Retail Space for Lease in Nampa Idaho

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					       City of Nampa, Idaho




Community Development Block Grant
            Program


  2005 Consolidated Annual
 Performance and Evaluation
          Report

                    December 2006
      Economic / Community Development Department
                   411 3rd Street South
                   Nampa, Idaho 83651
                     (208) 468-5488
City of Nampa                                                                                                       CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




            City of Nampa, Community Development Block Grant
    2005 Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)
Executive Summary ................................................................................................................................... 2
2005 CDBG Financial Summary ............................................................................................................... 4
Project Descriptions and Accomplishments .............................................................................................. 5
    Project Status ....................................................................................................................................... 5
    2005 Projects ....................................................................................................................................... 7
    2004 Projects ..................................................................................................................................... 32
    2003 Projects ..................................................................................................................................... 35
    Other Projects with Activity in PY 2005 ........................................................................................... 37
Assessment of five Year Goals & Objectives
    Consolidated Plan Priorities & Objectives ........................................................................................ 40
    2005 Amendment to Consolidated Plan Priorities & Objectives ...................................................... 45
    Assessing Achievements toward Consolidated Plan Objectives ....................................................... 46
    Priority of Projects as Identified in Consolidated Plan...................................................................... 48
    Fulfilling Priorities, Objectives and Strategies .................................................................................. 49
    % of Funding Allocated to Each Priority
        Program Year 2005 ..................................................................................................................... 50
        Program Year 2004, 2003 & 2002 .........................................................................................51-53
Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area (NRSA) .............................................................................. 54
    Evaluating Benchmarks 2002-2005 .................................................................................................. 55
    Evaluating Benchmarks 2005 ............................................................................................................ 57
    Evaluating Benchmarks 2004, 2003 & 2002 ................................................................................58-60
    Collaboration and Leveraging in the NRSA...................................................................................... 61
Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing .................................................................................................... 64
Affordable Housing ................................................................................................................................. 66
Continuum of Care................................................................................................................................... 69
Other Actions
    Addressing Obstacles to Meeting Underserved Needs...................................................................... 71
    Foster & Maintain Affordable Housing ............................................................................................ 71
    Remove Barriers to Affordable Housing .......................................................................................... 72
    Develop the Community’s Institutional Structure ............................................................................ 73
    Enhance Coordination between Public & Private Housing & Social Service Agencies .................. 73
    Foster Public Housing Improvements and Resident Initiatives ........................................................ 75
    Evaluate and Reduce Lead Based Paint Hazards ............................................................................. 75
    Strategies to Reduce the Number of Poverty Level Families ............................................................ 75
    Sub-recipient Monitoring and Compliance with Program and Planning Requirements ................... 76
    Section 3 Contracting ........................................................................................................................ 77
Leveraging Resources .............................................................................................................................. 78
Citizen Comments .................................................................................................................................... 78
Self Evaluation Summary ........................................................................................................................ 78
Certifications and Other HUD requirements ........................................................................................... 80
Attachments:
        Maps (NRSA, NNU District & Downtown)
        Meeting Minutes, Handouts, & Legal Advertisement
        IDIS Report PR26 – Financial Summary & the Financial Summary Reconciliation
        IDIS Report PR03 – Activity Summary Report
        IDIS Report PR23 – Summary of Accomplishments
        IDIS Report PR06 – Summary of Consolidated Plan Projects for Report Year 2005



                                                                                                                                                               1
City of Nampa                                                            CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
As the single point of contact for U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD),
the City of Nampa Economic / Community Development Department is responsible for
developing the 5-Year Consolidated, Annual Action and Consolidated Annual Performance and
Evaluation Plans/Reports for the Community Development Block Grant.

Consolidated Plan: Every three to five years, the City of Nampa is required by law to prepare a
Consolidated Plan in order to receive federal funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development (HUD). The City of Nampa’s Consolidated Plan spanning fiscal years 2002
through 2007 is the City’s blueprint for addressing the community’s most critical housing and
community development needs.

Action Plan: For each succeeding year, the City of Nampa is required to prepare a one-year
Action Plan to notify citizens and HUD of the City’s intended actions during that particular
year. This Plan includes citizen and stakeholder input and is due to the HUD Field Office in
Portland, Oregon no later than August 15, annually. This plan was developed under the
guidelines established by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and
it serves as the application for the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program.

CAPER: At the end of each program year, the City must also prepare a Consolidated Annual
Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER) to provide information to HUD and citizens
about that year’s accomplishments. This information allows HUD, City officials, and the public
to evaluate the City’s performance and determine whether the activities undertaken during the
year helped to meet the City’s five-year goals and to address priority needs identified in the
Consolidated Plan and the Annual Action Plan. This annual performance report, prepared with
public review and comment, must be submitted to HUD annually no later than December 31.

2005 CAPER Description
The City of Nampa’s program year 2005 One-Year Action Plan covers the time period from
April 1, 2005 to September 30, 2006. During Program Year 2005, the City elected to extend the
program year from twelve months to eighteen months in order to bring the CDBG program on
the same accounting cycle as the fiscal year of the city. As a result, the CDBG 2006 Program
Year coincides with the City of Nampa’s Fiscal Year 2007.

The 2005 CAPER describes the resources expended during the program year from Federal, non-
Federal and private sources. It includes a description of the accomplishments achieved by the
activities that were undertaken to meet the stated local priorities and objectives in the Five-Year
Plan, including those designed to meet homelessness and other special needs. The CAPER also
describes actions that were undertaken to address obstacles in meeting the needs of the under-
served, removing barriers, and enhancing coordination in the community.

The strategies listed largely address the expenditure of the City’s annual Community
Development Block Grant because that funding source is known and available, however the
success of each project was largely dependent on the efforts and resources of other private and



                                                                                                   2
City of Nampa                                                             CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



public agencies and organizations, those additional resources are delineated in the project
narrative.

The actual level of funding Nampa receives from HUD is determined annually and is based upon
a formula all entitlement communities are subject to, in relation to HUD’s overall annual budget.
For program year 2005, Year Four of the Five-Year Plan, Nampa received $589,068.00 in
Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds. Because the actual level is governed by
HUD’s annual budget it is impossible to project future funding levels.

The allocation the City received for PY2005 represents an approximate 4% cut in CDBG funds
from PY2004. Larger cuts were proposed by the Whitehouse in Fiscal Year 2007’s budget
(program year 2006), as well as a proposal to end the CDBG program and shift a reduced portion
of its funds to the Department of Commerce. In all instances, however, bi-partisan efforts by
both the Senate and House of Representatives have served to maintain CDBG’s existence at
HUD and have prevented larger cuts as proposed by the Whitehouse. While CDBG remains
popular with the Congress, the prospect of larger cuts remains a distinct possibility for the future.
Budgetary constrains, desires for deeper cuts at the Executive Branch level and potential changes
to HUD’s allocation formula may result in a substantial decrease in federal funding received by
the City in years to come, which would in turn place great pressure on the City to meet its goals
as stated in its Five-Year Consolidated Plan.

Performance Measure System
HUD has, through a collaborative effort with Housing and Community Development
organizations (as well as several governmental departments), established a new standardized
performance evaluation measurement system using the new HUD initiative listed below. The
new system seeks to standardize the languages used in gauging the success of the CDBG
program, as well as to provide standardized metrics of what those successes are measured. This
new system has been implemented for Program Year 2006. However, the City of Nampa has
elected to apply this new system to all Program Year 2005 projects and for all projects that are to
remain open through the next program year. This new system is reflected in the projects,
programs or activities that the City has promoted, implemented and accomplished through the
PY 2005.

The performance measure system is based upon the following HUD initiatives:

        Create a Suitable Living Environment for its residents,
        Provide Decent Housing for its residents, and
        Create Economic Opportunities for its residents.

These initiatives are carried out by the City’s Economic / Community Development Department
(ECD) and various local agencies this Department works with as needed. These initiatives are
consistent with guidelines set-forth by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
(HUD) in accordance with the regulations governing the utilization of Federal funds and are
based upon the needs that the City has determined to exist through its own assessment and the
on-going input of Nampa residents.




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City of Nampa                                                                        CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




                        2005 CDBG FINANCIAL SUMMARY
ALLOCATIONS
PUBLIC SERVICES (15% of Entitlement Grant & 2004 Program Income):                                 $ 102835.20
   Community Family Shelter (The Salvation Army)                                                   $49,400.00
   Empowerment Education Program (Valley Crisis Center)                                            $23,826.00
   Gateway Crossing Resident Services (Neighborhood Housing)                                        $2,788.95
   Northside Neighborhood Youth Services (Academy of Delinquency)                                  $12,345.25
   CASDAP (City of Nampa, Fire Department)                                                         $14,475.00

HOUSING/COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT:                                                                    $489,892.60
   Housing Choice Voucher Homeownership Option (SICHA)                                             $43,425.00
   Nampa Family Justice Center (City of Nampa) PROJECT CANCELED                                    $60,500.00
   Gateway Neighborhood Revitalization (Neighborhood Housing)                                      $67,667.60
   Casa de la Raza (Academy of Delinquency)                                                        $66,300.00
   Downtown Nampa Façade Design (City of Nampa) 1                                                  $25,000.00
   Downtown Nampa Façade Rehabilitation (City of Nampa)2                                          $147,375.00
   Downtown Nampa Directional Signage (City of Nampa)3                                             $49,125.00
   Downtown Abandoned Sign Removal (City of Nampa)4                                                $ 5,000.00
   Library & Police Station Design Services (City of Nampa)5                                       $30,000.00
   Downtown Crosswalk Rehabilitation (City of Nampa)6                                              $56,000.00
ADMINISTRATION/PLANNING (20% of Entitlement Grant & 2005 Program Income):                         $117,813.60
CODE ENFORCEMENT:                                                                                 $150,542.99
TOTAL:                                                                                            $861,084.39
1
  A new project added to the 2005 Action Plan on March 20, 2006.
2
  Funding was increased to this project from $72,375 to $147,375 on June 16, 2006.
3
  Funding was increased to this project from $24,125 to $49,125 on June 16, 2006.
4&5
     New projects added to the 2005 Action Plan on June 16, 2006.
6
  A new project added to the 2005 Action Plan on September 22, 2006.

                  SOURCE COMPONENTS OF 2005 ACTION PLAN FUNDS
     $589,068.00         CDBG Annual Entitlement
     $194,579.16         Project Carryover
       $5,260.75         2003 Program Income
      $48,624.99         2004 Program Income
      $23,551.49         2005 Program Income
    $861,084.39          TOTAL FUNDS ALLOCATED IN 2005 ACTION PLAN

                           DISTRIBUTION OF FUNDS
SECTOR                                ALLOCATED                                  % OF ENTITLEMENT
Program Planning and Administration     $117,813.60                                     13.7%
Public Services                         $102,835.20                                     11.9%
Housing and Community Development       $640,435.59                                      N/A


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City of Nampa                                                                       CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




                     2005 ACTION PLAN PROJECT STATUS
Projects                        Location            Beneficiary       Allocated       Project      Amount         Amount
                                                    Households /      Funding         Status       Drawn          Left to
                                                    Individuals                                    To Date       Drawdown
Salvation Army – Community      1412 4th St. S.     900 Individuals   $49,400.00     Completed     $49,400.00    $0.00
Family Shelter, Operations      City-wide                                             9/30/06
Valley Crisis Center –          Suppressed               1,000        $23,826.00     Completed     $14,823.11    ---------------
Empowerment Education           City-wide             Individuals                     9/30/06
Gateway Crossing Resident       511 6th Road N.     425 Individuals   $ 2,788.95      Contract     $0.00         $2,788.95
Services                        N.R.S.A                                               Extended
                                                                                     to 9/30/07
Academy of Delinquency -        N.R.S.A.            50 Individuals    $12,345.25     Completed     $12,345.25    $0.00
Northside Neighborhood Youth                                                           9/30/06
Services
SICHA - Housing Choice          1108 W. Finch       9 Households      $43,425.00      Contract     $5,000.00     $38,425.00
Voucher Homeownership           City-wide                                             Extended
                                                                                     to 9/30/07
Nampa Family Justice Center     1305 3rd St. S.     350 Individuals   $0.00           Canceled     $0.00         $0.00
                                City-wide
Neighborhood Housing            N.R.S.A.            6 Households      $67,667.60      Contract     $0.00         $67,667.60
Services - Gateway                                                                   extended to
Neighborhood Revitalization                                                            9/30/07
Nampa Fire Department -         NNU                    1129           $14,475.00      Contract     $6,221.29     $8,253.71
CASDAP                          Neighborhood         Households                      extended to
                                                                                       9/30/07
Academy of Delinquency –        N.R.S.A.            50 Individuals    $66,300.00      Contract     $0.00         $66,300.00
Casa de la Raza                                                                      extended to
                                                                                       8/31/07
City of Nampa - Downtown        Central Nampa            N/A          $25,000.00      Contract     $7,656.00     $17,344.00
Nampa Façade Design             Revitalization       (Slum/blight)                   extended to
                                Area (CNRA) –                                          9/30/07
                                Historic District
City of Nampa - Downtown        CNRA – Historic          N/A          $147,375.00     Contract     $4,991.00     $142,384.00
Nampa Façade Rehabilitation1    District             (Slum/blight)                   extended to
                                                                                       9/30/07
City of Nampa - Downtown        CNRA                     N/A          $49,125.00      Contract     $0.00         $49,125.00
Nampa Directional Signage2                           (Slum/blight)                   extended to
                                                                                       9/30/07
City of Nampa - Downtown        CNRA                     N/A          $5,000.00       Contract     $0.00         $5,000.00
Nampa Abandoned Sign                                 (Slum/blight)                   extended to
Removal                                                                                9/30/07
City of Nampa – Library &       City Wide                             $30,000.00      Contract     $0.00         $30,000.00
Central Police Station Design                                                        extended to
                                                                                       9/30/07
City of Nampa - Downtown        CNRA                     N/A          $56,000.00      Contract     $0.00         $56,000.00
Nampa Crosswalk                                      (Slum/blight)                   extended to
Rehabilitation                                                                         9/30/07
Code Enforcement –              N.R.S.A./ NNU          2,000          $150,542.99    Completed     $147,841.86 ---------------
Neighborhood                                         Households                       9/30/06
City Administration / Fair      City-wide                N/A          $117,813.60    Completed     $115,330.32 ---------------
Housing / Planning Activities                                                         9/30/06
TOTAL:                                                                $861,084.39                  $363,608.83 $494,763.56




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City of Nampa                                                                                  CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



PROJECTS STILL OPEN FROM PROGRAM YEAR 2004
Gateway Neighborhood                    N.R.S.A.                 6 Families      $35,000.00      Contract     $35,000.00   $0.00
Revitalization (Phase 1)                                                                        extended to
                                                                                                  9/30/07
ADA Sidewalk Improvements               N.R.S.A.                   8,400         $75,000.00      Contract     $0.00        $75,000.00
                                                                Individuals                     extended to
                                                                                                  9/30/07
Syringa House, Street                   Horton Ave.            24 Individuals    $75,169.00      Contract     $0.00        $75,169.00
Improvements                            City-Wide                                               extended to
                                                                                                  9/30/07
TOTAL:                                                                           $185,169.00                  $35,000.00   $150,169.00
PROJECTS STILL OPEN FROM PROGRAM YEAR 2003
Majestic Theater Roof Repair            210 12th Ave. S.           N/A           $169,760.00     Contract     $165,501.40 $4,258.60
                                                               (Slum/blight)                    extended to
                                                                                                  9/30/07
TOTAL:                                                                           $169,760.00                  $165,501.40 $4,258.60

1
    Funding was increased to this project from $72,375 to $147,375 on June 16, 2006
2
    Funding was increased to this project from $24,125 to $49,125 on June 16, 2006




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City of Nampa                                                            CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




2005 PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

SALVATION ARMY OF NAMPA – COMMUNITY FAMILY SHELTER, OPERATIONS
Area Served: City –Wide
Allocated    $49,400         Amount Drawndown: $49,400
Funding:
Project Status:    Completed 9/30/06        Beneficiaries:            1333 Individuals
National           Benefit to LMI Persons (Limited Clientele – Housing Activities)
Objective:
City Objective:    Public Services: Objective Four: Maintain or improve the provision of
                   housing and supportive services to individuals and families to transition
                   along the continuum of care.
City Priority:     High
Performance        Objective category:
Measurement           Suitable Living Environment       Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                   Outcome category:
                      Availability/Accessibility        Affordability         Sustainability
Additional         United Way, Nampa Shelter Foundation, Contributions, Emergency Shelter
Resources:         Grant Program, Supportive Housing Program, FEMA
$ Leveraged:       Total Budget = $581,769          CDBG = 8.5%

The Salvation Army of Nampa requested CDBG funds to assist them in the offsetting the
operational costs of the Community Family Shelter (CFS), the only permanent shelter and
temporary housing facility for homeless families and single women in the nine county area.
The funds requested represent only 8.5 % of the total operational budget. Contributions from the
United Way, Emergency Shelter Grant, Supportive Housing Program, FEMA, the Nampa Shelter
Foundation, and Salvation Army donations comprise the rest of the budget. The Community
Family Shelter runs several programs to assist families and individuals in their quest for stable
housing, employment and self-sufficiency: 1) Provide food and shelter to homeless families and
children from Nampa and nine of the ten counties in southwestern Idaho; 2) Provide case
management and require accountability of all program participants; 3) Provide resources that will
enable clients to maintain hygiene, obtain employment, obtain housing and meet other needs; 4)
Facilitate the transition from homelessness to self-sufficiency for families and single women; and
5) Provide meals, showers, laundry facilities, job training, access to telephones and access to
computers for homeless or at-risk of homeless persons who are not residents of the CFS in order
to help them maintain, or obtain, employment and remain self-sufficient.

The Salvation Army Community Family Shelter (CFS) opened March 1, 2002. The facility,
located at 4th St. and 14th Avenue South in Nampa, can house 12 to 13 families and 4 to 8 single
women for a period of six months to two years depending on their progress towards self-
sufficiency. The Community Family Shelter is approximately 9,000 square feet including eight
family sleeping rooms. In addition, there are two rooms with four beds in each room to
accommodate, dorm-style, eight single homeless women. This project includes a commercial



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City of Nampa                                                                    CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



kitchen, dining room, emergency day shelter, separate communal bathrooms with showers for
men and women, offices for counseling, intakes, administration; a one-bedroom apartment for
the on site resident manager; common areas for shelter residents and an inside play area for
children; laundry facilities; reception area; storage; fenced yard and play area for children; and
adequate parking spaces. An estimated 44 – 50 individuals can be housed daily.

The shelter opened on March 1, 2002, housing two families on the first night. The shelter
continually increased in the number of families it housed until June, 2002, when it reached its
capacity, housing 13 families and four single women. Since June of 2002 the Shelter has been
operating at or near its capacity. The CFS is housing approximately 45 – 56 individuals each
night.

In addition to housing, CFS offers a comprehensive program that includes a day resource center
for all homeless and at risk of homeless persons, the Jobs Program, social skills classes, and case management.
The program provides emergency shelter and supportive services to homeless families and single
women, with self-sufficiency and permanent housing as the final objectives. The day resource center is
open to non-shelter residents and serves approximately 70-80 non-resident homeless persons and
persons at risk of becoming homeless, per day.

In 2005, the Community Family Shelter recorded the following results.
          2179 hungry persons had access to food, met their personal hygiene needs, and had access
           to laundry facilities, which enabled them to be better prepared for job interviews and
           employment.
          32 families and 9 single women found permanent housing.
          67% of participating clients found employment.
          11% of participating clients increased their savings.
          67% of participating clients found childcare and/or transportation.

During this last year, the Community Family Shelter has been able expand their partnerships with
some new businesses that have entered the community. In partnering with the new Costco store they
have built partnerships with other Social Service Agencies, sharing muffins, pastries and breads to
supplement their own food supplies and increasing their ability to serve the community.

An example of the success of the Community Family Shelter in PY 2005 involves a young single
woman who moved into the Shelter in March 06. She was loosing a battle with alcoholism that had
cost her a job and her home. As part of her recovery she worked intensely with her case manager and
house managers, to avoid alcohol. With the support she received from the Community Family
Shelter, she was able to attend weekly counseling and attend regular AA meetings. She was able to
save enough money and given enough access to outside resources that she was able to move out into
an apartment of her own. She now volunteers part time at a local retirement community and has just
celebrated her ninth month of sobriety.

A second example of a success story concerns a young boisterous family of seven. The mother,
father and five sons came to live at the Shelter in July of 2005. They stayed at the Shelter for several


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City of Nampa                                                               CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



months well into 2006, working towards employment and saving enough money to move out. With
the support of staff, adequate food and housing and weekly case management meetings, eventually
both parents, became employed, moved to a large 3 bedroom townhouse and have remained
economically stable and self-sufficient since.


VALLEY CRISIS CENTER – EMPOWERMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM
Area Served:  City –Wide
Allocated            $23,826.00                  Amount Drawndown:           $14,823.11
Funding:
Project Status:      Completed 9/30/06           Beneficiaries:              3,897 Individuals
National             Benefit to LMI Persons (Limited Clientele)
Objective:
City Objective:      Public Services Priority: Objective Five: Support education, counseling and
                     other services to help reduce domestic violence.
City Priority:       High
Performance          Objective category:
Measurement            Suitable Living Environment         Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                     Outcome category:
                       Availability/Accessibility          Affordability         Sustainability
Additional           Idaho Council on Domestic Violence, Emergency Shelter Grant Program,
Resources:           Supportive Housing Program, and in-kind contributions.
$ Leveraged:         Total Budget = $75,240          CDBG = 19.7%

CDBG funds were used to help fund a certified counselor and staff to teach a variety of classes
within the Valley Crisis Center’s Empowerment Education Program. These classes included
“Pattern Changing for Abused Women,” “Safety Planning,” “Parenting,” and other support
groups for domestic abuse victims and their children. There are other social service agencies in
the area that offer training in basic life and job skills, but VCC is the only facility that addresses
the special needs unique to victims of domestic violence. VCC recognized the need for a
complete and balanced program that not only addresses the client’s trauma but also helps them
rebuild a successful life with their children.

The Valley Crisis Center (VCC) is a non-profit domestic violence shelter/program located in
Nampa. VCC serves the victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and child abuse in Nampa
as well as Idaho’s Region III comprised of rural areas in the six southwestern Idaho counties. It
is the mission of VCC to provide shelter, services, and self-help programs to anyone who is a
victim of domestic violence, helping to break the cycle of violence in the family and for clients
to learn to lead healthy and productive lives.

2912 women participated in VCC’s Empowerment Education Program. Additionally, 985
persons accessed housing through their domestic violence shelter. This is for a total of 3,897
persons assisted by VCC.



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City of Nampa                                                             CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



CDBG funds were used in conjunction with a grant from the Supportive Housing Program and
the Council on Domestic Violence to fund this much needed educational program. Funds were
used for the salary of a certified counselor at the beginning of the program. However, with the
increase in staff and skills, the program facilitation was brought in-house and provided by VCC
staff. Therefore, all funds originally allocated were not needed and the project closed. All unused
funds will be reallocated to other projects.

An example of the success of the Valley Crisis Center in PY 2005 revolves around a mother of
three who came to the shelter in early 2005. She had no confidence in her ability to be
successful on her own after listening to years of her husband telling her she was stupid and
would fail at everything she tried. Despite her fears that she couldn’t make it on her own, she
continued with groups and counseling, eventually enrolling in nursing school. She entered the
Transitional Housing Program and moved into the first home she had lived in as an independent
adult. When as opening occurred at the VCC for a residential aide, she applied and was
accepted. Twenty months later, she continues to be one of the best residential aides at VCC and
is only four months away from graduating from nursing school.


NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING SERVICES, INC. - GATEWAY CROSSING RESIDENT
SERVICES
Area Served: Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area (N.R.S.A.)
Allocated           $2,788.95                   Amount Drawndown:          $0.00
Funding:
Project Status:     Contract Extended to        Beneficiaries:             107 Individuals
                    September 30, 2007
National            Benefit to LMI Persons (Area Basis)
Objective:
City Objective:     Housing Priority: Objective One: Increase participation and involvement by
                    residents in planning, developing and implementing activities that will affect
                    their families and neighborhoods.
City Priority:      High
Performance         Objective category:
Measurement           Suitable Living Environment        Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                    Outcome category:
                      Availability/Accessibility         Affordability         Sustainability
Additional          Local Contributions, In-Kind, Neighborhood Housing Services, Inc.
Resources:
$ Leveraged:        NA

Neighborhood Housing Services, Inc. requested CDBG funds to expand their residential services
program at Gateway Crossing, a 72 unit affordable multifamily community in Nampa’s
Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area. New services provided by this grant included
educational assistance, transportation assistance, youth activities, Food Bank Program, and



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City of Nampa                                                              CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



community garden supplies. Through its Resident Services, Gateway Crossing has managed to
transform its community from one of depression and fear to one of ownership and family.

The beneficiaries of this project are families living at Gateway Crossing, a 72-unit affordable
multifamily community in the North Nampa neighborhood (NRSA). Gateway residents earn 60% of
below area median income. In addition, the project also serves residents living in the surrounding
neighborhood.

In 1998, Neighborhood Housing Services (NHS) built Gateway Crossing in North Nampa, one of the
most depressed neighborhoods in Nampa. During its first year of operation, the property experienced
challenges with crime, disorder, gang and drug activity. Police calls averaged over 300 per year and
the complex suffered significant damage from vandalism and graffiti. Residents did not feel safe and
were afraid for their children to play outside.

This project did not progress as anticipated. Funding awarded in PY 2004 was not utilized as
anticipated and changes in staff and responsibilities at Gateway Crossing Apartments and
Neighborhood Housing Services occurred. Funding for PY 2005 was not made available for the
resident services program until the PY 2004 project was completed. As a result, the contract on this
project has been extended to September 30, 2007.


ACADEMY OF DELINQUENCY – NORTHSIDE NEIGHBORHOOD YOUTH
SERVICES
Area Served: Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area (N.R.S.A.)
Allocated           $12,345.25                  Amount Drawndown:           $12,345.25
Funding:
Project Status:     Completed 9/30/06        Beneficiaries:                 105 Individuals
National            Benefit to LMI Persons (Limited Clientele)
Objective:
City Objective:     Public Services Priority, Objective Six – Assist community based
                    organizations to serve at risk youth specifically in LMI neighborhoods.
City Priority:      High
Performance         Objective category:
Measurement           Suitable Living Environment         Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                    Outcome category:
                      Availability/Accessibility          Affordability         Sustainability
Additional          Nampa Urban Renewal Agency, the Catholic Health Initiative Grant, OG’s
Resources:          Basic Academy of Delinquency, and local contributions
$ Leveraged:        Total Budget = $95,345          CDBG = 13%

The goal of this project is to provide targeted youth prone to gang-involvement in the North
Nampa Revitalization Strategy Area with alternatives to the public school education process,
recreational opportunities and job training classes as a community tool for gang prevention.



                                                                                                    11
City of Nampa                                                           CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



The City of Nampa has experienced a spiked increase in gang activity in the past several years.
In October, 2002, the City of Nampa was identified by the Boys & Girls Club of America and
the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) as being in the top three in
the nation (behind Anchorage and San Francisco) for needing gang prevention and intervention
programs. OG’s Basic Academy of Delinquency was established under the auspices of the
Boys & Girls Club of Nampa in late 2002. For eighteen months, the Boys & Girls Club
successfully ran a Gang Prevention Through Targeted Outreach initiative out of the River city
Racquet Club, with the goal of reaching 50 youth. That goal was exceeded by 50%, but the
Boys & Girls Club determined that the cost of addressing the needs of this target population
(teen youth in trouble) was more than the Club could spend on a long-term basis. OG’s Basic
Academy of Delinquency was formed during the summer of 2004 to continue to provide gang
prevention and intervention programming to these targeted youth.

OG’s Basic Academy of Delinquency provides targeted youth who are prone to gang
involvement with alternatives to a gang lifestyle. GITTO employs three objectives in attaining
its purpose of gang intervention. The first objective is to provide targeted youth with
alternatives to the public school educational process from which they have dropped, been
expelled or been suspended. The curriculum varies according to the need of the targeted youth:
study for high school credits or GED exams. The second objective is to provide youth with job
skill training, using on-the-job mentoring from OG’s Basic Academy of Delinquency volunteers
and community partners. The third objective is the gang intervention strategy to provide
targeted youth with appropriate recreational and social activities.

OG’s Basic Academy of Delinquency had experienced a significant success rate. Over the
course of the program year, they have served 105 target youth. In addition to the success with
these youth they were also able to establish community partnerships with churches and
businesses and a local technical school. These partnerships allow OG’s Basic Academy of
Delinquency to continue to provide their graduates with meaningful careers rather than high
turnover jobs. The training offered at the technical school in welding has expanded their
partnerships in to manufacturing plants that are willing to pay for the students welding training
to get a certified welder upon graduation. OG’s Basic Academy of Delinquency requires an
application form that tracks family size and income.

An example of the success of the OG’s Basic Academy of Delinquency in PY 2005 revolves
around a youth who came to Idaho looking to get away from the gangs and streets of Las Vegas.
She came to OG’s Basic Academy of Delinquency because her sister have been referred to them
by a local police officer in the Gang Unit. After many months of hard work and studying, she
received her GED and is now attending Boise State University. Another such story revolved
around a young man who was active in a gang in Nampa, frequently getting into fights at
school. After spending almost three years in the program, studying and working on the
community work crews, he received his GED and is not working as a reporter intern for a local
newspaper. He intends to continue his education and get a degree in journalism.




                                                                                                 12
City of Nampa                                                            CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



SOUTHWEST IDAHO COOPERATIVE HOUSING AUTHORITY – HOUSING
CHOICE VOUCHER HOME OWNERSHIP OPTION
Area Served: City –Wide
Allocated           $43,425.00                Amount Drawndown:           $5,000.00
Funding:
Project Status:     Contract extended to      Beneficiaries:              1 Household (Very Low
                    September 30, 2007                                    Income)
National            Benefit to LMI Persons (Limited Clientele - Housing)
Objective:
City Objective:     Housing Development Priority, Objective Two: Extend technical assistance
                    support to potential housing service providers as a means to encourage new
                    assistance programs for owners and renters in focus areas of homeownership,
                    self-help, rehabilitation, and new developments.
City Priority:      High
Performance         Objective category:
Measurement           Suitable Living Environment       Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                    Outcome category:
                      Availability/Accessibility        Affordability         Sustainability
Additional          HUD Section 8, HUD Housing Choice Voucher, HOME Funds grant, Idaho
Resources:          Housing and Finance Association.
$ Leveraged:        NA

CDBG funds are being used as a one-time assistance grant for qualifying disabled families,
qualifying elderly and Family Self-Sufficiency participants to enable homeownership for up to 9
families. The purpose of this project is to promote and support homeownership for qualified
disabled families through gap financing grants. Funds can be used for home inspection costs,
buying down the mortgage loan, down payment assistance and closing costs.

The Housing Choice Voucher Homeownership Option (HCVHO) is a Southwestern Idaho
Cooperative Housing Authority (SICHA) program that allows a disabled person or family with a
disabled family member, qualifying elderly and Family Self-Sufficiency participants, who
receive Section 8 rental assistance to use their Housing Choice Voucher towards the purchase of
a home. Benefits of homeownership for families include equity investment, tax advantages,
stable housing costs along with a greater choice of neighborhoods, the pride of ownership and
improved accessibility accommodation.

Unfortunately, with escalating housing prices many of the families discovered that they were
having a hard time finding a quality home accessible to their needs in their price ranges. Most of
the families could only afford $70,000 - $85,000 homes. In Nampa, there is limited number of
houses in this price range; those in this price range are dominated by historic housing stock
which is often not friendly to disabled accommodations or is limited in number of bedrooms.

SICHA maintained open communication with the City of Nampa’s Community Development
Department with the obstacles that they were encountering, and after an extensive consideration


                                                                                                  13
City of Nampa                                                           CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



modified the contract to increase the amount of funding available per family for the one-time
assistance grant. This has resulted in the number of families that can be assisted to decrease
from 9 to 5. Additionally, the City of Nampa elected to extend SICHA’s contract through March
31, 2007. In addition to the one family that has already purchased a home, a second family will
be purchasing a home in mid-October and four families are actively looking.

The anticipated outcome of this program will be to assist up to 6 or more families within Nampa
achieve homeownership. This homeownership opportunity will ultimately affect the lives of
approximately 18 to 25 family members. The targeted beneficiaries of the HCVHO are the
families who currently receive Section 8 rental assistance in the City of Nampa who are disabled,
elderly or participating in SICHA’s Family Self-Sufficiency Program.


NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING SERVICES, INC. – GATEWAY NEIGHBORHOOD
REVITALIZATION PROJECT (Phase 2)
Area Served: City-Wide and N.R.S.A
Allocated          $67,667.60                 Amount Drawndown:          $       0.00
Funding:
Project Status:    Contract extended to       Beneficiaries:             6 Households
                   September 30, 2007
National           Benefit to LMI Persons (Housing Activities)
Objective:
City Objective:    Housing Priority: Objective Three: Encourage new construction
                   development throughout LMI neighborhoods to meet the needs of
                   individuals and families.
City Priority:     High
Performance        Objective category:
Measurement          Suitable Living Environment       Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                   Outcome category:
                     Availability/Accessibility        Affordability         Sustainability
Additional         HOME, Idaho Housing and Finance Association
Resources:
$ Leveraged:       Total Budget = $661,050               CDBG = 10%

Neighborhood Housing Services, Inc. requested CDBG funds to help purchase 4-6 lots in the
North Nampa Revitalization Strategy Area to develop affordable homeownership opportunities
for low and moderate income residents of the neighborhood. In the past year, Neighborhood
Housing Services diligently researched and surveyed available properties with no luck. As a
result, NHS applied to the city in PY 2006 for more funds to assist in the purchase of property
and infrastructure development costs. The City of Nampa has extended the contract for this
project to September 30, 2007.

The Gateway Neighborhood Revitalization, Phase II is to be a redevelopment effort by
Neighborhood Housing Services in collaboration with the neighborhood to provide more


                                                                                                 14
City of Nampa                                                            CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



opportunities for home ownership as a means of revitalizing the North Nampa Revitalization
Strategy Area. The area has experienced considerable disinvestment over the past 20 years.
Existing housing opportunities are generally substandard rental or overcrowded situations.
Estimated median incomes in the area are below 50% of the AMI for the City of Nampa. NHS
will provide homebuyer education and counseling as well as additional funding through the NHS
Lending second mortgage program if supplemental funding is required.

With rising property costs and construction costs that have occurred in the past few years as well
as the expected floodplain expansion, the City of Nampa has requested NHS to revisit this
project to evaluate the viability of new construction versus extensive rehabilitation of existing
housing stock. They have been requested to visit with their other funding agencies to determine
the viability of either project.


NAMPA FIRE DEPARTMENT – CASDAP
Area Served: NNU District
Allocated           $14,475.00                 Amount Drawndown:          $ 6,221.29
Funding:
Project Status:     Contract extended to       Beneficiaries:             1129 Households
                    September 30, 2007
National            Benefit to LMI Persons (Housing Activities)
Objective:
City Objective:     Housing Priority: Objective Four, Strategy A: Continued limited
                    rehabilitation program for smoke detectors throughout LMI neighborhoods to
                    increase safety and preserve life.
City Priority:      High
Performance         Objective category:
Measurement           Suitable Living Environment       Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                    Outcome category:
                      Availability/Accessibility        Affordability         Sustainability
Additional          Fire Fighter labor force
Resources:
$ Leveraged:        Total Budget = $14,475.00             CDBG = 100%

CASDAP is a City of Nampa Fire Department program to install smoke detectors and 6” address
numbers on homes in the city’s LMI neighborhoods as a means of preventing fire and life safety
issues. Local firemen go door-to-door throughout the neighborhood inquiring if the resident
needs smoke detectors and address numbers. If needed, smoke detectors and address numbers
are immediately installed and the firemen visit with the residents about any additional fire
prevention issues that they may observe. With this done, hopefully the number of fire related
calls in the neighborhood will be reduced by the early warning of fire with the smoke detectors
and the 6” address numbers will improve the ability of the fire crews to locate the targeted homes
in cases of emergencies.



                                                                                                  15
City of Nampa                                                          CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



In 2001, this program was implemented as a pilot program in the North Nampa Neighborhood
Revitalization Strategy Area. The program was so well received by both the residents and the
fire crews alike, that it was decided to continue the program in other targeted LMI
neighborhoods. The Northwest Nazarene University Neighborhood was chosen due to the new
code enforcement presence in that area as well as the propensity of older homes.

The installation of the detectors and address numbers are tracked in the Fire Department’s
NFIRS database. During this program year, 106 homes have been visited, 329 detectors have
been installed in 96 homes and 14 homes have had new address numbers attached. CDBG funds
are used to purchase the detectors and address numbers. The Fire Department, using city funds,
installs them as necessary.

As a result of these efforts the City of Nampa Fire Department has documented at least 1 life
saved as a direct result of the program. In August, the Nampa Fire Department responded to a
call of a cooking/stove top fire. The resident stated she had been cooking on the stove top, but
had left the kitchen and had fallen asleep. She woke to the sound of her smoke detectors going
off and she found the pan of food caught fire. The homeowner stated the fire went out when she
turned off the stove. Nampa Fire Department was called out to ensure the fire was completely
out on the electric stove that the pot was being heated on.

The smoke detectors that awoke the sleeping homeowner where installed by the Nampa Fire
Department this year with the help of funding from a Community Development Block Grant.
This is a true depiction of the good things that can and do happen as a result of the work
accomplished by the Nampa Fire Department and Community Block Grants. A simple smoke
detector installation, in this case, may have saved a life.

The Fire Department experienced a change in and expansion of staffing this year that resulted in
the need to postpone the program implementation to accommodate the training needs. As a
result, the City of Nampa has extended the contract for this project until September 30, 2007.

ACADEMY OF DELINQUENCY – CASA DE LA RAZA
Area Served: N.R.S.A
Allocated    $66,300.00       Amount Drawndown:                          $      0.00
Funding:
Project Status:    Contract extended to       Beneficiaries:             50 Individuals
                   August 31, 2007
National           Benefit to LMI Persons (Area Benefit)
Objective:
City Objective:    Public Services Priority, Objective Six – Assist community based
                   organizations to serve at risk youth specifically in LMI neighborhoods;
                   Community Development Priority: Objective Three: Invest in public
                   facilities in targeted LMI neighborhoods to provide a safe environment for
                   people to live.
City Priority:     High



                                                                                                16
City of Nampa                                                            CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




Performance         Objective category:
Measurement           Suitable Living Environment       Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                    Outcome category:
                      Availability/Accessibility        Affordability         Sustainability
Additional          OG Basic Academy of Delinquency
Resources:
$ Leveraged:        Total Budget = $900,000               CDBG = 7%

The goal of this project is to provide targeted youth prone to gang-involvement in the North
Nampa Revitalization Strategy Area with alternatives to the public school education process,
recreational opportunities and job training classes as a community tool for gang prevention by
finding a permanent home for the OG’s Basic Academy of Delinquency.

The original property identified in the application was sold before grant funds were made
available. However, after many months of searching for another suitable site and making
unaccepted offers, OG’s Basic Academy of Delinquency began searching for additional partners.
In August, OG’s Basic Academy of Delinquency secured enough funding and through
researching of multiple locations, has finally identified a potential site. The environmental
review of the property is about to begin on the identified property. If the environmental review
is cleared, the purchase of the property is anticipated for late November or early December.
OG’s Basic Academy of Delinquency will then begin operating in the facility that is move-in
ready. It is anticipated that services will begin to be provide in late winter/early spring at the
new facility. As a result, the City of Nampa has extended the contract until September 30, 2007.


CITY OF NAMPA – DOWNTOWN NAMPA FAÇADE DESIGN
Area Served: Central Nampa Revitalization Area – Historic District
Allocated    $25,000.00             Amount Drawndown: $ 7,656.00
Funding:
Project Status:     Contract extended to        Beneficiaries:            NA
                    September 30, 2007
National            Slum & Blight (Area Basis)
Objective:
City Objective:     Community Development Priority, Objective Six, Strategy B: Invest in the
                    rehabilitation of commercial facades as designated by the Downtown Action
                    Plan.
City Priority:      High
Performance         Objective category:
Measurement           Suitable Living Environment       Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                    Outcome category:
                      Availability/Accessibility        Affordability         Sustainability
Additional          Idaho Heritage Trust Fund
Resources:
$ Leveraged:        Total Budget = $30,000                CDBG = 83%


                                                                                                  17
City of Nampa                                                             CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



The goal of this project is to help market the Downtown Nampa Façade Rehabilitation Matching
Grant. A consultant was hired to compile a list of priority structures for the façade rehabilitation
program based on a developed list of criteria, such as: maximum impact for lowest investment,
maximum impact, most visible project, etc. The consultant provides each property owner on the
priority property list a before and after rendering of the project with estimated costs.

During PY 2005 12 designs were completed and 12 are expected to be completed in PY 2006.
Additionally, the City of Nampa continues to pursue additional funding to assist with design
services. The City has applied for an additional $5,000 from Idaho Heritage Trust Fund to
augment the existing funding. As such, the contract has been extended for the project to
September 30, 2007.


CITY OF NAMPA – DOWNTOWN NAMPA FAÇADE REHABILITATION
MATCHING GRANT
Area Served: Central Nampa Revitalization Area – Historic District
Allocated           $147,375.00                 Amount Drawndown:          $    4,991.00
Funding:
Project Status:     Contract extended to        Beneficiaries:             NA
                    September 30, 2007
National            Slum & Blight (Area Basis)
Objective:
City Objective:     Community Development Priority, Objective Six, Strategy B: Invest in the
                    rehabilitation of commercial facades as designated by the Downtown Action
                    Plan.
City Priority:      High
Performance         Objective category:
Measurement           Suitable Living Environment        Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                    Outcome category:
                      Availability/Accessibility         Affordability         Sustainability
Additional          Private Investment
Resources:
$ Leveraged:        Total Budget = $294,750.00             CDBG = 50%

The purpose of this project is to arrest the decline and deterioration of Nampa’s Historic
Downtown District through a Façade Rehabilitation Matching Grant program. As the city of
Nampa embarks on an ambitious downtown revitalization project as outlined in the Downtown
Nampa Revitalization Blueprint, the Façade Rehabilitation Matching Grant program was chosen
as one of the first projects to implement due to its high impact and low private/public investment.

In 2004, the City of Nampa, recognizing the deterioration of its historic downtown brought in a
consultant to design a blueprint of activities that would help to alleviate the conditions as
described above, and develop a downtown where Nampa residents could live, work and play.
One of the actions identified as a phase one priority was the restoration of the Nampa’s Historic


                                                                                                   18
City of Nampa                                                            CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



Downtown district’s commercial facades in order to stimulate community interest and
investment in this downtown historic district. In order to facilitate this project, the City of
Nampa elected to provide a matching grant (1:1), up to $30,000, to property owners per property
as an incentive to participate in this program and as a means to help offset the additional costs of
historic preservation. Most of the project budgets have come in as a 2:1 match, therefore
increasing the amount of private investment directed to our downtown district.

Properties that will be deemed eligible to participate in the Façade Rehabilitation Matching
Grant Program must be located within the boundaries of the designated slum and blighted area
and one of the following: 1) On the National Register of Historic Places; 2) Considered a
contributing structure in a National Register of Historic Places Historic District or 3) Be
considered eligible for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. Each project goes
through a two part review process. Each project is first reviewed by the City’s Historical
Preservation Commission and then by the State Historical Preservation Office.

Three of the contributing factors leading to the slum and blighted conditions in the downtown as
outlined in the City of Nampa’s downtown slum and blight report are as follows:

        Existence of vacant and abandoned buildings.
        Unattractive, architecturally unsympathetic façade “improvements”
        Underutilized property

This project began late due to the need of meeting the HUD Slum & Blight designation
requirements and contracting for design services. Once the boundaries for the area and
documentation had been completed, the City of Nampa began promoting the program. The
program has been so successful that we increased the allocation from $72,375 to $147,375.
Two of our success stories revolve around the reinvestment into our underutilized properties and
the occupancy of vacant and abandoned buildings. include the rehabilitation of one of our
downtown buildings that served an old storehouse for fixtures leasing at $3.72 sq/ft. With the
revitalization efforts, this building has been converted to a Boise based retail business expansion,
resulting in a lease of over $13 per square foot. This property owner also invested well over
$300,000 in interior improvements. Another of our project involves the rehabilitation of a
building that has sat vacant for over 15 years. This building will be redeveloped into
professional office space and a restaurant.

To date, we have signed 2 contracts for façade rehabilitation. One has already begun
reconstruction of the façade with 4 others completing their environmental review. Additionally,
2 are in the pipelines for contract execution. These 8 projects result in a 100% commitment of
the entire projects funds. Additionally, the City of Nampa has obtained $38,000 to use on other,
smaller, non-preservation, projects to help to revitalize the downtown.


CITY OF NAMPA – DOWNTOWN NAMPA DIRECTIONAL SIGNAGE
Area Served: Central Nampa Revitalization Area – Historic District
Allocated           $49,125.00                  Amount Drawndown:          $      0.00
Funding:


                                                                                                  19
City of Nampa                                                             CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




Project Status:      Contract extended to       Beneficiaries:             NA
                     September 30, 2007
National             Slum & Blight (Area Basis)
Objective:
City Objective:      Economic Development Priority, Objective Two: Make infrastructure
                     improvement to correct and improve public right of ways as a means to
                     retain and attract businesses
City Priority:       High
Performance          Objective category:
Measurement            Suitable Living Environment       Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                     Outcome category:
                       Availability/Accessibility        Affordability         Sustainability
Additional           City of Nampa
Resources:
$ Leveraged:         Total Budget = $53,125.00             CDBG = 92%

The purpose of this project would be to develop and install directional signage in the City of
Nampa’s downtown historic district which has been locally designated as a slum and blighted
area under Idaho State Statute 50-2903 (8) (b) to help arrest the current state of deterioration and
economic underdevelopment.

In addition to the state of deteriorated and/or deteriorating buildings, Nampa’s downtown street
layout is currently so confusing that most travelers (both resident and out-of-town) to the area
either do not know how to find the downtown or how to access it. With such conditions,
Nampa’s historic downtown district is one of the most devalued commercial areas in the city,
with some of the prime ground floor retail space being leased out for warehouse storage.

In 2004, the City of Nampa, recognizing the deterioration of its historic downtown brought in a
consultant to design a blueprint of activities that would help to alleviate the deteriorating
conditions, and develop a downtown where Nampa residents could live, work and play. One of
the actions identified is a signage program.

One of the contributing factors leading to the slum and blighted conditions in the downtown as
outlined in the City of Nampa’s downtown slum and blight report is as follows:

        Inadequate infrastructure in the form of open spaces, right-of-way improvements,
         streetscape amenities, and wayfinding.

Currently there is very little extant signage directing both residents and travelers to downtown
Nampa from any of the main arterials, and upon arrival in the downtown core, there is very little
extant wayfinding signage directing travelers through the maze of one-way streets and principal
arterials that circumvent downtown Nampa, and little or no signage directing travelers to
downtown parking. This lack of signage and street confusion contributes to the state of slum and
blight in the downtown historic district by substantially impairing the economic sound growth of



                                                                                                   20
City of Nampa                                                             CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



the downtown area. It is the intent of this project to help arrest that economic decline by
installing a signage program.

This project began late due to the need of meeting the HUD Slum & Blight designation
requirements. Once boundaries for the area and documentation had been completed, the City of
Nampa negotiated for services to develop the new signage. The City of Nampa has already
procured the design services, however, the quote for production came in higher than anticipated.
The City of Nampa increased the CDBG allocation from $24,125 to $49,125 to ensure the
signage could be completed. The city is currently in the final stages of discussions about right of
way issues with the Idaho Transportation Department and it is anticipated that the signage will
be in place Summer 2007. The City of Nampa has extended the contract for this project to
September 30, 2007.


CITY OF NAMPA – ABANDONED SIGN REMOVAL
Area Served: Central Nampa Revitalization Area
Allocated           $5,000.00                  Amount Drawndown:           $     0.00
Funding:
Project Status:     Contract extended to       Beneficiaries:              NA
                    September 30, 2007
National            Slum & Blight (Area Basis)
Objective:
City Objective:     Community Development Priority, Objective Six, Strategy B: Invest in the
                    rehabilitation of commercial facades as designated by the Downtown Action
                    Plan.
City Priority:      High
Performance         Objective category:
Measurement           Suitable Living Environment        Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                    Outcome category:
                      Availability/Accessibility         Affordability         Sustainability
Additional          NA
Resources:
$ Leveraged:        Total Budget = $5,000.00              CDBG = 100%

The City of Nampa’s downtown area bounded roughly by Nampa Boulevard to the West, the
Railroad Tracks to the North, 16th Avenue South to the East, and 4th Street South to the South,
is one of most blighted commercial areas in the city. Disinvestment and business flight has
contributed to this condition for the past twenty-five years. Although, Nampa is the second
largest city in the state of Idaho and one of the fastest growing cities in the Northwest, its
downtown core and city center is plagued with abandoned buildings, deteriorating structures and
inadequate infrastructure. Commercial property values are some of the lowest, lease rates are
some of the lowest, and industry vacancy rates are the highest in the downtown core.




                                                                                                   21
City of Nampa                                                             CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



Nampa’s downtown grew up around the railroad. The historic district is reminiscent of a
thriving mercantile industry in the 1920s. However, in the early 1980’s, with the advent of
suburbs and the first indoor mall in the state of Idaho, many of the anchor retailers and
professional offices moved away from the downtown area to the outskirts of town. This trend
continues to this day. No new construction has occurred in the historic area in 25 years.
Specialty retail shops open and close in 6 months time. Prime ground floor retail is occupied by
non-profit organizations, and small professional offices. The retail that does exist struggles to
remain vital and attract sufficient customers. Due to the lack of income, property owners do not
maintain their buildings, allowing them to fall into a state of disrepair, collectively creating an
eyesore for the community and a safety hazard for the public.

Four of the contributing factors leading to the slum and blighted conditions in the downtown as
outlined in the City of Nampa’s downtown slum and blight report are as follows:

        Existence of vacant and abandoned buildings.
        Inadequate infrastructure in the form of open spaces, right-of-way improvements,
         streetscape amenities, and wayfinding.
        Unattractive, architecturally unsympathetic façade “improvements”
        Underutilized property

The project will remove abandoned signs from buildings and the public right of way in the
downtown district. The City of Nampa is currently identifying the abandoned signs to remove in
order to being the environmental review process required for CDBG funding. It is anticipated
that the signs will be removed in the early Spring to improve the marketability of the properties.
The contract for this project is being extended to September 30, 2007.


CITY OF NAMPA – DOWNTOWN NAMPA CROSSWALK REHABILITATION
Area Served: Central Nampa Revitalization Area
Allocated    $56,000.00               Amount Drawndown: $ 0.00
Funding:
Project Status:      Contract extended to      Beneficiaries:              NA
                     September 30, 2007
National             Slum & Blight (Area Basis)
Objective:
City Objective:      Economic Development Priority, Objective Two: Make infrastructure
                     improvement to correct and improve public right of ways as a means to
                     retain and attract businesses
City Priority:       High
Performance          Objective category:
Measurement            Suitable Living Environment       Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                     Outcome category:
                       Availability/Accessibility        Affordability         Sustainability
Additional           City of Nampa



                                                                                                   22
City of Nampa                                                            CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




Resources:
$ Leveraged:         Total Budget = $156,000.00            CDBG = 36%

The City of Nampa’s downtown area bounded roughly by Nampa Boulevard to the West, the
Railroad Tracks to the North, 16th Avenue South to the East, and 4th Street South to the South,
is one of most blighted commercial areas in the city. Disinvestment and business flight has
contributed to this condition for the past twenty-five years. Although, Nampa is the second
largest city in the state of Idaho and one of the fastest growing cities in the Northwest, its
downtown core and city center is plagued with abandoned buildings, deteriorating structures and
inadequate infrastructure. Commercial property values are some of the lowest, lease rates are
some of the lowest, and industry vacancy rates are the highest in the downtown core.

Nampa’s downtown grew up around the railroad. The historic district is reminiscent of a
thriving mercantile industry in the 1920s. However, in the early 1980’s, with the advent of
suburbs and the first indoor mall in the state of Idaho, many of the anchor retailers and
professional offices moved away from the downtown area to the outskirts of town. This trend
continues to this day. No new construction has occurred in the historic area in 25 years.
Specialty retail shops open and close in 6 months time. Prime ground floor retail is occupied by
non-profit organizations, and small professional offices. The retail that does exist struggles to
remain vital and attract sufficient customers. Due to the lack of income, property owners do not
maintain their buildings, allowing them to fall into a state of disrepair, collectively creating an
eyesore for the community and a safety hazard for the public.

Most of the crosswalks in the historic downtown district zone are constructed of stamped
concrete and were installed in the 1980s. They have not been actively maintained in that time
and have deteriorated to the point of inaccessibility for the handicapped and/or elderly. Three of
the contributing factors leading to the slum and blighted conditions in the downtown as outlined
in the City of Nampa’s downtown slum and blight report are as follows:

        Existence of vacant and abandoned buildings.
        Inadequate infrastructure in the form of open spaces, right-of-way improvements,
         streetscape amenities, and wayfinding.
        Infrastructure is not pedestrian friendly or accessible.

Engineering for the redesigning the material and specifications for the crosswalks for
accessibility, durability and maintenance have already begun. The project is expected to be put
out for bid during winter 2006 for construction to start in spring 2007. The City of Nampa has
extended the contract for this project to September 30, 2007.


CITY OF NAMPA – LIBRARY & CENTRAL POLICE STATION DESIGN SERVICES
Area Served: City wide
Allocated    $30,000.00        Amount Drawndown: $    0.00
Funding:
Project Status:      Contract extended to      Beneficiaries:              67,112


                                                                                                  23
City of Nampa                                                              CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



                    September 30, 2007
National            Benefit to LMI Persons (Area Basis)
Objective:
City Objective:     Community Development Priority, Objective 3, Invest in public facilities in
                    targeted LMI neighborhoods to provide a safe environment for people to
                    live; Economic Development Priority, Objective 3, Strategy A: Invest in the
                    installation, upgrade, construction and acquisition of public facilities to assist
                    in the public cost to promote expansion of an existing business or location of
                    a new business.
City Priority:      High
Performance         Objective category:
Measurement           Suitable Living Environment         Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                    Outcome category:
                      Availability/Accessibility          Affordability         Sustainability
Additional          City of Nampa
Resources:
$ Leveraged:        Total Budget = $60,000                 CDBG = 50%

As the city moves forward with it library / central police station / and city hall mixed-used
private / public development project in the downtown slum and blighted area, CDBG funds can
be used for the design portion of the project for the library and central police station. The goal of
this project is to contract for design services for the City of Nampa Library and for the Central
Police Station. At this time a site location has not been determined. A scope of work for the
services is currently being developed. It is anticipated that a contract will be executed no later
than early Spring 2007. Services have already been procured. The proposed budget came in
higher than anticipated and the City of Nampa is reviewing whether or not to split the services to
have the Library designed with CDBG funds and the Police Station to be funded with city funds.
Until a final determination is made, the contract has been extended for this project until
September 30, 2010 to accommodate the actual completed construction of both facilities.


CODE ENFORCEMENT – NRSA & NNU NEIGHBORHOODS
Area Served: City wide
Allocated           $150,542.99                 Amount Drawndown:           $147,841.86
Funding:
Project Status:     Completed as of             Beneficiaries:              2753 Households (972
                    September 30, 2006                                      NNU & 1781 NRSA)
National            Benefit to LMI Persons (Area Basis)
Objective:
City Objective:     Community Development Priority: Objective Four: Reduce deterioration of
                    neighborhoods through code enforcement in designated LMI Census Tracks.
City Priority:      High
Performance         Objective category:


                                                                                                    24
City of Nampa                                                           CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




Measurement          Suitable Living Environment       Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                   Outcome category:
                     Availability/Accessibility        Affordability         Sustainability
Additional         None
Resources:
$ Leveraged:       NA

CDBG funds were used for the salary and all related expenses for a full-time code enforcement
officer who worked in the HUD approved Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area (see
attached NRSA & NNU map) and an officer in the Northwest Nazarene University
Neighborhood. Using a proactive approach to code enforcement, the officers worked with
residents to clean up their properties, encouraging education about city codes before problems
occur. A focus of this program is person-to-person contact with a constant city presence in the
neighborhoods.

During the 2005 program year, the Code Enforcement Officers funded through the CDBG
program sent a total of 2753 notices and performed 3819 inspections; of those, 972 notices and
1295 inspections were for the NNU district and 1781 Notices and 2524 inspections were for the
Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area. These notices and inspections are in addition to the
day-to-day operations of the officer, many additional projects were successfully completed to
educate and involve residents in improving their neighborhoods. These activities include
translating city notices into Spanish, attending neighborhood association meetings, coordinating
the annual “Brush Up Nampa” program funded through the Nampa Urban Renewal Agency and
city funds, and assisting the Community Development Division and Police Department in
identification of blighted or nuisance properties.

The officers worked closely with non-profit organizations such as the North Nampa Residents
Association, the Lakeview Neighborhood Association and the Northwest Nazarene University
Neighborhood Association, Mercy Housing Idaho, the Nampa Housing Authority, and the now
closed Nampa Urban Renewal Agency as well as local businesses.

Recently, a newly defined Code Enforcement Plan was developed as a means to guide and direct
code enforcement activities to successfully beautify and increase the quality of life for all
residents within the designated neighborhoods.


CITY OF NAMPA – CDBG ADMINISTRATION / FAIR HOUSING/ PLANNING
Area Served:        City-Wide
Allocated Funding:           $117,813.60          Amount                     $115,330.32
                                                  Drawndown:
Project Status:              Completed as of September 30, 2006

CDBG funds were used for complete administration of the City of Nampa’s Community
Development Block Grant program. Staff changes occurred this program year. At the beginning
of the program year funds were used to pay for half of the salary and benefits of a full-time


                                                                                                 25
City of Nampa                                                             CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



Community Development Specialist and for the salary of a part-time Grant Administrator; at the
end of the program year the positions were consolidated into one full-time Community
Development Program Manager. Additionally, funds were used to pay for the related costs
including travel and training, advertising, and supplies. Staff’s time was also spent on fair
housing activities, program planning and technical assistance to non-profit organizations.

In addition to the normal solicitation, review and monitoring of sub-recipient projects, the
Community Development staff identified and implemented the following projects to further the
goals of the City of Nampa’s Consolidated Plan for Housing and Community Development.

        Downtown Nampa Revitalization Blueprint: Worked with consultants and community
         advocates on a downtown Nampa Revitalization Blueprint. Officially adopted by City
         Council in August, 2004. In January 2005 a Central Nampa Development Commission
         was appointed to implement the action plan of the blueprint. The Community
         Development team staffs and directs this commission. This Blueprint has been used to
         identify and implement many of the PY 2005 projects. The Blueprint will continue to
         direct many of the revitalization projects in Nampa’s Downtown.

        Redevelopment (Slum & Blight) Area Designation: To assist in the implementation of the
         Downtown Nampa Revitalization Blueprint, Community Development Staff conducted a
         property by property survey of Downtown Nampa to designate the downtown as a
         Redevelopment Area as proscribed by state statute and CDBG regulations. A report was
         completed summarizing the finding and was submitted to City Council for adoption of
         Resolution # 32-2005 declaring the downtown business district, downtown village
         district, and downtown historic district to be a redevelopment area.

         The report stated that of the 361 primary structures in the downtown area, 152 are
         considered deteriorated or deteriorating (42%). These buildings are either abandoned and
         not code compliant, structurally questionable, unmaintained, etc. Some buildings have
         the remnants of several different, pieced-together façade “make-overs” that were either
         never finished or are totally incompatible with the rest of the building.

         Downtown is comprised of three sub-districts, which boast deteriorated or deteriorating
         buildings at the following proportions:

                   Downtown Business District – 35 of 68 Buildings (51%)
                   Downtown Village District – 46 of 93 Buildings (49%)
                   Downtown Historic District – 71 of 200 Buildings (35.5%)

         Nampa’s downtown grew up around the railroad. The historic district is reminiscent of a
         thriving mercantile industry in the 1920s. However, in the early 1980’s, with the advent
         of suburbs and the first indoor mall in the state of Idaho, many of the anchor retailers and
         professional offices moved away from the downtown area to the outskirts of town. This
         trend continues to this day. No new construction has occurred in the historic area in 25
         years. Specialty retail shops open and close in 6 months time. Prime ground floor retail
         is occupied by non-profit organizations, and small professional offices. The retail that


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City of Nampa                                                              CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



         does exist struggles to remain vital and attract sufficient customers. The perception is
         that locating in downtown Nampa is for those businesses that can not afford any better.
         One large building in the heart of the historic district is utilized as a warehouse facility
         since the lease arrangements are cheaper than that of a storage unit. Due to the lack of
         income, property owners do not maintain their buildings, allowing them to fall into a state
         of disrepair, collectively creating an eyesore for the community and a safety hazard for
         the public. Larger industrial buildings that border the railroad tracks are vacant and
         abandoned.

        Increasing Coordination and Communication:

                o HUD Faith Based Grant Writing Workshop: In collaboration with the HUD
                  Boise Field office, the City of Nampa hosted the HUD sponsored Faith Based
                  Initiative Grant Writing Workshop. Through collaborative efforts with the local
                  HUD Field Office in Boise, 142 people attended, with approximately 40%
                  comprising the faith based community. The City of Nampa assisted with
                  distributing notices, securing a facility and refreshments for the attendees. City
                  also assisted with staffing the two day workshop. The workshop allowed non-
                  profits and faith-based organization to network as well as to learn about resources
                  available and other organizations serving similar populations.

                o Canyon County Coalition Against Hunger: During the course of the PY 2005
                  application process it became clear that the Consolidated Plan for Housing and
                  Community Development did not adequately address the need of hunger in the
                  community. The Idaho Food Bank applied for some funds to help them deliver
                  more food to the City of Nampa, however the Consolidated Plan does not even
                  provide a priority provision for food delivery to the hungry in the City of Nampa.
                  Recognizing that there might be a need to at least establish a conversation
                  amongst food providers about whether or not there was a need for increased
                  services for the hungry, the Community Development Department developed a
                  roundtable discussion inviting all of the food providers to the table. Many of the
                  providers did not know each other and/or what type of services each other
                  provided. The roundtable was invaluable for that service alone. However, even
                  more impressively, the providers decided that they needed to meet monthly as a
                  group to talk about their needs as providers and how they can work better together
                  to serve the people of Nampa. From that roundtable the Hunger Coalition of
                  Region III was formed, that is working on collaborative food drives. Staff
                  continues to collaborate with these members.

                o Region III Housing Coalition: The City of Nampa continues to take an active role
                  in encouraging the coordination between public and private housing and social
                  service agencies. A representative from the City attends the Region III Housing
                  Coalition meetings to participate in the discussions around housing and
                  homelessness in our community. The City continues to encourage the expansion
                  of its membership thereby identifying duplication of services and reductions in
                  service gaps.



                                                                                                    27
City of Nampa                                                                CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




                o Family Self-Sufficiency Program Committees: City staff attends both the Family
                  Self-Sufficiency committees hosted by SICHA and the Nampa Housing
                  Authority. These programs offer applicants with educational and training
                  opportunities that will ultimately increase their wages to a level that will be nearer
                  to the median income for the city of Nampa. As the enrollee moves through their
                  stated objectives and goals, the amount of income increase they earn, is placed
                  into an escrow account that may be utilized as a down payment for a home. As a
                  member of these committees, the City is able to facilitate collaboration between
                  other organizations and to promote communication and identify gaps.

        Family Justice Center Grant Writing: The Community Development Department
         stepped forward to help manage the development of the Nampa Family Justice Center, a
         one-stop facility co-locating all of the service providers that work with domestic violence
         and family violence victims in one place to more efficiently serve the victims. This is
         continuing efforts from Program Year 2004.

        North Nampa Neighborhood Improvement Projects: Community Development staff
         worked with the North Nampa Residents Association and the Urban Renewal Agency
         Board to identify, prioritize and implement several projects that were aimed at helping to
         revitalize the Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area. These projects included the
         Boys and Girls Club of Nampa’s Gang Prevention Program, the Nampa Housing
         Authority’s Project House, a Neighborhood Major Clean-Up Program and a 16th Ave.
         North Street-Lighting & fiber optic Project. These activities were funded through the
         Urban Renewal Agency, which sunset in September 2005. Remaining neighborhood
         activities to be completed with the remaining Urban Renewal Agency funds include the
         street lighting program on 16th Avenue north and the completion of the North Nampa
         Master Plan.

        Landlord & Citizen Participation Training: The Nampa Landlord/Citizen Involvement
         Training program has been adapted for the City and is based on the National Landlord
         Training Program, originally supported by the Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S.
         Department of Justice and authored by John Campbell of Campbell DeLong Resources.
         The program is designed to help law enforcement agencies, owners, property managers
         and residents keep illegal drug activity and other criminal activity off their property and
         out of their neighborhoods without violating the Fair Housing Act. The content of the
         course has been developed through a process of intensive research involving hundreds of
         organizations and individuals: landlords, management associations, private attorneys,
         public defenders, housing authority personnel, tenant screening companies, narcotics
         detectives, district offers, and many others. The program has won the approval of active
         landlords and concerned tenants alike. As with many communities in Idaho and the
         nation, the City of Nampa is struggling with ongoing issues of drug and gang activities in
         rental properties and the community in general. Most drug house activity is on rental
         property. A large number of rental properties are located in our LMI neighborhoods.
         Law enforcement alone cannot solve the problem; the number of search warrants issued
         is a fraction of the number of drug houses suspected. Prevention efforts must include the


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City of Nampa                                                               CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



         involvement of those with the greatest leverage to stop the activity, the property
         management community and neighbors. Many landlords and management associations
         fear screening potential residents for fear of violating Fair Housing laws. This training is
         geared to help alleviate these fears and in the end improve the livability of our
         community. With over 50% of all rental properties, according to the census, located with
         the NRSA and NNU districts, this program allows us to directly impact the two districts
         with the highest LMI population and improve the lives of the residents. The City’s efforts
         were rewarded with the 2006 City Achievement Award from the Association of Idaho
         Cities. This award program recognizes cities for improvements to running their city. In
         selecting the winners, the judges consider the following factors: 1) Programs that
         improve quality of life; 2) Programs that solve a community problem; 3) Programs that
         reduce the cost of government; and 4) Programs that increase municipal services with a
         minimal additional dollar outlay.

        Historical District: Community Development staff, in collaboration with the City of
         Nampa Historic Preservation Commission, organized and implemented the development
         of the Old Nampa Neighborhood Historic District. The City of Nampa was incorporated
         in 1890. The architecture in this neighborhood reflects styles popular from the late 19th
         century and early 20th century generally not later than post WWII. It is generally uniform
         in character exhibiting not only the same architectural styles but changes to the building
         over time. This neighborhood abuts the Downtown Nampa Revitalization Area and is an
         low- moderate-income neighborhood. The City of Nampa hired an architectural historian
         to complete a reconnaissance survey and to conduct the nomination process of the
         residential district to the National Register of Historic Places. This is the first residential
         historic district for the City of Nampa and one of the largest in the State of Idaho with
         293 structures. It is the hope to use this designation as leverage toward neighborhood
         revitalization. This has also served as a catalyst for the Historic Preservation
         Commission, as it is pursuing funds to develop a City of Nampa historic preservation
         plan that will look at city policy and ordinance as to how they support historic
         preservations in the community, identify sites of local importance and establish programs
         to recognize, celebrate and preserve those sites.

        Consolidated Planning: Community Development staff helped to organize and
         implement the CDBG consolidated planning process. Every three to five years, the City
         of Nampa is required by law to prepare a Consolidated Plan in order to receive federal
         funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The City of
         Nampa has hired a consulting firm with extensive experience with Consolidated Planning
         to assist the city in collecting and analyzing data; facilitating community meetings and
         writing the plan. The City of Nampa’s Consolidated Plan spanning fiscal years 2008
         through 2012 (program year 2007 – 2011) will be the City’s blueprint for addressing the
         community’s most critical housing and community development needs. This process will
         be spanning over Program Years 2005 and 2006 with the plan submitted to HUD in the
         summer of 2007.

        North Nampa Master Plan: Community Development staff helped to organize and
         implement a North Nampa Master Plan. This blueprint is to be action oriented and


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City of Nampa                                                              CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



         establish a game plan for future development and investment in North Nampa with an
         emphasis on improving the quality of life for the residents of the area and the community
         at-large. The goal is to create a neighborhood revitalization guide, aesthetically,
         environmentally, economically, and socially, for one of Nampa’s oldest and most
         disadvantaged neighborhoods. The City of Nampa has hired a consulting firm to assess
         all of the strengths and weaknesses associated with this multi-faceted neighborhood and
         prepare a blueprint of action items – projects and actions that will stabilize and revitalize
         this residential and commercial neighborhood in the city’s center and establish a
         foundation for future rehabilitation, investment and growth. Part of the plan is to look at
         the uses of open spaces, such as Indian Creek, trails, greenbelts; to look at uses for
         commercial and retail space as well the implications of the proposed new floodplain. The
         City has already held the kick-off meeting with public meetings schedule for October
         2006, January 2007 and another in February/March 2007. The blueprint is expected to be
         complete in March and to be incorporated in the new Consolidated Plan.

        Community Collaboration Contracts: Community Development staff helped
         organizations in the community apply for funding from the State of Idaho. These funds
         are to be used to assist organization in the delivery of services to the youth in our
         community. During the course of this program year we assisted 3 organizations in Fiscal
         Year 2005 and 5 organizations in Fiscal Year 2006. Of these recipients, 3 of the
         organizations are current CDBG recipients; Original Gangster’s Basic Academy of
         Delinquency, Northwest Children’s Home (Syringa House) and the Salvation Army. The
         remaining two organizations that were awarded Community Collaboration Contracts
         include the Nampa Family Justice Center and Terry Reilly Health Services.

        Lead Safe Work Practices: Community Development staff helped to distribute notices of
         the Lead Safety Work Practices workshop hosted by Idaho Housing and Finance
         Association (IHFA) in Boise during the summer of 2006. The City contacted known
         housing providers, neighborhood and homeowner associations and current sub-recipients
         about the training session. The training was at no cost to attendees. The goal of the
         program was to teach attendees lead-safe work practices and the strategies for
         implementing them. Many homes built before 1978 contain lead-based pain, so it is
         important that renovations, remodeling and repair activities use methods that reduce and
         control dust and debris created during work. Even a small amount of dust can pose a
         serious health risk to children and families. Due to the timing of the session at the height
         of construction season, not as many contractors attended the session as was hoped. As a
         result, the City of Boise and the City of Nampa decided to start planning for another
         session during the winter months. Both Cities have been working to recruit other
         sponsors and notify building and remodeling contractors. The planning process will
         continue through PY 2006 with the next training session scheduled for January 2007.

        Fair Housing Collaborative Activities: Community Development staff also took part in a
         fun and informative Fair Housing Activity during the program year. The City of Nampa
         sits on the Idaho Fair Housing Forum that is facilitated by the local HUD office in Boise.
         As part of the forum, the city helped sponsor the 2007 Fair Housing Calendar. Through
         sponsorship from the City of Nampa, Idaho Commerce & Labor, Idaho Housing and


                                                                                                    30
City of Nampa                                                            CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



         Finance Association, the City of Boise, local businesses, and numerous other
         organizations, a calendar contest to coincide with Fair Housing Month in April 2006 was
         implemented. The contest was open to all Idaho high school students with winning
         entries chosen based on how well the student artistically interpreted fair housing in their
         communities. This contest has resulted in, not only statewide media attention but, local
         media attention. Arielle Nelson, a local Nampa High School student, won first prize for
         her artistic rendering of diversity in our community and the importance of fair housing.
         The City of Nampa scheduled a recognition ceremony for fall 2006. These calendars are
         available to the public at no cost. The City of Nampa will be provided with 500 copies in
         December 2006 and will be distributing to local business and sub-recipients to encourage
         dialogue about the subject.

         Additionally, the City of Nampa has been in communication with the City of Boise and
         the Idaho Commerce and Labor State CDBG staff to develop a plan to educate the
         residents of the Treasure Valley about fair housing issues rather than tackle this on an
         individual basis. These conversations have only just begun, but we are optimistic of the
         potential outcome. For further information regarding other Fair Housing Activities
         conducted by the City of Nampa see the Fair Housing section later in this document.

        America’s Promise: America's Promise is the nation's leading voice for young people.
         America’s Promise is an Alliance for Youth that brings together communities,
         individuals, companies and organizations from all sectors to improve the odds for
         children and youth. The City recognized that the community had been addressing these
         areas for quite a few years through the use of the Search Institute survey. Nampa
         conducted its first Search Institute survey in 1994 to bring focus to youth issues
         throughout the community- and Healthy Nampa Healthy Youth (HNHY) was born. Over
         a decade and four surveys later, Nampa continues to strengthen its cross sector
         collaborations, sponsors community wide fundraisers dedicated to youth activities, and
         has remained true to asset development. The survey's measure of students' strengths and
         weaknesses gave the community a roadmap to improve Nampa's climate for raising kids.

         The Community Development staff pulled together roundtable meetings of multiple
         youth service providers to discuss the best practices and to collaborate in the community
         completing an America’s Promise application in 2005. The City of Nampa was named
         one of our nation's 100 Best Communities for Young People. The 100 Best Communities
         for Young People competition honors outstanding efforts on behalf of young people by
         multiple sectors of communities. In cities, suburbs, small towns and counties across the
         country, this annual competition is leading communities to assess their efforts, work more
         effectively together for young people, and share best practices. The City of Nampa began
         the process for the 2007 competition again this program year. The City brought together
         all different sectors of the community, youth service provider, the Mayors Teen Council,
         Chamber of Commerce, schools, and governmental agencies to again discuss best
         practices and changes that have occurred in the last year. The application is to be
         submitted in PY 2006 and notice of award should be made in December 2006. America’s
         Promise also administers grant funds, available only to applicants, of up to $100,000 to
         support efforts to deliver the Five Promises to more young people in their community.



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City of Nampa                                                              CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



         Additionally, it is the hope of the city to use the award designation to bring media
         attention to the youth services and leveraging the status toward expansion of youth
         services.

        Research & Analysis: The Community Development staff continues to research better
         ways to meet the needs of our community. During this program year, staff began to
         analyze the viability of administering a city run urgent need housing rehabilitation
         program. It is anticipated, that the analysis of the feasibility will be completed in summer
         2007. Staff has also begun researching the need and establishment of a CBDO for
         economic empowerment and housing issues. The completion of the North Nampa Master
         Plan will help staff in this analysis. It is anticipated, that the analysis of the need for a
         CBDO will be completed in summer 2007.

        Indian Creek Improvements: The Community Development Department stepped forward
         to develop an application for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers funds to improve Indian
         Creek. The proposed project is to conduct a feasibility study to restore the habitat of
         Indian Creek and, as needed, implement restoration. Over the course of many years, silt
         has accumulated in the Creek not only altering the floodplain, but altering the natural
         environment of the Creek. Unfortunately, the City was unsuccessful in obtaining
         funding. However, the City of Nampa is not undaunted in this quest. Staff continues to
         work with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to prepare a new application as well as
         pursue other funding to conduct the feasibility study and implementation as needed.


2004 PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING SERVICES, INC. – GATEWAY NEIGHBORHOOD
REVITALIZATION PROJECT (Phase 1)
Area Served: City wide & NRSA
Allocated    $35,000.00          Amount Drawndown: $35,000.00
Funding:
Project Status:      Contract extended to        Beneficiaries:             6 Households
                     September 30, 2007
National             Benefit to LMI Persons (Housing Activities)
Objective:
City Objective:      Housing Priority: Objective Three: Encourage new construction
                     development throughout LMI neighborhoods to meet the needs of
                     individuals and families.
City Priority:       High
Performance          Objective category:
Measurement            Suitable Living Environment        Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                     Outcome category:
                       Availability/Accessibility         Affordability         Sustainability
Additional           Nampa Urban Renewal Agency, HOME, Idaho Housing and Finance


                                                                                                    32
City of Nampa                                                            CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




Resources:          Association
$ Leveraged:        Total Budget = $655,170.00            CDBG = 5.4%

Neighborhood Housing Services, Inc. requested CDBG funds to help purchase 2-4 lots in the
North Nampa Revitalization Strategy Area to develop affordable homeownership opportunities
for low and moderate income residents of the neighborhood. NHS was unable to located single
lots that met the building and/or environmental requirements. Therefore, in the past program
year, Neighborhood Housing Services diligently researched and surveyed available properties
until they found a large 1.15 acre parcel in the N.R.S.A. that would allow for six single-family
homes. An Environmental Review was conducted, the Purchase Agreement has been signed and
the NHS is due to close on the property July 30, 2005.

However, with the new floodplain anticipated to be adopted in Spring 2007, the property will be
located within the new zone. This impacts not only CDBG funding but also HOME funding
which is an additional resource for the project, therefore this project has been put on hold. With
the expected floodplain expansion, the City of Nampa has requested NHS to revisit this project
to evaluate the viability of new construction using floodplain mitigation measures that include
filling the property to raise the buildings out of the floodplain zone. The City of Nampa has
requested NHS to visit with their other funding agencies to determine the viability of the project.
The City of Nampa is awaiting the outcome of that meeting to determine what avenue to pursue.


CITY OF NAMPA – ADA SIDEWALK IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT
Area Served: NRSA
Allocated           $75,000.00                 Amount Drawndown:          $0.00
Funding:
Project Status:     Contract extended to       Beneficiaries:             Approximately 500
                    September 30, 2007                                    Households
National            Benefit to LMI Persons (Limited Clientele)
Objective:
City Objective:     Community Development Priority: Objective Two: Invest in the
                    infrastructure in targeted LMI neighborhoods to provide a safe environment
                    for people to live.
City Priority:      High
Performance         Objective category:
Measurement           Suitable Living Environment       Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                    Outcome category:
                      Availability/Accessibility        Affordability         Sustainability
Additional          None
Resources:
$ Leveraged:        NA

The City of Nampa wants to start replacing all of the old existing “step-down” curbs at all of the
intersections in the North Nampa Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area with ADA


                                                                                                  33
City of Nampa                                                             CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



accessible curb ramps in order to make the neighborhood more navigable for handicapped
persons and improve the quality of life for the neighborhood as a whole. This will be the first
phase of a multi-year project.

Initially this program will immediately benefit up to 500 households in the targeted
neighborhood area, of which 77% are low and moderate-income. However, this project should
ultimately benefit anyone who travels through these neighborhoods, ultimately increasing the
beneficiary numbers. Then as the program develops and becomes an annual program, the
beneficiaries become immeasurable as our whole community benefits from providing a safer and
more navigable means of transportation for non-auto traveling handicapped persons throughout
the City of Nampa.

Currently many residents of North Nampa are forced to conduct their non-auto travel in the
streets since the sidewalks are not accessible to their wheelchairs, canes, etc. In addition, young
children are riding their bikes in the streets due to the poor condition of the sidewalks and curbs.
Many of the sidewalks were installed in the first half of the twentieth century and are
deteriorated, dangerous and at least 6” up from the street level.

The City of Nampa realized that it was important to do something about the deteriorated
sidewalk condition in North Nampa, and therefore identified the curb cutouts at the intersections,
because they are considered part of the public-right-of-way.

This project has conceptually been in the planning phase for a couple of years as the City of
Nampa tries to make its community more accessible to its citizens with disabilities. Already a
program is in place to install curb ramps at intersections anytime an old curb is replaced in the
older neighborhoods of the city. However, the City felt it was time to be proactive rather than
reactive.

This project was extended to October 31, 2007, due to a staffing shortage and changes in 2004-
2006. CDBG funding for FY 2004 will be used in a 16-block section of the neighborhood.
During an analysis of the proposed project during this program year, it was determined that it
was necessary to construct “step-down” curbs using the new truncated dome type. The truncated
dome design provides enhanced accessibility. However, this new design increases the cost of
each curb. City staff have reviewed the 16 block area and identified and prioritized corners to
begin the process. With the increased cost, it is anticipated that 6-12 corners will be completed.
The Environmental review has been initiated and the project is anticipated to go out to bid in the
winter 2006.


SYRINGA HOUSE – STREET IMPROVEMENTS
Area Served: City Wide
Allocated    $75,169.00       Amount Drawndown:                            $0.00
Funding:
Project Status:     Contract extended to        Beneficiaries:             24 Individuals
                    September 30, 2007



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City of Nampa                                                             CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




National            Benefit to LMI Persons (Limited Clientele – Housing Activity)
Objective:
City Objective:     Housing Priority: Objective Five: Expand the supply and effectiveness of
                    emergency shelter and transitional housing to alleviate the tragedy of
                    homelessness.
City Priority:      High
Performance         Objective category:
Measurement           Suitable Living Environment        Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                    Outcome category:
                      Availability/Accessibility         Affordability         Sustainability
Additional          None
Resources:
$ Leveraged:        NA


Northwest Children’s Home initially requested CDBG funds to fund the street improvements
necessary for their planned new Syringa House development in the City of Nampa enlarging
their existing situation from 12 beds to 40 beds. However, after many months of semi-successful
fund-raising the board of Northwest Children’s Home decided to re-evaluate the new Syringa
House development, resulting in a reduction of beds to 24. The project is moving forward and
the facility has broken ground and the bid for infrastructure development has been let. With the
winter season approaching and the need to do work with the irrigation ditch when it is empty, the
timing of the construction of the infrastructure surrounding the irrigation ditch and to no disrupt
water flow is specific. We anticipate that construction to begin in spring 2007.

2003 PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

MAJESTIC ENTERTAINMENT FOUNDATION – MAJESTIC THEATER ROOF
REPAIR
Area Served: City Wide
Allocated    $169,760.00     Amount Drawndown: $165,501.40
Funding:
Project Status:     Contract extended to        Beneficiaries:              24 Individuals
                    September 30, 2007
National            Slum & Blights (Spot Basis)
Objective:
City Objective:     Community Development Priority, Objective 6, Strategy A: Reduce the
                    occurrence of slum and blight in designated neighborhoods in order to
                    continue the momentum of revitalization in the neighborhood, by investing
                    in the structural rehabilitation of properties not owned by private entities that
                    have been deemed slum and blight on a spot basis and have been designated
                    as a public safety hazard to the general public by the City of Nampa’s
                    Building Department.


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City of Nampa                                                            CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




City Priority:      High
Performance         Objective category:
Measurement           Suitable Living Environment       Decent Housing        Economic Opportunity
                    Outcome category:
                      Availability/Accessibility        Affordability         Sustainability
Additional          Insurance Money, In-kind contributions
Resources:
$ Leveraged:        Total Costs: $382,155 CDBG = 44%

Built in 1946, the “Majestic” Theater is the last surviving historic theater in downtown Nampa.
On or about July 26, 2003, a high velocity windstorm destroyed the historic theater’s roof,
causing it to collapse and ultimately endanger the structural integrity of the building.
The theater is located in the heart of downtown Nampa, an area of town that is on the verge of
deterioration or revitalization, and that is surrounded by LMI neighborhoods. The City of
Nampa was just beginning to embark on a comprehensive downtown revitalization action plan to
reinvigorate the downtown and create new job opportunities for low and moderate income
persons. In addition, the community of Nampa is in need of a non-profit venue for cultural and
performing arts programs.
The City of Nampa agreed to support this project as part of the PY 2003 Action Plan with the
following provisions: 1) That the funds are used only for roof structural repairs; and 2) That the
building remains in operation as a non-profit community performing arts center for at least ten
years after it becomes operational or operates as another eligible use as pre-approved by the City.

CDBG funds were requested to help replace the roof of a historic theater in the downtown core
that had been destroyed during a large windstorm. At this time most of the roof has been
replaced and the non-profit organization that owns the building is moving forward with fund-
raising for a performing arts and community center. However, due to engineering difficulties
and raising construction costs, the completion of the roof repair project has been delayed until
August 31, 2007.




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    City of Nampa                                                           CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




    Other Projects Funded in Previous Program Years with Activity in 2005

   HISPANIC CULTURAL CENTER OF IDAHO – FAMILY RESOURCES
    This project was originally funded in 2003. CDBG funds were requested to help staff the Family
    Resources Center and the programs associated with it. The Family Resource Center was located
    in the Hispanic Cultural Center of Idaho, and comprised of a partnership between the Hispanic
    Cultural Center, the Boys and Girls Club of Nampa and the Idaho Migrant Council. It offered
    community-based family programming, including homeownership classes, job skills training,
    literacy programs, gang prevention, domestic violence training and education, anger
    management and children’s play therapy. The courses, counseling sessions, community
    information fairs, and other offerings were made available to the residents of the City of Nampa
    in a bicultural and bilingual environment. The purpose of the Center was to create a one-stop,
    multi-function service that provides comprehensive family serves to LMI households AND
    targets Nampa's most critical issues including family self-sufficiency, prevention of Gang
    development, and financial management with the intent to increase home ownership.

    The collaboration between the three partners involved in establishing the Family Resources
    Center got off to a shaky start, due to staff changes and budget setbacks. After an intensive
    program monitoring in December and January, 2004, the Community Development Department
    met with the partners to discuss how to proceed forward. At that time, it was agreed that the
    Family Resources Center was a much-needed and valuable addition to our community and that
    the partners were committed to working out solutions for the Family Resources Center enough to
    warrant an extension of their PY 2003 contract to 6/30/05. Since the extension, the Family
    Resource Center has dissolved as originally designed. Most recently, the Hispanic Cultural
    Center has hired a new Executive Director and is working diligently to expand the services and
    recruit organizations to provide services at the Center. All funds originally allocated were not
    needed and the project closed. All unused funds were reallocated to other projects during the 2005
    Program Year.

   SOUTHWEST IDAHO COOPERATIVE HOUSING AUTHORITY (SICHA)
    This project was originally funded in 2003. The project was to assist Section 8 families with a
    member who is disabled in purchasing a home. Due to being a pilot project, it experienced some
    substantial delays in the beginning. First, no lenders wanted to participate in the program, until
    the Idaho Housing and Finance Association (IHFA) partnered with SICHA to design a program
    where they purchased the loans and then sold them to the local lenders. IHFA then provided a
    training program for the lenders in August, 2004. In addition to the lending difficulties, many of
    the families discovered that they were having a hard time finding a quality home accessible to
    their needs in their price ranges. Most of the families could only afford $70,000 - $85,000
    homes, and in Nampa, this price range is dominated by historic housing stock which is often not
    friendly to disabled accommodations.

    SICHA maintained open communication with the City of Nampa’s Community Development
    Department with the obstacles that they were encountering, and after an extensive monitoring in
    December and January, 2004, the City of Nampa elected to extend SICHA’s contract through
    October 31, 2005. As a result, 10 disabled families on the Section 8 program were able to
    purchase homes in Nampa. These were all families who would not have otherwise been able to


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    City of Nampa                                                              CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



    purchase a home without the help of the program and grant monies to assist with closing costs,
    down payment assistance, etc.

    An example of one such family assisted is a single Hispanic mom with four children, including a
    disabled son. She had been on rental assistance for 5 ½ years before purchasing her home with
    the help of the HCHVO program. She has always been on of SICHA’s clients who tried very
    hard (she went to school, obtain employment as a pharmacy tech, received raises, etc.) but just
    was not able to get enough income to purchase a home. She how has a home for her kids, has
    even done some improvements, and is paying all by $162 of her mortgage payments. She has
    also recently returned to school to become a pharmacist.

    The success of the Housing Choice Voucher Homeownership Option program can be measured
    not only by the number of families which have had the opportunity to become homeowners, but
    also by the financial savings as well to both the homeowner and to HUD. Eighteen families, of
    which 10 were CDBG recipients, have participated in this program. The average mortgage
    assistance payments vs. the families’ previous rental assistance payments, allows HUD an
    average savings of $14,220 in assistance payments per year. In addition, the families average
    payment portions have also decreased, resulting in an average savings of $408 yearly for these
    families. All homeownership families are monitored annually based on their closing dates. This
    allows SICHA to continually compile and measure the financial savings for HUD and the
    families as well as monitoring the overall success of the homeownership program.

   NAMPA FAMILY JUSTICE CENTER – DESIGN SERVICES
    This project was originally funded in 2003. Funds were requested to help off-set Design Services
    and Construction management costs for the rehabilitation of an existing public facility due to gross
    underestimate of facility square footage and overall rehabilitation costs. With services being
    provided by the Family Justice Center, this project completed November 30, 2006.

   NAMPA FAMILY JUSTICE CENTER REHABILITATION
    This project was originally funded in April 2004. The mission of the Family Justice Center is to co-
    locate professionals serving victims of family violence under one roof enhancing agency
    coordination and collaboration which ultimately will improve victim services, increase victim safety
    and abuser accountability. Streamlining a coordinated community response (CCR) will help prevent
    duplication of services and speed up the referral process for victims that will, in turn, increase the
    efficiency and effectiveness for victims accessing services. By centralizing services and coordinating
    efforts between agencies, victims will no longer have to travel from location to location or repeat
    their story of victimization numerous times. Bridging the gaps in communication and access to
    services will make reporting domestic violence incidents much less overwhelming for the victims.
    Police investigations and criminal prosecutions will be enhanced, increasing the rate of prosecution
    and abuser accountability. The center opened the doors on November 30, 2005 and has benefited
    well over 450 victims of family violence.

   RELOCATION ASSISTANCE FOR NAMPA FAMILY JUSTICE CENTER
    On August 4, 2004, bids were opened for the Nampa Family Justice Center Rehabilitation
    Project. Initially anticipated to cost approximately $350,000, the lowest bid was $698,000.
    Initially the design of the project intended to use a portion of the first floor and most of the


                                                                                                        38
    City of Nampa                                                             CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



    basement for the facility. At that time the design team realized that they needed to rethink the
    project. It was decided at that time to pursue rehabilitating the same building, but use the entire
    first floor of the facility and leave the basement vacant. A construction cost estimate was
    solicited and the estimate came in at approximately $500,000. At that time (November 12, 2004)
    the city elected to pursue the new design.

    The new design displaced six non-profit tenants and thus triggered the Uniform Relocation
    Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970. This act stipulated that the city
    needed to financially reimburse the existing tenants at the building for the costs of relocating and
    any increased rent and utility costs they would incur over two years. In December, 2004, the city
    held a public hearing to amend the 2004 Action Plan to add the project, “Relocation Assistance
    for the Nampa Family Justice Center”. New spaces were found for all six organizations in PY
    2004 and with the invoices processed in PY2005 for the costs incurred during that relocation
    process. All funds originally allocated were not needed and the project closed. All unused funds
    were reallocated to other projects during the 2005 Program Year.

   SYRINGA HOUSE – DRUG AND ALCOHOL THERAPIST
    This project was originally funded in April 2004. This contract was extended to July 31, 2005 due
    to the fact that Syringa House experienced considerable difficulties finding a part-time qualified
    therapist for the position. After three advertisements and several months, they were able to hire.
    However, they were unable to maintain the program and the project closed. All unused funds were
    reallocated to other projects during the 2005 Program Year.

   2004 GATEWAY CROSSING RESIDENT SERVICES
    This project was originally funded in April 2004. This contract was extended to October 31, 2005
    and then again to October 31, 2006 due to the fact that some services went over budget and others
    were not being utilized as anticipated. This was specifically true for two programs, the GED
    Financial Assistance Fund and the Transportation Assistance Fund. Neighborhood Housing
    Services, Inc. revisited the objectives of both programs and altered the delivery to achieve their
    objective. Gateway Crossing submitted a budget revision to address the overages and shortfalls and
    cut those programs not being utilized. Due to the overestimation of use of some of the services, all
    funds were not needed and the project closed and unused funds were reallocated to other projects
    during the 2005 Program Year. The length of this project impact the funding awarded in 2005,
    previously discussed.

    Geographical Distribution of Projects
    Consistent with the City of Nampa’s Consolidated Plan, Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy
    Area Plan and the Nampa Revitalization Blueprint, many of the City’s CDBG activities in 2005
    were located and targeted towards north Nampa or to the revitalization of Nampa’s downtown
    district. Three (3) of the 2005 Program Year projects are located within the NRSA. These three
    projects consist of 20% of the CDBG funds available for projects in 2005 Program Year. Six (6)
    of the 2005 Program Year projects are located within the Downtown Revitalization district.
    These six projects consist of 42% of the CDBG funds available for projects in 2005 Program
    Year.



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City of Nampa                                                              CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




CONSOLIDATED PLAN GOALS, OBJECTIVES, AND ACHIEVEMENTS

Federal law requires that housing and community development grant funds primarily benefit
low- and moderate- income persons in accordance with the HUD initiatives. Not only must the
funds benefit low- and moderate– income persons and remove slum & blight, but each project
must also meet a local priority and objective. 2005 was the fourth program year in the Five-Year
Plan. The Five-Year Plan (The City of Nampa, Consolidated Plan for Housing and Community
Development 2002-2007) identifies 4 local priorities, Housing Development, Community
Development, Public Service and Economic Development. The projects identified for 2005
addressed all four priorities. Many of the projects selected for the 2005 Program Year Action
Plan met multiple Objectives outlined in the Consolidated Plan. Below is a list of the priorities
and the corresponding objectives and strategies as outlined in the Consolidated Plan. Following
this list are charts outlining which projects addressed which objective and how the funding was
spent.

PRIORITIES

    1. Housing: Respond to the needs for affordable, decent, safe and appropriate housing,
       shelter and services of low- and moderate-income (LMI) individuals and families.
    2. Community Development: Support the revitalization of low- and moderate-income
       neighborhoods as identified in the Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area (NRSA).
    3. Public Services: Assist non-profits in meeting the needs of the low-income community
       in Nampa with appropriate supportive services to encourage self-sufficiency.
    4. Economic Development: Support the infrastructure needs of businesses expanding or
       developing in or serving low and moderate income neighborhoods as a means to both
       create and retain jobs.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

Housing: Respond to the needs for affordable, decent, safe and appropriate housing,
shelter and services of low and moderate-income individuals and families.

    1. Increase participation and involvement by residents in planning, developing and
       implementing activities that will affect their families and neighborhoods.
                a. Conduct a variety of outreach activities in both English and Spanish to promote
                   attendance at residents meetings, block parties, and neighborhood events.
                   Outreach activities may include: articles about programs published in newsletters
                   and informational bulletins, features in the newspaper, radio talk shows,
                   community bulletin board, speakers bureau and others.
    2. Extend technical assistance support to potential housing service providers as a means to
       encourage new assistance programs for owners and renters; homeownership, self-help,
       rehabilitation, and new developments.
                a. Conduct an analysis of the need for development of a new Community Based
                   Development Organization (CBDO). If the analysis warrants the creation of a


                                                                                                    40
City of Nampa                                                                CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



                   new CDBO, work toward that end. If the analysis shows otherwise, work with
                   housing providers and developers to provide alternative methods to deliver
                   housing opportunities to low and moderate-income families
    3. Encourage new construction development throughout LMI neighborhoods to meet the
       needs of individuals and families.
                a. Support affordable housing efforts by assisting non-profit entities apply for
                   federal and state resources, i.e. HOME funds, Low Income Tax Credits.
                b. Encourage infill development for affordable owner-occupied housing in NRSA
                   through acquisition of properties, demolition and clearance of structures and by
                   collaborating and leveraging CDBG resources.
    4. Use CDBG funds for limited rehabilitation of owner-occupied housing due to life safety,
       health or accessibility requirements.
                a. Continued limited rehabilitation program for smoke detectors throughout LMI
                   neighborhoods to increase safety and preserve life.
                b. Implement limited rehabilitation program for house lighting through LMI
                   neighborhoods to increase visibility and safety.
                c. Offer rehabilitation assistance to address handicapped accessibility barriers.
    5. Expand the supply and effectiveness of emergency shelter and transitional housing to
       alleviate the tragedy of homelessness.
                a. Support the development of community resources that serve homeless individuals
                   with emergency and transitional housing.
    6. Determine the viability of developing a revolving loan fund for housing rehabilitation.
                a. Evaluate the feasibility and marketability of a low-interest loan program for
                   owner-occupied and rental unit rehabilitation utilizing a lender pool from the
                   bank, alternative financing, or CDBG funds.
    7. Affirmatively further Fair Housing.
                a. Continue Fair Housing education and outreach activities including training and
                   advertising campaigns.
                b. Update the Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing to identify and address the
                   barriers of homeownerhsip, rental housing, support services, and shelters due to
                   violations of fair housing practices.

Community Development: Support the revitalization of low and moderate-income
neighborhoods as identified in the Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area.
    1. Increase public participation to involve the residents in planning, developing and
       implementing activities that will affect their families and neighborhoods.
                a. Conduct a variety of outreach activities in both English and Spanish to promote
                   attendance at resident meetings, block parties, and neighborhood events.
                   Outreach activities should include: articles about programs published in



                                                                                                      41
City of Nampa                                                                  CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



                   newsletters and informational bulletins, features in the newspaper, radio talk
                   shows, community bulletin board, speakers bureau and others.
    2. Invest in infrastructure in targeted LMI neighborhoods to provide a safe environment for
       people to live.
                a. Repair and replace water and wastewater lines, streets, drainage, street lighting
                   and other infrastructure in qualifying neighborhoods as deemed appropriate.
    3. Invest in public facilities in targeted LMI neighborhoods to provide a safe environment
       for people to live.
                a. Support opportunities to improve, acquire, and develop neighborhood parks and
                   trail ways within North Nampa.
                b. Explore improvement and utilization of natural geographical features such as
                   Indian Creek.
                c. Consider acquisition and related development activities for a neighborhood
                   facility to serve multi-purpose, i.e. meeting facility, satellite offices, computer
                   labs, etc.
    4. Reduce deterioration of neighborhoods through code enforcement in designated LMI
       Census Tracks.
                a. Utilize CDBG funds to support a full time, bilingual Code Enforcement Officer in
                   the designated NRSA.
    5. Ensure that public owned facilities and services are accessible to all citizens and in
       compliance with the Americans With Disabilities Act.
                a. Continue to improve accessibility to all public facilities, including parks.
    6. Reduce the occurrence of slum and blight in designated neighborhoods in order to
       continue the momentum of revitalization in the neighborhood.
                a. Invest in the structural rehabilitation of properties not owned by private entities
                   that have been deemed slum and blight on a spot basis and have been designated
                   as a public safety hazard to the general public by the City of Nampa’s Building
                   Department.
                b. Invest in the rehabilitation of commercial facades as designated by the Downtown
                   Action Plan
                c. Invest in the rehabilitation of commercial buildings in designated neighborhoods
                   that have been identified for code violations that are detrimental to the public
                   safety.


Public Services: Assist non-profits in meeting the needs of the low-income community in
Nampa with appropriate supportive services to encourage self-sufficiency.
    1. Help educate residents about resources available to them and ways to access these
       resources.



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City of Nampa                                                              CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



                a. Conduct a variety of outreach activities in both English and Spanish to promote
                   awareness of community resources. Activities may include: articles about
                   programs published in newsletters and informational bulletins, features in the
                   newspaper, radio talk shows, community bulletin board, speakers bureau and
                   others.
                b. Develop and distribute a Community Resource Guide illustrating services and
                   referrals through the community. Target audience is low- and moderate-income
                   individuals, consumers of services.
    2. Encourage social service providers, faith-based groups, private businesses, school
       districts, non-profit agencies and community leaders to work together to comprehensively
       meet the needs of families in poverty.
                a. Provide support to the Region III Housing Coalition to expand their membership
                   and encourage more involvement thereby identifying duplication of services and
                   reduces service gaps. Involve all recipients of CDBG funding in the monthly
                   meetings.
    3. Increase coordination and communication between service providers, with a specific
       focus toward faith-based organizations, in an effort to identify potential unmet needs, i.e.
       job training programs, transportation availability, childcare services, etc.
                a. Assist community based organizations to provide new and innovative solutions
                   for self-sufficiency.
                b. Host roundtable meetings of services providers organized around topic areas to
                   promote communication and collaboration.
    4. Maintain or improve the provision of housing and supportive services to individuals and
       families to transition along the continuum of care.
                a. Support the operations of programs that serve homelessness in Nampa.
    5. Support education, counseling and other services to help reduce domestic violence.
                a. Support organizations serving victims of domestic violence.
    6. Assist community based organizations to serve at risk youth specifically in LMI
       neighborhoods.
                a. Support organizations that serve at risk youth.
    7. Encourage the development of more “Crime Watch” groups to reduce crime.
                a. Support activities designed to enhance crime prevention and neighborhood watch.


Economic Development: Support the infrastructure needs of businesses expanding or
developing in or serving low and moderate-income neighborhoods as a means to both
create and retain jobs.
    1. Create and maintain opportunities for the success of new and existing businesses.




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City of Nampa                                                                 CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



                a. Partner with the Downtown Business Association, Chamber of Commerce and
                   others in the development a downtown revitalization strategy and implementation
                   plan to increase employment for low and moderate-income resident.
    2. Make infrastructure improvements to correct and improve public right of ways as a
       means to retain and attract businesses.
                a. Conduct an inventory of the area, determine the needs and conduct the
                   improvements as appropriate.
    3. Expand economic opportunities for low and moderate-income persons.
                a. Invest in the installation, upgrade, construction and acquisition of public facilities
                   to assist in the public cost to promote expansion of an existing business or
                   location of a new business.




                                                                                                       44
City of Nampa                                                             CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




2005 AMENDMENT TO CONSOLIDATED PLAN PRIORITIES AND OBJECTIVES
After considerable review and discussion, the City of Nampa felt that it was necessary to add the
following objective, strategies and performance measurements to the Community Development
Priority of the Consolidated Plan for Housing and Community Development, 2002 – 2007. This
amendment was reviewed at a public hearing on February 21, 2006 and the City Council made a
motion to approve the amendment on that same night.
    Actions:
    1.) Add the following objective, strategies and performance measurements to the Economic
        Development Priority on Part 8 - Page 10.
    2) Amend Table 41, Community Development Needs on Part 5 – Page 9.

    Economic Development Priority, Objective 3:
    Expand economic opportunities for low and moderate-income persons.

         A. Strategy
         Invest in the installation, upgrade, construction and acquisition of public facilities to
         assist in the public cost to promote expansion of an existing business or location of a new
         business.
                Performance Measurement
                Research and document improvements and total number of jobs available to,
                created or retained for low and moderate-income persons.




                                                                                                   45
City of Nampa                                                              CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




Evaluating How 2005 CDBG Funded Projects Achieved Consolidated Plan Objectives

Each program year, the projects that are submitted for City of Nampa CDBG funding are
referenced against the priority areas and objectives listed above. The City of Nampa works
diligently to fulfill aspects of each priority area every program year. As you can see from the
charts on the following pages, Priority of Projects as Identified in Consolidated Plan, Fulfilling
the Consolidated Plan’s Priorities, Objectives and Strategies and % of Funding Allocated to
Each Priority, the City of Nampa actively addressed many of its priorities and objectives as
presented in the 2002 – 2007 Strategic Plan with this round of 2005 projects.

It is clear that from the percentage of funding allocated and objectives addressed, the emphasis of
PY 2005 projects was in the Community Development priority. This is due in part to the
emphasis that the City of Nampa put on the redevelopment of the Central Nampa Revitalization
Area in PY 2005. With the extended PY 2005, the city devoted its efforts to developing and
implementing programs and projects that directly respond to the Community Development
Priority. The city feels that these projects will not only serve to fulfill a high priority need in our
community, but will also serve to catalyze private investment in our downtown core and
therefore increase the number of jobs made available to our residents.

Nampa has greatly improved on absorbing businesses into our existing facilities. According to a
recent study conducted by a local commercial real estate company, there is over 6 million square
feet of industrial space in Nampa with a vacancy rate of 7.5% which is significantly lower than
the 10.7% vacancy reported for last year. Office space is Nampa boasts over 1.3 million square
feet with a vacancy rate of 5.9%, down from an 11.2%. This growth has had a great impact upon
the City of Nampa and its economic bases.

Throughout the past program years, the City of Nampa has had difficulty addressing the
Economic Development priorities as our funding system is based on application submittals. In
PY 2004, the City of Nampa made some progress into addressing the Economic Development
priority by adopting a Downtown Revitalization Blueprint in August, 2004. Through this
process the downtown was designated a redevelopment area (slum & blighted area). To address
this shortfall, the City of Nampa hired a full-time Economic Development Director to help
improve and diversify the economy. This position is not funded with CDBG funds, nor are
CDBG funds used to implement activities undertaken by the Economic Development Director.
Although not funded with CDBG funds, the position works in concert with the CDBG staff.
During this program year, the department has met with numerous success stories. During the
course of this last program year, three (3) new manufacturing facilities opened and two expanded
their facility creating approximately 500 new jobs and an aviation professional service business
opened creating approximately 100 high wage professional service jobs. Two notable
manufacturing businesses growing in Nampa are Micron and Great American Appetizer.
Micron, a large computer chip manufacture based in Boise, opened a plant in Nampa creating
200 jobs just outside of the NRSA. The second is an existing company based within the NRSA
boundaries which through an expansion is creating 125 new positions. These new and
expanding manufacturing businesses do not include the numerous retail positions available with
the locating of large national retail stores throughout the City.




                                                                                                    46
City of Nampa                                                              CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



Our downtown, in addition to the efforts of the Economic Development Director, is the only area
in which CDBG funds have been used to address economic concerns. The area has benefited
from these efforts with 12 new restaurants and specialty shops. Although identified as
Community Development Projects, the dedication of CDBG funds to the redevelopment of our
downtown will have an indirect economic impact as seen with the façade rehabilitation program.
We expect even more impact in the downtown this next program year with the completion of the
crosswalks, signage and removal of abandoned signs. By addressing slum & blighted conditions
outlined in the Redevelopment Report, the downtown will become desirable to more private
developers willing to invest their own funds into redeveloping property.

In the PY 2003 CAPER, the City of Nampa recognized the need to focus on providing
affordable, decent, safe and appropriate housing, shelter and services to low and moderate-
income individuals and families as outlined in the Consolidated Plan’s Housing Priority. To this
end, the city has been working with Neighborhood Housing Services, Inc. on the development of
their Gateway Neighborhood Revitalization Projects that is to yield six single-family homes for
LMI families in Phase I (funded in PY 2004) and then an additional six potential single-family
homes in PY 2005.

However, the City of Nampa still recognizes the need to continue to focus on and direct its
resources to affordable housing in the community. For this reason, the city began to explore the
following objectives that were not being fulfilled.

        Housing Priority, Objective Two: Analyzing the need and impact of establishing a
         CBDO in Nampa.

        Housing Priority, Objective Six: The Community Development Department will
         evaluate the feasibility and marketability of a low-interest loan program for owner-
         occupied and rental unit rehabilitation utilizing a lender pool from the bank, alternative
         financing or CDBG funds.




                                                                                                      47
City of Nampa                                                           CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




Priority of Projects as Identified in Consolidated Plan:

It is clear from the following table that the City of Nampa is working diligently to insure that
CDBG funds are expended on projects identified as a “High” priority for the community in the
City of Nampa’s Consolidated Plan for Housing and Community Development, 2002 – 2007.



Project                                                High         Medium            Low
Community Family Shelter                                 
Empowerment Education Program                            
Gateway Crossing Resident Services                       
Northside Neighborhood Youth Services                    
Housing Choice Voucher Homeownership Option              
Gateway Neighborhood Revitalization                      
Nampa Family Justice Center                              
CASDAP                                                   
Casa de la Raza                                          
Downtown Façade Rehabilitation Program                   
Downtown Directional Signage                             
Downtown Façade Design                                   
Downtown Abandoned Sign Removal                          
Downtown Crosswalk Rehabilitation                        




                                                                                                   48
City of Nampa                                                                       CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




Fulfilling the Consolidated Plan’s Priorities, Objectives and Strategies
Refer to the Nampa Consolidated Plan, 2002–2007, Part 8 or the excerpt provided above
Priority         Objective        Strategy   2002 2003 2004 2005 2005 CDBG Project
                 Objective 1         A                                Gateway Crossing Services & Administration
HOUSING          Objective 2         A                                      Home Ownership Option, & Gateway
                                                                                       Neighborhood
                 Objective 3         A                                            Gateway Neighborhood
                                     B                                            Gateway Neighborhood
                 Objective 4         A                                                  CASDAP
                                     B
                                     C
                 Objective 5         A                                         Community Family Shelter
                 Objective 6         A                                                 Administration
                 Objective 7         A                                               Administration
                                     B               
          Objective 1                A                                 Gateway Crossing Services & Administration
COMMUNITY Objective 2
DEVELOP-
                                     A                    
MENT      Objective 3                A                                       Casa de la Raza, Administration
                                     B                                                Administration
                                     C                                   Library & Police Station Design Services
                                                                                       &Administration
                 Objective 4         A                                            Code Enforcement
                 Objective 5         A              
                 Objective 6*        A               
                                     B                                   Downtown Façade Design & Rehab Program,
                                                                                 Abandoned Sign Removal
                                     C                                      Downtown Abandoned Sign Removal

                 Objective 1         A                                              Administration
PUBLIC
SERVICES
                                     B               
                 Objective 2         A                                               Administration
                 Objective 3         A                                                Administration
                                     B                                                Administration
                 Objective 4         A                                         Community Family Shelter
                 Objective 5         A                               Empowerment Education, Family Justice Center
                 Objective 6         A                                 Northside Youth Services & Casa de la Raza
                 Objective 7         A              
ECONOMIC         Objective 1         A                                                Administration
DEVELOP-
MENT
                 Objective 2         A                                  Downtown Crosswalk Rehabilitation, Abandoned
                                                                        Sign Removal, Signage Program & Administration
                 Objective 3**       A                                      Library & Police Station Design Services
*Added to the Action Plan in PY 2003; **Added to Action Plan in PY 2005
Note: Please reference the project descriptions for a detailed analysis of how these projects achieved each
Consolidated Plan objective.




                                                                                                                  49
City of Nampa                                                         CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




                      % of Funding Allocated to Each Priority for PY 2005

Priority          Project                                                          Allocated
                                                                                   Funding
Housing           Salvation Army of Nampa – Homeless Shelter Operations            $49,400.00
                  Gateway Crossing Resident Services                                $2,788.95
                  Gateway Neighborhood Revitalization Project                      $67,667.60
                  Southwestern Idaho Cooperative Housing Authority                 $43,425.00
                  Nampa Fire Department – CASDAP                                   $14,475.00
                  City Administration (1/4)                                        $29,453.40
Housing % of Total Funding:                      24.1%
Community         Code Enforcement                                               $150,542.99
Development       Downtown Nampa Façade Design                                    $25,000.00
                  Downtown Nampa Façade Matching Grant Program                   $147,375.00
                  Academy of Delinquency – Casa de la Raza                        $66,300.00
                  City Administration (1/4)                                       $29,453.40
Community Development % of Total Funding:         48.6%
Public Services   Valley Crisis Center – Empowerment Education Program             $23,826.00
                  Academy of Delinquency – Northside Neighborhood Youth            $12,345.25
                  Services
                  City Administration (1/4)                                        $29,453.40
Public Services % of Total Funding:                7.6%
Economic          Downtown Nampa Abandoned Sign Removal                             $5,000.00
Development       Downtown Library & Police Station Design Services                $30,000.00
                  Downtown Nampa Directional Signage                               $49,125.00
                  Downtown Nampa Crosswalk Rehabilitation                          $56,000.00
                  City Administration (1/4)                                        $29,453.40
Economic Development % of Total Funding:          19.7 %




                                                                                               50
City of Nampa                                                     CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



                     % of Funding Allocated to Each Priority for PY 2004

Priority        Project                                                        Allocated
                                                                                Funding
Housing          Salvation Army of Nampa – Homeless Shelter Operations         $50,000
                 Gateway Crossing Resident Services                            $13,000
                 Gateway Neighborhood Revitalization Project                   $35,000
                 Syringa House – Street Improvements                           $75,169
                 City Administration (1/4)                                     $30,650
Housing % of Total Funding:                      25.5%
Community        ADA Sidewalk Improvements                                     $75,000
Development      Code Enforcement                                              $80,500
                 City Administration (1/4)                                     $30,650
Community Development % of Total Funding:         23.2%
Public Services Syringa House – Drug and Alcohol Therapist                    $15,000
                 Nampa Family Justice Center – Rehabilitation                $292,731
                 Nampa Family Justice Center – Relocation Assistance          $40,000
                 City Administration (1/4)                                    $30,650
Public Services % of Total Funding:                47.3%
Economic         City Administration (1/4)                                     $30,650
Development
Economic Development % of Total Funding:             4%




                                                                                           51
City of Nampa                                                        CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



                      % of Funding Allocated to Each Priority for PY 2003

Priority         Project                                                          Allocated
                                                                                   Funding
Housing          Southwestern Idaho Cooperative Housing Authority                 $50,000
                 Salvation Army of Nampa – Homeless Shelter Operations            $35,000
                 City Administration (1/4)                                        $27,500
Housing % of Total Funding:                        12%
Community        City of Nampa – Infrastructure Improvements                    $449,090
Development      Hispanic Cultural Center – Family Resources Center (1/3)        $10,650
                 Majestic Theater Roof Repair                                   $169,760
                 Code Enforcement                                                $70,000
                 City Administration (1/4)                                       $27,500
Community Development % of Total Funding:           75%
Public Services McAuley Project                                                   $15,000
                 Valley Crisis Center – Empowerment Education                     $10,000
                 Family Justice Center – Design Services                          $30,500
                 Hispanic Cultural Center – Family Resources Center (2/3)         $21,300
                 City Administration (1/4)                                        $27,500
Public Services % of Total Funding:                  11%
Economic         City Administration (1/4)                                        $27,500
Development
Economic Development % of Total Funding:               2%




                                                                                              52
City of Nampa                                                      CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



                      % of Funding Allocated to Each Priority for PY 2002

Priority         Project                                                        Allocated
                                                                                Funding
Housing          Nampa Shelter Foundation –Homeless shelter construction      $237,000
                 Salvation Army of Nampa – Homeless Shelter Operations         $40,000
                 Mercy Housing Idaho                                          $185,000
                 1/3 City Administration                                       $35,066
Housing % of Total Funding:                      54%
Community        City of Nampa – Park Acquisition / Development               $188,300
Development      Hispanic Cultural Center - Construction                       $50,000
                 Code Enforcement                                              $55,000
                 1/3 City Administration                                       $35,066
Community Development % of Total Funding:         35%
Public Services McAuley Project                                                 $22,000
                Valley Crisis Center – Empowerment Education                    $13,000
                Boys and Girls Club – Project Learn                             $20,000
                Nampa Police Dept. – Crime Watch Program                         $5,000
                1/3 City Administration                                         $35,066
Public Services % of Total Funding:                11%
Economic                                                                      $0
Development
Economic Development % of Total Funding:             0%




                                                                                            53
City of Nampa                                                          CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




NEIGHBORHOOD REVITALIZATION STRATEGY AREA -
GOALS, BENCHMARKS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS
In April of 1998, HUD approved the City of Nampa’s Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy
Area (NRSA.) This approved area is concentrated in “North Nampa” and encompasses the
Census Tracts 207 Block Groups 1 and 4 and CT 202 Block Groups 1-3 as defined by the 2000
Census (see Attached Map). As part of the strategic process for Nampa’s newly revised
Consolidated Plan for Housing and Community Development, 2002 – 2007, the benchmarks for
the Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area were reviewed and revised as well (see attached
maps for designated area).

In an effort to more accurately reflect the accomplishments of the Neighborhood Revitalization
Strategy Area, the following new benchmarks were developed. These benchmarks provide a
measurement tool to assess progress and leverage limited funds creatively to increase positive
outcomes. A benefit to the NRSA is the coordinated focus and leveraging of resources that can
occur when multiple organizations, individuals, and services can be synchronized to provide a
tight pattern of multiple opportunities for enhancement of a relatively small geographical area.
The revised benchmarks are as follows:

    1.  Stabilization of Housing Valuation, (time on the market).
    2.  Code Enforcement Activities, (compliance rates, inspections completed.)
    3.  Resident Involvement, (meetings, participation).
    4.  City Outreach Effort, (number of publications distributed, specific events).
    5.  Housing Activity (type of improvements, # of permits issued)
    6.  Smoke Detectors Installed.
    7.  Porch Lights Installed.
    8.  Crime Watch Groups and Contacts. (Establishment of new groups, retention of
        established groups).
    9. Infrastructure, (identify need, complete installation of water lines, signals and
        streetlights).
    10. Economic Development Activities, (new job opportunities for low-income).
    11. Youth Services (# of children served at Boys and Girls Club)
    12. Analysis and creation of new CBDO for economic empowerment or housing issues.
    13. Development of neighborhood plans with resident driven process.
    14. Increase in Home Ownership
    15. Decrease in Blighted Property (# of demolitions and repairs)
    16. Increase in Park Land.
    17. Location of Financial Institution in or very close to on north side of NRSA.
    18. Decrease in Rental Property - to increase stability of neighborhood.
    19. New businesses attracted to the area.
    20. Landlord Training and Screening – teaching responsible ownership.
    21. Business Association in Area Formed.




                                                                                                54
City of Nampa                                                              CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




                Evaluating N.R.S.A. Benchmarks, Program Years 2002 - 2006
Benchmark                                                   2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
1. Stabilization of Housing Valuation

2. Code Enforcement Activities                                                
3. Resident Involvement                                                       
4. City Outreach Effort                                                       
5. Housing Activity                                                            
6. Smoke Detectors Installed                                                  
7. Porch Lights Installed

8. Crime Watch Groups and Contacts                                            
9. Infrastructure                                                             
10. Economic Development Activities                                              
11. Youth Services                                                            
12. Analysis & Creation of new CBDO for economic
empowerment or housing issues.
13. Development of neighborhood plans with resident                              
driven process.
14. Increase in Home Ownership                                                  
15. Decrease in Blighted Property                                    
16. Increase in Park Land                                                        
17. Location of financial institution in or very close to         
north side of NRSA
18. Decrease in rental property

19. New businesses attracted to the area                                         
20. Landlord training and screening                                           
21. Business association in area formed.




                                                                                                    55
City of Nampa                                                            CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




Evaluating NRSA Benchmarks, Fiscal 2002–2007 (Program 2002-2006):
Just like the evaluation of the Consolidated Plan Objectives achieved in PY 2005, it is clear that
the City of Nampa needs to continue to focus on developing more opportunities for affordable
housing development and economic development in the Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy
Area.

As outlined in the discussion evaluating the Consolidated Plan objectives achieved, the city is
committed to the following projects in the PY 2006, which will help to achieve some of the
N.R.S.A. benchmarks in these priorities.

     Analysis and Creation of a new CBDO for economic empowerment or housing issues.

     Rehabilitation/new construction in the N.R.S.A. promoting increased home ownership.

     Implementing Downtown Revitalization Plan geared towards business recruitment and
      job creation.

     Development of a new Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Plan




                                                                                                  56
City of Nampa                                                                     CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




                               Evaluating N.R.S.A. Benchmarks, 2005
Benchmark                                     Accomplishments                Project                    Funding
1. Stabilization of Housing Valuation
2. Code Enforcement Activities                On-going                       Code Enforcement           CDBG 2005
3. Resident Involvement                       On-going                       City of Nampa –            CDBG 2005
                                                                             Administration
                                              North Nampa Neighborhood       Developed and              Urban Renewal
                                              Improvement Projects           implemented projects
                                                                             prioritized in 2003.
4. City Outreach Effort                       On-going                       City of Nampa –            CDBG 2005
                                                                             Administration
5. Housing Activity                           Painting and Cleaning Up       Brush-Up Nampa             Urban Renewal
                                              Homes for Elderly & Disabled
6. Smoke Detectors Installed                  On-going                       CASDAP                     CDBG 2005
7. Porch Lights Installed
8. Crime Watch Groups and Contacts            On-going CDBG 2003 Project     Nampa Police Dept. –       CDBG 2003
                                                                             Crime Watch Program
9. Infrastructure                             ADA Sidewalks                  ADA Sidewalks              CDBG 2004
                                              Improvements                   Improvements
10. Economic Development Activities           On-going                       Economic Development       City Funds
                                                                             Director Hired
11. Youth Services                            On-going – Academy of          Northside Neighborhood     CDBG 2005
                                              Delinquency                    Youth Services
12. Analysis & Creation of new CBDO for
economic empowerment or housing issues.
13. Development of neighborhood plans         On-going                       North Nampa Master         CDBG 2005 &
with resident driven process.                                                Plan                       Urban Renewal
14. Increase in Home Ownership                Construction of six new        Gateway Neighborhood       CDBG 2005,
                                              single-family homes &          Revitalization, SICHA      2004 & 2003
                                              Downpayment assistance
15. Decrease in Blighted Property             On-Going. 117 Structures       Voluntary Demolition       Urban Renewal
                                              demolished since 8/02.         Program
16. Increase in Park Land                     Acquisition of property for    Starr park                 Urban Renewal &
                                              development of new park                                   General Funds
17. Location of financial institution in or
very close to north side of NRSA
18. Decrease in rental property
19. New businesses attracted to the area      Recruited & expanded           Great American             General Funds
                                              businesses                     Appetizer, Retail Center
20. Landlord training and screening           150+ landlords trained,        Landlord Awareness         CDBG 2005 &
                                              detecting illegal activity.    Training Program           General Funds
21. Business association in area formed.



                                                                                                             57
City of Nampa                                                                     CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




                               Evaluating N.R.S.A. Benchmarks, 2004
Benchmark                                     Accomplishments                Project                  Funding
1. Stabilization of Housing Valuation
2. Code Enforcement Activities                On-going                       Code Enforcement         CDBG 2004
3. Resident Involvement                       On-going                       City of Nampa –          CDBG 2004
                                                                             Administration
                                              North Nampa Neighborhood       Developed and            Urban Renewal
                                              Improvement Projects           implemented projects
                                                                             prioritized in 2003.
4. City Outreach Effort                       On-going                       City of Nampa –          CDBG 2004
                                                                             Administration
5. Housing Activity                           Painting and Cleaning Up       Brush-Up Nampa           Urban Renewal
                                              Homes for Elderly & Disabled
6. Smoke Detectors Installed                  On-going CDBG 2000 Project     CASDAP *                 CDBG 2000
7. Porch Lights Installed                     On-going CDBG 2000 Project     CASDAP *                 CDBG 2000
8. Crime Watch Groups and Contacts            On-going CDBG 2000 Project     Nampa Police Dept. –     CDBG 2000
                                                                             Crime Watch Program
9. Infrastructure                             ADA Sidewalks                  ADA Sidewalks            CDBG 2004
                                              Improvements                   Improvements
10. Economic Development Activities
11. Youth Services                            On-going CDBG 2003 Project     Hispanic Cultural        CDBG 2003
                                                                             Center Family
                                                                             Resources Center
                                              Crime and gang prevention      Boys and Girls Club –    Urban Renewal
                                              program.                       Club Night
12. Analysis & Creation of new CBDO for
economic empowerment or housing issues.
13. Development of neighborhood plans
with resident driven process.
14. Increase in Home Ownership                Construction of six new        Gateway Neighborhood     CDBG 2004
                                              single-family homes            Revitalization Project
15. Decrease in Blighted Property             On-Going. 117 Structures       Voluntary Demolition     Urban Renewal
                                              demolished since 8/02.         Program
16. Increase in Park Land
17. Location of financial institution in or   Home Federal in Hispanic       Hispanic Cultural        CDBG 2002
very close to north side of NRSA              Cultural Center – 2002         Center
18. Decrease in rental property
19. New businesses attracted to the area
20. Landlord training and screening           150+ landlords trained,        Landlord Awareness       Urban Renewal
                                              detecting illegal activity.    Training Program
21. Business association in area formed.




                                                                                                           58
City of Nampa                                                                     CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




                               Evaluating N.R.S.A. Benchmarks, 2003
Benchmark                                     Accomplishments                Project                   Funding
1. Stabilization of Housing Valuation
2. Code Enforcement Activities                On-going                       Code Enforcement          CDBG 2003
3. Resident Involvement                       On-going                       City of Nampa –           CDBG 2003
                                                                             Administration
                                              North Nampa Neighborhood       Conducted three           Urban Renewal
                                              Improvement Projects           neighborhood meetings
                                                                             to prioritize projects.
4. City Outreach Effort                       On-going                       City of Nampa –           CDBG 2003
                                                                             Administration
5. Housing Activity                           Painting and Cleaning Up       Brush-Up Nampa            Urban Renewal
                                              Homes for Elderly & Disabled
6. Smoke Detectors Installed                                                 CASDAP *                  CDBG 2000
7. Porch Lights Installed                                                    CASDAP *                  CDBG 2000
8. Crime Watch Groups and Contacts                                           Nampa Police Dept. –      CDBG 2000
                                                                             Crime Watch Program
9. Infrastructure                             10th Ave. Sewer Replacement    Infrastructure            CDBG 2003
                                              Project                        Improvements
                                              5th Street North Extension     Street Build-out          Urban Renewal
10. Economic Development Activities
11. Youth Services                                                           Hispanic Cultural         CDBG 2003
                                                                             Center Family
                                                                             Resources Center
                                              Crime and gang prevention      Boys and Girls Club –     Urban Renewal
                                              program.                       Club Night
12. Analysis & Creation of new CBDO for
economic empowerment or housing issues.
13. Development of neighborhood plans
with resident driven process.
14. Increase in Home Ownership
15. Decrease in Blighted Property             84 Structures have been        Voluntary Demolition      Urban Renewal
                                              demolished since 8/02.         Program
16. Increase in Park Land
17. Location of financial institution in or   Home Federal in Hispanic       Hispanic Cultural         CDBG 2002
very close to north side of NRSA              Cultural Center                Center
18. Decrease in rental property
19. New businesses attracted to the area
20. Landlord training and screening           150+ landlords trained,        Landlord Awareness        Urban Renewal
                                              detecting illegal activity.    Training Program
21. Business association in area formed.



                                                                                                            59
City of Nampa                                                                         CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




                               Evaluating N.R.S.A. Benchmarks, 2002
Benchmark                                     Accomplishments               Project                      Funding
1. Stabilization of Housing Valuation
2. Code Enforcement Activities                                              Code Enforcement             CDBG 2002
3. Resident Involvement                                                     City of Nampa –              CDBG 2002
                                                                            Administration
                                              Distributed to 3500           North Nampa Residents        Urban Renewal
                                              households.                   Association Newsletter
4. City Outreach Effort                                                     City of Nampa –              CDBG 2002
                                                                            Administration
5. Housing Activity
6. Smoke Detectors Installed                                                CASDAP *                     CDBG 2000
7. Porch Lights Installed                                                   CASDAP *                     CDBG 2000
8. Crime Watch Groups and Contacts                                          Nampa Police Dept. – Crime   CDBG 2000
                                                                            Watch Program
9. Infrastructure                                                           Indian Creek Bridge          Urban Renewal
10. Economic Development Activities
11. Youth Services                                                          Boys and Girls Club –        CDBG 2002
                                                                            Project Learn
                                              Crime and gang                Boys and Girls Club – Club   Urban Renewal
                                              prevention program.           Night
12. Analysis & Creation of new CBDO for
economic empowerment or housing issues.
13. Development of neighborhood plans
with resident driven process.
14. Increase in Home Ownership
15. Decrease in Blighted Property             84 Structures have been       Voluntary Demolition         Urban Renewal
                                              demolished since 8/02.        Program
16. Increase in Park Land                     Developed park at             City of Nampa – Park         CDBG 2002
                                              11th Ave. & 16th Ave. N.      Acquisition/Development
                                              Snake River Park              City of Nampa                Urban Renewal
                                              improvements
                                              Hunter Park                   City of Nampa                Urban Renewal
                                              improvements
17. Location of financial institution in or
very close to north side of NRSA
18. Decrease in rental property
19. New businesses attracted to the area
20. Landlord training and screening           150+ landlords trained,       Landlord Awareness           Urban Renewal
                                              detecting illegal activity.   Training Program
21. Business association in area formed.


                                                                                                               60
City of Nampa                                                            CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




Collaboration and Leveraging in the N.R.S.A.
One of the goals of a Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area plan is to leverage funds and
spur additional economic development activity that may not be directly funded by CDBG or
other federal funds. Nampa’s NRSA plan has been highly effective at stimulating dialog with
other funding agencies as well as keeping the revitalization of North Nampa as a priority for the
City as a whole. This focus has allowed for collaboration and creativity in meeting our goals of
economic empowerment and enhancing the residential and commercial neighborhoods in this
area. Below are listed a variety of projects and efforts which have been undertaken in the NRSA
in the last year. Unfortunately many of the projects ceased to exist with the sunset of the Urban
Renewal Agency in September 2005. However, some of the projects remained through the
remaining Urban Renewal Agency funds or have been funded through other funding sources.
With the upcoming North Nampa Master Plan, the City of Nampa is optimistic of identifying
projects and activities that will help achieve the vision that the City and residents have for the
neighborhood.

Abandoned Vehicles Towed: Funded through the Urban Renewal Agency, the city of Nampa
not only paid for the towing of abandoned vehicles but also paid the owner $25 as a nominal
award. Six vehicles were removed from April 1, 2005 to the sunset of the Urban Renewal
Agency.

Habitat for Humanity House: Nampa Urban Renewal Agency funded the acquisition of a vacant
lot for the development of two Habitat for Humanity homes in North Nampa. These two homes
have been built and are now occupied.

Property Demolition Project: This project improved the quality of life for the residents of the
Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area by demolishing and removing blighted, vacant
structures, in order to make room for new construction, affordable housing and improvements on
these properties. The property owners retain title to the property and no liens are filed to recover
the costs of the demolition. The Nampa Fire Department and Police SWAT Team were asked to
utilize some of the old buildings for training exercises.

The original hope was that some of the lots that had been cleared of deteriorated structures could
be purchase by Neighborhood Housing Services, Inc. for in-fill single-family, affordable housing
and Habitat for Humanity. Unfortunately, the lots did not meet with the environmental
requirements of HOME and CDBG and therefore could not be used by Neighborhood Housing
Services, Inc. for the Gateway Revitalization projects. This demolition project was funded
through a collaborated effort by the City of Nampa CDBG program, the Nampa Urban Renewal
Agency Board and Idaho Housing and Finance Association.

Project House: A second collaborative project between the Nampa Housing Authority, the
Nampa Urban Renewal Agency Board and the Nampa School District. Two lots that were
previously cleared of deteriorated structures in the Property Demolition Project were purchased
for single-family home construction. The construction of the homes was conducted by high
school students studying construction vocational skills as part of their curriculum. After
construction, the homes are sold to qualifying families in the Nampa Housing Authority’s Family


                                                                                                  61
City of Nampa                                                            CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



Self-Sufficiency Program. Funds from the sale of these homes are then returned to the program
to assist with lot purchases and the construction of future homes. Currently, one property is
under pre-development to construct an additional single family home. This partnership was
extremely well received by all parties involved and the community-at-large, and it is anticipated
that it will serve as a successful program for the City of Nampa for many years to come.

Landlord Awareness Training Program: In partnership with the Nampa Police Department, the
Community Development Division organized and implemented a fourth and fifth training to
assist landlords to keep illegal activity out of rental property. Over 370 landlords have attended
and the feedback is extremely positive

The program, developed by Campbell DeLong Resources, Inc. of Oregon gives practical ideas
for landlords on security issues, working with the police department, property maintenance
suggestions, and how to recognize the warning signs of drug activity on their property; as well as
how to property screen potential residents. Conducted in collaboration with the Nampa Police
Department, this program was funded by the CDBG and City general funding.

“Club Night” at the Boys and Girls Club of Nampa: A collaborative effort between the Boys and
Girls Club, the Nampa Police Department and the Urban Renewal Agency, to provide a youth
recreational program designed to prevent crime, gang and juvenile delinquency. Modeled after a
national program.

North Nampa Neighborhood Improvements Project: Prior to the sunset of the Urban Renewal
Agency, 56 Neighborhood Clean-Up Projects were implemented and funded through the Urban
Renewal Agency in collaboration with the City of Nampa Community Development Department
and the North Nampa Neighborhood Association.

Brush Up Nampa: During the course of this program year, two Brush Up Nampa events have
been held. With the help of over 300 volunteers, the two Brush Up Nampa were again a huge
success. Over 30 property owners were assisted with painting and property clean up projects.
Funding for this project was provided through the remaining Nampa Urban Renewal Agency
funding and City general funding. Additionally, the City of Nampa hired a Volunteer
Coordinator who assists with recruiting volunteers and processing Brush Up Nampa applications.

Economic Development: The City of Nampa hired a full-time Economic Development Director.
During this program year the city has been able to recruit businesses in and to help existing
businesses expand. Two notable manufacturing businesses growing in Nampa are Micron and
Great American Appetizer. Micron, a large computer chip manufacture based in Boise, opened a
plant in Nampa creating 200 jobs just outside of the NRSA. The second is an existing company,
Great American Appetizer, based within the NRSA boundaries. The city helped Great American
Appetizer expand through passage of an Industrial Revenue Bond and assistance in obtaining a
Work Force Training Fund Grant. As a result of the expansion, Great American Appetizers will
be creating 125 new jobs. Additionally, the City passed a General Obligation Bond for the
reconstruction of Garrity Blvd. Garrity Blvd serves as a major entrance, not only into the City
but, into the NRSA. With the reconstruction, a surge in businesses interesting in the area has
been seen. Additionally, land along Franklin Blvd has been acquired for commercial



                                                                                                  62
City of Nampa                                                           CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



development that is expected to be realized during PY 2006. Two additional facilities within the
NRSA are currently under development with expected openings to occur in spring 2007.

Park Land: Funded through the Urban Renewal Agency, the City of Nampa developed a
neighborhood pocket park in the NRSA. Starr Park is currently open with a shelter, playground
equipment, trees and a sprinklers system. Grass will be in place in spring 2007. Until that time,
bark is on the ground to allow for usage.




                                                                                                 63
City of Nampa                                                            CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




FAIR HOUSING
All projects funded through the City of Nampa’s Community Development Block Grant program
are implemented in ways to promote fair housing and equal opportunity.

In 2004, the City Council officially adopted a Revised Fair Housing Analysis of Impediments
and Action Plan.

The following impediments were identified:

Public Sector Review:

        The definition of “Family” in the Planning and Zoning Ordinance could appear to be
         contrary with Fair Housing law.
        The city’s position regarding restrictive covenants might raise Fair Housing concerns.
        It would be useful to provide annual training for Planning and Zoning Commissioners
         and staff.

Private Sector Review:

        Five Major Employers human resources office were contacted and asked three questions
         regarding fair housing. All five were not aware of fair housing laws.
        Evidence of Fair Housing violations due to reasonable accommodation or rental/eviction
         condition is documented.
        Indications of need for better understanding of Fair Housing laws/issues were observed in
         the lending industry.

Other Public & Private Areas:

        Indications that the process of filing and carrying through with a Fair Housing complaint
         may be too daunting for individuals.
        Indications of a perception of steering Hispanic individuals toward housing in the North
         Nampa area.
        State and Federal level complaint data supported by community demographic information
         suggests that discrimination on the basis of disability and familial status occurs in
         Nampa.

Recommendations to rectify and mitigate the impediments are as follows:

        Revise city ordinances in regards to familial status.
        Offer annual training and awareness to both city employees and major employers in the
         area.
        Develop a new master plan for the North Nampa area.

It is clear that one of the most important items associated with this new Fair Housing AI and
Action Plan are the actions and performance measurements needed to overcome the identified


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impediments. All sub-recipients of CDBG grant funds receive a copy and adherence to the Plan
is mandated in sub-recipient contracts. The City of Nampa’s 1996 Fair Housing Plan was so
broad in scope and action that the city struggled in its efforts to address the impediments
identified. To that end, the City of Nampa elected to extend its PY 2005 to 18 months in order to
re-evaluate the benchmarks and master plan for the North Nampa Revitalization Strategy Area.
The City of Nampa contracted for the development of a North Nampa Master Plan, it is
anticipated that a final document will be available in March. This information will be
incorporated into the new five year Consolidated Plan due the summer of 2007.

The City of Nampa initiates a yearly Fair Housing public awareness campaign in April. This
campaign begins with the Mayor proclaiming April as Fair Housing Month for the city. This
event is publicized and community members are encouraged to attend. Fair Housing Training
was conducted by the Fair Housing Council and Idaho Legal Aid Services at the Nampa Housing
Authority. On April 6, 2006 the HUD Boise Field Office hosted a free training seminar. The
seminar included presentations from several officials including Bryan Greene, deputy assistant
secretary for enforcement and programs at HUD. The City of Nampa distributed notices of the
training to organizations in the city and new staff that was joining the city attended. The City
also distributes Fair Housing information to major employers.

In addition, the City of Nampa has already collected substantial training material but is
continuing to collect and compile training and public awareness materials to be used in annual
training with appropriate city employees and to send out to major employers in the area for
reference. The City of Nampa sponsors a luncheon at the Chamber of Commerce every spring
and this will be used as an opportunity to not only increase awareness with the City’s major
employers, but the smaller employers as well. The Community Development Department staff
has been working with the Mayors office, economic development staff and the public
information officer to begin collection and preparation of material to be distributed during this
event. The City of Nampa has also included links and informational material on to the City
website for the public to review and education about the Fair Housing Act. The website also
contains information on how to file a complaint.

The City of Nampa also continues to coordinate efforts with Intermountain Fair Housing Council
and Idaho Legal Aid, including certifying consistency with our consolidated plan for their grant
application efforts. Nampa is also continuing to translate city codes into Spanish in an effort to
reduce communication barriers. Fair Housing brochures in both English and Spanish published
by IFHC were made available at city hall and various local businesses, and at local neighborhood
association meetings. Community Development staff is working on preparing the brochures for
publication on the website.

The City of Nampa also sits on the Idaho Fair Housing Forum that is facilitated by the local
HUD office in Boise. As part of the forum, the city helped sponsor the Fair Housing Calendar.
Through sponsorship from the City of Nampa, Idaho Commerce & Labor, local businesses, and
numerous other organizations, a calendar contest to coincide with Fair Housing Month in April
2006 was implemented. The contest was open to all Idaho high school students with winning
entries chosen based on how well the student artistically interpreted fair housing in their
communities. This contest has resulted in, not only statewide media attention but, local media



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attention. Arielle Nelson, a local Nampa High School student, won first prize for her artistic
rendering of diversity in our community and the importance of fair housing. The City of Nampa
is scheduling a recognition ceremony for the fall 2006. These calendars are to be available to the
public at no cost. The City of Nampa will be provided with 500 copies in December and will be
distributing to local business and sub-recipients to encourage dialogue about the subject.

The City of Nampa has also begun communication with the City of Boise and the Idaho
Department of Commerce and Labor CDBG staff about a collaborative effort to educate
residents in the Treasure Valley rather than to address this issue on our own. These
communications will be continuing through the PY 2006 with the ultimate outcome of a plan of
action to implement no later than PY 2007.

The City of Nampa has improved access to all city services and amenities for those with
disabilities. Accessibility improvements were completed at all city owned public facilities,
including improvements to city parks, curb cuts, accessible routes of travel, and improvement of
amenities where accessibility barriers existed.



AFFORDABLE HOUSING

It is clear that the City of Nampa needs to focus on its programs and partners that encourage and
develop affordable housing in Nampa. Until its closure in October 2001, Nampa Neighborhood
Housing Services (NNHS) administered many of the City’s efforts to increase the supply and
condition of affordable housing. With the closure of NNHS, the City of Nampa continues to
evaluate the need for city sponsored affordable housing programs. The city began evaluating the
need of a Community Based Development Organization. However, a determination has not been
made at this time.

The City of Nampa is currently working with Neighborhood Housing Services, Inc., a CBDO out
of Boise, on a phased Gateway Neighborhood Revitalization Project. Property was acquired
with PY 2004 CDBG funds to construct six affordable single-family homes in North Nampa.
And PY 2005 CDBG funds were to be used to acquire more property for an additional six new
single-family homes.

However, both of these projects have been put on hold. The first project has been put on hold as
result of the impact of the expected floodplain expansion. The City of Nampa has requested
NHS to revisit this project to evaluate the viability of new construction using floodplain
mitigation measures that include filling the property to raise the buildings out of the floodplain
zone. The City of Nampa has requested NHS to visit with their other funding agencies to
determine the viability of the project. The City of Nampa is awaiting the outcome of that
meeting to determine what avenue to pursue. The second project has been delayed due to
Neighborhood Housing Services inability to procure adequate property. As a result, NHS
applied to the city and was awarded in PY 2006 more funds to assist in the purchase of property
and infrastructure development costs. However, with rising property costs and construction costs
that have occurred in the past few years as well as the expected floodplain expansion, the City of



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Nampa has requested NHS to revisit this project to evaluate the viability of new construction
versus extensive rehabilitation of existing housing stock. They have been requested to visit with
their other funding agencies to determine the viability of either project. It is still the goal of the
City of Nampa to develop affordable housing.

In addition to Neighborhood Housing Services, Inc., the City of Nampa has been worked with
Nampa Housing Authority on the purchase and construction of two lots yielding two single-
family affordable homes in North Nampa. Currently, one property is under pre-development to
construct an additional single family home. And Habitat for Humanity recently constructed two
Habitat for Humanity homes in North Nampa of which both are now occupied.

In terms of housing rehabilitation, Nampa faces a challenge. Many of the homes in Nampa’s
LMI neighborhoods are older homes often on substandard foundations. They warrant continued
evaluation and consideration of potential innovative projects to leverage federal funding and
provide the best solution. The City of Nampa is evaluating the viability of developing a
rehabilitation program, not only with NHS, but also by the City.

With that said, opportunities for homeownership for low and moderate-income families are
continuing in Nampa. Low interest rates, builder incentives, and innovative lending programs
with local banks and mortgage companies have provided many families a way to move from
rental units into a home of their own. Opportunities for homeownership have also opened up
with the Family Self-Sufficiency program being offered by Southwestern Idaho Cooperative
Housing Authority. City staff serves on the Advisory Board of this program.

For those families receiving housing assistance who want to become economically self-
sufficient, they can voluntarily enroll in the FSS program and begin to work on a plan.
As the family’s goals are accomplished and they start to pay more towards their rent, a
comparable amount to their rent increase is deposited in an escrow/savings account for them.
The money going into the account comes from the Housing Authority (not the family). This is
the money that would be used for their rental subsidy if they were not able to pay more on their
own. When the family successfully completes their goals/contract, they will receive the money
in the escrow account and most use these funds to provide a down payment on a home and pay
off debt. Not only does SICHA administer a FSS program, but the Nampa Housing Authority
also administers the FSS program for it’s residents.

PY 2003 funds were allocated to assist disabled families participating in the FSS program to
convert their section 8 rental subsidy into a mortgage subsidy. Thus far, eleven families in using
CDBG (nineteen total) have closed on new homes with this program, and the contract with
SICHA was extended to August 31, 2005. In addition, SICHA was allocated additional funds
through PY 2005 to continue the program.

Since its inception, the Community Assisted Smoke Detector and Addressing Program has
provided specific rehabilitation assistance to 2753 homes in north Nampa by installing life
saving smoke detectors in homes that had fire safety concerns. While installing the detectors,
firefighters were often able to make recommendations to residents regarding other safety
improvements for their homes. While not solving all health and safety concerns in these homes,



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this program provides a front line effort to help save lives and raise awareness about fire safety
in older, balloon-framed homes. This program was continued in PY 2005 with additional
funding to start installing Smoke Detectors and Address Numbers in the Northwest Nazarene
University Neighborhood, with 1129 homes being assisted.

The City of Nampa also continues to support collaborative efforts designed to support affordable
housing. The Community Development Division is a member of the Region III Housing
Coalition and the Idaho Housing Policy and Coordination Council. By participating in these
organizations and staying abreast of programs and housing projects being undertaken by other
agencies, it allows the funds the City allocates for affordable housing to leverage other public
and private funds.

The City of Nampa recognizes its role in supporting more development in two housing needs
categories outlined in the Consolidated Plan as “high” priorities, large related renter housing
(31–50%) and owner-occupied housing (31-50%). Working with Neighborhood Housing
Services, Inc., SICHA and Nampa Housing Authority, the City of Nampa is pursuing owner-
occupied housing, however the city has yet to identify a partner for the large related renter (31-
50%) housing needs and will be strategically working in that direction in the program years to
come.




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CONTINUUM OF CARE


The Idaho Housing and Finance Association administer HUD Emergency Shelter and Supporting
Housing Grant funds that benefit local homeless individuals and providers. However, reducation
of homelessness is a strategy of the City’s Consolidated Plan. As referenced in the affordable
housing section of this report, the City continues to be very active in the Region III Housing
Coalition. In additional to advocacy and collaboration with issues regarding affordable housing,
the coalition is involved in the continuum of care, specifically supportive services and
emergency and transitional housing.

Specific actions supported by CDBG funding during this program year include the 2005 CDBG
public service funds allocated to a variety of organizations providing supportive services and
homeless programs, specifically the Salvation Army – Community Family Shelter. A network of
agencies throughout Nampa and Canyon County helps to provide services without notable
duplication.

Homeless prevention activities in the Nampa area include FEMA rental and utility assistance
programs, referral to housing programs through Treasure Valley Referral and Resource Center,
food pantry programs, and case management services provided through a variety of agencies
including Terry Reilly Health Services, the Community Family Shelter and Valley Crisis Center.

Emergency Shelter- Three facilities located in Nampa serve the region with shelter and
supportive services for homeless. The first facility is the Lighthouse Mission, which is a 60- bed
facility, owned by the Boise Rescue Mission. Opened in November 1999, this facility provides
shelter to homeless single men and does not accept any governmental funding. In addition to
shelter, the Lighthouse Mission also provides three meals daily and food boxes to those who
need them. Additionally, they are in the process of adding a 12 apartment transitional
housing unit adjacent to the existing Lighthouse Mission which will accept women and children
as well as men. Units will be available for persons that are currently involved in the drug and
alcohol rehabilitation program offered by the Mission. The transitional housing units are
expected to open in November 2006.

The second facility is the Valley Crisis Center, which serves as the region’s only domestic
violence shelter and opened a new 9,000 square foot facility in December 1999. VCC received
$375,000 of CDBG funds in 1998 for this project. The facility has 64 beds and provides a wide
range of supportive services both to residents and non-resident clients, including educational
programs, daily meals and transitional housing.

The third facility is the Community Family Shelter which serves families and single women.
Nampa’s CDBG funds were awarded directly three years in a row to help with the construction
of this facility. The City also continues to fund operational costs of the shelter through public
service grants to the Nampa Salvation Army. Opened in 2002, the Community Family Shelter
has been running at full capacity since June, 2002. In addition to shelter, the Community Family
Shelter provides meals, case management, gas vouchers, hotel vouchers and job training.



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In 2004, the City of Nampa committed funds to the Syringa House, a facility that provides
housing and supportive services for abused teenage girls. This facility is not an emergency
shelter facility in the classic sense of the term. However, it does provide residential living
opportunities for teenage girls who are not able to live in foster care or with their families and in
turn ensures that they are not on the streets.


TRANSITIONAL HOUSING

Numerous sources for transitional housing exist within our community. The city of Nampa is
supportive of HOME or ESG grants by organizations to develop more transitional housing units
within the city. The existing units are linked to the continuum of care process through
participating organizations and sponsors of such transitional housing such as IDAHO, Inc,
Linden House, and Valley Crisis Center. Recently, both the Valley Crisis Center and the
Community Family Shelter have added transitional housing to their list of services provided.




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OTHER ACTIONS

1. Addressing Obstacles to Meeting Underserved Needs- The primary obstacle to meeting
underserved needs is the lack of identified and available resources. One way to help address this
obstacle is to help identify available resources for organizations within the community. To this
avenue, the City of Napa has implemented a webpage on the internet for Community Grants.
This webpage is an information only resource to help facilitate community organizations in
locating and researching resources available. Additionally, the City of Nampa hosted the HUD
sponsored Faith Based Initiative Grant Writing Workshop. Through collaborative efforts with
the local HUD Field Office in Boise, 142 people attended, with well over 40% comprising the
faith based community.

Groups identified as being underserved in the City of Nampa’s Consolidated Plan included
Hispanic residents, and those residents with disabilities. Many programs funded with CDBG
funds strive to provide services to these groups and implement programs in innovative ways to
address the lack of the use of services. One of the greatest accomplishments made in this area is
the community and neighborhood approach taken by the City’s bilingual Code Enforcement
Officer that works in the North Nampa Revitalization Strategy Area. Outreach to the Hispanic
community within the City has taken many forms including efforts to produce bilingual
publications, targeted marketing of programs, involvement by Hispanic residents on city
commissions and citizen committees, and cultural appreciation efforts.

In addition, the Hispanic Cultural Center has provided a central community center for the
Hispanic community to obtain services for their families, socially, economically and culturally.
Educational classes, job training and family improvement programs are all offered at the facility
both during the day and the evening. Cultural events celebrating the Hispanic heritage are hosted
by the Hispanic Cultural Center and are well attended by the entire community. In the last few
years, the Hispanic Cultural Center has not been used to the greatest extent possible by the
community or service organization. As a result management has changed at the Center and is
pursuing redevelopment of partnerships with other community organizations and recruitment of
a community-based bank to locate within the facility.

In terms of meeting the needs of the city’s residents with disabilities, the City of Nampa has
spent the last four years updating all of the city-owned facilities with ADA accessible amenities,
including the entire park system. In addition, the City of Nampa is in the process of
implementing a program to change over the old curb cut-outs at neighborhood intersections to
ADA accessible ramped curb cut-outs. And perhaps most importantly, in PY 2003 and PY 2005,
the City of Nampa teamed up with Southwest Idaho Cooperative Housing Authority to provide a
grant program that enabled disabled families to become homeowners.

2. Foster & Maintain Affordable Housing - The Housing Choice Voucher Option Program,
funded in 2003 and the Gateway Neighborhood Revitalization Project funded in 2004 & 2005
foster or maintain affordable housing. Details of each can be found in the project descriptions.

Housing needs of low-income families continue to be a focus of the Community Development
Block Grant program and every effort is made to maintain and increase the number and level of


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available housing within the City. The housing market continues to boom in Nampa and
developers actively have pursued LITC funding for new rental units and new homeownership
units targeting 70-90% of Area Median Income are being produced in the private market.

The City also continues to encourage housing developers to utilize additional funding sources the
City does not allocate including Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC), and continue to
evaluate opportunities to be supportive of these projects within its limits. The City also
encourages developers to leverage CDBG funding for housing projects with HOME funding
where appropriate. This is seen directly with the Gateway Housing Projects

Section 8 rental assistance is managed by Southwestern Idaho Cooperative Housing Authority
and the city has continued to fund the Housing Choice Voucher Option Program this Agency
provides to convert some of the rental vouchers into homeownership.

The Nampa Housing Authority manages “Project House”. This program is a collaborative effort
that began in 2003. In 2004, the Nampa Urban Renewal Agency provided the housing authority
with two lots and funds to construct one affordable housing unit. With assistance of the general
construction apprentice program and the design services of a student at the Nampa School
District the first home was completed in late 2004. A Nampa Housing Authorities Family Self
Sufficiency Program participant purchased the home and the proceeds were used to construct the
second home. Again in 2004, the Nampa Urban Renewal Agency provided the housing authority
with funds to help purchase an additional two lots to continue to replicate the program. This
property is currently under pre-development.

3. Remove Barriers to Affordable Housing - The City of Nampa is committed to removing any
barriers to affordable housing. In January 2004, the City of Nampa adopted its 2004
Comprehensive Plan with the following goals, objectives and actions:

    Goal: Provide a wide variety of housing types to meet the needs of Nampa’s current and
    future population.

    Objective: Encourage a diversity and mix of housing choices including a variety in price,
    value, type and lot size.

    Action:
       1. Encourage infill development and inventory the location and type of platted lots
            within the city limits of Nampa.
       2. Encourage a variety of housing types and densities within a single development.

    Goal: Provide a wide variety of housing types to meet the needs of Nampa’s current and
    future population.

    Objective: Protect, maintain and improve the quality of Nampa’s neighborhoods.

    Action:




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         1. Support a neighborhood development concept which provides for a mix of
            compatible land uses.
         2. Provide for a balance of amenities in neighborhoods.
         3. Implement a land-banking program in the City’s north end.
         4. Use code enforcement as a tool to upgrade neighborhoods.

In addition, the City of Nampa supports a mortgage down payment assistance program operated
by Southwestern Idaho Cooperative Housing Authority for disabled, elderly and low-income
persons to achieve homeownership.

The City of Nampa also has begun to analyze barriers to affordable housing through the
Consolidated Planning process.

4. Develop the Community’s Institutional Structure - The institutional structure of the
implementation of CDBG programs includes public entities, for-profits, non-profit organizations,
social service providers, health care agencies, private sector, city government, financial
institutions, religious organizations, and local residents group. However, a gap has formed with
the closure of the city’s Community Based Development Organization (CBDO), Nampa
Neighborhood Housing Services, in 2001. The Consolidated Plan called for evaluation of the
approach regarding affordable housing development and neighborhood revitalization, prior to
making the assumption a new non-profit organization was needed to fill the role of NNHS. The
City of Nampa began researching the need for a new CBDO during this program year. It is
anticipated that the analysis will be completed in Spring 2007.

5. Enhance Coordination between Public & Private Housing & Social Service Agencies - The
City of Nampa continues to take an active role in encouraging the coordination between public
and private housing and social service agencies. A representative from the City attends the
Region III Housing Coalition meetings as well as the Idaho Housing Policy Coordination
Council. The City continues to support Treasure Valley Community Resource Center’s annual
Information Fair, which strives to link providers, public and businesses together to meet the
needs of our community. The Information Fair has grown each year and provides valuable
publicity on issues affecting low-income people.

In 2004, the City of Nampa helped to form the Canyon County Coalition Against Hunger, in an
effort to bring together all those service agencies serving the needs of the hungry in the city in
order to coordinate activities and leverage resources. City staff continues to collaborate with
these service agencies.

The application process and scoring for the CDBG Action Plan also helps to enhance
coordination between providers, as leverage and planning are areas which are scored in the
evaluation of the application. It is apparent from comments received at the CDBG public
hearing that most agencies in Nampa serving low income are working well together and are
striving to improve services and reduce duplication. Private businesses are also involved
whenever appropriate. The business community in Nampa is very active both in donations and
volunteer support for activities designed to build our community and serve those most in need.




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The City of Nampa also, in collaboration with the HUD Boise Field office, hosted the HUD
sponsored Faith Based Initiative Grant Writing Workshop. Through collaborative efforts with
the local HUD Field Office in Boise, 142 people attended, with approximately 40% comprising
the faith based community. The workshop allowed non-profits and faith-based organization to
network as well as to learn about resources available and other organizations serving similar
populations. City staff attends both the Family Self-Sufficiency committees hosted by SICHA
and the Nampa Housing Authority. These programs offer applicants with educational and
training opportunities that will ultimately increase their wages to a level that will be nearer to the
median income for the city of Nampa. As the enrollee moves through their stated objectives and
goals, the amount of income increase they earn, is placed into an escrow account that may be
utilized as a down payment for a home. As a member of these committees, the City is able to
facilitate collaboration between other organizations and to promote communication and identify
gaps.

During Program Year 2005, The City took the lead in applying for America’s Promise 100 Best
Communities for Youth award. America's Promise is the nation's leading voice for young
people. America’s Promise is an Alliance for Youth that brings together communities,
individuals, companies and organizations from all sectors to improve the odds for children and
youth. The City recognized that the community had been addressing these areas for quite a few
years through the use of the Search Institute survey. Nampa conducted its first Search Institute
survey in 1994 to bring focus to youth issues throughout the community- and Healthy Nampa
Healthy Youth (HNHY) was born. Over a decade and four surveys later, Nampa continues to
strengthen its cross sector collaborations, sponsors community wide fundraisers dedicated to
youth activities, and has remained true to asset development. The survey's measure of students'
strengths and weaknesses gave the community a roadmap to improve Nampa's climate for raising
kids.

The Community Development staff pulled together roundtable meetings of multiple youth
service providers to discuss the best practices and to collaborate in the community completing an
America’s Promise application in 2005. The City of Nampa was named one of our nation's 100
Best Communities for Young People. The 100 Best Communities for Young People competition
honors outstanding efforts on behalf of young people by multiple sectors of communities. In
cities, suburbs, small towns and counties across the country, this annual competition is leading
communities to assess their efforts, work more effectively together for young people, and share
best practices. The City of Nampa began the process for the 2007 competition again this
program year. The City brought together all different sectors of the community, youth service
provider, the Mayors Teen Council, Chamber of Commerce, schools, and governmental agencies
to again discuss best practices and changes that have occurred in the last year. The application is
to be submitted in PY 2006 and notice of award should be made in December 2006. America’s
Promise also administers grant funds, available only to applicants, of up to $100,000 to support
efforts to deliver the Five Promises to more young people in their community. Additionally, it is
the hope of the city to use the award designation to bring media attention to the youth services
and leveraging the status toward expansion of youth services.




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6. Foster Public Housing Improvements & Resident Initiatives - The mayor of the City of Nampa
appoints the Commissioners to the Nampa Housing Authority Board. All hiring, contracting and
procuring is the independent responsibility of that Board. The City of Nampa receives periodic
report and minutes of Board meetings of the Housing Authority. The City has increased its
involvement in the monitoring and provision of technical assistance to the housing authority.

The Executive Director of the Housing Authority is being consulted in the development of the
new Consolidated Plan for Housing and Community Development. The Nampa Housing
Authority residents are involved in crime watch activities and are undertaking efforts to
strengthen their resident advisory board. A resident of the Housing Authority units also serves
on the Board of Commissioners.

In PY 2003, the City of Nampa worked with the Nampa Housing Authority on planning and
implementing a pilot project with the local school system. Then the Nampa Urban Renewal
Agency awarded the Nampa Housing Authority funds to build an affordable housing project in
North Nampa with the assistance of the general construction apprentice program and the design
services of a student at the Nampa School District. The first Project House was funded almost
entirely through the Urban Renewal Agency, and proceeds from the sale of that house were used
to help build the second Project House. This collaborative project was so well received that the
Nampa Urban Renewal Agency awarded the agency more project money to continue the
program. As a result, two homes have been built and two additional homes are in the
construction process. This program has been met with considerable enthusiasm in the
community, the school system and the potential qualifying families.

7. Evaluate & Reduce Lead Based Paint Hazards-The City of Nampa has worked with Idaho
Housing and Finance Association and City of Boise to market lead based paint trainings to
interested contractors and increase the capacity of the region to implement the lead based paint
regulations. Currently the City is not undertaking any rehabilitation programs effecting over the
minimums area of paint, however we will evaluate the capacity of the program as projects arise
in the future. The local housing authority administering the Section 8 program, SICHA, has
notified landlords participating in their program of training opportunities and encouraged their
involvement. The City has also begun to work with the City of Boise is providing more training
and targeting persons to become certified inspectors, supervisors and workers.

8. Strategies to Reduce the Number of Poverty Level Families - The City of Nampa continued in
2005 to implement programs designed to reduce poverty within affordable housing programs and
provision of public services. While the City cannot realistically control many factors which
cause families to remain in poverty, an effort was made to provide a comprehensive web of
public services to address multiple facets of poverty. These programs include programming at
the Original Gangster’s Basic Academy of Delinquency for at-risk youth, shelter, counseling
services, and legal advocacy programs through Valley Crisis Center and a comprehensive shelter
and supportive service program for homeless families through the Salvation Army and Nampa
Shelter Foundation. In light of recent reductions in charitable giving by the public, and
increasing pressures on the budgets of agencies providing these services, the City of Nampa has
continued to utilize a full 15% of its CDBG entitlement for public services as allowed by
regulation.



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In addition to supporting the above-mentioned organizations and facilities, the City of Nampa
published a Community Resources Guide in PY 2003 that listed out all of the service providers
available to low and moderate-income residents of the city. 5,000 copies of this booklet were
printed and it was very well received in the community. The City of Nampa is currently
updating the guide to be placed on the web as well as produced. Additionally, the City of Nampa
has linked the city webpage to the Treasure Valley Referral Directory website that identified
resources throughout the Valley. This directory is also linked into the State of Idaho 211
information system.

9. Sub-recipient Monitoring and Compliance with Program and Planning Requirements - In 2002
the City of Nampa reviewed and improved its sub-recipient program. At that time a sub-
recipient monitoring guide and risk assessment process was developed. The monitoring process
consists of four components: 1) Pre-Assessment, 2) Desk Monitoring, 3) On-Site Monitoring,
and 4) On-going Technical Assistance.

      1) Pre-Assessment
      During the application process, sub-recipients are evaluated on the capacity of the
      organization to complete the project as described and are scored appropriately. Prior to
      contract execution, each sub-recipient is required to submit audited financial statements. If
      the sub-recipient is a past recipient, past performance is reviewed during the application
      process and again at contract execution to ensure capacity and progress in meeting
      identified outcomes.

      In PY 2002, the application forms were designed to require the applicant to identify, the
      Consolidated Plan priority area and objective(s) they seek to address by their proposal. In
      addition, quantitative proposed accomplishments must be provided. We anticipate these
      changes to provide better compliance with our planning framework and encourage
      collaboration and consistency with program goals.

      2) Desk Monitoring
      Monitoring is an ongoing process for the City of Nampa. A review of the sub-recipient’s
      progress and capacity is conducted at all stages of contact. The formal stages of contact
      include draw requests, quarterly reports and close-out.
         Draw Requests: both sub-recipients and city-sponsored projects are submitted on an
           official form requiring progress and financial information. A review of invoices and
           supporting documentation is conducted to ensure that all costs correspond to project
           services as outlines in recipient’s contract budget. Draw requests are not processed
           unless progress reports are submitted.
         Quarterly Reports: at the end of each quarter, CDBG recipients submit a report
           including financial information, beneficiary data, progress toward completion and
           narratives are required of all projects.
         Close-out reports: are submitted no less than sixty days after the close-out of a
           contract synthesizing the outcomes achieved during the project year. This
           information is the make-up of the CAPER.




                                                                                                  76
City of Nampa                                                             CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



      3) On Site Monitoring
      In addition to desk monitoring, the City of Nampa is committed to conducting at a
      minimum of three on-site monitoring reviews every year. These site visits review sub-
      recipients records for program and/or financial compliance. A checklist used at these site
      visits was developed and approved by HUD in December, 2004. An official letter
      reporting the results of the monitoring visit is sent to the authorized agency official within
      thirty days of the monitoring visit. This letter identifies any concerns or findings and
      suggestive corrective actions as well as a timeframe in which to respond to the suggestive
      corrective actions. Funds may be withheld until the satisfactory actions are taken.

      In PY 2005, the City of Nampa went through an extensive staff change. This change
      resulted in only one new on-site monitoring visit was conducted with the City of Nampa
      Fire Department – CASDAP and a follow-up monitoring site visit was held with
      Neighborhood Housing Services, Inc. – Gateway Crossing Resident Services.
      Additionally, the two monitoring conducted in PY 2004 for The Salvation Army –
      Community Family Shelter and the Family Resource Center in the Hispanic Cultural
      Center were completed and closed. From PY 2005, two other sub-recipients were
      identified for site visit; these two are also PY2006 sub-recipients with visit scheduled for
      winter 2006 to review both the PY2005 & PY2006 projects.

      4) On-going Technical Assistance
      The monitoring process is further enhanced by regular contact between the CDBG grant
      staff and the CDBG subrecipients. Constant communication and technical assistance is
      offered at all stages of the program from application to close out to ensure compliance with
      appropriate regulations. The CDBG grant staff also remains in contact with other city
      officials to facilitate any permitting and inspections necessary for any building or
      construction activities.

      Additionally, the City staff maintains ongoing communication with HUD field staff that
      provides invaluable technical assistance on issues that may arise. These preventative
      measures help to ensure CDBG programs are implemented consistent with the applicable
      federal regulations. All sub-recipients of CDBG funding also have executed contracts
      before drawing down any funds, provide quarterly progress reports to the City, and must
      submit all draw requests on specified forms which require information about project
      performance and timelines.

10. Section 3 Contracting- The City of Nampa notifies the State of Idaho Disadvantaged
Business Center and the Idaho Business Network anytime a Bid solicitation is going to be
released that is covered by the applicable Section 3 or MBE/WBE policies. All contractors are
required to present to the city steps they intend to take to comply with section 3 at the time of
bidding. The only covered contract during the 2005 program year was the Nampa Family Justice
Center Rehabilitation Project, funded in PY 2004, which broke ground on June 6, 2005 and
opened its doors in November 2005.




                                                                                                     77
City of Nampa                                                           CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




LEVERAGING RESOURCES

As discussed in many other sections of the CAPER, CDBG funds leveraged a variety of
additional funding sources. Additional HUD resources including HOME, SHP, and ESG funds
granted directly to non-profit organizations were leveraged significantly by CDBG grants.
Notable examples of this were the Salvation Army - the Community Family Shelter, the
Gateway Neighborhood Revitalization Project, and the Southwest Idaho Cooperative Authority –
Housing Choice Voucher Homeownership Option.


CITIZEN COMMENTS-

The 2005 Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report was made available for
public review from December 4, 2006 to December 20, 2006. Notice of availability was
identified at the public hearing held on December 4, 2005 and published in the local newspaper,
the Idaho Press Tribune, and on city bulletin boards.

No public comments, either written or verbal were received.


SELF EVALUATION SUMMARY

PROJECTS: In summary, the City of Nampa has continued to support numerous important
projects identified as priorities in the Consolidated Plan for Housing and Community
Development. Indeed, all of the projects implemented and supported were identified as “high”
priority projects. However, as noted in the “Evaluation of Achieved Consolidated Plan
Objectives” and “Evaluation of N.R.S.A. Benchmarks”, the city needs to, and has plans in
PY 2006 to start addressing those objectives and priorities not yet achieved in Housing
Development and Economic Development. By keeping track of the objectives and benchmarks
achieved throughout the different program years in chart form, it is simple to identify those areas
that need to be strategically addressed in the future. In the past the City of Nampa has relied on
its partnerships with community organizations to help achieve those stated objectives. However,
the city elected to extend its Program Year 2005 to 18 months with the goal of evaluating other
options to fulfill those needs. Initially the City of Nampa had hoped to evaluate the need for a
CBDO in PY 2004. However, we soon realized that we needed an extended Program Year to
achieve the sort of evaluation and reassessment of our programs that we wanted. With the aide
of the Performance Measurement System outlined in CPD Memo 03-09, the city will further
evaluate its success and needs in achieving its goal of serving the low and moderate-income
residents of this community. The need for a CBDO began to be evaluated during this program
year and will continue through the PY 2006. A new master plan with new measurable
benchmarks began to be developed for the North Nampa Revitalization Strategy Area with
expected completion in spring 2007 and will be incorporated into the New Consolidated Plan. A
second revitalization strategy area in the Northwest Nazarene University Neighborhood began to
be researched and evaluated through the new Consolidated Planning process.


                                                                                                 78
City of Nampa                                                           CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




Overall, the commitment for neighborhood revitalization and provision of affordable housing
and supportive services for low and moderate-income citizens in our community remains
undeterred. The City has increased its coordination and partnership with the Neighborhood
Housing Services, Inc., the Nampa Housing Authority, Southwestern Idaho Cooperative Housing
Authority and Idaho Housing and Finance Association, and other existing non-profit
organizations to sustain the enthusiasm and focus on our mutual goals. The city feels that with
its plan to leverage resources in the Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area, the lowest
income census tracts in the city, it is making a considerable difference in bettering the lives of
the residents who live there.

In the long run though, it is clear from the evaluation charts provided in this CAPER, that the
city has been very successful in achieving many of its goals outlined in the five year
Consolidation Plan for Housing and Community Development in the first four program years.
Very few objectives and strategies have not been addressed.

TIMELINESS: The city still continues to wrestle with timeliness in its program year. However,
we have seen a slight improvement over the last 6 months. Many of the PY 2004 projects which
were reviewed for immediate implementation experienced some sort of obstacle that delayed the
project substantially. The Nampa Family Justice Center came in after the first bid process at
twice the projected costs. The Syringa House Street Improvements Project was suspended as the
Northwest Children’s Home Board of Directors decided to re-evaluate their program. The ADA
Sidewalks Improvement Project was delayed considerably due to staffing issues. The Gateway
Crossing Resident Services project was delayed due to underutilization of some funded
programs; this required a reevaluation of each program and their needs. Even with these
significant delays that also encompassed the PY 2005, all the PY 2004 projects, are now
completed or underway towards successfully achieving their goals. With an extended PY 2005,
the City of Nampa was able to work with sub-recipients on project development to ensure that
the funded projects were ready to proceed immediately. As a result only one non-acquisition
project suffered significant delays; the Gateway Crossing Resident Services. The Gateway
Crossing Resident Services project was delayed until the entire PY2004 funded project had
completed. The acquisition projects were delayed due to unexpected escalation in land prices.
OG Basic Academy of Delinquency was unable to purchase the property identified in the
application and continued to research sites and fundraise. Additionally, Gateway Neighborhood
Housing Revitalization was unable to locate property in the identified price range. However,
OG Basic Academy of Delinquency has identified a property and an environmental review is
currently underway and the City elected to increase funding for the Gateway Neighborhood
Housing Revitalization phase 2 project using PY 2006 funds.

The City is also researching other mechanisms to address timeliness. One such avenue is
through the application process. The City is reviewing the application to place more weight on
project readiness to ensure that the projects are implemented immediately following funding
award. The City is also reviewing the city’s policy of extending contract awards and awarding
multi-year projects.




                                                                                                  79
City of Nampa                                                           CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




CERTIFICATIONS AND OTHER HUD REQUIREMENTS

The City of Nampa has pursued all resources identified in our Consolidated Plan including
CDBG entitlement funds, Nampa Urban Renewal funds, and encouraging non-profit application
for other federal and state funding sources including HOME Funds, Tax credit incentives and
Community Collaboration Contracts. The City has provided requested Certification of
Consistency for HUD programs in a fair and impartial manner, for which we indicated we would
support application by other entities. Through the City’s involvement with program
development in many of the agencies applying for these outside funds, we have actively
participated in the formulation of such applications, leveraging CDBG funds whenever possible.

All projects funded were reviewed against Consolidated Plan goals, priorities, objectives,
strategies and performance measurements. In fact, all projects funded in PY 2005 served “High”
priority needs identified in the Consolidated Plan. The City of Nampa did not hinder its
Consolidated Plan by action or willful inaction. There have been no issues regarding
expenditure of funds not matching disbursements from the federal treasury. All funds have been
dispersed to sub-recipients expeditiously after receiving the request and making the subsequent
draw in the IDIS system. All of the funded activities were used exclusively for the three CDBG
National Objectives, and the City is in compliance with the overall benefit certification.

Overall Benefit: The aggregate use of CDBG funds including section 108 guaranteed loans
during program year(s) 2005- 2007 principally benefit persons of low and moderate income in a
manner that ensures that at least 70 percent of the amount is expended for activities that benefit
such persons during the designated period.

Acquisition- The City of Nampa did undertake acquisition projects during the 2005 program
year. In Program Year 2004, the City of Nampa awarded Neighborhood Housing Services, Inc.
funds to purchase property for the construction of new affordable housing. Suitable property
was identified and purchased in summer 2005. The property was vacant therefore no
displacement occurred. Unfortunately, this project has been put on hold until a determination of
the floodplain and ability to secure HOME funds from Idaho Housing and Finance
Administration is resolved.

Job Creation- The City of Nampa did not undertake activities under the category of job creation
in the 2005 program year.

Limited Clientele Activities - The following activities were funded under the “limited clientele”
category of documenting benefit to low and moderate-income persons

        Salvation Army of Nampa- These activities benefit a clientele that is generally presumed
         to be low and moderate-income (homeless persons).

        Valley Crisis Center – This project benefits women who have been subjected to domestic
         violence. This is a clientele that is generally presumed to be low and moderate-income
         (battered spouses).



                                                                                                 80
City of Nampa                                                           CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




        SICHA – This project benefits elderly, disabled or low and moderate-income persons
         participating the SICHA Family Self-Sufficiency program. This is a clientele that is
         generally presumed to be low and moderate-income (elderly) or the participant’s income
         is verified.

        Syringa House – This project benefits abused girls who can no longer live with their
         families. This is a clientele that is generally presumed to be low and moderate-income
         (abused children).

Financial Notes and Program Income- Funds from loans paid back under the Nampa
Neighborhood Housing Services (disbanded in 2001) housing rehabilitation project are still
being generated. However, these funds have been nominal at best. All but one of the original
seven loans remains to be paid off.

After their closure, and once these funds were returned to the City, it was determined that due to
the original use of the funds, they would need to be documented and treated as program income.
These funds are returned to the U.S. Treasury and reprogrammed via IDIS into the City’s line of
credit. Actual amount of program income received from remaining outstanding loans can be
found in IDIS Financial Reports.

Rehabilitation- The City of Nampa did not undertake any housing rehabilitation projects in PY
2005, other than the close-out of the Community Assisted Smoke Detector and Addressing
Program (CASDAP) in the NRSA and the implementation of the program in the NNU district.
These two projects completed over 3900 units of limited rehabilitation assistance for heath and
safety in the two identified areas. The average assistance per unit is approximately $45. City of
Nampa general fund pays for the labor of the firefighters installing the detectors and address
numbers in this project.




                                                                                                  81
City of Nampa   CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




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City of Nampa   CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




                                         83
City of Nampa   CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year




                                         84
City of Nampa                                                             CAPER 2005 CDBG Program Year



                         FINANCIAL SUMMARY RECONCILIATION
                                 2005 PROGRAM YEAR

RECONCILIATION
Unexpended balance shown on Financial Summary (Line 16) =                    $677,767.13

ADD: LOCCS Balance:                                                          $779,728.83
Cash on Hand:                                                                $0.00
               Program Account
               Subrecipients
               RLF
Subtract Liabilities                                                         $779,728.83
               Subrecipient Liabilities
TOTAL RECONCILING BALANCE:                                                   $677,767.13
UNRECONCILED DIFFERENCE:                                                     $101,961.70

NOTES: Unreconciled Difference is from draws made after 9/30/06, at which time the LOCCS
balance was calculated, for Program Year 2005. Those draws were marked as “Prior Year” to
ensure their expenditures are listed correctly in Program Year 2005 reports. This has resulted in
the unexpended balance listed on Line 16 to account for those addition draws but not accounted
for in the LOCCS from 9/30/06. This draws include:

  IDIS ACT ID                          Activity Name                            Drawn Amount
 96                Community Family Shelter                                $ 2,744.44
 96                Community Family Shelter                                $ 2,744.52
 97                Empowerment Education Program                           $ 3,092.75
 97                Empowerment Education Program                           $ 2,205.36
 108               2005 Code Enforcement                                   $ 37,651.75
 108               2005 Cope Enforcement                                   $     10.87
 107               2005 Administration & Planning                          $ 45,156.99
 107               2005 Administration & Planning                          $ 3,775.62
 109               Downtown Nampa Façade Design Services                   $ 4,579.40
 TOTAL                                                                     $101,961.70

                              Explanation of Adjustments made to PR26
    Amount         Line Number                                     Notes
$   (48,624.99)         07     Program Income booked in 2005, but was accounted for in 2004 CAPER
$    21,322.00          30     Unliquidated Obligations identified in Previous year that was not
                               drawndown and was reprogrammed.
$     43,364.24         34     The difference between Program Income that was accounted for in 2004
                               but not booked until 2005 and for the 2003 Program Income that was
                               booked in 2004. ($48,624.99 - $5,260.75 = $43,364.24).
$    (48,624.99)        44     Adjustment made to decrease PI booked in PY 05 by the amount that was
                               from PY 2004 accounted for in 2004 CAPER.




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