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2008 Word 2003 Calendar Template - PDF

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2008 Word 2003 Calendar Template - PDF Powered By Docstoc
					July 29, 2008




        Typing Dissertations
             or Theses
        for UMass Amherst
                   with Word XP (2003)
Getting started – make your life easy (or easier at least)

   1. Read the Graduate School’s Typing Guidelines and follow their rules.
   2. Choose some basic formats, then use them for everything:
      a. a common 10 or 12 point font (Times New Roman is good)
      b. margins: 1.5 inches on the left, 1 inch each for top, bottom and right.
      c. paragraphs for chapters: double-spaced, first line indented 0.5 inch, widow and orphan
          protection on, no hyphenations; left-justified or full-justified
      d. block quotes: indent the left margin of your paragraph.
   3. Make sure all tables and figures fit within the required margins. If some don’t, you will have to
      rotate them or place them on landscape-oriented pages. If you can, keep landscape pages
      together, preferably at the end, rather than switching back and forth between landscape and
      portrait.
   4. Some things to avoid:
      a. Do not attempt to put dots in a list by pressing the period key repeatedly. Set a tab stop
          (Format > Tabs) and under Leader choose #2, dots.
      b. Do not attempt to line things up by pressing the tab key repeatedly. Set a tab stop where you
          want it.
   5. Use styles to make your headings within chapters consistent (see section IV in this document).
   6. Bibliography: single-spaced with a blank line between entries. Word can keep each entry on the
      same page, as required.
   7. Don’t type your Table of Contents yourself – let Word do it. If you use the Heading styles in
      your document, Word can create a Table of Contents for you.




Elisa Campbell                                                              OIT – Software Support
campbell@oit.umass.edu
I. the template files...................................................................................................................................... 3
    A. save the templates files in your My Templates folder ....................................................................... 3
    B. starting a document and using the UMass template........................................................................... 7
    C. applying the UMass template to an existing document ..................................................................... 8
II. general formatting of chapters ............................................................................................................... 9
    A. the font and style in UMass templates ............................................................................................... 9
    B. the Page Setup .................................................................................................................................. 13
    C. page numbering ................................................................................................................................ 14
    D. the format for paragraphs in the text................................................................................................ 15
    E. using the header to put chapter number and date of printing on each page (optional) .................... 16
III. references ............................................................................................................................................ 17
    A. endnotes ........................................................................................................................................... 17
    B. bibliography ..................................................................................................................................... 19
IV. headings and captions ......................................................................................................................... 21
    A. headings in chapters ......................................................................................................................... 21
    B. captions for tables and figures.......................................................................................................... 22
V. finishing ............................................................................................................................................... 24
    A. adding a portrait page number to a landscape page ......................................................................... 24
    B. put chapters into the same file as preliminary pages........................................................................ 28
    C. preliminary pages ............................................................................................................................. 29
    D. create lists of figures and tables ....................................................................................................... 30
    E. create the table of contents ............................................................................................................... 32
Appendix................................................................................................................................................... 38
    A. heading styles................................................................................................................................... 38
    B. styles for Table of Contents ............................................................................................................. 40
    C. styles for lists of figures and tables .................................................................................................. 41




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I. the template files
There are two different template files in order to meet the needs of different graduate students. The
Graduate School permits three different formats of headings and Table of Contents entries. This handout
includes, and the templates support, the two most commonly used format. I call those formats the
“simple” and the “numeric” formats.

Select the template that uses the styles of Headings and Table of Contents that you prefer to use. You
can change your mind later.

A. save the templates files in your My Templates folder
The My Templates folder has a path to it that will look similar to this (with your name instead of
“Administrator”):

Local Disk / Documents and Settings/ Administrator / Application Data / Microsoft.



first, find the Templates folder:

   Start Word and Open any Word file; select Tools > Templates and Add-Ins:




Word XP (2003)                                    3                                             7/29/2008
   Word presents you with the Templates and Add-ins window:




   Click Attach. Word presents the Attach Template window:




   Click on the small triangle/arrow that points down next to the “pane” containing the word
   Templates. Word will show you the “path” to that folder. On my computer, it looks like this:




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make the Application Data folder visible
The Application Data folder, by default, is “hidden” and you can’t open it. To make it visible:

   In the Control Panel, open Folder Options.
   On the View tab, find Hidden Files and Folders.
   Click to Show hidden files and folders




Word XP (2003)                                  5                                        7/29/2008
Find the template file on the CD or the folder you downloaded it to from the web; select it and choose
Edit > Copy; then Paste it in the Templates folder:




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B. starting a document and using the UMass template
For a new document: when you start Word or,
within Word, select File > New, Word opens a
“pane” on the side of your screen which
displays several choices. One of the choices is
New from template. Within that section, select
General Templates…:




Select umassXPsimple or umassXPnumeric by clicking on it and then clicking on OK:




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C. applying the UMass template to an existing document
For existing documents: within the file, select Tools > Templates and Add-ins; Word presents you
with the Templates and Add-ins dialog box. Please see the first three example screens in the section
“find the Templates folder” above. Click on either umassXPsimple or umassXPnumeric template:




Click Open.

Word returns you to the
Templates and Add-ins screen; be sure
that the box next to Automatically update
document styles is checked. Then click OK.




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II. general formatting of chapters
A. the font and style in UMass templates
We use Times New Roman, 12 point, as our default style (which is called Normal):




The style also implements Widow/Orphan Control and turns off Hyphenation, both of which are
necessary.


NOTE on the relationship between the font in Normal style and other styles:
Most other styles in a Word template take their font from Normal, so if you change the Normal font to
something else, most other styles will follow as they should. The exceptions are the Page Number and
Endnote Reference or Footnote Reference styles. You must change those styles yourself.




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how styles are defined

You can see which styles are used and what
they are called by looking in
Format > Styles and Formatting:




Word displays the
Styles and Formatting window. To see
what the actual formatting is, hold your cursor
over the name of the style in the list:




Word XP (2003)                                    10   7/29/2008
Or, you can select Reveal Formatting, either by choosing that option under the Format menu (the left
example) or by clicking on the down-pointing triangle-arrow to the right of the title
Styles and Formatting:




Although in the Reveal Formatting screen it does not appear so, the style does include
Widow/Orphan Control.

to change a style

For example, to change the "Normal"
font: in the
Styles and Formatting
window, select the Normal style as
shown above, then right-click.
A menu shows up on which you can
select Modify:




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   Word opens a screen that shows
   an example and a description of
   the style you want to modify.




Hold your mouse button down on the
Format button at the bottom left of
the screen and select what you want
to modify (in this case, Font):




Word opens the Font window. See
the example for “the font we use in
UMass templates” at the beginning
of this section of the handout. Don’t
forget to put a check mark in the
Add to Template box (see the first
example of the Modify Style
screen).




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B. the Page Setup
Some things in a document are too big to be set by a style in a template, since styles relate to
paragraphs. One of the things we can't set in styles is the page setup and margins.

In File > Page Setup:
• Top, bottom and right margins are 1 inch
• left margin is 1.5 inches
• header and footer are 0.5 inch from edge of paper (since we put the page numbers in the footer, the
    position of the footer is important)




Note: Apply To: gets reset to This Section each time you open it; since all files will be set to
have the same margins, that is OK. Or, you may select Whole Document before you make any changes.




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C. page numbering
Page numbering is at bottom center (in the
footer). To get it there, choose
Insert > Page Numbers


Word brings up a dialog box in which we
choose Bottom of page (Footer), Center,
and Show number on first page as shown
here.

Click on the Format button.


On the Page Number Format screen, set the
Number Format to Arabic (1,2,3, etc).
Within the first chapter, select Start at 1.




In all subsequent chapters, we need
Continue from Previous Section.



NOTE: the font for page numbers is not
based on the Normal style. If you change the
Normal style, be sure to change the Page
Number style as well.

If you have pages in landscape orientation,
see the section on Adding a Portrait page
number later in this document.




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D. the format for paragraphs in the text
Within the chapters, most of the text is double-spaced, left-justified, no hyphenation, and with an indent
on each first line. Either use the style I created for paragraphs (called paragraph-text) or set the
paragraph format yourself.

To use the paragraph-text style:
Type a paragraph for the text, without any formatting. Then, select that paragraph by clicking your
cursor in it once. Then, in the box for styles in the formatting ribbon across the top of your screen, select
the style paragraph-text. Select the style as shown in the image on the left, which should produce the
result on the right:




To set the paragraph format yourself:
In Format > Paragraph on the Indents and Spacing tab: select double space; under Special, select
First Line indent 0.5 inch.




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E. using the header to put chapter number and date of printing
   on each page (optional)
We can use Word to help us keep track of our document as we work on it so we aren’t buried in
indistinguishable stacks of paper. Word can print information on each page in the header or footer; I
chose header here since the footer is being used for the page numbers.

In View > Header and Footer, type an abbreviation for the chapter (like C1 for Chapter 1) then a
space or two, then a dash, then a space or two; then click on the icon for date (it looks like a calendar
page – fourth icon from the left); if you want, you may add some more spaces and dashes and then click
on the clock icon for time.




Close the window; from then on, Word will print the chapter indicator and the date (and time, if
selected) on each page every time you print this chapter. That way, any piece of paper you pick up will
tell you what chapter it is from, its page number within that chapter (bottom of page) and the date (and
time) you printed it, so you know if this is the most recent version of the chapter or an older page you
can recycle.

example of View      >    Print Layout showing Header:




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III. references
The Graduate School allows: (1) citations in the text; (2) footnotes at the bottoms of pages;
(3) endnotes at the end of the entire document; (4) or endnotes at the end of each chapter. If you must
have notes, putting notes at the end of each chapter is easiest for the writer. However, if you have any
pages in landscape orientation (wider than they are tall), Word cannot automatically put the notes at the
end of individual chapters or at the end of the dissertation (before the Bibliography) because the Section
Break for the landscape page(s) causes Word to put the endnotes there. You can use footnotes that are
numbered sequentially throughout the document.

A. endnotes
Under Insert > Reference select Footnote:




On the Footnote and Endnote screen, choose
Endnotes at: End of section, Arabic numbers
(1, 2, 3, etc.), Start At 1, and Numbering:
Restart each section. For Apply changes,
select Whole document:



Click on Apply.




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Word puts a super-scripted reference number in the text (which it updates as necessary) and opens an
endnote/footnote window in which it also puts the reference number and waits for you to type the actual
text of the note. In addition to typing the text, you will need to do some formatting to follow the style in
your Style Manual. See the example in Turabian style below:




endnote placement
There are two choices for placing endnotes: at the end of each chapter or at the end of the thesis or
dissertation (just before the Bibliography).

Word puts the notes at the end of the current section. To put notes at the ends of chapters, end each
chapter with a Section Break. Insert a Page Break at the end of the text in the chapter (before the
Section Break) so that notes begin printing on a new page, not on the last page of text. Then replace the
default “note separator” (see below).

To put notes at the end of the thesis or dissertation insert a Page Break between each chapter, and insert
a Section Break before the Bibliography.

note separators
Be sure you are using View > Normal. Change
the Separators (which separate the notes from
the chapter’s text) from the default. Go to the
note “pane,” by clicking on the arrow next to
the phrase All Endnotes; select
Endnote Separator; within that window, center
and bold the word Notes and add a blank line.

Next, select Endnote Continuation Separator
from the pane and replace the line that was in it
with a space, and press the Enter key twice.
This will cause these pages to print without a
visible separation (instead of a line across the
page, which is the default).




Word XP (2003)                                      18                                            7/29/2008
B. bibliography
The format of your Bibliography is determined by the Style Manual you are using (see “Appendix B:
Suggested Style Manuals,” in the Graduate School’s Typing Guidelines). Since there are ten different
possibilities, I did not attempt to create styles in the templates for each one. The examples in the
“sample dissertation” and this handout are in Turabian style.

what it looks like (in Turabian style):




Word XP (2003)                                  19                                           7/29/2008
paragraph formatting
The Bibliography style uses a Hanging indent of 0.5” (under Special) and single spacing.




To keep the text of each entry on one page, in Line and Page Breaks click to put a check next to
Keep Lines Together.




Word XP (2003)                                  20                                          7/29/2008
IV. headings and captions
A. headings in chapters
The Graduate School requires that each chapter have a title. Most people also have at least one level of
headings within the chapters. The Typing Guidelines show three different formats of headings and their
corresponding entries in the Table of Contents. This handout includes the two most commonly used
ones: the simple format and the numeric format. The simple format is recommended whenever possible.
The numeric format is often used in the sciences.

The Heading 1 - Heading 5 styles in the UMass templates will format the headings correctly in your
chapters and mark the headings for proper inclusion in your Table of Contents.

Heading 1 is used for the acknowledgements, abstract, chapter titles, bibliography, and any appendices.
Note that if you are using bold face for your chapter titles, you need to also bold face the word
CHAPTER and its number. You need to do that yourself, since those paragraphs are not in Heading 1
style.

For Heading 1, the style is the same for both the simple format (from the umassXPsimple template) and
for the numeric format (from the umassXPnumeric template).

Heading 2 is for the first level of subheadings. For the simple format, Heading 2 is centered,
upper/lower case, underlined; because Heading 1 is in bold, so is Heading 2. For the numeric format, the
heading is bold and at the margin preceded by a number (e.g., 1.1 Introduction is the first Heading 2 in
Chapter 1).

Heading 3 is for the second level of subheadings. For the simple format, Heading 3 is centered,
upper/lower case, not underlined; because Heading 1 is in bold, so is Heading 3. For the numeric format,
the heading is bold and at the margin preceded by a number (e.g., 1.1.1 is the first Heading 3 in Chapter
1, section 1).

Heading 4 is for the third level of subheadings. For the simple format, Heading 4 is at the margin,
upper/lower case, underlined; because Heading 1 is in bold, so is Heading 4. Numeric format is bold;
example: 1.1.1.1.

Heading 5 is for the third level of subheadings. For the simple format, Heading 5 is at the margin,
upper/lower case, not underlined; because Heading 1 is in bold, so is Heading 5. Numeric format is
bold; example: 1.1.1.1.1.




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B. captions for tables and figures
The Graduate School permits you to number the captions sequentially throughout the document (Table
1, Table 2, etc.) or to number them with the chapter number included (Table 1.1, Table 1.2, etc.). It is
easier to use the simple format if you are able to put all Tables and Figures in Appendices at the end of
the thesis or dissertation.

Select the Caption style for the titles or captions of all Tables and Figures. You may be able to use the
Word command/menu Insert > Reference > Caption but do not use auto-caption (because we don’t
have the chapter numbers in the style Heading 1). If this command gives you trouble, then just type the
caption and format it with the Caption style.




tables or figures needing more than one page
   If a table or figure cannot fit on the current page, but will fit on one page, insert a Page Break and
   put the entire object on one page (in other words, don’t split a table or figure unless you have to).

   If a table or figure cannot fit on one page, leave room at the bottom of the page(s) for
   Continued on next page

   And room at the top of the next page(s) for the name of the table or figure and “continued”; for
   example,
   Table 2.3, continued




Word XP (2003)                                    22                                             7/29/2008
Generally, captions for figures go below the figure; captions for tables go above the table.




Word XP (2003)                                    23                                           7/29/2008
V. finishing
A. adding a portrait page number to a landscape page
If you have landscape-oriented pages (pages wider than they are tall) you have to use Word to put
portrait-oriented page numbers on them. It may be possible to put the table or figure on the page in
portrait orientation and then rotate the object; that’s the easiest method. If that doesn’t work, there are
two different methods to move and rotate the page number: Text Box or Table. For both, you begin as
follows:

   1. Separate the portrait and the landscape pages in your document with a Section Break between
      them. For example, at the end of the page of text (the portrait page), in the Insert menu, select
      Break, then select Section Break / Next Page. Insert a Section Break / Next Page
      after the landscape page (or pages) and before the next portrait page.

   2. With the insertion point in each Section in turn, under the View menu, click Header and Footer.
      On the small Header and Footer toolbar that opens up, click the Same as Previous icon to
      make the header and footer for each section unlike the preceding section.




using the Text Box method
   1. With the Header and Footer toolbar still open, in the Insert menu, select Text Box.
   2. Using your mouse pointer, draw a text box in the left margin of the landscape page.
   3. In the Format menu, select Text Box. On the Color and Lines tab, in the Line section, change
      Color to No Line; click OK.
   4. Click in the text box. The Text Box toolbar should be showing. If it isn’t, go to
      View > Toolbars and select Text Box.
   5. On the Text Box toolbar, click on the Change Text Direction button (the icon on the right) to
      change the orientation of the text.




   6. Enter the page number: on the Header and Footer toolbar, click on the Page Number button
      (the # sign button).
      Make sure you get the page number on the page in the right location (the same as on the portrait
      pages). You may have to experiment to place it correctly. I recommend using the Absolute
      Position option:
          a. select the Text Box by clicking on the border around it.
          b. In the Format menu, select Text Box.
          c. On the Layout tab select Advanced…




Word XP (2003)                                     24                                              7/29/2008
         d. On the Advanced Layout screen, in both the Horizonal and Vertical sections, enter
            numbers in the Absolute position box; make the position relative to the Page (as in the
            example below) not the column. The numbers in the example worked for my sample
            thesis, so I’d start with them. You may use negative numbers (for example, -0.12) if
            needed.




         e. Print the page and compare the placement of the page number to that on a portrait page;
            adjust as necessary.


Word XP (2003)                                25                                           7/29/2008
using the Table method
   1.   With the View > Header and Footer window still open, in the File menu, select Page Setup.
   2.   Click the Margins tab and change the Top Margin to -1.5 inches (a negative value).
   3.   On the Table menu, click Draw Table.
   4.   You now have a Tables and Borders toolbar; using your pointer, draw a table / cell on the left
        margin, from the header to the footer. Create a small cell in the middle of the table by drawing
        across to connect the two lines of the big cell. Remember that you want the number to be in the
        same location as it is on portrait pages: the bottom of the number should end up 0.5 inch from
        the left side edge of the paper, and the number should be in the middle of the space within the
        margins. In my examples, that is just above the number 4 on the ruler on the left side of the
        screen.




   5. Click in a table cell. On the Table menu, point to Select, then click on Table.
   6. On the Format menu, click Borders and Shading. On the Borders tab, under Settings, click
      None. Click OK.
   7. Enter the page number: on the Header and Footer toolbar, click on the Page Number button
      (the # sign button).
   8. To rotate the text, on the Tables and Borders toolbar, click the Change Text Direction button.




Word XP (2003)                                   26                                            7/29/2008
      The results look like this:




      You can move the boundaries of the cell if necessary to move the page number up or down as
      needed.




Word XP (2003)                                27                                         7/29/2008
B. put chapters into the same file as preliminary pages
Put all the chapters together by copying them, in turn, and pasting them into the end of the file with the
preliminary pages in it.

The best option is to use the actual file on the disk (PrelimXPsimple or PrelimXPnumeric) and substitute
your name, committee members’ names, dates, etc. for the phony ones we used in the example. If you
do not have a Dedication, Acknowledgements, or lists of Figures or Tables, delete those pages from the
preliminary pages (but keep the Section Break at the end). You can then copy the files containing your
chapters into the file with the preliminary pages, after the Section Break. If you do not have a
Dedication or Acknowledgements, you will need to change the number for the first numbered page (see
the next page of this handout for how to change that page number).

Make sure that Same as Previous is turned off for the Footer in both the preliminary pages and the first
chapter.

If you do not have endnotes at the ends of chapters, insert a Page Break between chapters.

if you have endnotes at the ends of chapters
If you have endnotes at the ends of chapters,            Choose Insert Section Break Next Page at
be sure you have done an Insert Page Break               the end of each chapter (so that the next chapter
after the text in each chapter (so that the notes        begins on a new page).
begin on a new page, not at the bottom of the
last page of text).




                                                         .



Example of the break between chapter 1 and chapter 2:




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C. preliminary pages
The best option is to use the actual file on the disk (PrelimXPsimple or PrelimXPnumeric) and substitute
your name, committee members’ names, dates, etc. for the phony ones we used in the example. If you
are not using one of the Prelim files, be sure to use the same font, orientation and margins as in the main
part of the document. Then follow the instructions below to put in the page numbers.

page numbers
Page numbering first appears on the Acknowledgments page (if there is no Acknowledgments page, it
appears on the Abstract page); it begins with the number of the actual piece of paper (page 5 if you have
both a Dedication and Acknowledgments – as in the sample dissertation). If you are not using either
prelimXP file, insert a Section Break between this page and the previous page.

Make sure that Same as Previous is turned off for the Footer.

On the first page that gets a printed page number, turn
on page numbering in
Insert > Page Numbers.

Click on the Format button.




On the Page Number Format screen, set the type of page
numbers to lower-case Roman numerals and set Page Numbering
to Start At: the appropriate number (in our example, v).




When you paste your chapters into the document after the preliminary pages, make sure that:

   1. there is a Section Break / Next Page between the preliminary pages and the first chapter (if
      you use one of the PrelimXP files, the Section Break is there, at the end).

   2. Same as Previous is turned off for the Footer.

Word XP (2003)                                    29                                            7/29/2008
D. create lists of figures and tables
Once all the chapters are together in one file, you can create the lists of Tables and Figures. For
example, to create a list of Figures, click in the sample List of Figures; then choose
Insert > Reference > Index and Tables:




On the tabs, choose Table of Figures.

Choose Figure and From template. Click OK.




Word usually creates a list but it isn’t quite right. [I say “usually” because sometimes this function does
not work at all. When that happens, you have to type your lists of Figures and Tables yourself.]



Word XP (2003)                                     30                                             7/29/2008
For the simple version, where all figures (and tables) are numbered sequentially throughout the entire
document, it looks like this:




The numeric version looks similar except for the numbering.

We need to fix the list by removing the word “Figure” in front of each number, changing the colon to a
period, and changing the space after the colon to a tab. For the simple list, it should look like this:




For the numeric version, it should look like this:




For a more detailed discussion about editing lists created by Word, see the discussion about Table of
Contents later in this handout.

If, later on, you need to update the page numbers in this list without changing the words or their
formatting, you can do that by pressing the F9 key on your keyboard. See the example in the discussion
of Table of Contents, later in this handout.

Creating a list of Tables is a similar procedure except that you choose Table instead of Figure.




Word XP (2003)                                       31                                            7/29/2008
E. create the table of contents
Once all the chapters are together in one file, click in the dummy Table of Contents; then choose
Insert > Reference > Index and Tables; from the tabs, choose Table of Contents. Choose
From template. Remove the check next to Use hyperlnks instead of page numbers – it reduces the
headaches of formatting the table of contents correctly later.




When Word asks if you want to replace the selected Table of Contents, click on OK.

Word creates a Table of Contents with the correct order, page numbers and general formatting; see the
examples on the next page.




Word XP (2003)                                  32                                           7/29/2008
the simple format: from umassXPsimple.dot




the numeric format: from umassXPnumeric.dot




Word XP (2003)                              33   7/29/2008
fix the table of contents
For either Table of Contents, you need to do some reformatting (see the Graduate School’s Typing
Guidelines and/or my example dissertation):

   -   contiguous headings of the same level should be single-spaced in relation to each other;
       headings of different levels should be double-spaced in relation to each other
   -   add the word CHAPTER above the first chapter name
   -   add the numbers of chapters (Arabic or Roman, as in text) and tab the names to 0.5 inches
   -   if you have one or more Appendices, format those titles correctly.

You can click in the Table of Contents and edit it. However, you have to be very careful to stay away
from the page numbers, or Word will jump to that page in the document. I recommend you move your
cursor as far to the left as possible on a line of text (for example, next to the word New in the title of the
first chapter); the cursor image should change to an I-bar (it looks like a capital I) instead of an arrow or
hand. Then click. Once you have the cursor in the ToC, it is generally easier to move around using the
arrow keys on your keyboard – that way you won’t give Word an excuse to jump to a page in the
document.

When you are inserting new lines for text, or making a double-space between two lines, pay attention to
whether the Line Spacing in the “paragraph” is set for Double or Single space. Usually it should be
Single space (a blank single-spaced line between two lines with text makes them look double-spaced).
See the example of the Format > Paragraph screen below:




Examples of Tables of Contents are on the next two pages.




Word XP (2003)                                      34                                              7/29/2008
the simple format: from umassXPsimple.dot




Word XP (2003)                              35   7/29/2008
the numeric format: from umassXPnumeric.dot




Word XP (2003)                           36   7/29/2008
updating page numbers

If you have either a List of Tables or List of Figures, you need to get the “vertical spacing” (number of
pages) of the Table of Contents correct first so Word can figure out what page numbers to assign to
those lists (in case the ToC is longer than one page). You can then update the page numbers in the ToC
without changing the words or their formatting: click the cursor in the ToC, then press the F9 key on
your keyboard; Word will display the Update Table of Contents dialog box:




Click in the circle for Update Page Numbers Only.




Word XP (2003)                                    37                                            7/29/2008
Appendix
A. heading styles
Heading 1 is for the Abstract, Chapter Titles, Bibliography, any Appendices, etc. Note that if you are
using bold face for your chapter titles, you need to also bold face the word CHAPTER and its number.
You need to do that yourself, since those paragraphs are not in Heading 1 style.
For Heading 1, the style is the same for both the simple format (from the umassXPsimple template) and
for the numeric format (from the umasXPnumeric template).




Heading 2 is for the first level of subheadings.
   simple Heading format: from umassXPsimple.dot




   numeric Heading format: from umassXPnumeric.dot




Heading 3 is for the second level of subheadings.
   simple Heading format: from umassXPsimple.dot




   numeric Heading format: from umassXPnumeric.dot




Word XP (2003)                                  38                                           7/29/2008
Heading 4 is for the third level of subheadings.
   simple Heading format: from umassXPsimple.dot




   numeric Heading format: from umassXPnumeric.dot




Heading 5 is for the fourth level of subheadings.
   simple Heading format: from umassXPsimple.dot




   numeric Heading format: from umassXPnumeric.dot




Word XP (2003)                               39      7/29/2008
B. styles for Table of Contents
Word automatically uses styles TOC1-TOC5 to format the ToC entries.

For all TOC styles, the Tab stop position for the page number is a Right tab to 6” (which coincides with
right margin) with leading dots set in the Format > Tabs dialog box:




The TOC styles are:


TOC1



TOC2




TOC3


TOC4


TOC5




Word XP (2003)                                   40                                           7/29/2008
The TOC styles are indented from the right to avoid obscuring the page numbers in the list.

For all but TOC1, the paragraph formatting for the style includes a hanging indent so that if the title is
too long to fit on one line, the second line won’t interfere with seeing the first line. This hanging indent
varies in size. For the simple ToC, it is 0.25”. For the numeric ToC, the handing indents are big enough
to keep the numbers of the Headings easily visible. Below is one of the definitions of the hanging indent
(for TOC3 numeric).




If you are using my preliminary pages, or keep your headings short enough to fit on one line in the ToC,
you don’t need to worry about any of this!


C. styles for lists of figures and tables
Table of Figures style is used for these lists. It has a hanging indent as well as being indented from the
right margin so that long captions will wrap properly without interfering with the placement of the page
numbers. For the numerical list:




Word XP (2003)                                     41                                             7/29/2008

				
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