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					                                 WIGA News Clips July 20, 2005
LOCAL
Groups sue in Snohomish County over I-601 overhaul The Daily News 7/20/05
Flames rip tribal auto shop Bellingham Herald 7/20/05
American Indian youths hone talent for leadership The Olympian 7/20/05
Reservation gets van service The Bellingham Herald 7/17/05

NATIONAL
Lingle and Case insist Akaka Bill allows no gambling Star Bulletin 7/20/05


LOCAL

Groups sue in Snohomish County over I-601 overhaul

By Associated Press
Jul 20, 2005 - 08:27:53 am PDT

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) -- A coalition of fiscally conservative groups asked a Snohomish
County judge Tuesday to invalidate new taxes approved by lawmakers this year, taking a
second swipe at doing away with the Legislature's overhaul of voter-approved tax-and-
spending limits.

The challengers include the Washington Farm Bureau, Washington State Grange, state
chapter of the National Federation of Independent Business, the Building Industry
Association of Washington and the Evergreen Freedom Foundation.

The challenge was filed in Snohomish County Superior Court, less than a week after the
Washington Supreme Court ruled that under existing law, the secretary of state properly
refused to accept Referendum 60.

The point of contention is a new law that allows the Legislature to raise taxes with a
simple majority vote for the next two years, rather than the two-thirds supermajority
required by Initiative 601, which voters approved in 1993.

The law also changes the voter-approved spending limit to make it based on the 10-year-
average personal income growth, roughly 5 percent a year, rather than the old growth
factor of population growth plus inflation, about 3.5 percent a year.

"It's hard to say we're honoring the will of the people who want a spending limit, when
you're eliminating the only mechanism within 601 that kept the tax increases and
spending in check," Jason Mercier, with Evergreen Freedom Foundation, said Tuesday.
The bill included an emergency clause to put it into effect the minute Democratic Gov.
Christine Gregoire signed it. Democrats then quickly passed a $500 million package of
revenue bills to balance the $26 billion, two-year state budget.

The Supreme Court ruled last Thursday that the emergency clause in the measure was a
valid move by lawmakers. Opponents have argued lawmakers were purposely trying to
evade the possibility of a public vote by including that emergency clause.

Tuesday's lawsuit does not address the validity of the emergency clause, instead arguing
that the bill passed by lawmakers modifying Initiative 601 was unconstitutional, and that
the taxes that were able to be passed due to that law are essentially void. The groups also
allege that lawmakers artificially inflated the state's expenditure limit by moving $250
million dollars from various accounts.

Mercier said that move was to avoid a provision of the initiative that prohibits enacting
taxes that might exceed the expenditure limit.

The suit is asking the court to invalidate the law, and to require that the taxes passed by
the law go before the voters.

Richard Stephens, an attorney for the coalition, said that lawmakers, while changing the
two-thirds rule in one section of the statute, failed to reference another statute which
reaffirms the initiative's requirement that the two-thirds vote stands.

"They can't amend one and not the other," he said, citing a 2000 state Supreme Court
decision that an initiative that eliminated the value-based motor vehicle excise tax
violated the state constitution. The court ruled that the initiative created conflicting laws,
something the coalition says is the case with the overhaul of I-601.

The new law allowed Democrats to pass a budget this year without help from
Republicans. Democrats hold a 55-43 majority in the House and a 26-23 majority in the
Senate.

The change will expire in July 2007.

Gregoire's office said they had not yet been served, and could not comment until they had
seen the lawsuit.

Senate budget Chairwoman Margarita Prentice, D-Renton, said she wasn't surprised by
the move, but didn't think the challenge would prevail in court.

"We would never have attempted it if we weren't sure we were on safe legal ground," she
said. "They imagine that they're expert, but the one thing that has never been tested is the
unconstitutionality of 601 altogether. We may end up having the court looking at that and
they may not be happy with the results."
Flames rip tribal auto shop
Fast-moving fire was hours putting out

JOHN STARK
THE BELLINGHAM HERALD

DEMING - A fire possibly caused by a spark from a blowtorch destroyed the Nooksack
Indian Tribe's vehicle shop Tuesday morning, said Whatcom County Fire Marshal
Warner Webb.
Authorities believe a spark from a torch being used to cut metal landed in some
combustibles, igniting the fire, Webb said.
Flames erupted so fast that tribal employees in the shop and adjoining offices at the south
end of First Street across the railroad tracks from Deming Road had to run for it. Nobody
was hurt.
Mechanic Marvin Morrow was inside the shop working on a truck when the fire started.
"I just heard a popping sound and looked up and the ceiling was heavy with smoke,"
Morrow said. "We just ran outside."
The two-story building, which also contained offices and storage space, was quickly
engulfed in flames. Webb estimated damages around $200,000.
Chief Frank Cain of Whatcom County Fire District No. 14 works a short distance away
for the Mount Baker School District. About 9:20 a.m., Cain said he saw the fire and heard
small explosions inside the building, possibly caused by propane tanks and other
combustibles.
"When I arrived here, power lines were sparking and coming down," Cain said.
Two hours later, crews from Fire Districts 1, 4 and 14 were still spraying water on the
smoking ruins.
Webb said firefighting efforts were hampered by the limited nearby water supply. Fire
district tankers ran relays to the site to keep the water flowing. While the shop was
destroyed, their efforts kept the fire out of adjacent buildings.
Tribal financial officer Brock Hochsprung said employees were pulling computers out of
powerless adjoining offices and setting up shop in the main tribal headquarters building
at 5016 Deming Road. He expressed optimism that the adjoining offices might be back in
commission soon.
Reach John Stark at 715-2274 or john.stark@bellinghamherald.com.



American Indian youths hone talent for leadership
Conference at Evergreen draws 100 participants

BY KARI NEUMEYER
THE OLYMPIAN

OLYMPIA -- Being a leader means taking notice of those in need of extra support.
 Not all of the teens at this week's Native Youth Leadership Academy stood up when
asked whether they were going to school, honoring their elders and keeping their bodies
free of drugs and alcohol.

A handful also remained seated when asked whether they were proud to be American
Indian and whether they value the opportunity to meet new people.

Those youths need leaders to stand up for them and model healthy behavior, said Robert
Johnston of the Native Wellness Institute in Gresham, Ore.

The institute and the Skokomish Tribal Nation put on the four-day leadership conference
for American Indian youths ages 12 to 17. The youths learned traditional ways to
confront contemporary challenges such as drug abuse, dropping out of school and
depression.

American Indian teens are more likely to struggle with those problems because of the
historical trauma suffered by their ancestors, said Jillene Joseph, director of the Native
Wellness Institute.

"We know that if you look at the statistics, ours are going to be way higher," she said.

About 100 youths from across the country participated in the conference at The
Evergreen State College. They were divided into clans, to which they gave traditional
names such as Raven, Thunder and Warrior.

"We tell them they can't be Wu-Tang Clan," Joseph said.

The second day of the conference, Johnston encouraged participants to form bonds within
their clans.

"You have some clan members who have a hard time adjusting," he said.

Everyone is a role model, he stressed.

"From the day you are born you are an elder to somebody," Johnston said. "There's
always someone watching you."

Trying to be a leader to peers can feel awkward at first, said Skokomish member Jazzy
James, 15.

"It gets easier," she said.

James has attended youth conferences for years because her parents work for the Native
Wellness Institute.
About 40 Skokomish members participated in the leadership academy, she said. Several
of them had never been to a conference before, James said. As for her peers who
remained sitting during Johnston's poll of leadership qualities, James said she would
make an effort to draw them out.

"There's always going to be people who are always talking, always participating," she
said. Others require a little more attention.

The conference helps teenagers feel more comfortable speaking in front of people, said
Kayla Strong, 15, also from Skokomish.

The academy included motivational talks by Johnston and Maria Trevizo from the
Wellness Institute and activities aimed at strengthening leadership skills and teamwork.

Standing in a circle holding a rope, members of two of the clans told one another about
their personal and group goals.

Many shared the desire to meet new people, learn about other tribes and have fun.

"This will show you the support we all have for each other," said Skokomish health
counselor Creighton Runnette, instructing the group to lean back, pulling the rope taut.

Still holding the rope, the teens sat down and stood up again on the grass outside
Evergreen's longhouse.

"This is what's going to happen if I let everyone down," Runnette said, releasing the rope
and causing a boy on the other side of the circle to lose his balance.

Other activities included traditional crafts, resume and college preparatory workshops,
swimming, rock-climbing and basketball.

Kari Neumeyer covers diversity for The Olympian. She can be reached at 360-357-0204 or
kneumeye@olympia.gannett.com.



Reservation gets van service

SERENA LEI
THE BELLINGHAM HERALD

Lummi Nation and the Whatcom Transportation Authority are collaborating to provide
free van service to the east side of Lummi reservation, where WTA buses do not run.
The 11-passenger van travels a 90-minute route from Silver Reef Casino, down Lummi
Shore Road to Gooseberry Point and then back to the casino along Smokehouse, Cagey
and Robertson roads. Service began July 1.
The van runs from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays and until 7:30 p.m. weekends.
NATIONAL

Lingle and Case insist Akaka Bill allows no gambling
11th-hour wrangling envelops Akaka Bill
Sign-up drives parallel Akaka Bill

By Sally Apgar
sapgar@starbulletin.com

The Akaka Bill has raised concerns about whether native Hawaiians will be able to host
gambling if they gain federal recognition and subsequently form a self-governing body.

That government would still be subject to control by Congress under its "plenary
powers."

U.S. Rep. Ed Case, D-Hawaii, said yesterday, "Absolutely nothing authorizes gambling
in the state of Hawaii."

Gov. Linda Lingle, who is in Washington, D.C., this week for debate on the Akaka Bill
and the possible closure of the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, said: "We amended the bill
already. The version before the Senate outlaws gambling. This does not allow legalized
gambling in our state -- something I have opposed all my life in public office."

Lingle said, "We wouldn't object to any strong language as it relates to gambling."

Case noted that the federal Indian Gaming Regulatory Act does not allow gaming activity
by an American tribe if the state does not allow gaming. Currently, Hawaii, Utah and
Tennessee are the only states without some form of gaming.

Additionally, Case said that even if the state of Hawaii had gaming, the federal gaming
act currently only applies to Indian lands.

"And there are no Indian lands in Hawaii," said Case. "Ceded lands are not Indian lands.
Under IGRA, Indian lands are owned and operated by federally recognized Indian
tribes."

Under the current wording of the Akaka Bill, called the Native Hawaiian Recognition Act
of 2005, "nothing shall be construed to authorize the native Hawaiian governing entity to
conduct gaming activities under the authority of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act."

Last week, the Department of Justice took issue with several aspects of the Akaka Bill,
including gambling. The issues were raised in a letter from Assistant Attorney General
William Moschella to U.S. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., chairman of the Senate
Committee on Indian Affairs.
The letter said "the legislation should clearly provide that the Indian Gaming Regulatory
Act will not apply to the native Hawaiian governing entity, and that the governing entity
will not have gaming rights."

Case said, "This is a red-herring issue thrown out to cause concern where there is none.
This argument has three nails in its coffin, and if one more is needed, I'm happy to
hammer it home."
Lingle and Case insist Akaka Bill allows no gambling
11th-hour wrangling envelops Akaka Bill
Sign-up drives parallel Akaka Bill

By Sally Apgar
sapgar@starbulletin.com

The Akaka Bill has raised concerns about whether native Hawaiians will be able to host
gambling if they gain federal recognition and subsequently form a self-governing body.

That government would still be subject to control by Congress under its "plenary
powers."

U.S. Rep. Ed Case, D-Hawaii, said yesterday, "Absolutely nothing authorizes gambling
in the state of Hawaii."

Gov. Linda Lingle, who is in Washington, D.C., this week for debate on the Akaka Bill
and the possible closure of the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, said: "We amended the bill
already. The version before the Senate outlaws gambling. This does not allow legalized
gambling in our state -- something I have opposed all my life in public office."

Lingle said, "We wouldn't object to any strong language as it relates to gambling."

Case noted that the federal Indian Gaming Regulatory Act does not allow gaming activity
by an American tribe if the state does not allow gaming. Currently, Hawaii, Utah and
Tennessee are the only states without some form of gaming.

Additionally, Case said that even if the state of Hawaii had gaming, the federal gaming
act currently only applies to Indian lands.

"And there are no Indian lands in Hawaii," said Case. "Ceded lands are not Indian lands.
Under IGRA, Indian lands are owned and operated by federally recognized Indian
tribes."

Under the current wording of the Akaka Bill, called the Native Hawaiian Recognition Act
of 2005, "nothing shall be construed to authorize the native Hawaiian governing entity to
conduct gaming activities under the authority of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act."

Last week, the Department of Justice took issue with several aspects of the Akaka Bill,
including gambling. The issues were raised in a letter from Assistant Attorney General
William Moschella to U.S. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., chairman of the Senate
Committee on Indian Affairs.

The letter said "the legislation should clearly provide that the Indian Gaming Regulatory
Act will not apply to the native Hawaiian governing entity, and that the governing entity
will not have gaming rights."

Case said, "This is a red-herring issue thrown out to cause concern where there is none.
This argument has three nails in its coffin, and if one more is needed, I'm happy to
hammer it home."

				
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