LAKE WORTH LAGOON SYMPOSIUM May 16 2007 Palm Beach Atlantic University West Palm Beach Florida Lake Worth Lagoon

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LAKE WORTH LAGOON SYMPOSIUM May 16 2007 Palm Beach Atlantic University West Palm Beach Florida Lake Worth Lagoon Powered By Docstoc
					                LAKE WORTH LAGOON SYMPOSIUM
                          May 16, 2007
                  Palm Beach Atlantic University
                    West Palm Beach, Florida

Lake Worth Lagoon extends more than 20 miles along the coast of Palm Beach County from
PGA Boulevard to Ocean Avenue Boulevard in Boynton Beach. This unique “urban”
waterbody supports significant natural resources including mangrove wetlands, mudflats,
and seagrasses which provide valuable habitat for fisheries, manatees, sea turtles, oysters,
and wading birds. Altered hydrology, fishing and boating pressures, and loss of natural
habitat have all contributed to the lagoon’s environmental degradation. Recognizing the
need for protection and restoration, Palm Beach County and the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection joined forces along with many other partners to produce the first
Lake Worth Lagoon Management Plan in August 1998. Now, nearly 10 years later, many
components of the management plan have been implemented. However, much more needs
to be done. This symposium will provide information on research and restoration projects in
the Lake Worth Lagoon and its watershed as well as address the perspective of business
and recreational interests that depend on the lagoon. Attendees will learn the current status
of the watershed, the progress of completed and ongoing projects and future goals for
restoring, protecting and enhancing this important urban system.


                               Planning Committee

               Center for Environmental Studies, Florida Atlantic University
            Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Southeast District
                            Florida Inland Navigation District
                                   LagoonKeepers.org
                               Lake Worth Drainage District
                   Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners
                                   Port of Palm Beach
                        South Florida Water Management District
                                University of Florida/IFAS
                             West Palm Beach Fishing Club


                          Symposium Session Topics
                            Morning Session: Natural Systems
                         Afternoon Session: Community Systems
KEYNOTE


          LAKE WORTH LAGOON – DEFINING THE FUTURE OF AN
                        URBAN ESTUARY


Dr. Duane De Freese, Ph.D., Vice President of Florida Research
Hubbs SeaWorld Research Institute
6295 Sea Harbor Drive
Orlando, FL 32821-8043
(407) 370-1650 FAX (407) 370-1659
ddefreese@hswri.org
ddefreese@cfl.rr.com


Dr. De Freese will present a keynote address that will set the stage for the symposium
papers and discussions. He will focus on unique aspects of the Lake Worth Lagoon urban
land-estuary interface with a forward-looking view of five “big picture” considerations for
stewardship of the Lake Worth Lagoon in the 21st century: 1. Importance of understanding
the spatial and temporal scale of change; 2. Power of common-sense science; 3. Need for
regional thinking; 4. Understanding community and estuary values; and 5. Creating a
framework for community vision, action and estuary transformation.




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NATURAL SYSTEMS


      STATE OF THE LAKE WORTH LAGOON IN PALM BEACH COUNTY

Richard Walesky, Director
PBC Department of Environmental Resources Management
2300 North Jog Rd., 4th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33411-2743
(561) 233-2400 FAX (561) 233-2414
rwalesky@co.palm-beach.fl.us

Paul Davis, Environmental Program Manager
PBC Department of Environmental Resources Management


The ground work has been laid and many projects have been completed that will lead to
significant improvements to Lake Worth Lagoon. Lake Worth Lagoon is a unique estuary
due to its history, its location in Florida and its urban character. Much of the focus has been
to replace and enhance destroyed habitats. This has been accomplished through
partnerships developed and strengthened over the last decade. The Partnership Grant
Program was the primary mechanism to accomplish this but it was augmented by efforts
and funds from a wide variety of agencies, community leaders and volunteers. The Grant
Program used over $13 million to fund 37 construction projects with an overall value of $47
million. These projects have resulted in restoration of over 125 acres of habitat and the
construction of water quality projects treating 1,700 acres of stormwater runoff. The Lagoon
has certainly been improved by these actions. However, restoration has limited benefits
unless there is significant change in the stormwater inputs. We have learned that suspended
sediments have a greater limiting effect on the lagoon than salinity changes. The future
requires a renewed focus on expanding stormwater treatment, solving muck management
challenges, evaluating how the Lagoon responds to changes, and improving community
involvement. New partnerships will need to be forged and old relationships strengthened to
fully realize the potential of Lake Worth Lagoon.




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NATURAL SYSTEMS


 RADICAL DAMAGE CALLS FOR RADICAL REMEDIATION: THE SNOOK
       ISLANDS ENVIRONMENTAL ENHANCEMENT PROJECT

David Carson, Environmental Analyst
PBC Department of Environmental Resources Management
2300 North Jog Rd., 4th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33411-2743
(561) 233-2442 FAX (561) 233-2414
dcarson@co.palm-beach.fl.us


The Lake Worth Lagoon was previously a freshwater lake fed by groundwater seepage from
the Everglades to the west. In the 1870s, a permanent oceanic inlet was established near
Palm Beach converting the freshwater system to an estuarine system. Mangroves and other
estuarine flora and fauna took over the lagoon. Over the next 100 years, however,
dredging/filling and bulkhead construction eliminated roughly 80% of the mangrove fringe
and much of the lagoon’s shallow water resources. In 1998, Palm Beach County’s
Department of Environmental Resources Management (ERM) began planning a habitat
enhancement project at the Lake Worth Municipal Golf Course. Dredging and bulkheading
of the shoreline to create the golf course virtually eliminated the area suitable for
development of inter- and shallow sub-tidal resources such as mangroves, seagrasses, and
oyster reefs. The only way to remediate the loss of these resources was to place fill in the
water to re-create the lost wetland grades. Peanut Island was a ready source of dredge spoil
and an island makeover was in the final planning stages. The Peanut Island makeover
project was combined with the offloading of 1.2 million cubic yards of spoil. The spoil was
transported 10 miles and used to create the Snook Islands enhancement project, resulting in
creation of 10 acres of red mangroves, 2.8 acres of Spartina marsh, 2.3 acres of oyster reef,
and ~50 acres of seagrass recruitment area. Radical environmental damage to the lagoon
can only be remedied through radical enhancement projects. Regulatory agencies need to
recognize this when processing enhancement permit applications.




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NATURAL SYSTEMS


           MODELING A SEAGRASS RESTORATION TARGET FOR
                        LAKE WORTH LAGOON


Rod Braun, Sr. Environmental Analyst
PBC Department of Environmental Resources Management
2300 North Jog Rd., 4th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33411-2743
(561) 233-2536 FAX (561) 233-2414
rbraun@co.palm-beach.fl.us


Loss of seagrass has been documented worldwide and has been correlated with
anthropogenic eutrophication and alteration of habitats. Developing a seagrass restoration
target or numeric goal based on available understanding of the history and physical
characteristics of an estuary, sets up guidelines for ongoing and future habitat restoration
projects. Palm Beach County (Florida) Department of Environmental Resources
Management has developed a methodology to model a seagrass restoration target in Lake
Worth Lagoon. Potential seagrass habitat is modeled using a digital elevation model,
seagrass depth distributions, and estuarine substrate characteristic modeling. A user can
determine where seagrass restoration or recruitment is likely to occur and can assist in
setting a restoration target based on these factors. Additionally, the information developed
provides an effective management tool to determine where restorative and protection efforts
should be focused.




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NATURAL SYSTEMS


                   SEA TURTLES OF LAKE WORTH LAGOON:
                        CANARIES IN THE COAL MINE


Mike Bresette, Director                               Dean Bagley
InWater Research Group, Inc.                          InWater Research Group, Inc.
4160 NE Hyline Drive                                  4160 NE Hyline Drive
Jensen Beach, FL 33497                                Jensen Beach, FL 33497
(772) 349-5905
mbresette@inwater.org

Carly De Maye, Sr. Environmental Analyst
PBC Department of Environmental Resources Management
2300 North Jog Rd., 4th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33411-2743
(561) 233-2503 FAX (561) 233-2414
cdemaye@co.palm-beach.fl.us

John Gorham                                           Blair Witherington
InWater Research Group, Inc.                          InWater Research Group, Inc.

Richard Herren                                        Steve Traxler
InWater Research Group, Inc.                          InWater Research Group, Inc.


The status of sea turtles utilizing Lake Worth Lagoon was largely unknown outside of
incidental sightings and stranding records. This paucity of data for one of the lagoon's
endangered species was the impetus for a comprehensive demographic study to assess the
status of sea turtles in Lake Worth Lagoon. InWater Research Group initiated this study at
the bequest of Palm Beach County’s Department of Environmental Resources
Management. Here we present results from the first two years of sampling effort and lagoon
wide visual transects. We have found that significant numbers of green turtles (Chelonia
mydas) utilize the northern region of the lagoon as developmental habitat and that close to
70% are afflicted with fibropapillomatosis, a debilitating and sometimes deadly disease. The
health of green turtles in Lake Worth Lagoon may serve as a good barometer of the success
of restoration efforts in this important estuary.




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NATURAL SYSTEMS


      ON-GOING COOPERATIVE ON MANATEE UTILIZATION OF THE
                 LAKE WORTH LAGOON SYSTEM


Christine Hudak, Marine Research Associate            Lucy Keith, Research Scientist
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission     Wildlife Trust
19100 SE Federal Highway                              1601 3rd Street, South, Suite F
Tequesta, FL 33469                                    St. Petersburg, FL 33701
(561) 575-5407 FAX (561) 743-6228                     (727) 895-7140
christy.hudak@myfwc.com                               keith@wildlifetrust.org

Cathy Beck, Wildlife Biologist
U.S. Geological Survey
Florida Integrated Science Center
Sirenia Project
2201 NW 40th Terrace
Gainesville, FL 32605
(352) 264-3550
cbeck@usgus.gov


The Lake Worth Lagoon System is an important travel corridor for the Florida manatee
(Trichechus manatus latirostris). Manatees travel north and south through the Intracoastal
Waterway and Lake Worth Lagoon to gain access to the Lake Worth Inlet, Riviera Beach
Power Plant (RBPP) discharge canal, and the scattered seagrass beds throughout the
system. During the winter season, large numbers of manatees travel through the lagoon to
utilize the warm water discharge at RBPP. The travel corridor also is used for access to the
southern coastal waters of Broward, Dade, and Monroe counties. Through the cooperative
efforts of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute (FWRI), the United States
Geological Service Sirenia Project (USGS), and the non-profit Wildlife Trust, ongoing
research is being conducted on manatee utilization of the Lake Worth Lagoon system. In
these joint efforts, manatee usage of the system has been and will continue to be monitored
through aerial synoptic (state-wide annual) and distribution (locally focused) surveys.
Wildlife Trust and FWRI monitor temperatures at RBPP and will be placing additional
temperature probes at and around RBPP to monitor manatee utilization of temperature
gradients. FWRI, in cooperation with USGS, has and will continue to photograph manatees
at RBPP to identify manatees that frequent the discharge canal.




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NATURAL SYSTEMS


MAPPING THE DISTRIBUTION AND POPULATION DENSITY OF EASTERN
 OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) WITHIN LAKE WORTH LAGOON
           UTILIZING REAL-TIME KINEMATIC (RTK) GPS


Mark Gambordella, Research Scientist                  Luke McEachron, Research Scientist
Fish and Wildlife Research Institute                  Fish and Wildlife Research Institute
100 8th Avenue SE                                     100 8th Avenue SE
St. Petersburg, FL 33701                              St. Petersburg, FL 33701
(727) 896-8626 ext. 2227                              (727) 896-8626
mark.gambordella@myfwc.com                            luke.mceachron@myfwc.com

William S. Arnold, Ph.D., Lead Research Scientist
Fish and Wildlife Research Institute
100 8th Avenue SE
St. Petersburg, FL 33701
(727) 896-8626 ext. 4110
bill.arnold@myfwc.com


The objective of this project was to conduct updated mapping of the major oyster reefs in
the Lake Worth Lagoon (LWL), test our ability to map these oyster reefs in the vertical
dimension using Real-Time Kinematic (RTK) GPS technology, and provide a quantitative
summary of oyster reef distribution patterns within LWL. Oyster reefs were mapped in a 1-m
x 1-m grid across the entire surface collecting x, y, and z coordinates at each data point.
Each reef was then sampled using multiple 0.25 m2 quadrats, collecting all live and dead
oysters from within each quadrat, and measuring the shell height (SH) of each individual
oyster (whether live or dead) to the nearest mm. A total of 2.06 hectares of oyster reef was
mapped. Results of mapping allowed for the production of three-dimensional contoured
maps of the selected reefs with an overall vertical confidence interval range of +8 - +23cm.
Live oyster SH ranged from 2 to 97 mm with a mean of 33 mm. Dead oysters SH ranged
from 3 to 89 mm with a mean of 35 mm. A statistical difference among reefs for both live SH
(p<0.0001) and dead SH (p<0.0001) was detected. The proportion of live oysters by reef
ranged from 76% to 84%. Our results demonstrate that RTK-GPS can be a useful tool for
mapping oyster reefs in the vertical dimension, and that healthy oyster reef populations are
found throughout LWL with no major trend in size or density observed.




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NATURAL SYSTEMS


                   LAKE WORTH LAGOON WATER QUALITY


Nenad Iricanin, Lead Environmental Scientist   Greg Graves, Lead Environmental Scientist
South Florida Water Management District        South Florida Water Management District
P.O. Box 24680                                 P.O. Box 24680
West Palm Beach, FL 33416                      West Palm Beach, FL 33416
(561) 682-2956                                 (561) 681-2563 ext. 3730
nirican@sfwmd.gov                              ggraves@sfwmd.gov


The Lake Worth Lagoon is the major estuarine water body located in Palm Beach County,
Florida. The ecosystem has undergone significant and widespread anthropogenically-driven
changes during the past one hundred years. Freshwater discharges into the lagoon have
introduced excess influxes of nutrients, suspended and dissolved organic matter,
contaminants, and toxins into the lagoon, which have affected flora and fauna. Water quality
monitoring has been underway since 1991 by Palm Beach County Department of
Environmental Resources Management and by the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection from 2001-2006. This presentation will provide an overview and interpretation of
these datasets, and discuss how efforts to evaluate the water quality condition of the Lake
Worth Lagoon relate to the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) Monitoring
and Assessment Plan (MAP). Potential implications as regards implementation of Adaptive
Management will also be addressed.




                        Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                       Page 9 of 34
NATURAL SYSTEMS


                 LOCAL, STATE, AND FEDERAL PERSPECTIVE

On January 31, 1997, the Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners and the
Florida Department of Environmental Protection co-sponsored the first Lake Worth Lagoon
Ecosystem Management Area Workshop. At that time, more than 150 people from
numerous government agencies, municipalities, business and industry, non-profit
organizations and concerned citizens came together in a consensus-building process to
work towards solutions for the diminished water quality and habitat degradation in Lake
Worth Lagoon. That partnership continues to this day with multiple partners continuing to
work towards the common goal of an improved lagoon.

For this presentation, each speaker will briefly summarize the local, state and/or federal
agency efforts, respectively that have been implemented since the 1990s to restore
conserve and manage the Lake Worth Lagoon.


                                           PANEL

Warren H. Newell, Commissioner, Palm Beach County

Timothy Rach, Acting Director, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Southeast
      District

Fred Rapach, Palm Beach Service Center Director, South Florida Water Management
      District

LTC Paul Baker, Deputy Commander for South Florida & the Antilles, U.S. Army Corps of
     Engineers




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COMMUNITY SYSTEMS


         LAKE WORTH LAGOON PARTNERSHIP GRANT PROGRAM


Rod Braun, Sr. Environmental Analyst
PBC Department of Environmental Resources Management
2300 North Jog Rd., 4th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33411-2743
(561) 233-2536 FAX (561) 233-2414
rbraun@co.palm-beach.fl.us


Since 1998, the Legislature has supported the restoration and enhancement of the Lake
Worth Lagoon by appropriating $13.4 million for the Lake Worth Lagoon Partnership Grant
Program. The grant program has developed 15 agency and municipal partnerships and has
leveraged $33.7 million in local funding. The grant funds construction projects that benefit
water quality and habitat in the lagoon. A total of 37 construction projects have been funded.

Stormwater/water quality projects include wet and dry retention systems, pollution control
devices, and swale construction. Based on a pollution load reduction study, it is estimated
that 12 tons of nitrogen and 2 tons of phosphorous are removed annually by these projects.
Habitat projects funded under the grant program benefit the lagoon by restoring or creating
habitat through construction of artificial reefs, environmental enhancement of areas
impacted by dredged spoil material, and the installation of mangrove planters along
hardened shorelines. More than 20 acres of mangroves and 58 acres of potential
submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) have been created in addition to the creation of hard
bottom, artificial reefs, and maritime hammock. The grant has also funded baseline
monitoring projects include seagrass & shoreline mapping, sediment transport, and a fish
and invertebrate survey.




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                                        Page 11 of 34
COMMUNITY SYSTEMS


        CITY OF WEST PALM BEACH STORMWATER MASTER PLAN
                      IMPROVEMENTS INITIATIVE


Ken Rearden, Assistant City Administrator
City of West Palm Beach
200 Second Street
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
(561) 822-1400 FAX (561) 822-1424
krearden@wpb.org

The City of West Palm Beach has embarked on an aggressive plan to improve the Lake
Worth Lagoon. The City's Stormwater Master Plan, adopted in 2000, outlines several
measures to reduce pollutants discharged to the Lake Worth Lagoon via stormwater runoff.
These measures include the initiation of the Renaissance Project of converting stormwater
to surface water for drinking purposes, installation of pollution control devices, exfiltration
systems and unique systems for environmental purposes along our waterfront.

The Renaissance Project was completed in April 2001 at a cost of over $13 million. It
converts the stormwater runoff from a 150-acre urban environment, including City Place and
the Convention Center, and treats it to Class 1 drinking water quality through the use of
chemicals, retention basins, and a settling lake prior to discharge to the water supply lakes.
The City's plans the installation of stormwater pollution control devices on seventeen (17) of
the City's primary drainage systems that outfall directly to the Lake Worth Lagoon. The
purpose of pollution control devices is to reduce the amount of trash, oils and greases and
suspended solids entering the Lagoon in an attempt to reverse the adverse impacts caused
by decades of untreated runoff.

The City has also embarked on many neighborhood improvement projects that include
stormwater system and sanitary sewer system replacement. With the stormwater system
replacement, all systems must meet water quality standards imposed by the South Florida
Water Management District (SFWMD). To date the City has expended over $30 million on
these neighborhood improvement projects.

Finally the City is embarking on an exciting project of revitalizing our Waterfront. One of our
primary goals is to make the Project environmentally sensitive. With the addition of boat
dockage, assurances are being met by limiting the impacts to sea grasses in the Lake Worth
Lagoon, providing a manatee protection zone, and only allowing day dockage to assure
there are no long term boats docked in the same area. We are also attempting to utilize
nature to filter runoff from this area and have plant life that will enhance the quality of the
runoff enhance the natural elements we are designing.

The City is committed to restoring the Lake Worth Lagoon and looks forward to a continuing
partnership with the State of Florida and Palm Beach County as we continue to improve the
City's stormwater management system.



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COMMUNITY SYSTEMS


      C-51 MUCK DREDGING AND INNOVATIVE BENEFICIAL REUSE


Julie Bishop, Environmental Program Supervisor     Mike Voich, Lead Project Manager
PBC Department of Environmental                    South Florida Water Management
Resources Management                               District
2300 North Jog Rd., 4th Floor                      P.O. Box 24680
West Palm Beach, FL 33411-2743                     West Palm Beach, FL 33416
(561) 233-2446 FAX (561) 233-2414                  (561) 681-2563 ext. 3720
jbishop@co.palm-beach.fl.us                        mvoich@sfwmd.gov


The C-51 Canal is the predominant source of stormwater discharge into the Lake Worth
Lagoon (LWL). Stormwater and subsequent sediment/nutrient loadings, have contributed to
the accumulation of muck sediments in the LWL. Palm Beach County, the South Florida
Water Management District, and City of West Palm Beach have partnered to address these
muck sediments by dredging the C-51 Canal. Over 121,000 cubic yards of muck will be
dredged, dewatered and trucked to sites for beneficial re-use on County Parks, Natural
Areas and Florida Department of Transportation road right-of-ways. Dredging these muck
sediments upstream of the S-155 structure will prevent discharge of these sediments into
the Lake Worth Lagoon. This project provides a tangible management tool to effectively
remove the existing muck deposits within the C-51 and create a “sump” to prevent future
deposits from reaching the LWL. The project will remove approximately 900 tons of total
nitrogen and 100 tons of total phosphorous from the system.




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                                      Page 13 of 34
COMMUNITY SYSTEMS


    NORTH PALM BEACH COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE EVERGLADES
           RESTORATION PLAN/LAKE WORTH LAGOON
            -- CHALLENGES AND PROJECT UPDATE --


Jim Bolleter, South Florida Regional Manager   Mike Voich, Lead Project Manager
Ecology and Environment, Inc.                  South Florida Water Management District
1665 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 500         P.O. Box 24680
West Palm Beach, FL 33401                      West Palm Beach, FL 33416
(561) 640-6552 FAX (561) 640-6551              (561) 681-2563 ext. 3720
jbolleter@ene.com                              mvoich@sfwmd.gov


The reduction of peak freshwater flows and sediment loads into Lake Worth Lagoon are
goals of the North Palm Beach County Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan
Project. Also the improvement of bottom substrate is a goal. As this project has moved
through the planning stages, a number of challenges have presented themselves and new
ideas have been generated. This presentation discusses some of those challenges,
provides an update on the project status and where the team is heading with the Lake
Worth Lagoon component of the multi-purpose North Palm Beach Project.




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COMMUNITY SYSTEMS


  THE FUTURE OF PUBLIC OUTREACH IN THE LAKE WORTH LAGOON


Ginny Powell, Environmental Program Supervisor
PBC Department of Environmental Resources Management
2300 North Jog Rd., 4th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33411-2743
(561) 233-2452 FAX (561) 233-2414
gpowell@co.palm-beach.fl.us


During the mid-1990s, Palm Beach County Department of Environmental Resources
Management was busy with its first major environmental restoration project, Munyon Island,
a 21-acre island in the north end of Lake Worth Lagoon. The associated mangrove planting
– hundreds of volunteers planted 44,000 mangroves on the island – was one of the first
outreach projects in the lagoon.

In January 1997, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and Palm Beach
County collaborated to produce the first Lake Worth Lagoon Ecosystem Management Area
Workshop. The workshop resulted in the publication of the Lake Worth Lagoon
Management Plan in August 1998, laying out the framework for the restoration and
enhancement of the lagoon. Public Use and Outreach was one area addressed in the plan
with 26 projects identified to develop awareness and to involve and inform the residents,
visitors and decision makers about the Lake Worth Lagoon ecosystem and how to preserve
it. Portions of 16 projects have been implemented. While the basic objectives of the
program were met, the program has suffered from a lack of organization and long-term
planning. The revised management plan makes some recommendations to address these
concerns including the creation of an Outreach Advisory Committee (OAC) to develop and
implement strategies and activities emphasizing the importance of environmental education
and outreach to the long-term health of the lagoon. If approved, the committee would meet
quarterly and be composed of representatives from government agencies, businesses, non-
profit organizations, and concerned citizens.




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COMMUNITY SYSTEMS


              THE ECONOMICS OF THE LAKE WORTH LAGOON
                     AND ITS WATERWAY ACCESS


David K. Roach, Executive Director
Florida Inland Navigation District
1314 Marcinski Road
Jupiter, FL 33477-9498
(561) 627-3386 FAX (561) 627-6480
droach@aicw.org


The Florida Inland Navigation District (the District), the state sponsor of the Atlantic
Intracoastal Waterway and a portion of the Okeechobee Waterway in Florida, has
completed several economic analyses of the waterways along Florida's East Coast within
the District. These studies have documented the importance of waterway access and the
economic output and impact of the waterway related industry in the District. The District has
utilized this information to educate and convince decision makers at all levels that the
investment of public and private funds in waterways and waterway access is a sound
investment decision.

This paper will focus on the results of these economic analyses in the Lake Worth Lagoon.
Additionally, efforts to improve waterway access, the partnerships necessary, and the
successes of the District's waterway programs within the Lake Worth Lagoon will be
highlighted.




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COMMUNITY SYSTEMS


 RECREATIONAL FISHING PERSPECTIVE ON HABITAT ENHANCEMENT
                OF THE LAKE WORTH LAGOON


Tom Twyford, Jr., Executive Director
West Palm Beach Fishing Club
P.O. Box 468
West Palm Beach, FL 33402
(561) 832-6780 FAX (561) 832-2137
ttwyford@mindspring.com


Over the past 50 years, rapid population growth along coastal Palm Beach County, and until
the 1970’s ineffective regulation of coastal development, has exerted tremendous pressure
on the Lake Worth Lagoon. This has had a negative impact on marine habitats crucial to
commercially and recreationally important fish species. For example, seawalls have
replaced nearly 90% of the lagoon’s mangrove shoreline. Other significant habitat loss (sea
grass, oyster beds, etc.) combined with issues related to poor water quality and overfishing
has led to declines in biodiversity and abundance. Spotted sea trout (Cynoscion
nebulosus), plentiful 50 years ago, once supported a commercial fishery in the lagoon and
was a popular target species for recreational fishers. They are now considered a rare catch.

Despite degradation, the shear numbers of people using the lagoon continue to increase.
Florida is widely recognized as the ‘Sport Fishing Capital of the World’ and its recreational
fishing industry generates over $4 billion annually. There are nearly 45,000 registered boats
in Palm Beach County, many of which use the lagoon on a regular basis. Fishing is an
important activity both socially and culturally for many area residents and visitors. Habitat
enhancement efforts are improving the recreational fishing experience. Areas frequented by
anglers within the lagoon, catch logs and ‘on the water’ observations, all suggest that efforts
to improve marine habitat through enhancement are having a positive impact on fish and
other benthic populations. For the first time in perhaps 25 years, anglers are seeing
noticeable improvements in portions of the lagoon. However, a delicate balancing act exists
between future enhancement efforts and continued coastal growth. Projects like Munyon
Island and Snook Islands have not only improved habitat for fish and wildlife, but have also
helped foster environmental stewardship within coastal communities. When developed with
good science and implemented with thorough public input, habitat enhancement projects
have the potential to: economically benefit property owners; improve the quality of life for
residents; help sustain abundance and biodiversity of marine resources; and significantly
improve the recreational fishing and boating experience. There is tremendous potential to
further enhance habitat throughout the entire lagoon, as long as there is strong political will,
an open dialogue among stakeholders and cooperation among the pertinent government
entities. Future generations will reflect kindly on our resolve to further develop habitat
enhancement projects and water quality initiatives in the Lake Worth Lagoon.




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COMMUNITY SYSTEMS


                          PORT OF PALM BEACH:
                  LAKE WORTH LAGOON’S ECONOMIC ENGINE

Kathy Andress, Deputy Executive Director
Port of Palm Beach
One East 11th Street
Riviera Beach, FL 33404
(561) 842-4201 FAX (561) 842-4240
andress@portofpalmbeach.com


The Port of Palm Beach pumps $261 million a year into the regional economy and some
3,000 people make their livelihood off of some aspect of the Port’s operations. The Port of
Palm Beach completed its Master Plan last year and will be making several improvements
which will impact the Lake Worth Lagoon and Lake Worth Inlet.

The Port has begun a dredging and channel modification study with the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers which may result in the first harbor deepening and widening improvements in
over 40 years. There is a South Gate Project under way adjacent to the FPL Riviera Power
Plant which will include a new warehouse/receiving facility and connection to the future
SR710 connection from Old Dixie to US1. There are plans to widen and extend Slip 3, which
needs replacement, east into the turning basin and south in front of the FPL Plant,
approximately 200 feet. There are plans to expand the Port south along the east side of the
FPL Plant for new terminal operations. The Port is proposing construction of almost 1 mile of
new double rail trackage to be built along the existing Florida East Coast right-of-way on the
west side of the Port. This would relocate the current rail interchange away from Blue Heron
Blvd. and greatly reduce rail blockage from about twenty-five minutes to about five minutes.




                         Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                        Page 18 of 34
COMMUNITY SYSTEMS



               CHALLENGES FACING THE MARINE INDUSTRY IN
                        PALM BEACH COUNTY


Jeff Scott, Professional Engineer
Isiminger & Stubbs, Inc.
649 US 1, Suite 9
North Palm Beach, FL 33408
(561) 881-0003 FAX (561) 881-8123
jeffreys@fdn.com


The Marine Industry in Palm Beach County is comprised of marinas, service and retail
companies, manufacturing, sales, marine construction, professional services and many
other related services. County wide, it provides over $1.3 billion in annual economic impact
and nearly 20,000 jobs. The challenges facing the Marine Industry in 2007 include
providing public access to the water, protecting boats and marinas during hurricanes, and
ensuring that manatee regulations do not unreasonably restrict access to the water.

Public water access provides recreation to county residents, promotes tourism, and
supports businesses and jobs in the Marine Industry, a key concern at the local and state
level. Marine Industry efforts in 2007 are focused on protecting working waterfront uses
from being taxed based on the “highest and best” use of the property. The Marine Industry
is also working with the County and Municipalities on the implementation of the Working
Waterfronts Bill.

The last three years have reminded us that marinas need to be able to evacuate their
facilities in some conditions and boat owners need somewhere to go during hurricanes. The
Marine Industry is working on this issue in the Florida Legislature and is actively seeking
practical solutions.

Public water access has been, and will very likely continue to be, restricted in the name of
manatee protection. The Marine Industry supports the protection of manatees and is
working with state and federal officials to attempt to establish clear success criteria for their
eventual delisting. In addition, the Marine Industry is working with the County and State on
a reasonable Manatee Protection Plan for Palm Beach County.

The long-term success of the Marine Industry is directly tied to the health of the Lagoon. By
applying for permits, embracing the Clean Marina program, and accepting Speed Zones, the
Marine Industry has demonstrated its commitment to the Lagoon and will continue to work
with local, state and federal officials to develop meaningful strategies to support its
continued and improving health.




                          Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                         Page 19 of 34
COMMUNITY SYSTEMS


                         A LOOK TOWARDS THE FUTURE


Nearly 10 years after the initiation of a partnership to restore, conserve and manage the
Lake Worth Lagoon, much work has been accomplished. However, much work remains to
be done. This presentation will provide a brief overview, from the perspective of several
Lake Worth Lagoon partners, regarding future efforts at the local and state level that will
continue to improve the water quality and habitat in the Lake Worth Lagoon.


                                          PANEL

Richard Walesky, Palm Beach County Department of Environmental Resources
      Management

Timothy Rach, Acting Director, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Southeast
      District

Fred Rapach, Palm Beach Service Center Director, South Florida Water Management
      District




                         Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                        Page 20 of 34
POSTER


               BIRD POPULATIONS IN LAKE WORTH LAGOON


Ginny Powell, Environmental Program Supervisor
PBC Department of Environmental Resources Management
2300 North Jog Rd., 4th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33411-2743
(561) 233-2452 FAX (233)-2414
gpowell@co.palm-beach.fl.us

Ann B. Hodgson, Ph. D., Gulf Coast Science Coordinator
Audubon of Florida Coastal Islands Sanctuaries Program
410 Ware Boulevard, Suite 702
Tampa, FL 33619
(813) 623-6826
ahodgson@audubon.org


As late as 2004, comprehensive data regarding bird activity in Lake Worth Lagoon (LWL), a
20-mile long urban estuary located in Palm Beach County, Florida, were limited, and
information from historical intermittent reports was not well-disseminated. As species
diversity is a measure of ecosystem integrity, Palm Beach County’s Department of
Environmental Resources Management (ERM) and its partners, the Audubon Society of the
Everglades (ASE) and the West Palm Beach Fishing Club, implemented a plan, beginning in
the winter of 2004, to survey the numbers and species of birds utilizing the lagoon for
foraging, habitat and/or nesting.

For the survey, ERM provided administrative support; the ASE provided technical
assistance regarding the methodology for the survey as well as member names interested in
assisting with bird counts, and; the West Palm Beach Fishing Club assisted by soliciting
their membership for volunteer boat captains interested in helping with the survey. The
lagoon system was divided into zones with a team of one boat and boat captain and two
birders per zone. Additional birders conducted a land-based survey in conjunction with the
water-based survey. Four two-day surveys were conducted over a 16-month period. The
survey results indicated that 89 species and a total of more than 14,000 birds utilized the
lagoon during the 8-day study period.

These data were compared with historical survey information for the Lake Worth Lagoon
compiled by the Florida Coastal Islands Sanctuaries Program.




                        Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                       Page 21 of 34
POSTER


CITY OF WEST PALM BEACH STORMWATER IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVE


Jonathan Bramley, Director of Engineering Service
City of West Palm Beach
1000 45th Street, Suite 15
West Palm Beach, FL 33407
(561) 494-1040 FAX (561) 494-1115
jbramley@wpb.org


The City of West Palm Beach has embarked on an aggressive plan to improve the Lake
Worth Lagoon. The City's Stormwater Master Plan, adopted in 2000, outlines several
measures to be taken to reduce pollutants discharged to the Lake Worth Lagoon via
stormwater runoff. These measures include the installation of pollution control devices,
drainage and sanitary pipe replacements, exfiltration systems and lake detention systems.
The submitted poster describes in detail the City's planned installation of stormwater
pollution control devices on seventeen (17) of the City's primary drainage systems that
outfall directly to the Lake Worth Lagoon. The purpose of pollution control devices is to
reduce the amount of trash, oils and greases and suspended solids entering the Lagoon in
an attempt to reverse the adverse impacts caused by decades of untreated runoff. There
are several pollution control devices on the market including the CDS, Stormceptor,
Vortechnics, and Suntree Technologies. The Suntree Technologies ''Nutrient Separating
Baffle Box'' will be explained in detail on the submitted poster. To date, the City has installed
two (2) Suntree Baffle Boxes and intends to install five (5) more in 2007 and 2008. The City
is committed to restoring the Lake Worth Lagoon and looks forward to a continuing
partnership with the State of Florida and Palm Beach County as we continue to improve the
City's stormwater management system.




                          Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                         Page 22 of 34
POSTER


CROSSING WITH CARE - FDOT BRIDGES OVER LAKE WORTH LAGOON


Ann Broadwell, District Environmental Administrator
Florida Department of Transportation
3400 West Commercial Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309
(954) 777-4325 FAX (954) 777-4319
ann.broadwell@dot.state.fl.us

Richelle Ellis                                         Garett Lips
Florida Department of Transportation                   Florida Department of Transportation

Andrea Aqudelo                                         Ana Gannon
Florida Department of Transportation                   Florida Department of Transportation

William Leidy                                          Gregor Senger
Florida Department of Transportation                   Florida Department of Transportation

Miquel Vargas
Florida Department of Transportation


The Florida Dept of Transportation (FDOT) is studying the possibility of replacing 5 bridges
within the Lake Worth Lagoon boundaries in the next 10 years. FDOT will be improving
water quality by replacing scuppers with closed drainage systems and developing a regional
mitigation project to address potential impacts to mangroves and seagrasses. FDOT will
also investigate opportunities for recreation such as fishing, biking and pedestrian access.
FDOT would like to use this opportunity to provide information to the public and collect input
as to how to make these projects environmentally sound and provide the necessary
transportation improvements to the county.




                         Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                        Page 23 of 34
POSTER


           THE ECONOMICS OF LAKE WORTH LAGOON AND ITS
                       WATERWAY ACCESS


David K. Roach, Executive Director
Florida Inland Navigation District
1314 Marcinski Road
Jupiter, FL 33477
(561) 627-3386 FAX (561) 624-6480
droach@aicw.org


The Florida Inland Navigation District (the District), the state sponsor of the Atlantic
Intracoastal Waterway and a portion of the Okeechobee Waterway in Florida, has
completed several economic analyses of the waterways along Florida's East Coast within
the District. These studies have documented the importance of waterway access and the
economic output and impact of the waterway related industry in the District. The District has
utilized this information to educate and convince decision makers at all levels that the
investment of public and private funds in waterways and waterway access is a sound
investment decision.

This poster will focus on the results of these economic analyses in the Lake Worth Lagoon.
Additionally, efforts to improve waterway access, the partnerships necessary, and the
successes of the District's waterway programs within the Lagoon will he highlighted.




                         Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                        Page 24 of 34
POSTER


       LAKE WORTH LAGOON CONCEPTUAL ECOLOGICAL MODEL

Dianne Hughes (Crigger)                  Greg Graves, Lead Environmental Scientist
Florida Department of Environmental      South Florida Water Management District
Protection                               P.O. Box 24680
400 N. Congress Avenue, Suite 200        West Palm Beach, FL 33416
West Palm Beach, FL 33401                (561) 681-2563 ext. 3730
(561) 681- 6703 FAX (561) 681-6755       ggraves@sfwmd.gov
Dianne.Hughes@dep.state.fl.us

Dana Fike
411 SE Starflower Avenue
Port St. Lucie, FL 34983
dfike028@aldephia.net


The Lake Worth Lagoon is a major estuarine water body located in Palm Beach County,
Florida, whose remaining natural resources need to be protected. The lagoonal ecosystem
has been stressed through the past one hundred years due to many anthropogenic
influences. Altered hydrology of the system allows massive freshwater discharges into the
lagoon, which exit via two ocean inlets and influence continental reef systems. These
discharges carry large influxes of nutrients, suspended and dissolved organic matter,
contaminants, and toxins into the lagoon, affecting the flora and fauna. Additional pressures
in this urbanized coastal area include boating and fishing pressures, as well as loss of
natural habitat through physical alterations to the system. A conceptual ecological model of
the cause-and-effect relationships of flora and fauna to human-induced and natural
conditions within the system was developed. The model consists of ecosystem external
drivers and ecological stressors, ecological attributes, and ecological effects, and presents
research hypotheses, including the effects of altered volume, timing and distribution of fresh
water relative to seagrasses, macroinvertebrates, salinity, fishes, nutrients, toxins,
suspended solids, and dissolved organic loads that will assist in the development of a
quantitative hydrodynamic model for this system.




                         Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                        Page 25 of 34
POSTER


         LAKE WORTH LAGOON PARTNERSHIP GRANT PROGRAM


Rod Braun, Sr. Environmental Analyst
PBC Department of Environmental Resources Management
2300 North Jog Rd., 4th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33411-2743
(561) 233-2536 FAX (561) 233-2414
rbraun@co.palm-beach.fl.us


Since 1998, the Legislature has supported the restoration and enhancement of the Lake
Worth Lagoon by appropriating $13.4 million for the Lake Worth Lagoon Partnership Grant
Program. The grant program has developed 15 agency and municipal partnerships and has
leveraged $33.7 million in local funding. The grant funds construction projects that benefit
water quality and habitat in the lagoon. A total of 37 construction projects have been funded.

Stormwater/water quality projects include wet and dry retention systems, pollution control
devices, and swale construction. Based on a pollution load reduction study, it is estimated
that 12 tons of nitrogen and 2 tons of phosphorous are removed annually by these projects.
Habitat projects funded under the grant program benefit the lagoon by restoring or creating
habitat through construction of artificial reefs, environmental enhancement of areas
impacted by dredged spoil material, and the installation of mangrove planters along
hardened shorelines. More than 20 acres of mangroves and 58 acres of potential
submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) have been created in addition to the creation of hard
bottom, artificial reefs, and maritime hammock. The grant has also funded baseline
monitoring projects include seagrass & shoreline mapping, sediment transport, and a fish
and invertebrate survey.




                         Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                        Page 26 of 34
POSTER


                           MANATEE PROTECTION PLAN

Paul Davis, Environmental Program Manager
PBC Department of Environmental Resources Management
2300 North Jog Rd., 4th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33411-2743
(561) 233-2509 FAX (561) 233-2414
pdavis@co.palm-beach.fl.us


Palm Beach County approved a Manatee Protection Plan (MPP) in June 2006, which now
must be approved by the State. The primary goal is to establish policies that minimize risk to
manatees. Other goals include restoring manatee habitat, increasing public awareness, and
increasing compliance with existing speed zones to protect manatees and mitigate for the
effects of future boat slips.

Manatees are more abundant in the County during the winter with highest numbers found in
north Lake Worth Lagoon, Jupiter Sound, and Lake Wyman. The largest cause (39%) of
documented mortality in the County is collisions with watercraft. The County ranks 6th in the
state for watercraft mortalities which were highest in north Lake Worth Lagoon, Jupiter
Sound, and the south Intracoastal Waterway.

A comprehensive inventory of boating facilities found that there are 182 marinas with over
9,000 slips. Additionally, there are 19 boat ramps with approximately 805 trailer spaces and
6,590 single-family docks with 8,772 slips.

A Boat Facility Siting Plan (BFSP) was developed using a Geographic Information System
(GIS) methodology. The BFSP provides four categories defining Preferred, Conditional,
Non-preferred, and Exclusionary locations for new boat facilities; establishes maximum slip
densities; and favors public access by placing minimum restrictions on public boat ramps
and marinas.

Impacts to manatees associated with new slips will be offset by a program to fund improved
public education, increased enforcement of speed zones and environmental restoration.
The Board of County Commissioners has committed $1,000,000 per year for this purpose.




                         Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                        Page 27 of 34
POSTER


                 MANATEES AT FPL’S RIVIERA POWER PLANT


Stacy Foster, Sr. Environmental Specialist      Winifred Perkins, Environmental Relations
Florida Power & Light                           Manager
P.O. Box 1400                                   Florida Power & Light
Juno Beach, FL 33408                            P.O. Box 1400
(561) 691-7065                                  Juno Beach, FL 33408
stacy_foster@fpl.com                            (561) 691-7046
                                                winifred_perkins@fpl.com


One of the most endangered species to call the Lake Worth Lagoon home is the Florida
Manatee. These animals have historically been attracted to the Lake Worth Lagoon in
search of food from seagrasses and the warm water outfall from FPL’s Riviera Power Plant.
Typically, manatees begin to congregate at the Riviera Power Plant in November, when the
ambient lake temperatures fall into the 60’s. They generally disperse in March when the
water temperatures rise. Congregations of manatees have exceeded 500 on occasion,
generally after strong cold fronts pass through the area.

Manatees have come to depend on power plant outfalls throughout the state. FPL has five
power plant sites where manatees routinely congregate in large numbers after cold fronts
pass: Cape Canaveral, Riviera, Port Everglades, Ft. Lauderdale, and Ft. Myers. Like the
Riviera Power Plant, the number of manatees at a particular site can often be in the
hundreds during a cold snap.

For many years regulators, scientists, environmental advocates and the electric utilities have
been working together to try to develop a safe and workable solution to ensure that the
manatees will continue to be protected if and when these power plants shut down. At this
time, none of FPL’s five power plants mentioned above are scheduled to be shut down, but
FPL is strongly committed to ensuring that the health and well-being of the manatees are
factored into our decision making for future power plant operations.




                         Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                        Page 28 of 34
POSTER


           MODELING A SEAGRASS RESTORATION TARGET FOR
                       LAKE WORTH LAGOON


Rod Braun, Sr. Environmental Analyst
PBC Department of Environmental Resources Management
2300 North Jog Rd., 4th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33411-2743
(561) 233-2536 FAX (561) 233-2414
rbraun@co.palm-beach.fl.us


Loss of seagrass has been documented worldwide and has been correlated with
anthropogenic eutrophication and alteration of habitats. Developing a seagrass restoration
target or numeric goal based on available understanding of the history and physical
characteristics of an estuary, sets up guidelines for ongoing and future habitat restoration
projects. Palm Beach County (Florida) Department of Environmental Resources
Management has developed a methodology to model a seagrass restoration target in Lake
Worth Lagoon. Potential seagrass habitat is modeled using a digital elevation model,
seagrass depth distributions, and estuarine substrate characteristic modeling. A user can
determine where seagrass restoration or recruitment is likely to occur and can assist in
setting a restoration target based on these factors. Additionally, the information developed
provides an effective management tool to determine where restorative and protection efforts
should be focused.




                         Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                        Page 29 of 34
POSTER


   ON-GOING STUDY OF MANGROVE ROOT REPLICATION DEVICE IN
                    LAKE WORTH LAGOON


Christopher O’Hare
Bio Marine Technologies
151 Commerce Rd.
Boynton Beach, FL 33426
(561) 350-7551
pinegd@gmail.com


This poster will illustrate the installation and benefits of various mangrove root-like habitat
structures under study in the Lake Worth Lagoon. The structures are situated in various
locations adjacent to the South Lake Worth Inlet. Studies have been ongoing since August
2000. This synthetic habitat device is secured in the tidal zone to shoreline armored with
concrete bulkhead (seawalls) for the purpose of studying the device’s potential for providing
for the enhancement of open estuary systems. The device is designed to duplicate the
physical benefits of tidal mangroves with regard to providing shelter from predation and
increase the survival potential of juvenile fish. The habitat structure also provides substrate
for colonization by mollusks and other benthic filter organisms. The device is made from
recycled material and designed to easily attach permanently to existing seawalls with
minimal seaward projection to minimize property/boat owner resistance to its installation. It
is not a substitute or replacement for mangroves but rather an attempt to replicate the
environmental benefits to flora and fauna originally provided by the submerged roots of the
shoreline mangrove. The Lake Worth Lagoon currently has over 200 miles of minimally
productive armored shoreline. This shoreline has a limited prospect for restoration to the
productive mangrove shoreline that originally existed. The success of the studied habitat
device could provide some limited benefit to restoring environmental productivity to this
portion of the Lake Worth Lagoon shoreline.




                         Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                        Page 30 of 34
POSTER


    THE POLITICS OF WETLANDS RESTORATION FROM A MUNICIPAL
             PERSPECTIVE: THE SNOOK ISLANDS SAGA


Theodore O. Meiggs, Ph.D.                         Rodney Romano, former Mayor of
Meiggs Environmental Consultants, Inc.            Lake Worth
14250 Braun Road                                  824 North Lakeside Drive
Golden, CO 80401                                  Lake Worth, FL 33460
(303) 278-7452 FAX (303) 278-7478                 PlungeGrunge@aol.com
profinder1@comcast.net


This poster will trace the activities that resulted in the creation of the Snook Islands natural
area from its inception to the current day from the perspective of the municipality that was
instrumental in obtaining community approval for this wetlands remediation project. The
various pros and cons both real and imaginary of the project and the political efforts that
were required to educate the community and to gain their eventual acceptance of this
important natural resource will be discussed along with the status of the project today and
what we can learn from these efforts for future wetlands restoration projects.




                          Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                         Page 31 of 34
POSTER


  POPULATION ASSESSMENT OF SEA TURTLES IN THE LAKE WORTH
                         LAGOON


Carly De Maye, Senior Environmental Analyst           Mike Bresette, Director
PBC Department of Environmental Resources             InWater Research Group, Inc.
Management                                            4160 NE Hyline Drive
2300 North Jog Rd., 4th Floor                         Jensen Beach, FL 33497
West Palm Beach, FL 33411-2743                        (772) 349-5905
(561) 233-2503 FAX (561) 233-2414                     mbresette@inwater.org
cdemaye@co.palm-beach.fl.us

Paul Davis, Environmental Program Manager             Dean Bagley
PBC Department of Environmental Resources             InWater Research Group, Inc.
Management

Leanne Welch, Environmental Program Supervisor
Palm Beach County Department of Environmental Resources Management


The Lake Worth Lagoon (LWL) is a 20-mile long body of water located just west of the
Atlantic Ocean along the coast of Palm Beach County, Florida. The lagoon was historically a
freshwater lake, but it has been severely altered by human activities since the late 1800s.
Today, the LWL is a moderately polluted estuary and is the site of extensive environmental
enhancement. Five species of sea turtle have been reported in the LWL, largely from
stranding reports and anecdotal observations. This study seeks to characterize the size,
diversity, and health of the LWL Chelonia mydas (green; CM) and Caretta caretta
(loggerhead; CC) populations using a combination of netting activities and visual transects.
Seven three-day, quarterly sampling events have been conducted since March 2005. These
events have yielded 34 captures (33 CM and 1 CC) during 45 net sets, for an overall Catch
Per Unit Effort (CPUE) of 2.51, and over 150 sea turtles sightings on 179 km of visual
transects. Straight carapace length (SCL) averaged 42.6, and ranged from 29.8 cm to 54.9
cm. Moderate or severe cases of fibropapillomatosis (FP) have been documented in 63% of
the captured CM. Sightings, captures, FP rates, and FP severity were higher during the
winter sampling months, while SCL was highest during the summer. The seasonality of
captures and sightings, CPUE, FP rate, and SCL range are all similar to sampling sites in
the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), a well-documented sea turtle developmental habitat located
50 km north of the LWL. Though more data is needed, based on these preliminary
comparisons, the LWL likely also functions as an important developmental habitat for
juvenile green sea turtles.




                        Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                       Page 32 of 34
POSTER


    PROPOSED BOATING IMPROVEMENTS IN LAKE WORTH LAGOON


Bill Wilsher, Superintendent of Park Planning & Design
PBC Parks and Recreation Department
2700 Sixth Avenue South
Lake Worth, FL 33362
(561) 966-6636 FAX (561) 963-6747
bwilsher@pbcgov.com


This poster will provide a brief description of the proposed upland and waterward facilities
associated with several new boat access facilities, marinas and launching ramps that are
proposed within the boundaries of the Lake Worth Lagoon located in Central Palm Beach

The new Moroso Park Marina is a proposed boat launching facility to be built just to the
north of the Riviera Beach Marina. This facility will include the following amenities: three
boat ramps, a boat basin for boat launching and landing, and the creation of 72-car/boat
trailer parking spaces and 20 standard car parking spaces. The permits for this marina have
been received and construction is set to begin in the fall of 2007.

 The design for Phase 2 of the Phil Foster Park expansion is set to begin in the spring of
2007. This phase of the Phil Foster Park expansion includes a 221 wet-slip marina, a
breakwater, and a multi-story parking garage. The initiation of construction for Phase 2 is
pending budget approval. Phase I of the Phil Foster Park expansion, completed in May
2006, includes the following: 45 additional car/boat trailer parking spaces, 2 restroom
buildings, staging and day docks, a dock for dinghies, a personal watercraft concession,
picnic pavilions, a waterfront pedestrian promenade, children’s play area, site lighting, and
landscaping.

These and other similar projects are possible due to the cooperation of several Palm Beach
County Departments including Environmental Resources Management, Facilities
Development and Operations and Parks and Recreation.




                         Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                        Page 33 of 34
POSTER


   USING SURROGATE TECHNOLOGY TO DETERMINE SUSPENDED
 SEDIMENT LOADING FROM C-51 CANAL INTO LAKE WORTH LAGOON


Elizabeth Hittle, Project Manager                       Lee Massey, Lead Technician U.S.
U.S. Geological Survey                                  U.S. Geological Survey
1000 Church Hill Rd                                     3110 SW 9th Ave.
Pittsburgh, PA 15205                                    Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33315
(412) 490-3805                                          (954) 377-5912
ehittle@usgs.gov                                        lmassey@usgs.gov

Eduardo Patino, Technical Consultant
U.S. Geological Survey
1400 Colonial Blvd.
Ft. Myers, FL 33907
(239) 275-8448
epatino@usgs.gov


During the 20th century, urban development and addition of man-made inlets connecting
Lake Worth Lagoon, in Palm Beach County, Florida, to the Atlantic Ocean altered the water
quality of the lagoon. Historically, the freshwater lagoon contained freshwater and was
separated from the ocean by a barrier island. In recent years, the lagoon has been
transformed into a saltwater lagoon due to reduction of freshwater inflow and increased
saltwater inflow. The accumulation of sediment on the lagoon bottom has been (and
continues to be) a major problem that adversely impacts aquatic life, including submerged
vegetation and many fish species. In cooperation with the Palm Beach County Department
of Environmental Resources Management, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated continuous
measurement of turbidity in the C-51 Canal upstream of coastal gated structure S-155.
These data, coupled with non-continuous suspended sediment measurements, were used
to estimate suspended sediment loads in the lagoon. In 2005, a sediment trap was built in
the C-51 Canal to help reduce suspended sediment loading into the lagoon. Measurements
have continued in an effort to capture conditions before, during, and after construction of the
trap. In 2006, a laser instrument was added to a nearby monitoring station to estimate the
sand/fine ratio of the suspended sediment. Ongoing investigations are designed to assess
the reduction in sediment loading.




                         Lake Worth Lagoon Symposium – May 16, 2007
                                        Page 34 of 34

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Lake Worth Lagoon Florida Permit Applications document sample