cross culverts. This
maintenance includes the control and removal of aquatic vegetation when it becomes excessive and
hinders the flow of stormwater through the system.

The borrow canal and roadway cross drains along US 41 were designed to approximate the original sheet
flow conditions of the Tamiami Trail Canal basin. The condition of the canal and cross drains is
generally good and the capacities sufficient to prevent major backup above the roadway surface of any
surface water from the typical storm events. The maintenance of this canal is performed by Collier
County Road Maintenance and primarily consists of the control and removal of aquatic vegetation when
this becomes excessive and hinders the flow of stormwater through the system. Some sediment removal
work is also done to return the channel to its approximate original cross section when excess sediment
accumulations become a problem.

Proposed Improvements
The recently completed Belle Meade Watershed Master Plan has identified improvements for water
quantity, water quality, and environmental enhancement. The plan has recommended seven elements of
structural and canal improvements to restore the historic flow ways and improve water quality to the
receiving water of Rookery Bay and neighboring estuarine waters. One element of the plan calls for
diverting flows from the Golden Gate Main Canal through the APAC Lakes for the purpose of feeding
water downstream into its water-starved wetlands. This diversion at APAC Lakes will serve as a valuable
overflow valve for reducing point discharges of freshwater to Golden Gate Canal’s tail water confluence
with Naples Bay. Freshwater diversions into Belle Meade will also recharge aquifers, restore wetland
communities in the western Picayune forest, and for resurrect the presence of a distributed freshwater
discharge to the eastern Ten Thousand Islands.

Other elements of the plan also include:
    Diversion of Golden Gate Canal flows to Henderson Creek via the I-75 culvert near the toll
        booth,
    Enhanced conveyance of sheet flow across Sabal Palm Road
    66 Acre STA near US 41
    Manatee Road Area improvements
    Fiddler’s Creek spreader channels
    Flow ways through future 6L area developments
    Tomato Road diversion and enhanced conveyance under SR92

                                               Exhibit 25
                                              Page 28 of 67
                                        EXHIBIT 25]
                                DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION



F.    FAKA - UNION CANAL BASIN SYSTEM

The Faka - Union System is a large drainage area in central Collier County. This Basin was created by
the excavation of the Golden Gate Estates canal network in the 1960's and is separated from the Golden
Gate Canal Basin during normal flow situations by a water level control structure. The total area served
by this stormwater system is approximately 151 square miles. The principal land use in the Faka - Union
Canal Basin System as residential estates land use. An extensive roadway and canal system was installed
throughout the basin during initial construction and the land sold to private citizens with lot sizes
typically ranging from 1.25 to 5.00 acres. The northern half (north of I-75) of this basin is being
developed by numerous individual homeowners while the southern half (south of I-75) of this basin has
almost no residential development, and the State of Florida has acquired most of the properties as part of
a program for the hydrologic restoration of the Picayune Strand Restoration Project. Identifiable sub-
basins and water control structures in the basin are illustrated in Table 7.6.


                                             Table 7.6
                     Faka - Union Canal Basin – Sub-basins, Canals & Structures
       Sub-basin              Primary Canals & Structures          Secondary Canals & Structures
 Camp Keais N
 Camp Keais S
 Camp Keais W
 Catherine Island
 Small Rd Island
 Panther Refuge N
 Panther Refuge S       Merritt Canal, Lucky Lake Structure
 Merritt #1             Merritt Canal, Merritt #1
 Prairie #1             Prairie Canal
 Merritt S              Merritt Canal
 Prairie S              Prairie Canal
 FU #7                  Faka Union Canal, FU #7
 FU #6                  Faka Union Canal, FU #6
 FU #5                  Faka Union Canal, FU #5
 FU #4                  Faka Union Canal, FU #4
 FU #3                  Faka Union Canal, FU #3
 FU #2                  Faka Union Canal, FU #2
 FU #1                  Faka Union Canal, FU #1
 Miller N               Miller Canal, Miller #3
 Miller Central         Miller Canal, C1 connector, Miller #2
 Miller S               Miller Canal, Miller #1
 Bad Luck
 Tomato Road




                                              Exhibit 25
                                             Page 29 of 67
        EXHIBIT 25]
DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




         Exhibit 25
        Page 30 of 67
                                        EXHIBIT 25]
                                DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

Previous Studies
Numerous studies have been prepared to address the water management problems associated with the
Golden Gate Estates canal network. This network consists of the Golden Gate Canal System a nd the
Faka-Union Canal Basin System. The studies that included discussions on the Golden Gate Canal System
have been described previously in this document.

The "Proposed Interim Modifications, Golden Gate Estates Canal System" report prepared by CH2M Hill
in November 1978, addressed the problem of excessive fresh water discharge into the Naples Bay and
Faka-Union Bay estuaries. This report recommended the permanent physical separation of the two basins
by the installation of two earth plugs in the canals which connect the two systems. Installation of the two
plugs would prevent runoff from the Faka-Union Canal Basin System from flowing into the Golden Gate
system and would result in a significant decrease in outflow to Naples Bay. It also recommended that a
flashboard system be constructed of five weirs in the Faka-Union Canal Basin System, thus making it
possible to raise the weir crests an average of two feet. This would result in decreasing the runoff rate,
raising surface and groundwater levels and providing for additional storage of water during the dry
season.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers prepared the “Golden Gate Estates, Reconnaissance Report” in April
1980. The report addressed the environmental harm that the Faka-Union Canal Basin System was doing
to the surrounding land and estuary. The report recommended that the canal system be modified to
reduce the amount of fresh water being discharged into Faka-Union Bay and restore the hydro period of
the wetlands to what had existed prior to the construction of the canal system. Since this was an overview
type of report, it recommended that a more detailed study be undertaken to develop definite solutions to
the water management problems, but it did recommend a plan called Alternative D. This p lan
recommended the construction and/or modification of a number of weirs, water level control structures,
and earth plugs to raise the groundwater elevations and the construction of several water discharge
spreaders to partially restore the natural sheetflow of surface water to the Fakahatchee Strand area to the
east and the Faka-Union Bay to the south.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) prepared a second report, “Golden Gate Estates, Draft
Feasibility Report”, in February 1986. This report also cons idered the feasibility of modifying the
existing water control system within the Faka-Union Canal Basin System. It recommended that the plan
known as “Alternative C” be implemented. “Alternative C” is very similar to the previously described
Alternative D, but it does not incorporate the spreaders.

A report, "The Effect of the Faka Union Canal System on Water Levels in the Fakahatchee Strand, Collier
County, Florida" was prepared by the United States Geological Survey (U.S.G.S.) and recorded as Water
Resources Investigations 77-61 in September 1977. This study discussed the effects that the Faka Union
Canal Basin System, principally the Merritt (aka "E") and Prairie (aka "F") Canals, had on the removal of
traditional surface water sheet flow from the western edge of the Fakahatchee Strand. The water levels
south of the weir at Janes Scenic Drive and Stewart Boulevard were shown to slope from the Strand to the
canal throughout the year. However, throughout the winter and spring when the structure was closed, the
gradient was flat and groundwater flow toward the canal upstream of the weir was minimal. At the
beginning of the rainy season, in June, water levels rose in the canal north of the structure, and water
flowed from the canal into the aquifer and around the control structure.

Beginning in 1985, the State of Florida included the Southern Golden Gate Estates (SGGE) in the State’s
Conservation and Recreation Land (CARL) program to acquire approximately 55,000 acres of land in the
area under public ownership, and requested the District to develop a restoration plan formulated in
accordance with the COE feasibility study plan. As the complex land acquisition continued, in 1996 the


                                              Exhibit 25
                                             Page 31 of 67
                                        EXHIBIT 25]
                                DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

District submitted a comprehensive plan comprising of canal plugs, pump stations, spreader channels and
road removal to restore the historic flow way. The project was later named as Picayune Strand
Restoration Plan (PSRP) and included as a priority element of the State’s Comprehensive Everglades
Restoration Plan (CERP) for implementation in partnership with COE. A Project Implementation Report
(PIR) with detailed hydrologic, hydraulic and ecologic evaluation of the project was completed in 2004
and submitted to U.S. Congress for authorization. A series of Basis of Design Reports (BODR) of the
respective project elements (pumps, levees, canals and roads) were later prepared in 2005 and 2006 to
develop engineering design and to outline the impacts/benefits on flood stages, groundwater recharge and
wildlife habitats in the project area and the neighboring lands.

Historical Background
The excavation of the Faka-Union Canal created the Faka-Union Canal Basin. Prior to any construction,
the land was part of a wetland system between the Henderson Creek drainage area and the Fakahatchee
Strand area. The first major construction project within this basin was SR 84 (also known as Alligator
Alley), which has now been reconstructed as I-75. Cross drains were periodically installed so that there
was only a minimal effect to the wetland system. Following construction of the Faka-Union Canal, the
groundwater level was lowered and the surface runoff was intercepted by the canal instead of continuing
as sheet flow toward the southwest.

The excavation of the Miller Canal of the Faka-Union System created the Miller Canal Basin. Prior to
any construction, the land was part of a wetland system between the Henderson Creek drainage area and
the Fakahatchee Strand area. The first major construction project within this basin was SR-84 (also
known as Alligator Alley which has now been reconstructed as I-75). Cross drains were periodically
installed so that there was only a minimal effect to the wetland system. Following construction of the
Miller Canal, the groundwater level was lowered and the surface runoff was intercepted by the canal
instead of continuing as sheet flow toward the southwest.

The Merritt Canal Basin was created during the construction of the Merritt Canal in the late 1960's in an
attempt to drain the surface water from the Picayune Strand south of I-75. Due to the natural drainage
features of the Picayune Strand and its connection to the Stumpy Strand to the north of I-75, the drainage
area is much larger than the relatively small amount of drainage canals would seem to indicate.

The Prairie Canal Basin was created during the construction of the Prairie Canal in the late 1960's in an
attempt to drain the surface water from the Picayune Strand south of I-75. The Prairie Canal was also
supposed to provide a drainage outlet for the proposed community of Golden Gate Gardens.

Description of Existing Facilities
The existing facilities within this basin consist of a primary water management system of approximately
70 miles of canals and 13 water level control structures. However, due to the completion of plugging of
the Prairie canal as a part of PSRP, presently, an eight mile reach of the canal and its water control
structure are excluded for routine operation and maintenance activities.


Existing Condition/Capacity of Facilities
The Big Cypress Basin performs the operation and maintenance of the primary canal and associated water
level control structures in the Miller, Faka Union, Merritt and Prairie canals. The Collier County Road
Maintenance is responsible for the maintenance of the secondary canals. Operation and maintenance
primarily consists of the control and removal of aquatic vegetation and sediment when this becomes
excessive and hinders the flow of stormwater through the system. The design conveyance capacity of the
canals, even when properly maintained, is limited to provide flood protection for the design storm flows


                                              Exhibit 25
                                             Page 32 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

for less than a 10 year event. The Big Cypress Basin has reconstructed the Faka Union Canal weir# 4 and
weir#5 to enhance their water management functions, added a new structure in Merritt Canal (Lucky Lake
Weir) and modified the stop-log assemblies of Miller #1, Miller#3 and Faka Union#2 weirs.

Proposed Improvements
The Faka-Union Canal, north of I-75, is of sufficient size and condition so that no improvements are
planned. However to prevent over-drainage the Big Cypress Basin five year plan has outlined retrofit of
the Faka Union Canal Weir #7. As a part of roadway improvements to Randall Blvd, CR-858 and the
Vanderbilt Beach Road Extension, the existing bridges will be enlarged, and new bridges will be
constructed, which should improve conveyance capacity. As a part of
PSRP, all of the four canals south of I-75 in the Faka Union system will be plugged and large pump
stations will be constructed to maintain the existing levels of flood stages in North Golden Gate Estates.
The PSRP project will also involve removal of many miles of existing dirt roads to restore sheetflow
through the southern half of the basin, and construction of levees to provide flood protection in selected
private properties in the project area. Several components of the project are under construction, and
projected to be completed by 2010.


G.    COASTAL BASIN SYSTEM

The Coastal Basin Systems is a generalized description of the various portions of Collier County that are
along the coastal estuarine region and have not been included in any of the previously described basins.
The System of basins is bounded on the north and east by US Highway 41 and on the west and south by
the estuaries extending from Wiggins pass to the Ten Thousand Islands. Along the coastline, the
estuarine areas are divided into five prominent hypothetical basin areas:

                1.   Wiggins Pass Coastal Basin
                2.   Naples Shore Coastal Basin
                3.   East Naples Coastal Basin
                4.   Belle Meade Coastal Basin
                5.   Southern Coastal Basin

Several residential and commercial developments have been constructed within the various basins. Older
developments were typically constructed with roadside swales along the streets which discharge into
collector ditches.

Description of Basin
The region encompassed by this basin description varies but generally includes all drainage areas between
the coastal waters and the first major road inland, U.S. 41. The greatest land covered by this basin is in
the southeastern portion of the County south of US 41, but there are no facilities within this large area.

Due to tidal influences, no distinct boundaries can be established and the term basin is applied loosely
because no distinct flow directions or patterns can be established. These hypothetical estuarine basins are
the same as those established by the Collier County Department of Natural Resources in their Technical
Report 84-3 and 84-4. Extensive urban development has occurred within these estuarine basins, although
the density is sparse in the Southern Coastal Basin and includes Everglades City, and the communities of
Chokoloskee, Goodland, and Port of the Islands.

The Wiggins Pass Coastal Basin is a small, but separate drainage area located northwest of the
Cocohatchee River Basin in northwestern Collier County. This basin is approximately 2.4 square miles in


                                              Exhibit 25
                                             Page 33 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

size and is bound by the Cocohatchee River to the south, Old US 41 and the Cocohatchee River Canal
Basin to the east, natural drainage divide features to the north, and Vanderbilt Drive to the west. Several
residential PUD's are developed or proposed for this basin including The Retreat, Bentley Village,
Wiggins Lake, Tarpon Cove, Cypress Head, part of Audubon Country Club, Lawmetka Plaza and Village
Place. Except for the PUD's, the land within this basin is a mixture of undeveloped coastal pineland and
wetland.

The Naples Shore Coastal Basin includes the Pelican Bay Sub-basin, the Vanderbilt Lagoon Sub-basin,
the Naples Park North Sub-basin and the Naples Park South Sub-basin. The Naples Park North Sub-basin
is a small drainage basin in northwestern Collier County. This sub-basin is approximately 0.6 square
miles in size and is composed of urban residential and commercial land uses. It contains the northeast
quarter of the Naples Park Subdivision and the land due north of the Cocohatchee River. The sub-basin is
bounded by US 41 to the east, the Cocohatchee River to the north, a natural drainage divide to the west of
and parallel to 7th Street, and a second natural drainage divide along 101st Avenue to the south which
separates the Naples Park North and Naples Park South Sub-basins.

The Naples Park South Sub-basin is another small drainage basin in northwestern Collier County. This
sub-basin is approximately 0.9 square miles in size and is composed of urban residential and commercial
land use. It contains the southern half of the Naples Park Subdivision, and the Beachwalk, Pavilion
Commercial, and Pavilion Lake PUD’s. The basin is bounded by US 41 to the east, a natural drainage
divide along 101st Avenue to the north that separates the Naples Park North and Naples Park South
basins, Vanderbilt Drive to the west, and Vanderbilt Beach Road to the south.

The Vanderbilt Lagoon Sub-basin is also a small drainage basin composed of urban residential land use.
It is bounded on the east by the Naples Park North and South Sub-basins, on the south the extension of
Vanderbilt Beach Road and the Cocohatchee River to the north. The Pelican Bay Sub-basin is bounded
on the north by Vanderbilt Beach Road, on the south by Seagate Drive, and on the east by US41 and
Ridge Road in the Pine Ridge Subdivision.

Historical Background
The history on the establishment of the various drainage facilities within this region is as diverse as the
facilities themselves. Much of the work was done by individual development activities and/or attempts to
control mosquitoes to surrounding regions. Where information is known, it is included in the discussion
of each individual set of facilities.

The boundaries of the Wiggins Bay Basin were established by construction of roads and developments in
the area. It appears that the existing small drainage canal that traverses through the basin was excavated
at about the time of the modification of US 41.

The Naples Shore Coastal Basin was established in the late 1950’s when the Naples Park subdivision was
laid out and the drainage swales created.

Description of Existing Facilities
Generally speaking, the only public drainage facilities located within these areas are small ditches, culvert
pipes, or some canals excavated to obtain fill material for the construction of roadways. These are all
located in the estuarine basins where the discharge is affected more by tidal influence than by rainfall
intensity. The numerous developments contain internal drainage facilities which, depending upon the age
of the development, are designed either for a 10-year or 25-year storm event.




                                               Exhibit 25
                                              Page 34 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

As was stated previously for the Gordon River Basin, there are some very small areas that have been
identified where drainage transfers from the County to the City of Naples. One area is along Sandpiper
Street that is located on the east side of Naples Bay in the southern portion of the City limits. A series of
roadside swales or some short sections of storm sewer control drainage along this street in the Royal
Harbor area. The City limit extends to approximately 150 feet east of Sandpiper Street from the
intersection of US 41 to Blue Point Avenue. A small swale along the back limits of the private lots
prevents any drainage crossing into different jurisdictional areas. From Blue Point Ave. to Marlin Drive
the City limit is along the centerline of Sandpiper Street. There are four (4) storm sewer inlets that collect
runoff from the City and County area near the intersection of Blue Point Ave. and Sandpiper Street. This
short section of storm sewer outlets into Naples Bay. A similar collection system is also located near the
intersection of Jewel Box Ave. and Sandpiper Street. From Marlin Drive southward, Sandpiper Street is
totally outside the City limits and all drainage flows into a swale leading to Haldeman Creek.

Another very small area where drainage crosses the City/County boundary is located along the northern
City limit line. Seagate Drive, borders this area on the north on the east by US 41, on the south by the
Naples City limit north of Neapolitan Way, and on the west by the Naples City limit along West Blvd.
There is an existing County storm sewer along the 4-lane portion of Seagate Drive. This storm sewer
receives the drainage from Seagate Drive and a small portion of all the properties fronting on it. It also
receives the drainage from the Seagate Elementary school building and frontage area that is City property.
This storm sewer empties into the bay inlet west of Sand Dollar Ave. The interior portion of this area is
very flat and drainage is poor in some parts. The flow patterns are not easily defined but eventually
outfall into Lake 1 within the Naples City limit by means of small roadside swales and storm sewers
along West Blvd. and Neapolitan Way.

The only drainage facility within the Wiggins Pass Coastal Basin, other than the water management
facilities within the limits of the PUD's, is a small secondary canal, approximately 1 mile in length, which
discharges into the Cocohatchee River via the Gulf Harbor development canal system. There are no
water level control structures within this basin.

Within the Naples Shore Coastal Basin, the Naples Park Subdivision is constructed with roadside swales
along the avenues which discharge into collector ditches along the streets. The major collector ditch is
located along 8th Street. For the Naples Park North Sub-basin, the outlet canal for the collector ditches is
approximately 0.5 miles in length, is located at the northern end of 8th Street, and discharges through an
area proposed for a PUD. The ultimate discharge of the proposed PUD will be through a spreader system
into the Cocohatchee River.

For the Naples Park South Sub-basin, the outlet for the collector ditches is a large ditch between 91st and
92nd Avenues. This outlet ditch is approximately 0.8 miles in length and discharges into Vanderbilt
Lagoon through a cross drain consisting of a twin 3' x 7' box culvert beneath Vanderbilt Drive. The
Pavilion PUD discharges into this outlet ditch at 8th Street and the Beachwalk PUD discharges into the
outlet ditch at Vanderbilt Drive.

Localized flooding does occur within Vanderbilt Lagoon Sub-basin during heavy rains particularly during
high tide and on shore winds (storm surge). Discharge from the Naples Park South Sub-basin aggravates
the flooding in this sub-basin as well as the construction of new homes within the Vanderbilt Lagoon
Sub-basin area. The removal of roadside swales and driveway culverts creates localized street flooding.
The construction of retention / detention storm water storage ponds and the re-establishment of roadside
swales are potential solutions to minimize flooding of the area.




                                                Exhibit 25
                                               Page 35 of 67
                                        EXHIBIT 25]
                                DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION



Existing Condition/Capacity of Facilities
Generally, the drainage facilities are adequate to prevent flooding except when tidal conditions disrupt or
prohibit discharge into the Gulf. The Vanderbilt Lagoon has limited capacity to absorb the discharge
from Naples Park north and South Sub-basins and from the Vanderbilt Lagoon Sub-basin during periods
of high tides and on shore winds. Very little maintenance is required on the roadside canals except for
cleanup of any blockages after a major storm.
.
An analysis of the drainage/water management facilities that affect both the County and the City of
Naples in the areas of Sandpiper Street and Seagate Drive produced the following information. The
drainage areas along Sandpiper Street are very small and difficult to define near the existing storm sewer
inlets. Due to the flat and very low lying terrain, the runoff contributed by the County to City storm
sewer drainage facilities in only approximately 1 cubic feet per second (cfs) for each of the inlets. The
volume of runoff contributed by the City to County drainage facilities is approximately 2 cfs and occurs
at the intersection of Sandpiper Street and Marlin Drive.

In the Seagate Drive area, the volume of runoff contributed to the County storm sewer drainage controls
along Seagate Drive from the City drainage areas is approximately 3 cfs. The volume of runoff
contributed to the City drainage controls from the interior portions of this area is approximately 18 cfs.

The present capacity of the Naples Park North Sub-basin drainage outfall system is generally insufficient
to pass the volume of stormwater required by the level of service standard for this basin. One of the
major problems is the restriction caused by undersized culvert pipes and flat topography. The
maintenance of this outfall system is performed by the Collier County Road Maintenance and primarily
consists of the control and removal of aquatic vegetation when this becomes excessive and hinders the
flow of stormwater through the system. Some sediment removal work is also done to return the channel
to its approximate original cross section when excess sediment accumulations become a problem.

The present capacity of the Naples Park South Sub-basin outlet ditch, because of its size, is generally
insufficient to pass the volume of water required by the level of service standard for this basin. The
maintenance of this outlet ditch is performed by the Collier County Road Maintenance and primarily
consists of the control and removal of aquatic vegetation when this becomes excessive and hinders the
flow of stormwater through the system. Some sediment removal work is also done to return the channel
to its approximate original cross section when excess sediment accumulations become a problem.

Proposed Improvements
The only improvements planned for the drainage facilities within any of these areas are those within the
various proposed developments. As these proposals are submitted for permit review and approval they
will be evaluated for their effects on the existing drainage facilities and the incorporation of any major
basin outfalls that may be applicable.

The County is developing a Basin Master Plan for the Wiggins Bay Basin to provide direction for the
stormwater needs of future development activity. Additionally, developer contributions are helping
provide the necessary drainage easements to allow for necessary maintenance activities to the facilities.

In 1996 and 1997, the County contracted to install a major storm sewer system to replace the ditched
outfall system along 8th Street North. This work has enabled the sub-basin to provide a 10-year design
storm level of service. The 8th Street North system also has an outfall to the north into and through the
Old Collier Golf Club Development. However homeowners have aggravated the problem by filling in


                                              Exhibit 25
                                             Page 36 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

and failure to maintain the roadside ditches. A revision to the system that will correct the drainage within
the roadside swales supplemented by a retention pond or other system should be considered.




                                               Exhibit 25
                                              Page 37 of 67
        EXHIBIT 25]
DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




         Exhibit 25
        Page 38 of 67
                                       EXHIBIT 25]
                               DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




H.    FAKAHATCHEE STRAND BASIN SYSTEM

The Fakahatchee Strand Basin is a large, natural drainage basin located in the south central portion of
Collier County. This system encompasses approximately 197 square miles of wetland with some
extensive agricultural operations located in the northern part of the system and is divided into eight
identifiable sub basins. The system is bound by the Cocohatchee-Corkscrew Basin and the Okaloacochee
Slough-Barron River Basin to the north and east, the Faka-Union System basins to the west, US-41 and
the Fakahatchee Bay estuary to the south. The Fakahatchee Strand State Preserve and most of the Florida
Panther State Wildlife Preserve are also contained within this basin.

                                            Table 7.7
                       Fakahatchee Stand – Sub-basins, Canals & Structures
                            Primary Canals &
       Sub-basin                                           Secondary Canals & Structures
                                Structures
Immokalee S
Sliver Strand
Fakahatchee N
Fakahatchee NW
Fakahatchee SW
Fakahatchee S
Janes Scenic
Dan House




                                             Exhibit 25
                                            Page 39 of 67
        EXHIBIT 25]
DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




         Exhibit 25
        Page 40 of 67
                                        EXHIBIT 25]
                                DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

Previous Studies
Several studies have been completed to evaluate the impacts to the Fakahatchee Strand which may have
been caused by the development of surrounding lands. Some of these studies were listed in the
Faka-Union System section of this Sub-element.

The report, "Final Report on the Augmentation of Surficial Flow Through the Fakahatchee Strand, Collier
County, Florida", was prepared by William J. McElroy with the Florida Department of Environmental
Regulation, and Captain K. C. Alvarez with the Florida Department of Natural Resources in September,
1975. This report is also discussed in the Barron River Canal Basin.

The report, "The Effect of the Faka-Union Canal System on Water Levels in the Fakahatchee Strand,
Collier County, Florida", was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Investigations
77-61 in September, 1977. This report evaluated the effects that the eastern canals of the Faka -Union
System were having on the surface and groundwater profiles along the western boundary of the
Fakahatchee Strand. The drawdown and removal of stormwater from the Strand were demonstrated and
the limited beneficial effects of the one water level control structure were identif ied.

The Fakahatchee Strand State Preserve staff has been aggressively monitoring the surface and
groundwater hydrologic characteristics of the preserve for nearly three decades now through a
comprehensive network of monitoring well transects, rain gages and staff gages, including sample
measurement of flows through several culverts at I-75 and at US 41. The present management plan report
named “Fakahatchee Strand Preserve Unit Management Plan, (December 2000) outlines the unique
hydrology and measures to preserve and enhance the diverse ecology of the preserve.

The SFWMD Stormwater Management Division conducted a comprehensive evaluation of the resources
of the greater Fakahatchee Strand region in a recent study named “Reconnaissance of Hydrology and
Environmental Conditions in Central Big Cypress Basin - February 2006.”

The BCB has completed a detailed hydrologic modeling of flow characteristics of the Camp Keais Strand
in a recent study named “Hydrologic-Hydraulic and Environmental Assessment of the Camp Keais Strand
Flowway (August 2006)”. The report also outlines a recommended plan of hydraulic improvements to
restore the historic flow way, including enhanced conveyances through the new bridges and wildlife
crossings to be implemented as a part of the roadway improvements to CR 858.

Historical Background
Prior to any alteration of the drainage patterns within Collier County, the Fakahatchee Strand was a major
flow way for surface waters from most of central Collier County and western Hendry County. The
Okaloacoochee Slough was a major contributor to the stormwater supply to the Strand. Stormwater
traveled as sheet flow through vast forests of cypress and other wetland environments and eventually
discharged into the Fakahatchee Bay estuary.

The first major change in the Fakahatchee Strand area occurred with the construction of SR-29 along
what is now the eastern boundary of the basin. This highway and accompanying borrow canal (the
Barron River North and Barron River Canals) acted as a dike and diversion channel to reduce the inflow
of water from the Okaloacochee Slough area. The construction of CR-846 (Immokalee Road) also
diverted some traditional southward flows from the Lake Trafford/Corkscrew Swamp area. The
construction of the Faka-Union System by the Gulf America Corporation further reduced the inflow of
any water from the west and, as recent studies have shown, actually worked to withdraw stormwater from
the Strand. Thus the present basin boundaries of the Fakahatchee Strand have essentially been limited by
the various construction projects for surrounding areas.


                                              Exhibit 25
                                             Page 41 of 67
                                        EXHIBIT 25]
                                DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION


Within the Fakahatchee Strand Basin, extensive timbering operations in the 1950's were conducted to
harvest the cypress forests. This timbering utilized logging trams and the numerous railroad grades
created by these operations have also contributed to a diversion of the traditional sheet flow of surface
water so that artificial uplands have been created.

Description of Existing Facilities
The existing facilities within this basin do not include any primary canal or water control structure
operated by the Big Cypress Basin, or any secondary stormwater management systems.

The Fakahatchee Strand is a large natural drainage flow way that has not been developed for residential
purposes. The only development has been for some large agricultural operations in the northern limits of
the basin. The borrow canal along the north side of I-75 (Alligator Alley) intercepts the southerly sheet
flow and passes it beneath I-75 through various cross drains where it resumes the sheet flow toward the
estuary.

Existing Condition/Capacity of Facilities
The existing borrow canal along I-75 and the accompanying cross drains were designed to approximate
the original sheet flow conditions of this area and provide adequate capacity for the passage of surface
water through the Fakahatchee Strand. The condition of the canal and cross drains is good and the
capacities sufficient to prevent major backup above the roadway surface of any surface water from the
typical storm events. Maintenance to this canal or the cross drains is the responsibility of the Florida
Department of Transportation.

Proposed Improvements
There are major improvement plans for the North Basin that include the enlargement of a bridge along
CR 858 over Camp Keais Strand, and changes to the farm ditches and roads to restore the flow ways in
the Florida Panther National Refuge. Other drainage improvements associated with the Town of Ave
Maria should enhance the drainage in the basin and impr ove the existing drainage facilities within the
Fakahatchee Strand Basin at this time.




                                              Exhibit 25
                                             Page 42 of 67
                                        EXHIBIT 25]
                                DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION



I.    OKALOACOCHEE SLOUGH - BARRON RIVER SYSTEM

The Okaloacochee Slough - Barron River Canal System is a large watershed area located in the central
part of Collier County. The western boundary of this area is approximately one half mile west and
parallel to State Route 29 (SR 29). This area consists primarily of wetlands and agricultural land and, for
purposes of analysis, is divided into nineteen sub-basins.




                                            Table 7.8
            Okaloacochee Slough - Barron River Basin – Sub-basins, Canals & Structures
 Sub-basin                 Primary Canals & Structures        Secondary Canals & Structures
 Okaloacochee NE
 Okaloacochee NW
                                                          Barron River and Branch Canals/
 Immokalee                                                Ditches
                                                          Barron River and Branch Canals/
 Immokalee E                                              Ditches
 Sadie Cypress                                            Branch Canals/ Ditches
 Okaloacochee W
 Okaloacochee Central
 Okaloacochee E                                           Branch Canals/ Ditches
 Okaloacochee S                                           Barron River Weir- BRN-00-S0105
 Okaloacochee SE
 Barron River N          SR 29 Canal, SR 29 #8            Barron River
 SR 29 #7                SR 29 Canal, SR 29 #7            Barron River
                         SR 29 Canal, SR 29 #6, SR 29
 SR 29 #6
                         #6a, SR 29 #6b                   Barron River
 SR 29 #5                SR 29 Canal, SR 29 #5            Barron River
 Deep Lake               SR 29 Canal, SR 29 #4            Barron River
 SR 29 #1                SR 29 Canal, SR 29 #1
 SR 29 #3                SR 29 Canal, SR 29 #3            Barron River
 SR 29 #2                SR 29 Canal, SR 29 #2            Barron River
 Carnes Town             SR 29 Canal                      Barron River




                                              Exhibit 25
                                             Page 43 of 67
        EXHIBIT 25]
DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




         Exhibit 25
        Page 44 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

Previous Studies
A study was prepared in September, 1975 titled, "Final Report on the Augmentation of Surficial Flow
Through the Fakahatchee Strand, Collier County, Florida". William J. McElroy with the Florida
Department of Environmental Regulation and Captain K. C. Alvarez with the Florida Department of
Natural Resources. This report proposed to construct a dike across the Main Barron River Canal
approximately 3.5 miles north of SR 84. The dike would divert the normal flow level of water under an
existing bridge on SR 29 and into the Fakahatchee Strand through the use of a spreader waterway. The
dike would be constructed so that it would allow excess water to be passed into the Main Barron River
Canal during storm events. The diversion of this water into the Strand would help restore the water that
had historically entered the system from the Barron River Canal and Okaloacochee Slough Basins prior to
any construction. Big Cypress Basin has the hydraulics and hydrology of the canal in their watershed
computer model.

The Immokalee Stormwater Management Master Plan was completed in 2005 by Lochner, Inc. for the
SFWMD. The plan includes alternatives for improvements of the stormwater conveyance and control
facilities with the urban boundaries of Immokallee.

Historical Background
The boundaries of the Okaloacochee Slough Basin are very vague due to the extensive wetlands in the
region and the numerous agricultural operations that have constructed dikes and ditches for many years.
The size of the slough and the amount of stormwater it contains has limited the ability to utilize the land
for anything but a water reservoir.

The establishment of the Barron River Canal basin began in the 1920’s with the construction of SR-29
and its accompanying borrow canal between Immokalee and the City of Everglades. Agricultural dikes
and ditches generally establish the boundaries to the east and west, while drainage facilities within
Immokalee form the headwaters.

The community of Immokalee dominates the features of the Immokalee Sub-basin. The ground gradually
slopes away from the community in all directions and the drainage swales excavated with the gradual
expansion of the urbanized area reflect this. Flows are directed in all directions to the surrounding basins.
       .
Description of Existing Facilities
The existing facilities within this basin consist of approximately 22 miles of primary canal and 21 miles
of secondary canal. There are 9 adjustable water level control structures on the primary canal system and
1 adjustable water level control structure on the secondary canal system.

Existing Condition/Capacity of Facilities
The County Line Road Canal has been in existence for many years. The maintenance of this canal is
performed by the Collier County Road Maintenance and primarily consists of the control and removal of
aquatic vegetation and sediment when this becomes excessive and hinders the flow of stormwater through
the system. The canal is of sufficient size to provide the desired level of service for flood protection.
However many of the cross drainage facilities are not adequate, which results in minor road flooding.

As previously mentioned, the Barron River Canal has been in existence for many years. The maintenance
of that portion of this canal north of I-75 is performed by the Collier County Road Maintenance and
primarily consists of the control and removal of aquatic vegetation and sediments when this becomes
excessive and hinders the flow of stormwater through the system. South of I-75 the Big Cypress Basin is
currently responsible for the maintenance and operation of the eight water level control structures.
Although the canal is not routinely maintained work is performed by the Big Cypress Basin on an “as


                                               Exhibit 25
                                              Page 45 of 67
                                        EXHIBIT 25]
                                DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

needed” basis. The canal and water level control structures are of sufficient size to provide the desired
level of service for flood protection for the rural residents in the area.

The secondary canal that provides a stormwater outfall for most of the northern half of Immokalee
discharges into the upper end of the Barron River Canal North. This small secondary canal is generally
insufficient in size to provide an adequate level of flood protection to the community in times of intense
rainfall. Complicating this condition is the amount of debris thrown into the canal by local residents. The
maintenance of this canal is performed by the Collier County Road Maintenance and primarily consists of
the control and removal of aquatic vegetation and debris when this becomes excessive and hinders the
flow of stormwater through the system. Some sediment removal work is also done to return the channel
to its approximate original cross section when excess sediment accumulations become a problem.

The secondary canal that provides a stormwater outfall for some of the south central portion of
Immokalee discharges into the Corkscrew Slough Basin along the eastern side of Lake Trafford. This
small secondary channel is really nothing more that a slightly larger roadside swale and pipe combination
that is generally insufficient in size to provide an adequate level of flooding protection to the community
in times of intense rainfall. The Collier County Road Maintenance performs the maintenance of this
channel. Maintenance primarily consists of the control and removal of aquatic vegetation and sediment
and debris when this becomes excessive and hinders the flow of stormwater through the system.

Proposed Improvements
The County has replaced several of the existing private culverted roadway crossings that are in various
stages of collapse along the canal, and replaced one adjustable water level control structure at the
Sunniland rock quarry entrance that was destroyed by high water conditions in 1995.

The Immokalee Area Stormwater Master Plan has recommended numerous improvement of the
stormwater conveyance and control facilities. The County has outlined these improvements within their 5
year work plan.


J. INTERIOR WETLAND SYSTEMS
The Interior Wetland Systems is a generalized description of the various portions of Collier County that
cannot be included in any of the previously described basins. They are generally located in the eastern
portion of the County (areas east of the basins shown on the “Major Drainage Basin” map, Page 7-7) and
are basins made up of wetlands and other developed property. There are four basins that have been
included within this system as follows:

      1.      Corkscrew Slough Basin
      2.      Gator Hook Strand Basin
      3.      L-28 Tieback Basin
      4.      Turner River Canal Basin



Previous Studies
A search of the Collier County Stormwater Management files lists three engineering studies that have
been prepared for the portion of the County included in the Interior Wetland Systems. The study that best
describes this area is titled "Exploratory Drainage Study of Eastern Collier County" and was prepared by
Smally, Wellford, and Nalven in June 1962. Smally, Wellford, and Nalven also prepared the other two
studies and are titled "Report on Proposed Drainage and Road Improvements in Southeastern Collier


                                               Exhibit 25
                                              Page 46 of 67
                                        EXHIBIT 25]
                                DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

County" prepared in November 1962, and "Water Management in Western Collier County and a
Proposed Water Conservation District" prepared in June 1963. All three studies emphasized the extreme
flatness of the drainage area and the lack of development or habitation. Since the time of these studies,
little or no significant developmental improvements have taken place in the Turner River Basin. The Big
Cypress Preserve Management Plan has evaluated the resources of the areas water quality and hydrology.

In the past, some of these basins have been studied for special purposes or applications. Therefore, any
references to studies will be included as a separate section within the descriptions of the basins. In
addition to the studies prepared by the National Park Service for the management of the Big Cypress
Preserve, the water management district completed a central Big Cypress Basin reconnaissance study.
The report identified the problems for drainage and water quality and provided recommendations for
improvements. The resources and management of the L-28 Basin is included in the Comprehensive
Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP).

Existing Condition/Capacity of Facilities
The borrow canal and roadway cross drains along US 41 were designed to approximate the original
sheetflow conditions of the Gator Hook Strand Basin. The condition of the canal and cross drains is good
and the capacities sufficient to prevent major backup above the roadway surface of any surface water
from the typical storm events. The maintenance of this canal is performed by Collier County Road
Maintenance and primarily consists of the control and removal of aquatic vegetation and sediment when
this becomes excessive and hinders the flow of stormwater through the system.

The condition of the L-28 Tieback canal is good and the capacity sufficient to prevent major flooding
within the L-28 Tieback basin. The L-28 Canal was designed to provide flood protection for the
neighboring counties and exceeds any level of service standards for the Collier County water management
requirements. The maintenance of this canal is performed by the SFWMD and primarily consists of the
control and removal of aquatic vegetation and sediment when this becomes excessive and hinders the
flow of stormwater through the system.

The borrow canals and roadway cross drains along both I-75 and US 41 were designed to approximate the
original sheet flow conditions of the Turner River Canal Basin. The condition of the canals and cross
drains is not good and the capacities are not sufficient to prevent major backup above the roadway surface
of any surface water from the typical storm events. Any maintenance to these canals or cross drains with
the roads right-of-way (ROW) is the responsibility of the Florida Department of Transportation. Outside
of the ROW maintenance is the responsibility of the National Park Service.

The Turner River Canal is being allowed to slowly return to the pre-construction status of vegetation
stand. One set of corrugated metal cross drains was installed in cooperation with the National Park
Service to try to route the stormwater flow back into the original Turner River stream bed. This section of
the river is being allowed to accumulate excessive aquatic vegetation growth and thus restrict the flow of
stormwater from the land into the estuary. Its capacity will eventually return to that of the surrounding
lands.

Proposed Improvements
The Collier County portion of the Gator Hook Strand Basin is essentially a wilderness area and there are
no current plans to create any new drainage improvements. The Collier County portion of the L-28
Tieback Basin is a remote area and there are no current county plans to create any new drainage
improvements. Almost all of the area of Collier County contained in the Turner River Canal Basin is a
part of the Big Cypress National Preserve. This is a wilderness area and there are no current plans to
create any new drainage improvements.


                                               Exhibit 25
                                              Page 47 of 67
                                        EXHIBIT 25]
                                DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION



K. IMPERIAL RIVER BASIN AND OTHER MINOR AREAS WITH DIRECT OUTFLOW
TO ADJACENT COUNTIES

Description of Basin
This section contains a generalized description of additional small portions of Collier County that cannot
be included in any of the previously described basin sections. These areas can be located on the Major
Drainage Basins, Collier County, Florida map (Page 7-7). There are two small areas along the northern
County line near Lake Trafford where surface water flows from Collier County into Hendry County and
eventually into Lee County. There is also a small area of the Imperial River Basin along the northern
County line between I-75 and US 41 where surface water flows from Collier County into Lee County.
These areas are wetlands that have not been developed at this time.




                                              Exhibit 25
                                             Page 48 of 67
        EXHIBIT 25]
DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




         Exhibit 25
        Page 49 of 67
                                               EXHIBIT 25]
                                       DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

Historical Background
The establishment of these small isolated wetlands has occurred through agricultural and other development activity.
These wetlands are connected to wetlands in adjacent counties and are so minor in comparison to the overall
adjoining wetlands that their contributory impact is negligible.

Description of Existing Facilities
There are no publicly maintained drainage facilities located within these areas.

Existing Condition/Capacity of Facilities
There is no information that can be inserted into this section.

Proposed Improvements
There are no proposed improvements within these small areas.


L.      CITY OF NAPLES DRAINAGE SYSTEM

The City of Naples drainage system consists primarily of swales, ditches, canal basins located in twelve drainage
basins. In 1991, a Stormwater Utility Tax was implemented to ensure the system remained functional and reliable.
Currently the tax generates $1.4 million annually to fund the operation of the Stormwater Maintenance Department,
routine inspections, maintenance and repair of equipment and operation of the City street sweeper. In addition, the
stormwater tax funds the annual lake maintenance program for the control of aquatic weeds and vegetation on 28
lakes throughout the City to ensure they continue to function as detention areas.

All of the City’s stormwater facilities are inspected every six months and repairs are made accordingly with
concurrence from the Utility Director.

Daily operation of the City street sweeper reduces the amount of debris accumulation in the storm water system.

City of Naples
Major Basin and Sub-basin Identification

In order to determine the hydrology of a given area, it is necessary to determine the major storm water basin
boundaries. This was accomplished in the1990 draft report of the Storm Water Master Plan. The City’s major
stormwater system boundaries were depicted in the major storm water drawing.

Each of the boundaries were field verified and compared to existing system locations and, in some cases, were
modified to reflect current conditions. The City’s inventory of storm sewer system was also added on a storm water
facility inventory map. Minor basin boundaries and sub basin boundaries were added from current available
information, and then crossed checked and revised to agree with the storm sewer system inventory. The boundaries
were modified based on field review, storm sewer pipe and inlet location, and stormwater management design
experience. Drainage Sub-basin boundaries were also determined from roadway drainage maps (U.S. 41 Goodlette
Frank Road, etc.) as well as from storm sewer pipe inlet location and storm water management design experience.

The major basin descriptions are as follows:

Basin I:
This basin is bounded by the Gulf on the west, Seagate Drive on the north, US-41 on the east and a line that extends
from Doctors Pass through the Moorings Country Club to US-41 on the south. The land is characterized primarily by



                                                      Exhibit 25
                                                     Page 50 of 67
                                               EXHIBIT 25]
                                       DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

residential development in the Park Shore Area. The basin’s storm water runoff is routed via a series of swales,
inlets, pipes and detention lakes that discharge into Moorings Bay.

Proposed Improvements
An assessment of existing stormwater facilities and proposed improvements, including provisions for water quality
shall be performed as part of an upcoming Integrated Stormwater Management Program and Master Plan.

Basin II:
This basin is bounded by the Gulf on the west, Basin I on the north, US-41 and Basin V on the east, and a line that
runs from the intersection of 4th Ave. South and the beach northeasterly to the southeasterly corner of the Naples
Beach Club Golf Course on the south. The land use is characterized primarily by residential development with
commercial development along the US 41 corridor and multi-family high-rise residential and hotel development
along the Gulf beaches. The northern portion of the basin discharges its stormwater runoff via swales, inlets, pipes
and detention lakes to the Gulf of Mexico.

Proposed Improvements
An assessment of existing stormwater facilities and proposed improvements, including provisions for water quality
shall be performed as part of an upcoming Integrated Stormwater Management Program and Master Plan.

Basin III:
This basin is bounded by the Gulf on the west, Basin II and Basin VI on the north, Naples Bay on the east, and a line
running from the Naples Pier southerly to Naples Bay on the south. The land use is characterized primarily by
residential development with commercial development in the 5th Avenue South, 3rd Street South and Crayton Cove
areas. Additionally, Naples City Hall and Fire Station 1 are located in this basin. The basin’s stormwater runoff is
routed via swales, inlets and pipes and one detention lake to the Broad Avenue south storm water pump station for
discharge into Naples Bay.

Proposed Improvements
Recommended Alternative No. 3: Tota l Probable Construction Cost $6.3 Million:
The scope of stormwater infrastructure improvements consists of additional storm sewers for increasing flow
capacity to reduce street flooding, and also upgrades to the existing pump station with the pump capacity remaining
status quo. With one exception, the improvements associated with Alternative 3 will keep floodwaters at least 2
inches below the road crown under the 2-year 24-hour design storm event. The one exception occurs at the
intersection of 9th Avenue South and 10th Street South because the crown of the road at this junction is at the same
elevation as the tide conditions modeled for Naples Bay. As a slight modification to alternative 3, the City could elect
to reconstruct the subject intersection and adjoining street segments to attain the prescribed level of service for the
entire basin area.

Storm sewer construction involves replacement of existing pipelines and additionally the installation of new storm
sewers adjacent and parallel to existing pipelines. Storm sewer sizes range from 24-inch diameter to 5 foot by 8-foot
box culverts.

Basin IV:
This basin is bounded by the Gulf on the west, Basin III on the north and Naples Bay on the east and south. The land
use is characterized by the Port Royal and Aqualane Shores residential developments. The basin’s stormwater runoff
is routed via swales, inlets and pipes to the canals of the basin, which flow to Naples Bay. There is a stormwater
pump station located on Lantern Lane in Port Royal.

Proposed Improvements



                                                     Exhibit 25
                                                    Page 51 of 67
                                              EXHIBIT 25]
                                      DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

An assessment of existing stormwater facilities and proposed improvements, including provisions for water quality
shall be performed as part of an upcoming Integrated Stormwater Management Program and Master Plan.

Basin V:
This basin is bounded by US 41 and Basin II on the west, Creech Road on the north, Goodlette-Frank Road on the
east and a line that runs from the intersection of US 41 and 3rd Ave. North, northerly to Goodlette-Frank road on the
south. The land is characterized by commercial development along the US 41 corridor including the Coastland Mall
area with residential development throughout the basin. The basin’s stormwater runoff is routed via swales, inlets,
pipes and several detention lakes to a storm sewer pipe system along the west right-of-way of Goodlette-Frank Road.
This system discharges into the Gordon River.

Proposed Improvements
Study is In Progress, final recommended alternative has not yet issued. The cost evaluation is not complete but it
currently ranges between $5-$8 million.

The scope of stormwater infrastructure improvements consists of additional storm sewers and water level control
structures for increasing system flow capacity and attaining water quality requirements.

This basin is under final engineering analyses with two alternatives being developed. Alternative No. 1 involves
capacity and water quality improvements as set forth in the Phase IV Gordon River Extension Study with a
prescribed level of service standard equating to a maximum of 6 inches of flooding above the road crown for rainfall
depths resulting from a 25- year 72-hour design storm event. Improvements designated under Alternative No. 1 are
being developed to principally address stormwater problems within the easterly Collier County drainage basins and
also along Goodlette-Frank Road. Notwithstanding that the Phase IV Gordon River Extension Study improvements
were not developed to specifically address Basin V flooding problems in the City of Naples, the stormwater
improvements under this a lternative do have a significant positive impact on the hydraulic performance of the Basin
V system since proposed capacity improvements to the channel along Goodlette-Frank Road comprise the primary
outfall for Basin V. Alternative No. 1 comprises of 21 distinct locations for replacement of existing storm sewers and
culverts within and east of the Goodlette-Frank road channel, widening segments of the existing Goodlette-Frank
road channel and also constructing a 27 acre stormwater detention pond.

Alternative No. 2 provides for system wide stormwater improvements within Basin V to achieve the City’s
preliminary level of service goals for 25 drainage problem areas. Stormwater infrastructure improvements under this
alternative are intended to provide a Class B level of service benefit or no overtopping of road crown for the 25-year
72-hour design storm event. This level of service standard is more stringent that Alternative No. 1 which permits
flooding of up to 6 inches above the road crown.

Storm sewer construction under the Alternative No. 2 scenario involves extensive replacement of existing pipelines
and installation of new storm sewers within Basin V west of Goodlette-Frank Road with no improvements within the
channel adjacent to Goodlette Frank Road as such capacity improvements are designated in Alternative No. 1. The
scope of work under Alternative No. 2 comprises of 22 distinct locations for replacement of existing pipelines and
installation of new storm sewers adjacent and parallel to existing pipelines. Storm sewer sizes range from 24-inch
diameter to 4-foot by 10-foot box culverts.

Basin VI:
This basin is bounded by Basin II on the west, Basin V on the north, Goodlette-Frank Road on the east, and Basin III
on the south. The land use is characterized by primarily commercial development on the US 41 corridor and
downtown Naples area with residential development interspaced throughout. The majority of the basin’s stormwater
runoff is routed via swales, inlets and pipes to the Goodlette - Frank Road stormwater pump station near the Police



                                                    Exhibit 25
                                                   Page 52 of 67
                                              EXHIBIT 25]
                                      DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

Department. This system discharges into the Gordon River. A portion of the basin’s stormwater run-off is routed via
swales, inlets and pipes to a ditch and pipe system along the west right-of-way along Goodlette - Frank Road. This
system discharges into the Gordon River.

Proposed Improvements
Study recommended Alternative No. 3 with a total probable construction cost of $3.2 million. The general scope of
stormwater infrastructure improvements for Basin VI is similar in content to that described for Basin III consisting of
additional storm sewers along City streets for increasing flow capacity to reduce wet season flooding. Stormwater
improvements include replacing existing storm sewer pipes to achieve greater flows such as along 2nd Avenue North
and 10th Street North, and also involve re-directing the storm sewer collection system along Goodlette-Frank Road to
the pump station system. A 4-foot by 8-foot box culvert is required as the main trunk line from 10th Street to the
relocated pump station and along 12th Street between 1st Avenue South and Central Avenue a 2-foot by 4-foot box
culvert is proposed.

No locations within Basin VI would have system capacity less than that required to convey rainfall resulting f rom a
10-year design storm event.

Basin VII:
This basin is bounded by Naples Bay on the west, US 41 on the north, Sandpiper Street on the east, and Naples Bay
on the south. The land use is characterized by Royal Harbor, some multi-family residential development in the north
portion of the basin, and some commercial development along the US 41 corridor. The basin stormwater runoff is
routed via swales, inlets and pipes to canals of the basin, which flow to Naples Bay.

Proposed Improvements
An assessment of existing stormwater facilities and proposed improvements, including provisions for water quality
shall be performed as part of an upcoming Integrated Stormwater Management Program and Master Plan.

Basin VIII:
This basin is bounded by Goodlette - Frank Road on the west, an east west line that would be the westerly extension
of the north boundary of Naples Airport on the north and the Gordon River on the east and south. The land use is
characterized by some residential development in the north portion of the basin with commercial development along
the Goodlette-Frank Road corridor. The City Police and Emergency Services Department and the Goodlette-Frank
Road stormwater pump station are located within the basin. The basin’s stormwater runoff is routed via swales,
inlets and pipes into the Gordon River.

Proposed Improvements
An assessment of existing stormwater facilities and proposed improvements, including provisions for water quality
shall be performed as part of an upcoming Integrated Stormwater Management Program and Master Plan.

Basin IX:
This basin is bounded by Goodlette-Frank Road on the west, the Gordon River and Airport-Pulling Road on the east
and Basin VIII on the south. This basin is the City’s portion of the Collier County “Gordon River Extension
Stormwater Basin which extends well into the County. The land use is characterized by residential development,
some commercial development along the Goodlette-Frank Road corridor and undeveloped land/preserve. The
basin’s stormwater runoff is routed via swales and overland sheet flow to the Gordon River.

Proposed Improvements
An assessment of existing stormwater facilities and proposed improvements, including provisions for water quality
shall be performed as part of an upcoming Integrated Stormwater Management Program and Master Plan.



                                                    Exhibit 25
                                                   Page 53 of 67
                                             EXHIBIT 25]
                                     DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION


Basin X:
The Gordon River bounds this basin on the west, the north boundary of Naples Airport (north), Airport-Pulling Road
on the east, and the south boundary of the Naples Airport and US-41 on the south. Primarily the Naples Airport and
some residential and commercial development characterize the land use. The basin’s runoff is routed by swales,
inlets, pipes, and overland sheet flow to the Gordon River.

Proposed Improvements
An assessment of existing stormwater facilities and proposed improvements, including provisions for water quality
shall be performed as part of an upcoming Integrated Stormwater Management Program and Master Plan.

Basin XI:
This basin is bounded by Naples Bay on the west, Basin VII on the north, and the City limits on the east and south.
The land is undeveloped except for Bayview Park. The basin’s stormwater runoff is routed via overland sheet flow
to Naples Bay.

Proposed Improvements
An assessment of existing stormwater facilities and proposed improvements, including provisions for water quality
shall be performed as part of an upcoming Integrated Stormwater Management Program and Master Plan.

Basin XII:
This basin is the portion of Key Island within the City limits. The land is mostly undeveloped with some residential
development. The basin’s stormwater runoff is routed via overland sheet flow to Naples Bay and the Gulf of
Mexico.

Proposed Improvements
An assessment of existing stormwater facilities and proposed improvements, inclu ding provisions for water quality
shall be performed as part of an upcoming Integrated Stormwater Management Program and Master Plan.

There are two major basins within the county that directly affect the City of Naples. These are the Gordon River
Extension (GRE) and main Golden Gate (MGG). Both of these watersheds are a major contributor of runoff which
discharges into the Gordon River and Naples Bay and they both include land that is within the City. The GRE
watershed is the number one priority for the County with the MGG watershed being number two.




                                                   Exhibit 25
                                                  Page 54 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

City of Naples Drainage Basin Map:




                                          Exhibit 25
                                         Page 55 of 67
        EXHIBIT 25]
DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




         Exhibit 25
        Page 56 of 67
                                             EXHIBIT 25]
                                     DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

Naples Principle Flood Problem Areas Identification:




Data Sources Basin III
The 1990 Study reviewed flooding compliant files from January 1985 through June 1990. Various City staff was
interviewed and the following flooding problems areas were identified.
      All of Gulfshore Blvd. within Basin III
      13th Avenue South from 4th Street South to 7th Street South
      Southwest corner of 3rd Avenue South and 6th Street South
      Intersection of 5th Avenue South and 6th Street South
      Intersection of 5th Avenue South and Park Street
      8th Street South from 3rd Avenue South to North of the Basin III Boundary
      9th Street South from 10th Avenue South to 6th Avenue South
      10th Street South from 10th Avenue South to North of the Basin III Boundary
      10th Avenue South from 9th Street South to Naples Bay
      Southeast corner of 11th Street South and 8th Avenue South

The 1996 Master Plan identified the following problem areas:
    5th Avenue South from 3rd Street South to 7th Street South
    9th and 10th Street from 10th Avenue South to 5th Avenue South

In the 2000 interviews, City staff noted problems in the following areas
      5th Avenue South from the Eastern Basin Boundary to 3rd Street south
      Southeast corner of 11th Street South and 8th Avenue South as well as most of the areas bordering the Naples
        Bay. This is a tidal problem; extreme high tides are sometimes higher than the existing ground.



                                                   Exhibit 25
                                                  Page 57 of 67
                                              EXHIBIT 25]
                                      DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

     Gulf Shore Boulevard from 2nd South to 12th Avenue South
     13th avenue South from 4th Street South to 7th Street South
The Principle Flood Problem Area Identification figure illustrates the location of the reported flooding problem areas
within Basin III. The lines indicate areas with widespread problems. The dots (boxes) represent areas with more
localized flooding problems.

Basin VI Assessment Report
In the 1981 Study, observed street flooding locations in Basin VI as follows:
      5th Avenue north, from 19th Street North to 11th Street North
      10th Street North, from 3rd Avenue south to 5th Avenue South
      Intersection of US 41 and Central Avenue. City staff noted that chronic flooding problems continue to affect
        this area.
In 1990 various staff members were interviewed and the following flooding problem areas were identified within
basin VI:
      10th Street. This includes the entire length of 10th street within the basin boundary, a substantial increase
        over what was reported in the 1981 Citywide Drainage Study. This continues to be a high priority flooding
        problem area.
      Central Avenue, from 7th Street to 10th Street.
      8th Street, from 3rd Avenue south to 2nd Avenue North
In 1998, staff members were interviewed and the following problem areas were identified:
      Intersection of US 41 and 5th Avenue South
      Central Avenue, from US 41 to Goodlette-Frank Road. This area extends further east than was previously
        reported in the 1990 Study.
      10th Street from 5th Avenue North to 5th Avenue South.

Additional Flood Prone areas were identified by staff:
    Gordon Drive from Bay Road to 32 Avenue South and surrounding areas.
    Lantern Lane from Kingstown Drive,
    13th Ave South from 4th Street to 7th Street,
    10th Avenue South from 9th Street South to Naples Bay,
    10th Street from 10th Avenue south to 7th Avenue North, including the intersection,
    10th Street from 7th Avenue North to Fleischmann Blvd. and East,
    Central Avenue from 7th Street to 10th street,
    8th Street from 3rd Avenue South to 2nd Ave. North
    13th Street from 12th Avenue North including 14th Avenue north,
    15th Avenue North
    Intersection of Crayton Road and Spyglass Lane and surrounding areas,
    Gulfshore Blvd. from 1900 to 400 Mooring Line Drive and surrounding areas,
    Intersection of Rivera Drive and US 41 to Goodlette-Frank Road,
    Northeast intersection of Goodlette-Frank Road and Golden Gate Parkway.

The areas identified by City staff have chronic drainage problems and are predominately located along major
roadways (10th Street, Central Avenue, Goodlette - Frank Road, Golden Gate Parkway, Gulfshore Blvd. and US 41).




                                                    Exhibit 25
                                                   Page 58 of 67
                                              EXHIBIT 25]
                                      DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

M.      CITY OF MARCO ISLAND DRAINAGE SYSTEM

The City of Marco Island Stormwater Drainage System generally directs runoff into man-made and natural water
bodies, which are in turn connected to natural bays, and tidal water bodies. The existing drainage system relies on
open swales that discharge into catch basins with subsequent short runs (less than 170 feet) of small diameter pipe
(15 to 30 inches) that outfall directly to interior waterways.

Assessment of the Marco Island Area

Marco Island is a 24 square mile barrier island located on the Gulf of Mexico. It features over six miles of beaches
and over 100 miles of manmade waterways. Marco Island is the largest barrier island within Southwest Florida’s Ten
Thousand Islands area which extends from Marco Island to Cape Sable. Marco Island lies within the subtropical to
tropical climate zone and experiences a distinct wet and dry season with most of the rainfall occurring between the
months of June and October.

Prior to WW II there were small settlements at the north and south end of the island that are shown on early USGS
maps. At that time, Marco Island was a wide coastal beach with mangrove wetlands, agriculture fields, uplands and
elevated shell mounds around Barfield Bay. In the 1960’s concrete seawalls were installed, and roads, lots and a
drainage system were created by the Deltona Corporation. Founded by the Mackle Family, Deltona gained national
notoriety for Marco Island's success as a planned community. The island has a mix of single family, multi-family,
high rise condominiums schools, government facilities, resort hotels, and diverse commercial areas.

City Government has undertaken an aggressive capital improvement program to upgrade and improve the new
infrastructure. Thus far, the improvements along parts of Collier Boulevard have included new stormwater
infrastructure systems to eliminate flooding between Winterberry Drive and East Elkcam Circle. The balance of
flooding on Collier Boulevard will be addressed when funds become available. The City continues to reduce the
potential for road flooding through swale improvements and replacement of non-functioning outfalls. An active
water quality improvement swale program continues every year. Water quality inserts are being added to the 1,000
inlets through out the City. These inserts are capturing debris, floatable items and oil/greases prior to discharging
into receiving bodies of water. Swales are being regarded to aid in stormwater storage and treatment.




                                                   Exhibit 25
                                                  Page 59 of 67
                                             EXHIBIT 25]
                                     DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION


N.    REFERENCES

An Environmental Evaluation of the Gordon R iver of Naples, Florida, and the Impact of Developmental Plans,
     Howard T. Odum, Charles Littlejohn, and Wayne C. Huber, September 1972.

An Initial Report on the Augmentation of Surficial Flow Through the Fakahatchee Strand, Collier County, Florida ,
      William J. McElroy (Florida Department of Environmental Regulation) and Captain K. C. Alvarez (Florida
      Department of Natural Resources), Sept., 1975.

Belle Meade-Royal Palm Hammock Water Management Plan, CH2M Hill, July, 1982.

Cocohatchee Canal Salinity Control Structure Hydrologic Report, Collier County, Florida, Gee and Jensen
     Engineers-Architects-Planners, Inc., October, 1981.

Collier County Stormwater Management Program, Phase I -- Master Plan, Post, Buckley, Schuh & Jernigan, Inc.,
       1990.

D-2 Canal Drainage System Study, Hole, Montes and Associates, September, 1984.

Exploratory Drainage Study of Eastern Collier County, Smally, Wellford, and Nalven, June, 1962.

Final Report on the Augmentation of Surficial Flow Through the Fakahatchee Strand, Collier County, Florida,
      William J. McElroy (Florida Department of Environmental Regulation) and Captain K. C. Alvarez (Florida
      Department of Natural Resources), Sept. 1975.

Golden Gate Estates, Draft Feasibility Report, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, February 1986.

Golden Gate Estates, Reconnaissance Report, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, April, 1980.

Golden Gate Water Management Study, Johnson Engineering, Inc. December 1981.

Gordon River Watershed Study, CH2M Hill, February 1980.

Groundwater Resources of the Cocohatchee Watershed, Collier County, Florida, Missimer and Associates, Inc., July,
     1984.

Hydrogeologic Information on the Water-Table Aquifer Adjacent to the Proposed Control Structure on the
     Cocohatchee Canal, Collier County, Florida, Missimer and Associates, Inc., July, 1984.

Hydrologic Effects of Storm of Sept. 1-3, 1983, in Golden Gate City, Collier County, Florida , Johnson Engineering,
     Inc., Sept., 1983.

Hydrologic Study of the G.A.C. Canal Network, Collier County, Florida, Black, Crow and Eidsness, Inc., October,
     1974.

Hydrological Effects of the Proposed Gordon River Canal, Naples, Florida, Bertran W. Morrow and John A Stevens
     (University of Miami), 1971.




                                                   Exhibit 25
                                                  Page 60 of 67
                                             EXHIBIT 25]
                                     DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

Hydrological Study of the Effects of the Proposed Gordon River Canal, Naples, Florida, R. David G. Pyne and J. I.
     Garcia-Bengochea (Black, Crow and Eidsness, Inc.), 1971.

Hydrology of Western Collier County, Florida, Jack McCoy (U.S. Geological Survey), 1972.

Lely Outfall Surface Water Management System, CH2M Hill, Dec., 1979.

Master Plan for Water Management District No. 6, Collier County, Florida, Black, Crow and Eidsness, Inc.,
     February, 1974.

Master Plan Update for Water Management District No. 6, Wilson, Miller, Barton, Soll, and Peek, Inc., October,
     1985.

Master Plan, Water Management District No. 7 Including the Cocohatchee and Gordon River Basins, Collier County,
     Florida, Black, Crow and Eidsness, Inc., March, 1975.

Natural Resources of Collier County, Florida, Technical Report 84-3, Coastal Estuarine Resources, Collier County
      Natural Resources Management Department, 1984.

Natural Resources of Collier County, Florida, Technical Report 84-4, Coastal Zone Management Units: Data
      Inventory and Analysis, Collier County Natural Resources Management Department, 1984.

Phase 1, Golden Gate Estates Redevelopment Study, Collier County, Florida, Golden Gate Estates Study Committee,
      June, 1976.

Preliminary Study, Water Management in North Naples and East Naples Area, County of Collier, Florida, Smally,
      Wellford and Nalven, March, 1961.

Proposed Boundary for the Big Cypress Basin, South Florida Water Management District, Black, Crow and
      Eidsness, Inc., Sept., 1976.

Proposed Interim Modifications, Golden Gate Estates Canal System, CH2M Hill, November, 1978.

Proposed Lely Canal Water Control Structure, Collier County, Florida, CH2M Hill, December, 1978.

Regional Water Resources Study, Big Cypress                Basin    Program    No.   2201,    Gee    and   Jensen
      Engineers-Architects-Planners, Inc., Nov., 1980.

 Report on Proposed Drainage and Road Improvements in Southeastern Collier County, Florida, Smally, Wellford,
                                            and Nalven, Nov., 1962.

Report on Water Management in Collier County, Florida, Smally, Wellford, and Nalven, May, 1961.

Surface Water Conservation Study, C-31/Golden Gate Canal System, Johnson Engineering, Inc., May, 1986.

The Big Cypress Watershed, A Report to the Secretary of the Interior, Everglades-Jetport Advisory Board, April 19,
     1971.




                                                  Exhibit 25
                                                 Page 61 of 67
                                            EXHIBIT 25]
                                    DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

The Effect of the Faka Union Canal System on Water Levels in the Fakahatchee Strand, Collier County, Florida,
     U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Investigations 77-61, September, 1977.

Water Management in Western Collier County and a Proposed Water Conservation District, Smally, Wellford, and
     Nalven, June, 1963.

Water Resources Data and Related Technical Information to Assist Local Government Planning in Collier County,
     South Florida Water Management District, February 1, 1987.

U.S.G.S. Water Resources Data--Florida, Water Year 1980, Vol. 2A, U.S. Geological Survey, October 1981.

U.S.G.S. Water Resources Data--Florida, Water Year 1981, Vol. 2A, U.S. Geological Survey, October 1982.

U.S.G.S. Water Resources Data--Florida, Water Year 1983, Vol. 2A, U.S. Geological Survey, October 1984.

U.S.G.S. Water Resources Data--Florida, Water Year 1984, Vol. 2A, U.S. Geological Survey, July 1, 1986.

U.S.G.S. Water Resources Data--Florida, Water Year 1985, Vol. 2A, U.S. Geological Survey, May 27, 1987.

Watershed Analysis Henderson Creek Basin, (Draft), Johnson Engineering, Inc., May, 1990.

Big Cypress Basin References:
Golden Gate Watershed Control structures 7 and 7A
Golden Gate Watershed Control structure 4A-1
Big Cypress Basin Watershed Management Plan (Dames & Moore)
Big Cypress Basin Watershed Management Plan – Flood Control Element
Big Cypress Basin Watershed Management Plan: Hydrologic-Hydraulic Assessment for Retrofit of Golden Gate
Canal Weir #1
Big Cypress Basin Watershed Management Plan: Hydrologic-Hydraulic Assessment for Retrofit of Golden Gate
Canal Weir #2
Big Cypress Basin Watershed Management Plan: Hydrologic-Hydraulic Assessment for CR951 Canal Improvement
Big Cypress Basin Watershed Management Plan: Hydrologic-Hydraulic Assessment for Corkscrew Canal
Improvement
Hydrologic Restoration of Southern Golden Gate Estates – Conceptual Plan
Cocohatchee Canal Improvements Phase I
Cocohatchee Canal Improvements Phase II
Cocohatchee Canal Improvements Phase III
Cocohatchee Canal Improvements Phase IV
Project Management Plan - Southern Golden Gate Estates Hydrologic Restoration Project
Final Integrated Project Implementation Report – Picayune Strand Restoration Project (4 volumes)
Gordon River Watershed Study (CH2M Hill)

City of Naples References:
City of Naples Utility Department
City of Naples Major Basin and Sub-basin Identification by Camp, Dresser and McGee

City of Marco Island References:
City of Marco Island Community Development Department
City of Marco Island Utility Department


                                                  Exhibit 25
                                                 Page 62 of 67
                                           EXHIBIT 25]
                                   DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION

Marco Island Drainage Atlas produced by RWA, Inc. Civil Engineers Developmental and Environmental Consultants




                                               APPENDIX A


                             Collier County 5-Year Capital Improvement Plan

      South Florida Water Management District/ Big Cypress Basin 5-Year Capital Improvement Plan




                                                Exhibit 25
                                               Page 63 of 67
                                                                                                   EXHIBIT 25]
                                                                                           DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




       Collier County Stormwater Capital Improvement Program
 No.   SAP No.       Project Name                                                              FY 06-07                  FY 07-08                 FY 08-09                 FY 09-10                 FY 10-11                      Total
       Secondary - Capital Projects                               Basin Study
  2      510058      Twin Lakes Interconnect                      Gordon River Basin       $     176,926.95    C     $              -         $              -         $              -         $              -          $        176,926.95
  8      510185      Gordon River Water Quality Park (CIE 185)    Gordon River Basin       $   10,419,435.20   D/C   $              -         $              -         $              -         $              -          $   10,419,435.20
  9      510186      Gordon River Burning Tree Impr.              Gordon River Basin       $     250,000.00    C     $              -         $              -         $              -         $              -          $        250,000.00
  14     511011      Lely Area Stormwater Impr. (CIE 1011)        Lely Basin               $    7,996,154.82 D/C/R $ 11,617,000.00 D/C/R $ 11,886,000.00 D/C/R $ 10,778,000.00 D/C/R $              7,958,000.00   D/C    $   50,235,154.82
  15     511071      Avalon School Drainage                       Lely Basin               $     497,842.46    C     $              -         $              -         $              -         $              -          $        497,842.46
  17     511341      Bayshore & Thomason                          Lely Basin               $      26,950.11    C/R   $    500,000.00          $              -         $              -         $              -          $        526,950.11
  28     518031      Gateway Traingle (CIE 8031)                  Gateway Triangle Basin   $    1,564,872.79 D/C/R $      500,000.00 D/C/R $      1,000,000.00 D/C/R $     1,750,000.00   C     $   2,000,000.00          $       6,814,872.79
  30      TBD        Belle Meade Stormwater Impr. (CIE TBD) (1)   Belle Meade                                        $    100,000.00    D     $    400,000.00    D/R   $    400,000.00 D/C/R $      4,500,000.00   D/C/R $        5,400,000.00
  31      TBD        Immokalee Urban Imprv.                       Immokalee Basin                                    $    100,000.00    D     $    100,000.00    D/R   $   3,000,000.00 D/C/R $                -          $       3,200,000.00
  32      TBD        Gordon River / Golden Gate Impr. (2)         Golden Gate Basin                                  $              -         $              -         $    400,000.00    D     $   4,000,000.00   D/C/R $        4,400,000.00
  33      TBD        Wiggins Bay Basin Imprv. (2)                 Wiggins Bay Basin                                  $              -         $              -         $              -         $   2,000,010.00   D/C    $       2,000,010.00
                     Subtotal - Capital Projects                                           $   20,932,182.33         $ 12,817,000.00          $ 13,386,000.00          $ 16,328,000.00          $ 20,458,010.00           $   83,921,192.33


       Tertiary Systems                                           County Road
  1      510032      Global Positioning System                    County Wide              $     140,015.09    C     $     20,000.00    C     $     20,000.00    C     $     20,000.00    C     $      20,000.00   C      $        220,015.09
  3      510059      14th Street Outfall                          Gordon River Basin       $     387,531.67    C     $              -         $              -         $              -         $              -          $        387,531.67
  4      510075      County Wide Swales                           County Wide              $     257,360.57    C     $    200,000.00    C     $    350,000.00    C     $    700,000.00    C     $   1,000,000.00   C      $       2,507,360.57
  5      510076      Willow West Swale                            Cocohatchee River        $     417,626.96    C     $              -         $              -         $              -         $              -          $        417,626.96
  7      510141      Ibis Way & Lake"N" (N. Livingston)           Ibis Way / Cypress Way   $     724,727.99    C     $              -         $              -         $              -         $              -          $        724,727.99
  10     510212      Fish Branch Creek Box Culvert                Lake Trafford Rd.        $     221,635.40    C     $              -         $              -         $              -         $              -          $        221,635.40
  11     510241      West Eustis Ave.                             West Eustis - Immok      $      39,550.00    D     $              -         $    470,000.00    C     $              -         $              -          $        509,550.00
  12     510251      Pine Ridge Subdivision Impr.                 Ridge Dr. et. al.        $     189,350.00    D/C   $              -         $              -         $              -         $              -          $        189,350.00
  13     510252      Egret & Mockingbird Lake Outfall             Gordon River Basin       $      11,750.00    D     $              -         $              -         $              -         $              -          $         11,750.00
  16     511331      Wiggins Bay Basin - Old US41                 Cocohatchee River        $      61,725.00    D     $    400,000.00    C     $              -         $              -         $              -          $        461,725.00
  18     511351      Riviera Golf Estates                         Fleur De Lis Lane        $     137,703.36    C     $              -         $              -         $              -         $              -          $        137,703.36
  19     511361      Palm River Country Club                      Country Club Dr.         $     108,670.38    D     $    575,000.00    C     $              -         $              -         $              -          $        683,670.38
  20     511371      Victoria Lakes Outfall                       Cocohatchee River        $      33,781.76    D     $    750,000.00    C     $              -         $              -         $              -          $        783,781.76
  21     511381      North Road and Gail Blvd                     North Rd / Gail Blvd     $     119,350.08    D/R   $              -         $   1,250,000.00   C     $              -         $              -          $       1,369,350.08
  22     511391      Poinciana Village Drainage                   Gordon River Basin       $      97,703.45    D     $              -         $    500,000.00    D/C   $              -         $              -          $        597,703.45
  23     511401      County Wide Storm Sewer Impr.                County Wide              $     719,171.35    D/C   $    100,000.00    D/C   $    450,000.00    D/C   $    900,000.00    D/C   $   1,200,000.00   D/C    $       3,369,171.35
  24     511411      County Wide Stormwater Conveyance            County Wide              $     630,904.53    D/C   $    100,000.00    D/C   $    350,000.00    D/C   $    650,000.00    D/C   $   1,500,000.00   D/C    $       3,230,904.53
  25     515011      Australian Pine Removal                      County Wide              $    1,188,000.00   C     $    500,000.00    C     $    500,000.00    C     $    500,000.00    C     $              -          $       2,688,000.00
  26     517011      Farmworkers Village Culvert                  SR 29 Canal              $         890.59    C     $              -         $              -         $              -         $              -          $               890.59
  27     517041      Imm/Mockingbird Bird Outfall                 S. 5th St.               $      41,057.07    C     $              -         $              -         $              -         $              -          $         41,057.07
  29                 Misc Small Projects                          County Wide              $      11,284.01    C     $              -         $              -         $              -         $              -          $         11,284.01
  34      TBD        Gordon River Greenway Park                   Gordon River Basin                                 $    500,000.00    D     $   2,500,000.00   C     $   2,500,000.00   C     $              -          $       5,500,000.00
  35      TBD        NPDES/TMDL                                   County Wide                                        $    100,000.00    D     $    250,000.00    D     $              -         $              -          $        350,000.00
                     Subtotal - Tertiary Systems                                           $    5,539,789.26         $   3,245,000.00         $   6,640,000.00         $   5,270,000.00         $   3,720,000.00          $   24,414,789.26


       Tidal Areas                                                Tidal Basin
  6      510111      Haleman Creek Dredging                       Haldeman Creek           $    1,902,836.60   C     $              -         $              -         $              -         $              -          $       1,902,836.60
                     Subtotal - Tidal Areas                                                $    1,902,836.60         $              -         $              -         $              -         $              -          $       1,902,836.60


                     Transfers                                                             $      47,100.00          $     47,100.00          $     47,100.00          $     47,100.00          $      47,100.00          $        235,500.00
                     Reserves                                                              $     801,700.00          $    805,500.00          $   1,003,700.00         $   1,082,300.00         $   1,211,300.00          $       4,904,500.00


                     Total - Stromwater Program                                            $   29,223,608.19         $ 16,914,600.00          $ 21,076,800.00          $ 22,727,400.00          $ 25,436,410.00           $ 115,378,818.19
(1) Pending completion of Master Drainage Study by BCB
(2) Pending completion of Watershed Management Plan for basin                                                                                                                                   Project Fund 5 Year Plan 112906


                                                                                                            Exhibit 25
                                                                                                           Page 64 of 67
                                         EXHIBIT 25]
                                 DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




                               BCB Five Year Capital Improvement Program
                                         Fiscal Year 2006-2010


Fiscal                          Project                            Estimated        Status
Year                                                                 Cost         As of April
                                                                                     2006

2006     Golden Gate Canal Weir # 3                            $   2,500,000   Modeling
         BCB Office and Field Station Relocation               $   2,000,000   Land
                                                                               Acquisition
         Lake Trafford Restoration                             $   3,000,000   Construction
         Golden Gate Weir #2 Retrofit                          $   1,500,000   Permitting
         Picayune Strand Restoration Project                   $   *           Basis of Design
                                                                               Report (BODR)

2007     Henderson Creek Diversion                             $   1,500,000   Permitting by
                                                                               Developer
         Picayune Strand Restoration Project                   $   *           BODR
         Lake Trafford Restoration                             $   1,000,000   Construction
         Golden Gate Canal Weir #6 & #7 Retrofit               $   1,700,000   Modeling
         Camp Keais Flowway Improvements                       $   1,000,000   Modeling

2008     Lake Trafford Restoration                             $   1,000,000   Construction
         Barron River Canal Structures Retrofit Phase I        $   1,800,000   Feasibility
         Picayune Strand Restoration Project                   $   *           BODR

2009     Golden Gate Canal Weir#5 Retrofit                     $   2,000,000   Feasibility
         Picayune Strand Restoration Project                   $   *           BODR

2010     Golden Gate Canal ASR Phase I                         $   2,000,000   Feasibility
         Barron River Canal Structures Retrofit Phase II       $   1,500,000   Feasibility
         Henderson Creek Spreader Channel                      $   1,500,000   Modeling
         North Belle Meade Rehydration Plan                    $   1,000,000   SWM plan




                                                Exhibit 25
                                               Page 65 of 67
        EXHIBIT 25]
DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




         Exhibit 25
        Page 66 of 67
        EXHIBIT 25]
DRAINAGE BASIN INFORMATION




         Exhibit 25
        Page 67 of 67

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Golden Gate Estates Naples Florida document sample