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Incorporating in Arizona

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					1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Gravity Griffith * Arizona Institute of Business and Technology, Ronald C. Bauer Charter High School
* 6049 N 43rd Avenue * Phoenix AZ 85019 * Phone: 602.589.1322 * Email: ggriffith@aibt.edu

Project Description
The Arizona Institute of Business and Technology (AIBT) provides quality education and vocational training to young
people from disadvantaged populations at four junior colleges in Phoenix, the West Valley, Mesa, and South Tucson. About
a year ago, AIBT created charter high schools under the name Ronald C. Bauer (RCB). Presently there is a RCB Phoenix
campus and a RCB Mesa campus. RCB is designed to work with 11 th- and 12th-grade students to help them achieve their
educational goals and prepare them for college and/or vocational training. Currently RCB has a school-based service
learning program (Social Responsibility Class). This program promotes academic excellence by incorporating the Arizona
Standards, enables students to transfer the skills they learn in one class to all classes, allows students to collaborate with
business and community partners on their service experiences, and enables students to serve as role models. Students also
receive credit for these experiences. Over the next year, it is anticipated that this program will be expanded to involve 50-75
students in researching and implementing 6-10 new service learning activities that will be coordinated with other school
programs and classes.
Project Location
The Phoenix campus will be the main location for this program. The campus is located in a low-income, transitional
neighborhood with a high incident of crime.
Service Learning Team
The project team consists of the principal, the Social Responsibility teacher, and two students.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
Students will conduct research to identify current and relevant community needs. They will then vote on proposals and
choose at least three to work on each quarter. Each week, the instructors and administrators will meet to discuss what is
being taught and how lessons can be integrated.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
The service learning program will promote academic excellence and incorporate the Academic Standards. This project also
will help student improve their reading skills and vocabulary and reading comprehension.
Leadership Opportunities
Formal leadership training will be incorporated into the already existing curriculum. Specific activities will be assigned to
students on a rotating basis so that each one has an opportunity to serve in a leadership role. Leadership skills will be
developed through the formal integration of the Character Counts initiative. Finally, RCB will conduct at least one
leadership retreat that will give students the opportunity to meet outside the classroom and learn how to relate their service
activities and leadership skills to their education/vocational careers and as community members.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
The service learning program was founded for the purpose of helping RCB students understand their current and future roles
as citizens, acquire a sense of civic responsibility and pride, and expand their worldwide view. By expanding the current
program, emphasis will be placed on incorporating the Academic Standards in the curriculum, enabling students to
collaborate with community leaders, allowing students the time to reflect on their experiences, and providing the opportunity
for these students to serve as role models to other students.
Objectives
1. To integrate service learning activities into students’ academic program
2. To conduct service learning activities that are important to the community and that will benefit people in need
3. To help students develop leadership skills




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1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Edna Morris * Casa Grande Union High School, Casa Verde Charter High School * 1362 N Casa Grande Avenue
* Casa Grande 85222 * Phone: 520.316.3392 * Email: emorris@cgurs.org

Project Description
Casa Verde High School is Casa Grande Union High School District’s charter school. Participants in the Learn & Serve
Project will be the 75 juniors and seniors enrolled in the Externship Class that is a graduation requirement. The project will
bring adult community members into the classroom as speakers and presenters. The speakers will present information about
their education and training, work history, current workplace, job assignment, job positions in their business, and other
appropriate topics. The Learn & Serve coordinator will identify speakers/presenters who will be selected from among the
business supervisors with whom Casa Verde has externship placements. Each student will complete a year-end report that
describes the civic pride and leadership skills gained through the externship and volunteer placements. Casa Verde High
School will create a Learn & Serve Leadership Compendium that includes a digital photograph of each student, an excerpt
from their year-end report, information about and photographs of adult community supervisors, etc. A copy of this bound
book will be presented to each student and adult community supervisor. At the end of the year, all student externs and adult
community supervisors will attend the annual year-end awards event. The purpose of the event is to reward the leadership
and support shown by community volunteers and supervisors in the business community, to acknowledge the efforts made
by the students, and to foster in the students a sense of citizenship, leadership, responsibility, and civic pride.
Project Location
The Casa Grande Union High School District has a main campus and extended campus. Academic instruction and related
extracurricular activities are offered in a traditional format at the main campus. Charter school and evening classes in an
alternative school setting are offered at the extended campus. The extended campus and District Offices share a building.
The Casa Verde Charter High School is co-located with the alternative program, using existing classrooms during daytime
hours. This arrangement maximizes facility use, promotes the sharing of resources between programs, and daily reaffirms
the partnership with the District. All support programs and extracurricular activities at the main campus are available to the
charter students. Facilities for this project are the Casa Verde High School campus, which offers a full academic program,
computer technology program, and the career and technical Nursing Services program. Students also have access to the
main campus that offers fine arts, physical education, and career and technical programs. All students have email accounts
and folders through the technology system to provide access to instructors and grades.
Service Learning Team
The training team consists of an administrator, guidance counselor/parent, coordinator, neighborhood leader, community
leader, teachers, and students.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
The coordination between the school’s externship program and the business community is extensive. A number of
businesses have been identified to work on a volunteer basis to train the Casa Verde extern students. These businesses have
taken their time and expertise to acknowledge the students as valuable assets to our community. In addition Casa Grande
Union High School District has a variety of career and technical efforts in place with which efforts will be coordinated.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
Vocational and technical education is a major initiative for Casa Grande Union High School. The Career and Technical
Education Coordinator will manage the Learn & Serve Project.
Leadership Opportunities
In addition to business placement, each externship student must complete one trimester as a volunteer with Casa Grande
Boys and Girls Club. As volunteers, the students will serve as student leaders to the 200+ children participating in after-
school programs each day.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
The team will coordinate with the teachers to produce activities that foster citizenship, responsibility, and civic pride. One
such activity will be the culmination of the year’s activities through a video of projects and testimonials from students and
business community/volunteers. As part of the Learn & Serve Project, each externship student will complete a year-end
report that describes the civic pride and leadership skills gained through the externship and volunteer placements. Casa
Verde High School will create a Learn & Serve Leadership Compendium that includes a digital photograph of each student,
an excerpt from their year-end report, information about and photographs of adult community supervisors, etc. A copy of
this bound book will be presented to each student and adult community supervisor at the annual year-end banquet.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 Integrate adult volunteer activities into the academic/vocational program.
 Integrate service learning activities into academic/vocational program.



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1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Ernesto Zamudio * Chinle Unified School District, Chinle High School * PO Box 587 * Chinle AZ 86503
* Phone: 928.674.9560 * Email:ezbthnst@citlink.net

Project Description
The Agriscience Department at Chinle High School will implement a Service Learning Program that will involve 45 students
in grades 9-12. Students will (1) design and develop a half-acre traditional organic garden with 40 Navajo elders at the
Chinle Senior Citizens Center; (2) establish a native plant nursery on the site of the CHS Agriculture Building and use the
plants for landscaping the Senior Center and other public Buildings, plantings for erosion control, and land restoration; (3)
assist 20 elders with animal care and livestock improvement; (4) emphasize healthy traditional foods in diabetes education;
and (5) create and present public education programs on the project activities, emphasizing the importance of Agriscience
and Food Science. Activities will involve 25 students in the Food Science Department who will investigate nutritional
values of traditional foods, prepare healthy recipes with a focus on diabetes prevention, and coordinate a Harvest Banquet
honoring the elders. These hands-on service learning activities in a 9-12 Agriscience Curriculum tie education to Navajo
cultural values, combining traditional lifeways with contemporary best practices. By fostering a cross-disciplinary and
intergenerational approach, the project will create practical applications for the core competencies, increase cultural pride
and self-esteem, strengthen community ties, encourage students to maintain a lifelong commitment to community service,
and demonstrate how Agriscience education is relevant to the community.
Project Location
The location for this project will be the community of Chinle and Chinle High School. More specifically it will involve the
Agriscience and the Food Science Departments and the Chinle Senior Citizens Center.
Service Learning Team
Project staff from the Head of the Agriscience Department, the Food Science Department, and the Audio-Visual and
Communications Department will be involved in this project. Other departments, such as Biology and Math, will be
involved in specific activities such as the plant science and the development of recording keeping systems. All departments
will be invited to participate in special events.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
In addition to working with the Chinle Senior Citizens Center, this project will also coordinate with the Center for
Documentary Studies; Duke University, Center for Sustainable Environments; Northern Arizona University; Chinle
Veterinary Clinic; Diabetes Education Program; The Navajo Lifeway; KTTN radio; Navajo-Churro Sheep Association;
Native Seeds/SEARCH; Natural Resources Department; and Navajo Nation Department of Agriculture.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
This project coordinates with several already funded programs and others in the developmental stages. For example, CHS
has received funding from USDA/CEREES for a 2-year professional development program to encourage high school
students to pursue postsecondary education and careers in Agriscience and Agribusiness. The CHS was selected as one of
two schools to participate in a follow-up to the Indivisible Project that will involve 10 students in an intensive week of
recording interviews with elders and others about Navajo agro-pastorialist traditions. The CHS Future Farmers of America
club has been invited by the Heifer Project International to design a low-tech wool-washing facility to serve the region.
Leadership Opportunities
Students will be involved from the beginning with designing the project activities, scheduling, assigning work groups, and
taking leadership roles in making sure that obligations are met. They will be responsible for creating and assembling
presentation packets and displays, and making presentations. They will attend training sessions and compete in the FFA
Leadership Projects at regional and national levels. Most of all, students will learn how to work together to accomplish
objectives with the satisfaction of knowing that they are important to the continuation of their culture.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
Students will plan the implementation of the project components and make task assignments. They will maintain records on
each component and share their findings during regular meetings of the project team. Since many of the activities will take
place after school and on weekends, they must be responsible for getting to the project on time. Making presentations to
school and community groups will give them self-confidence and positive recognition for their accomplishments. Working
side by side with elders, listening to their stories, getting to know them, and knowing that they are involved with sustaining
the culture will instill pride in them as well as give them a sense of personal responsibility to their nation.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 Design and develop a half-acre traditional organic garden with Navajo elders at the Chinle Senior Citizens Center.
 Establish a native plant nursery at the CHS agriculture Building and install the plants in the community.
 Assist elders with animal care and stock improvement.
 Emphasize healthy traditional foods in diabetes education.
 Create and present a radio series and public archive of interviews with Navajo elders on agro-pastoralism.

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   Long-term attend conferences for Learn and Serve Program and National Youth Leadership.




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1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Dudliena Saeed * Dysart Unified School District, Dysart Center for Alternative Learning * 11405 N Dysart Road
* El Mirage 85335 * Phone: 623.876.7527 * Email: dsaeed@dysart.k12.az.us

Project Description
The school-based Service Learning Program will be integrated with the Character Education Program that is currently part
of the curriculum at the Dysart Center of Alternative Learning. This elementary class consists of students who come from a
poor social-economic environment, are at risk, and have been removed from their home elementary school due to severe
behavior challenges. Approximately 25 middle students will participate in monthly community activities. Such involvement
will clarify the habits of good character. Student involvement in serving the community will produce responsible, caring,
productive citizens. This will encourage children to be honest, hardworking, and self-motivated. The volunteer service
activities will not only be a great contribution to the community, but will foster character and emotional intelligence, good
relationships and social responsibility for students. The school and communities working together will help students become
leaders who are caring, responsible, and respectful adults.
Project Location
The community facilities are extremely flexible in working with students’ schedules. Students will be transported by the
school bus to each facility and volunteer for approximately 2-4 hours. Students will need to have fundraisers in order to
receive items to be donated. The projects that include toy drives and food drives will be based in the classrooms. A storage
room at the Dysart Center of Alternative Learning is available for all collected items.
Service Learning Team
The training team consist of phenomenal leadership: the Director of Alternative Education, the Behavior Intervention
Specialist, the Language Arts Instructor, the Computer Instruction, and Instructional Assistant, and approximately 25 middle
school students, 6th to 8th grades.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
The community service project activities will enhance the Character Education Program because students will have the
opportunity to practice learned virtues among peers and members of the community. Community service activities are being
planned with the City of Surprise Parks/Recreation, West Valley Child Crisis Center, Westside food Bank, Child Life
Children’s Cancer Center, Saint Vincent DePaul, Child Help USA Center of AZ, and Grandview Care Center.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
This project is being coordinated with America’s Promise. Encouraging students to be community service oriented will
build developmental assess in youth. In collaboration with America’s Promise dedication to ―be friendly to kids‖ will be
part of their learning experience. Focus on youth assets of Mentoring, Teaching, Community Service, Protection, and
Nurture will be displayed and practiced.
Leadership Opportunities
Each student will be assigned a duty that will develop leadership skills. The duties may consist of writing proposals to
companies requesting donated items, organizing group or individual responsibilities that enable all students to participate in
the assigned community service project of the month. Students will continue to learn how to interact with each other and
will learn that they are an essential part of the cooperative learning environment in the classroom and in the community.
Exposure to learning how to reach communal needs will foster a sense of responsibility, citizenship, and self-esteem. The
leadership skills to be developed will empower students to make better choices and encourage them to be leaders not
followers.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
The community service activities will compliment the character virtues that students will be taught. Responsibility,
Perseverance, Truth, Citizenship, Courage, Self-discipline, Fairness, and Friendship are virtues that will be incorporated in
the Character Education curriculum, which will play a major role in developing a sense of citizenship, responsibility, and
civic pride. Students will learn that as community members and future leaders, they have a responsibility to help one
another. Once students reflect on the community service events that they will participate in, they will have civic pride in
knowing that they will have made a difference in the liver of other.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 By May 25, 2002 the middle school students from Dysart Center of Alternative Learning will have participated in a
     minimum of four of the seven monthly activities as evidenced by attendance and participation records.
 By May 25, 2002 the middle school students from Dysart Center of Alternative Learning will understand meanings of
     the six character virtues. They will be able to apply the learned virtues at home, among peers, and in the community as
     evidenced by completion of signed assignment forms, completed journals, and staff and parental observation.
 By May 25, 2002 a 40 percent decrease in the number of office referrals from participating students will occur as
     evidenced by records of referrals.


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1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Nic Clement * Flowing Wells Unified School District, Flowing Wells High School * 1556 W Prince Road * Tucson AZ
85705 * Phone: 520.690.2205 * Email: clementn@flowingwells.k12.az.us

Project Description
This grant will support the after-school learning centers that have been established at Walter Douglas and Laguna
Elementary Schools. These schools were recently awarded a 21 st Century Community Learning Centers grant for the
creation of the Skills for Success Project. This project provides a variety of opportunities for elementary-aged students to
receive after-school, Saturday, and summer academic tutoring and support. The Service Learning Project (to be called One-
to-One Service Learning Project) will enable approximately 75 seniors to provide a minimum of 20 hours tutoring and
mentoring approximately 30-50 elementary students per day at each of the two established centers.
Project Location
Laguna and Walter Douglas Elementary Schools in Tucson.
Service Learning Team
The school training team will include the Skills for Success Administrator and the Service Learning Co-Coordinators.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
Poverty and literacy rates for the two elementary schools provide strong support for cross-age tutoring as well as the need
for after-school enrichment service. Senior tutors will work with community partners including Big Brothers Big Sisters,
Reading Seed (a senior citizen tutoring group), Family Counseling Agency of Tucson, and the University of Arizona’s
College of Education.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
The One-to-One Service Learning Project will integrate service learning activities into the academic/vocational program and
will promote academic excellence and incorporate Arizona Academic Standards.
Leadership Opportunities
One-to-One tutors will have the opportunity to plan, design, and implement creative learning activities for elementary-aged
students. Senior tutors will also be responsible for helping supervise and lead their students in a variety of other activities
including recreational games, attendance, dismissal, and snack distribution.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
A major goal of this project is to provide Flowing Wells High school seniors with the opportunity to develop a deeper
understanding of the responsibilities of citizens and the need for local action and decision-making. It is believed that
through their experiences as One-to-One tutors, students will develop a sense of personal reward and accomplishment when
they see their young students eyes ―light up‖ when they begin to read new words or understand new concepts. The
relationships that will develop as a result of the connection between high school and elementary students are invaluable in
the development of active, involved citizens and would be impossible to create within the traditional walls of a high school
government classroom.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
One-to-One senior tutors (participating in the service learning project):
 During the 2001-2002 school year, 20 percent of the Flowing Wells High School Class of 2002 will have the
     opportunity to complete a minimum of 20 hours of academic tutoring and mentoring service for elementary-aged
     students participating in the Skills for Success after-school learning programs.
 One-to-One tutors will have an opportunity to develop and practice effective teaching and classroom management skills.
     Tutors will be coached and evaluated utilizing performance criteria developed by the Skills for Success administrators.
 100 percent of the One-to-One tutors will gain an appreciation for their responsibilities as members of a democracy and
     will develop a desire to become productive and active citizens. These attitudes and perceptions will be measured using
     the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory and Community Survey based on the National Presidential Spirit of Community
     Youth Survey.
 100 percent of the One-to-One tutors will write reflective journals following each tutoring experience. These journals
     will include a narrative that analyzes their own growth as individuals and as citizens in the areas of self-esteem, self-
     awareness, and personal responsibility. These journals will be evaluated based on a rubric correlated to the Arizona
     State Writing Standards.
Laguna and Walter Douglas Elementary Students (participating in the Skills for Success program):
 After the third year, there will be a 20 percent increase in schoolwide student achievement in reading, math, and
     language arts as measured by the Stanford 9.
 After the third year, 70 percent of the students will demonstrate mastery of performance standards for math, reading,
     and writing as measured by AIMS.
 50 percent elementary students will attend 110 Skills for Success tutoring sessions from September 2001 to July 2002.
 At the end of each year of the project, there will be an increase in student satisfaction with the school as measured by

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the 21st Century Learning Centers’ survey.




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Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Lori Walk * Glendale Elementary School District, Landmark Middle School * 7301 N 58th Avenue * Glendale AZ 85301
* Phone: 623.842.8211 * Email: lori_walk@mail.gesd.k12.as.us

Project Description
The purpose of the Landmark Service Learning Program is to create a student-centered network through which the 928 7th
and 8th graders will create partnerships with businesses and community agencies for the purpose of improving the quality of
life for the students, parents, and the community. The program will provide training for teachers to enable them to develop a
student government structure that empowers students to have input into the format of their service learning projects; to
network with community agencies; and to write curriculum for other classroom teachers that integrates Arizona Standards
into the service learning process. Students will complete meaningful community-based learning activities that will serve to
increase their academic achievement. In order to maximize effectiveness, the Landmark School administration has
developed a 3-year plan that consists of planning, implementation, and continuous program evaluation.
Project Location
The Landmark Middle School is a comprehensive middle school that also serves as the site of a migrant preschool, a
community preschool, and location for adult education classes. Landmark serves a diverse school population that reflects
the changing face of the Glendale community. Geographically students come from all socioeconomic neighborhoods and
from Hispanic, Bosnian, Arabic, and Sudanese immigrant families. The population is highly transitory.
Service Learning Team
The school training team will consist of the principal, assistant principal, student advisor for service learning, student council
representative, and site council representative.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
The Service Learning Program will be integrated with the academic program of study to enable students to master the
academic standards by having the opportunity to relate classroom learning experiences to real-life community needs.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
The Service Learning Program dovetails with the efforts of America’s Promise. Many targeted organizations are committed
to increasing and enriching their relationships with public school students but have not yet taken action. The structure of
service learning will allow this support and collaboration to take place.
Leadership Opportunities
Students will develop leadership skills through the opportunities for participation in the student government process. They
will be taught to identify community needs and set priorities for participation.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
An important aspect of the Service Learning Program is the opportunity to provide a positive alternative to students who are
disenfranchised and are not being successful in the regular classrooms. The negative attitudes and low self-esteem of these
students often cause them to be removed due to behavioral disruptions. Also, community members who have positive
experiences with the students at Landmark will help allay concerns and negative perceptions of the school.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
1. Students will demonstrate increased academic achievement as measured by the reading score of the Stanford
      Achievement tests.
2. Students will demonstrate reduced numbers of and reduction in severity of student discipline as measured by student
      discipline referrals.
3. Students will demonstrate increased understanding of service learning as measured by a community service pre- and
      post-surveys.
4. Students will demonstrate increased school and community pride as measured by school vandalism reports.




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1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Jean Driescher * James Sandoval Preparatory High School * 3830 N 67th Avenue * Phoenix AZ 85033
* Phone: 623.845.0781 * Email: jdimage@yahoo.com

Project Description
James Sandoval Preparatory High School is a newly chartered school serving at-risk students grades 9-12. The service
learning program is designed to serve the entire student population, some 250 students, as a required two semester elective
course. All students at the school will be involved in leadership training and development. The course will introduce
students to the concept of school and community needs, addressing the needs, and solving issues addressed by students.
Approximately 50 percent of the teaching staff will be trained in service learning instructional strategies.
Project Location
James Sandoval Preparatory High School is a remodeled school built in the early sixties. It has self-contained classrooms,
each equipped with up-to-date technological equipment and services. The school will not exceed 300 students when it
reaches capacity and about 14 teachers. The strengths of the facility include the closeness of the buildings…every classroom
opens onto the quad. There is sufficient property surrounding the buildings for projects requiring painting or construction.
There is also ample storage for supplies. The facilities are well maintained and clean. There is the lack of transportation or
food service to students. Currently students are allowed to eat in the classrooms.
Service Learning Team
Members of the training team include the project coordinator, school principal, staff members with expertise and experience
in teaching basic literacy skills and technology, and student leaders who initiate the project concept.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
The service learning class is part of the school curriculum. Service learning will interact with the Professional Study
Program and will be incorporated into the staff development plan. A multi-stakeholder group called the School
Effectiveness Team that includes the West Valley Business Alliance and Maryvale Unite, a Maryvale neighborhood
association, will address this.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
This project is being coordinated with the school’s goal to provide each students with an extensive educational program and
relevant learning experience by preparing them academically, socially, and emotionally. The highest priority is to always
treat students with dignity and unconditional positive regard by establishing relationships between students, staff, and the
community. These relationships are the foundation of the teaching and learning process.
Leadership Opportunities
Leadership opportunities are an ongoing part of the service learning program. Students learn to take individual
responsibility as well as work together cooperatively in planning, implementing, and evaluating projects. Teachers work in
teams to provide students with needed encouragement, information, skill development, and monitoring as they facilitate
student-directed projects. Student participation in the service learning committee and in workshops is honing their
leadership skills. Students who lead committees are also developing their leadership skills. The pride and ownership of the
projects are only one reward the students will receive from service learning. They will be developing lifelong learning skills
that will be celebrated when the students plan and conduct the celebration of completion.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
Students develop a relationship with their community when they take responsibility for partnering within their community.
Academic achievement and fostering a sense of citizenship, responsibility, and civic pride are the ultimate goal of the James
Sandoval Preparatory High School’s service learning program. Student instruction, support, and reflection allow students to
see themselves independently in a role of responsibility and as a contributing member of a team. Civic pride is the result of
students’ taking responsibility.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 To establish a community advisory Board to attend the designated School Team Training Sessions as evidenced by 100
     percent participation. The team will consist of teachers, an administrator, students, parents, and community
     representatives.
 To establish a student leadership group to become involved in addressing community and school needs. Students will
     become involved in the Community Advisory Board as evidenced by their attendance.
 To support academic teachers to lead service learning projects in their classrooms as evidenced by the development of
     two learning projects per 18-week period.
 To provide training opportunities for staff to learn about service learning instructional strategies as evidenced
     attendance at four 3-hour workshops or two Saturday workshops.
 To establish a leadership retreat for students and teachers as evidence by 100 percent attendance at a 3-day leadership
     training retreat.


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10
1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Esperanza Lumm * Luz Preparatory Academy, c/o Luz Social Services, Inc. * 2797 N Introspect Drive, Tucson 85745 *
Phone: 520.882.6216 * Fax: 520.623.9291 * Email: elumm@luzacademy.com

Project Description
Luz Academy is a 5-year-old public charter high school. Its goal is to prepare 200 plus students from predominantly barrio
environments for high education. The LIFT (Luz Intervening for Tucson) Project utilizes Project SOAR and the Learn and
Serve Program as models for a youth volunteer service tutorial program. This program involves Luz’s secondary students in
peer tutoring and mentoring activities at two elementary schools: the Walter Douglas Elementary School and the Manzo
Elementary School. Service learning is a class that is conducted twice weekly. The LIFT program is working in conjunction
with the after-school art project that works with students 3 days a week. Students are offered the opportunity to choose from
the menu of service learning activities in place or they may become involved in another service learning activity with the
approval of the class instructor. Students receive a semester’s credit for the class based on participation, attendance, and a
report on what they learned.
Project Location
Luz Academy recently relocated to the west side. The Walter Douglas and Manzo Elementary Schools are conveniently
located on the west side, thus travel to these sites is easily accomplished. The school’s multipurpose facility provides
adequate space for the program’s activities. The facility is conducive to the needs of an academic tutoring program with
classroom-equipped desks, chalkboards, and textbooks. Program materials such as manipulatives, software, flashcards, and
similar tutorial supplements will be acquired with program resources.
Service Learning Team
A school-wide team has been organized to prepare student service volunteers for the program activities. Members include
the project coordinator, a school administrator, staff members with expertise and experience in teaching basic literacy skills
and technology, student leaders who initiated the project concept, Project SOAR personnel from the University of Arizona,
America Reads volunteers, LIFT Task Force members, and Luz Southside partnership staff and volunteers.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
Luz Academy has developed a comprehensive plan that includes participation of and collaboration with a number of school
and community agencies and programs. This plan was developed with the full participation of stakeholders representing a
cross-section of the community population. Funding from the district, 21 st Century Community After-School Learning
Centers, Entitlements, Goals 2000, Title IV Special Projects, State Tobacco, State Substance Abuse, and the Safe and Drug-
Fee Schools and Communities grants are being coordinated to supplement program activities. The Service Learning
Coordinator is working to implement Project LIFT activities into regular classroom lessons.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
Project LIFT addresses the Arizona Academic Standards by teaching students to serve as Reading tutors. This approach not
only strengthens the literacy skills of the high school students but also allows strengthens the literacy skills of the elementary
students. The ultimate goal of the project is to ensure that all students have the opportunities, the encouragement, and the
vision to develop the academic skills they need to pursue lifelong goals.
Leadership Opportunities
Students identified for participation in and training for the LIFT program will have the opportunity to utilize academic
assistance and modeling skills within their own communities. These student volunteers will learn to accept responsibility for
their own learning and the learning of elementary and middle school students. The LIFT Task Force believes that the
leadership students will exhibit through positive role modeling will foster a genuine sense of caring and will change the
demographics of the neighborhoods in which they live. The ownership they will experience in developing the project’s
concept and the training they will receive can be adapted to other leadership roles and activities as they move to higher
levels of education and responsibility.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
Students in the program will be trained as volunteer tutors. A support system has been prepared to ensure success. The
strength of the bond between adolescent youth and impressionable youth will be enhanced positively through efforts to
improve literacy and social skills. The combination of academic and service learning will help student volunteers develop
an understanding and appreciation for their own ability to affect their community in a positive and permanent way. That
understanding is expected to encourage them to use the successes to become more fully engaged in active leadership and to
encourage others to become involved in positive service to the barrio neighborhoods.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 To recruit 50 student service volunteers during 2001-2002 to participate in Project LIFT
 To serve the basic literacy needs of elementary school students by providing one-to-one and small group tutoring
 To engage student service volunteers in nationally recognized Habitat for Humanity projects during 2001-2002
 To involve student service volunteers and parents in monthly landscaping projects at Luz Academy.

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   To assist in the planning and organization of the 3rd Annual Thanksgiving in the Barrio with the Luz Southside
    Partnership




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1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Debbi Bertolet * Mesa Unified School District, Service Learning Project * 549 N Stapley Drive * Mesa AZ 85203
* Phone: 480.472.5985 * Email: djbertol@mpsaz.org

Project Description
The Mesa Service Learning Project is a districtwide program whose mission is to involve 71,000 student in meaningful
service learning activities, especially in the regular academic program. Currently there are some 800 teachers and 25,000
students involved in service learning. This program addresses the district’s goal to train 10 advanced level service learning
practitioners who will train another 50 educators. Each of the 60 teachers will create a unit or lesson plan that will be
integrated into their curriculum and reflect student achievement on the Arizona Academic Standards. To accomplish this
task, the district service learning coordinator will conduct an 8-hour training for 10 of the district’s advanced level service
learning practitioners. Training will include not only the content of the course they will teach, but tips on how to teach
adults and how to assist other teachers as they develop meaningful, practical service learning activities.
Project Location
The Service Learning Project is based in an office donated by Mesa High School. The network of teachers/coaches is
located all over the city in many classrooms. The program has been fortunate to develop an extensive library of books and
videos and a variety of equipment that can be used for cross-age activities. These can be checked out by teachers and
community youth leaders. In addition, each school with a service learning coach has a resource box that contains a variety
of books, idea lists, and helpful hints for that school’s teachers to utilize. Also both the Service Learning Program
Coordinator and the Program Assistant are part of the MPS phone system with computers that are networked to the district
as well as the Internet.
Service Learning Team
The Advisory Board will serve as the designated School Training Team. Different Board members and additional service
learning coaches will attend Learn and Serve activities as appropriate.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
The Service Learning Project is part of the Mesa Partnership for Tobacco-Free Youth, a partnership of Mesa Public Schools
and Mesa Community College. This partnership leads to collaboration with many MPS departments and superintendents,
MCC’s Center for Service Learning, and a myriad of United Way agencies. The Service Learning Project collaborates with
the City of Mesa, the Mesa Senior Center, the Volunteer Center, and many local organizations that often benefit from service
learning projects.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
All activities will be coordinated with the Arizona Academic Standards. Copies of the standards will be available as
teachers are trained, and the unit/lesson plan format will include the standards being met through the service learning
activity. In addition samples will be collected to show teachers how other Arizona schools and other states, have linked
service learning to state standards and testing. Finally, the training manual, unit/lesson plans, and subsequent
implementation will all be coordinated with the Arizona Academic Standards.
Leadership Opportunities
For years the Mesa Service Learning Project has encouraged and trained teachers to put students in leadership roles, listen to
the ―youth voice of their students, and allow the students to take responsibility for their own service learning projects. This
concept will be continued as teachers are trained on how to teach students to lead. The Advisory Board offers its youth
members significant leadership and decision-making opportunities. It is assumed that the two students who will attend the
National Service Learning Conference in Seattle will have leadership opportunities at the conference and upon their return.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
Students are allowed and encouraged to get involved in meaningful community activities such as those that will be created as
a result of teacher training. Some 1500 youth who will engage in service learning as a result of this grant will develop these
traits under the guidance of teachers who are trained in the elements of service learning preparation and reflection.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 By March 15, 2002, 10 advanced level service learning practitioners will have completed an 8-hour course preparing
      them to instruct other teachers in the best practices and curriculum integration of service learning.
 By May 15, 2002, two advanced level practitioners and the service learning coordinators will have revised and
      published a service learning training manual for teachers k-12.
 By June 15, 2002, 50 educators (K-12) will have completed an 8-hour training in the best practices and curriculum
      integration of service learning resulting in the production of lesson plans/units that will be implemented in 2002-2003.
 By June 30, 2002, the lesson plans/units developed by the 60 trained educators will be compiled into a manual that will
      be duplicated and distributed to the trained educators and others upon request.
 By March 25, 2002, two youth, one educator, and the service learning coordinator will have attended the National
      Service Learning Conference in Seattle.

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   By September 30, 2002, at least eight Service Learning Project staff, teachers, and Advisory Board members will have
    participated in designated Learn and Serve activities.




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1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Michael Brand * Peoria Unified School District, Oasis Elementary School * 7841 W Sweetwater Avenue * Peoria AZ
85381 * Phone: 623.486.6068 * Email: mbrand@peoriaud.k12.az.us

Project Description
Project Garden Oasis gives students the opportunity to experience service learning with the thrill of developing an outdoor
laboratory for raising and studying native and introduced plants. Success thus far includes setting up the curricula for the
docent and Junior Master Gardening workshops, planning the garden site, the coordination of donations and volunteers to
help create the gardens, and generate student excitement and interest. The new grant will support such activities as Grow-A-
Row for the Hungry and integration of the America’s Promise program. Students will become involved in and may
specialize in specific areas related to the gardens boosting their self-esteem as they teach younger students about their
specialty area. Garden Oasis is expected to unite the campus through cooperative learning, increase attendance by creating
an interesting way of learning, and increase academic grades by using integrated curricula in a real-world situation.
Project Location
Oasis was built in 1990. All classroom facilities in the district are compliant with federal, state, and local safety and
building codes and classroom space is available for tutoring. Each teacher has a personal computer with Internet access for
research and lesson planning. Funding from the grant will be used to purchase instruction materials and supplies that will be
used to develop, expand, and enhance environmental studies.
Service Learning Team
The school training team consists of the project coordinator and 7 th-grade science teacher, the 6th-grade science teacher, the
5th-grade science teacher, and science students.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
Garden Oasis will involved the America’s Promise program by integrating three of the five promises: Garden Oasis students
will have an ongoing relationship with caring adults; Garden Oasis will be a safe place for students to engage in after-school
programs; and Garden Oasis will team with the Grow-A-Row for the Hungry program to provide needy families with fruit
and vegetables from the garden.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
Garden Oasis incorporates the programs of docent and/or Junior Master Gardener as positions of leadership involving older
students in teaching younger students. Garden Oasis also supports the School-To-Work Opportunities Act by providing
positive role models that help children learn about contributing to the community through service.
Leadership Opportunities
Students will gain knowledge of leadership skills by learning how to help build the garden by working successfully as
members of a team, practicing good decision making and problem solving, doing research that can be applied immediately
to real-life situations, and by providing a service to the school. After the garden is completed, some students will be trained
as docents to lead visitors or younger students through the various environmental learning stations.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
Project Garden Oasis fosters a sense of citizenship, responsibility, and civic pride by having students participate in this
outdoor laboratory. They will develop a sense of ownership and will work together in their studies. Cooperation is certainly
necessary for a successful garden, and many educational reformers have noted the value of teamwork. The Oasis community
will take pride in having this special learning environment in their neighborhood.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 By January 1, garden-associated materials and supplies will be order and the kick-off reception will be organized.
 By January 1, the Parent Student Teacher Organization will host a kick-off reception to promote the service learning
     gardening program with community volunteers and students, parents, and staff.
 By February 1, students and community volunteers will landscape, construct, and irrigate the vegetable garden area.
 By January 1, at least 30 students will have been trained to provide gardening service learning to younger students.
 By February 1, a staff member who is involved with Project Garden Oasis will register for and attend a professional
     development conference to learn the latest research in strategies to increase student achievement.
 By June 1, 50 percent Sonoran Desert garden area will be completed.
 By June 1, members of the staff involved with Project Garden Oasis will register for and attend the required Learn and
     Serve training conference.
 By June 1, students interested in new positions on the Garden Oasis team will be trained.
 By November 1, 100 percent 7th- and 8th- grade science students will have participated in landscaping, planting, and
     cultivating Garden Oasis.
 By December 1, 100 percent 7th- and 8th- grade science students will read and use the environmental science books.
 By December 1, 100 percent of the students participating in Garden Oasis will increase their knowledge and awareness
     of the Sonoran Desert and the concept of service learning.

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   By December 1, 100 percent students participating in Garden Oasis will be honored at a culminating event attended by
    staff, parents, and adult volunteers and a special Native American author/speaker/artist.
   By December 1, members of the staff who are involved with Project Garden Oasis will register for and attend the
    culminating Learn and Serve Conference.




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1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Sue Raatjes * Peoria Unified School District, Project BEST * Ironwood HS, 6051 W Sweetwater Avenue * Glendale,
Arizona 85304 * Phone: 623.486.6400

Project Description
Project BEST is a school-based service learning initiative designed to expand and enhance a successful Future Teachers of
America Program. This program provides assistance and support to students in the elementary grades who are struggling
with learning, especially in reading. In the current year, the Peoria Unified School District will increase enrollment in Future
Teachers of America by 10 percent by including the Advanced Future Teachers class in three high schools. Currently there
are approximately 200 students enrolled at Cactus, Centennial, Ironwood, and Sunrise Mountain High Schools. The targeted
number of high school participants is 240. The courses (beginning and advanced) will be enhanced with resource materials
that will assist these students in teaching in 140 elementary classrooms. The high school students contribute their time to
increase the educational achievement of younger students by providing one-on-one tutoring, giving extra attention to needy
children, reading stories t entire classes, teaching short lessons, and helping with make-up work. As future teachers, students
are learning while serving and yet serving while learning.
Project Location
Project BEST will take place at Cactus, Centennial, Ironwood, and Sunrise Mountain High Schools. The high schools
service 17 elementary feeder schools. Additional schools will be serviced as enrollment in the FTA courses increases. All
classroom facilities are compliant with federal, state, and local safety and building codes and provide space for the FTA
course as well as the 200 elementary teachers and classrooms that participate in Project BEST. Each teacher has a personal
computer with Internet access for research and lesson planning.
Service Learning Team
The school training team consists of the FTA teachers and students from each of the high schools.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
Project BEST coordinates its volunteer effort in each school with the administrative staffs. The FTA course is a
discovery/overview class and focuses on school-aged children, grades K-8. The activities the high school students perform
in the classroom go beyond the usual teacher’s aide or parent helper in that the students eventually plan and teach lessons,
similar to what is done by a college Intern or Student Teacher. The future teachers from Ironwood and Centennial High
Schools have served as volunteers at Glendale Community College’s Read Feast that held is held each fall. This reading
festival invites elementary children from all over the west valley to participate in a carnival devoted to the love of reading.
Approximately 3000 children participate. The future teachers help run game booths that present word stories, reading
games, etc. The program directors from GCC are always extremely grateful for the donated hours of the volunteers.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
Project BEST supports the America Reads initiative by targeting students in the early elementary years and assisting them to
read at grade level by the end of the third grade. Project BEST supports the America’s Promise initiative by providing
resources that are deemed necessary for the success of your people. Project BEST supports the School-To-Work
Opportunities Act by utilizing youth as a resource in the school community.
Leadership Opportunities
FTA students are engaged in real-world service learning that challenges them to exercise leadership and responsibility and to
respect students from diverse cultures and learning backgrounds. FTA students love working with the children. They get
satisfaction from being responsible young adults and having young students admire them.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
Through productive service, these students are contributing NOW as citizens to the school, the district, and the community.
Active citizenship is not an abstraction to be learned from a textbook but rather one learned through service learning.
Responsibility is a primary component of the FTA program that is emphasized in a ―Statement of Professionalism‖ in which
confidentiality and role modeling are emphasized. Finally, FTA students develop civic pride as they bond with their
students in their elementary schools in their school district.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 By April 2002, books and video sets will be ordered and distributed to the four high school teachers.
 By May 2002, supplies will be ordered and delivered to the four high school teachers.
 By June 2002 enrollment in the FTA program will increase by 10 percent.
 By August 2002, new resources will be incorporated in the FTA curriculum.
 By August 2002, uniforms for the Service Learning Field Experience for 240 students will be ordered.
 By September 2002, elementary schools served will increase by 15 percent.
 By November 2002, the four high school teachers will meet to evaluate the implementation of resource materials,
     curriculum, and service learning field experience.
 By December 2002, eight Reflection and Appreciation Celebrations will take place.

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   By December 2002, the high school FTA teachers will attend the Learn and Service workshops.
   By December 2002, 95 percent of the students enrolled in the FTA program will demonstrate knowledge of the teaching
    and learning process.




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1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Johnnie Gordon * Roosevelt School District, Percy L. Julian Elementary School * 6000 S 7th Street * Phoenix AZ 85042-
4209 * Phone: 602.243-4866 * Email: gordonj@rsd.k12.az.us

Project Description
The Service Learning Program at Percy L. Julian Elementary School will serve approximately 60 students in grades 4-8.
These students will help at local senior citizen centers, nursing homes, work at food banks, paint, clean-up vacant lots, and
tour industrial places to learn about the local economy and career/job opportunities in the community. Service learning
activities will be integrated into the academic curriculum and emphases will be placed on social skills, organizational
studies, and enrichment skills in support of the Academic Standards. Students will utilize thinking skills, organizational
skills and will demonstrate character education attributes: compassion, integrity, responsibility, and respect.
Project Location
The home base for the project will be P. L. Julian School. The school is equipped with basic classrooms with Internet
capability, a computer lab, parent center, home economics center, library, and a student center.
Service Learning Team
The make up of the designated school training team will consist of parents, teachers, students, administrators, community
leaders, resource office, social worker, a representative from the religious community, a representative from the business
community, and a district representative.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
This project will coordinate with school and community projects by:
 teaching students how their classroom experiences relate to their work and to their lives,
 providing an opportunity for classroom knowledge to be applied and tested in real-life settings,
 meeting existing outcomes in an experiential manner,
 engaging students in high-quality service learning experiences, and
 providing leadership roles for students.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
 America Reads. Students will be rewarded for participation in the Principal’s Reading Club. Each week students will
     be required to read at least 1 hour, keep a log, and have a parent’s signature. Students will read at senior citizen centers,
     head-start centers, and to kindergarten students.
 School Initiative. Students’ name will be announced on the morning announcements. Certificates will be given monthly
     for the honor roll, attendance, Good Citizenship Wards, Most Improved Students, the Superintendent’s Reading Club,
     the Principal’s Reading Club, and the After-school Reading Club.
Leadership Opportunities
This project will allow students to take active roles and responsibility in getting the job done. Students will have a chance to
choose an area that they feel comfortable working with. Some may choose to stay in the background and organize projects.
However, all students must ―pitch in‖ to help accomplish tasks. The project will inspire students to become involved in
service, advocate for and educate others about service learning, and build bridges between young people and adults by
opening their minds to the power of youth to make a difference. It anticipated that students will take leadership roles and
responsibilities for the success of each activity. They will also be in charge of raising awareness about the project within the
community.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
The project will foster the development of a sense of citizenship, responsibility, and civic pride by connecting units to math,
science, social studies, and language arts/reading classes in partnership with the Department of Aging. Students will define
service learning, study citizenship, study the six pillars of character, and become aware of the needs of the community,
especially the changing physical and mental characteristics of aging. Students will then develop relationships with elderly
residents in their community who are living in nursing homes or are involved with a senior center. Students will also
beautify the community by painting walls and buildings, by planting flowers, trees, shrubs, and grass to replace dirt lots and
street corners that are infested with graffiti.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 To offer training programs in the areas of service learning school-based projects
 To measure the success of service learning school-based projects through surveys and questionnaires and group
     discussions
 To celebrate the success of the proposed service learning participants
Anticipated outcomes are as follows:
 A cadre of professional educators to establish training needs and priorities
 Workshops for staff, parents, students, administrators, and other interested community members
 An assessment to measure program success
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   Implementation of service learning school-based projects
   Completion of surveys at the end of the year
   Celebration/awards Banquet for service learning participants.




                                                                    20
1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Joan Daniels * Tucson Unified School District, Carrillo Intermediate Magnet School * 1010 East 10th Street, Tucson, AZ
85719 * Phone: 520.225.1200

Project Description
Carrillo’s Art and History Museum Project provides intermediate-age students the opportunity to create, display, and
research art and local history for themselves and as interpreters to the public. They move between two sites: Carrillo Magnet
School (the school) and La Pilita (the worksite). Carrillo has a long history of the exploration of culture for all students
through art, social studies, and the language arts. The local oral histories have provided a springboard for the explorations
of all cultures. Six books have been produced and published by the school. The Carrillo library houses student-produced
oral history tapes and videotapes made about the culture and history of the community. La Pilita is located just north of the
school. The adobe building and the double lot have been leased to the nonprofit La Pilita Association. La Pilita’s mission is
―to study the early history of Tucson, focusing on archaeology, ethnobotany, folklore and the arts.‖ Students literally move
from the educational setting to a public museum-like setting. Carrillo’s program can be viewed as a three-pronged
integration of curriculum that satisfies the state standards in social studies, science, and art; is integral in the students’
academic day; and provides an opportunity for the student to extend his/her learning in a way that serves or educates others.
This is Carrillo’s second year to receive a Learn and Serve grant.
Project Location
Carrillo School is located at 440 S. Main. The La Pilita is located at 420 S. Main. The buildings are located in Barrio
Historico immediately south of downtown Tucson.
Service Learning Team
The school team has the following membership: a Carrillo parent, La Pilita resource teacher, the art teacher, a classroom
teacher, Carrillo support staff, an administrator/curriculum specialist, and a member of the LaPilita Association Board.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
The school and community are intertwined. An example is the recent TPAC Mural Restoration Project. Students work in
art class on murals and a local artist works with them to restore the mural on the south wall of La Pilita. The
neighborhood helps on a Saturday workday. Las Posadas originates in the extended day then becomes a community event
with a procession throughout the neighborhood. School Studies projects will have the Learn and Serve component at La
Pilita Gallery. Archaeological studies proceed with construction on the site. Students work beside archaeologists to sift
excavated materials. Certain artifacts are kept and reused to seed digs for younger students. La Pilita facility will be used
by the neighborhood as the site undergoes improvements. This will give further exposure of students and student work to
the public. The ―tiendita‖ will be a source of retail experience as it evolves.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
The School to Work Opportunity Act provides a two-prong approach to helping students enter the world of work. It
requires that the academic requirements are met and that a real-life experience of the world of work is in place and that the
bridge between the two is established in the child’s understanding. The project links closely to the world of work initiative.
Teachers will meet the TUSD Core Curriculum and the Academic Standards in art, language, and social studies using
projects at the La Pilita gallery.
Leadership Opportunities
Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their leadership skills learned in Extended Day and regular classes in the
jobs of Artist, Exhibit Installer, Event Planner/Public Relations, Interpretive Writer, Historian, and as ―expert‖ docent
presenters. Consultants and career speakers will serve as models for students participating in their workshops. Students will
produce work and portfolios as a result of interacting with them.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
La Pilita itself is a community structure. Grounds maintenance, gallery maintenance, and gallery presentations enhance the
site and the civic pride of the neighbors and students who work there. Docents will have the stature of experts. They will be
responsible for presentations to adults as well as peers.
Objectives
 Fourth Grade Gallery Exhibit and Volunteer Reception
 Fourth Grade Native American Exhibit
 Third Grade Desert Exhibit and Community Reception
 Fifth Grade Learning Portfolio Presentation
 Carrillo staff will participate in a planning session to clarify and plan for the year’s projects.
 Carrillo staff will implement the curriculum defined by the Focus Committee and Carrillo MAP.
 Carrillo School Training Team will attend 2-day ADE workshop.
 Carrillo Focus Committee will plan grade-level content and experiences to be shared by all students in Social Studies.
 Additional staffing time on Museum site will be obtained.

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22
1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Lynn Blankinship * Tucson Unified School District, Howenstine High Magnet School * 555 S Tucson Boulevard
* Tucson AZ 85716 * Phone: 520.232.7400 * Email: carol.blankinship@tusd.k12.az.us

Project Description
HHMS has a unique history of integration and service learning. The school was founded for special education self-
contained students in 1976 and reorganized in 1996 under the alternative education umbrella as an open enrollment school
for all students. At this time service learning became a requirement for graduation. In November of 1999 the Tucson
Unified School District Board approved Howenstine as a magnet school with a service learning focus. Service learning at
HHMS is a teaching pedagogy integrated across the curriculum. HHMS is and will remain a small high school. Currently
191 students are enrolled in grades 9-12, approximately 60 are students identified as multiple disabled. The total school
enrollment will be 260 students. All students participate in service learning. The vision at HHMS is to improve students’
learning of academic, leadership, and work skills through service. Previous grant funds have supported the development,
implementation, and evaluation of the service learning program. New funds will be used to continue the development and
improve the program.
Project Location
The service learning program uses a school- and community-based model. Administration of the program is from the school
facility that maintains the school administration, school staff, teachers, office space, and classrooms. There is access to
phones, fax, computers, and the Internet. The service learning teams meet in the classrooms and this is where the students
attend school and where the service learning activities are linked to the CORE Curriculum and the Arizona Standards.
Students at community sites will be located throughout the greater Tucson area. Access to the community will be assured by
training students to use public transportation and when necessary school transportation. HHMS is located in mid-town
Tucson within easy walking distance to public transportation.
Service Learning Team
The school training team is made up of teachers, students, staff, administrators, parents, and community representatives.
These people will have a high-level of understanding of the school program. The team will be responsible for transferring
information learned at a level that will greatly impact the schoolwide service learning program.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
Coordination with school and community programs is evident through a list of partners and activities with the Tucson
Museum of Art, Habitat for Humanity Tucson, and Campfire Association as well as over 50 community nonprofit sites
where students have served. Coordination of service learning within the school community is evident with the collaboration
of the service learning teams, coordinators, and the school council in providing input necessary to evaluate and improve the
program.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
The service learning program coordinates with the School-To-Work Opportunities Act. TUSD staff is on the local Board
and provides timely program information to HHMS staff. Students from age 16 are eligible and do receive services from
TUSD School-to-Work programs. HHMS’s service learning information is shared with local representatives on a regular
basis. Service learning also has its roots in experiential education philosophy. Service learning projects are the key to
HHMS providing hands-on, student-directed learning.
Leadership Opportunities
Leadership opportunities will be an ongoing part of the program. Service learning teams allow students to work together
cooperatively in selecting, planning, carrying out, and evaluating projects. As a team, teachers are better able to monitor
students and provide needed encouragement, insights, information, or skill development while facilitating the student-
directed projects. Students who participate in the school council and attendance at service learning workshops and camps
develop leadership skills. When they are involved with the creation of materials and the sharing of information, they are
developing leadership skills and increasing community awareness of HHMS and the value of service learning.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
Academic achievement and the fostering of a sense of citizenship, responsibility, and civic pride are the ultimate goal.
Service learning activities provide the balance of student instruction, support, and reflection to permit students to act
independently and to see themselves in roles of responsible, contributing members of their team, school, and community.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 A team of teachers, staff, students, parent, a community representative or an administrator will be formed to attend the
     Learn and Serve workshops.
 The database record keeping system for the school will be maintained and the utilization improved.
 At least 180 HHMS students will participate in projects and at least 1000 individuals and groups will be served.
 80% of the teachers will integrate at least one service learning activity into class curriculum.
 Service learning resource materials will be developed with input form service learning teaching teams and coordinators.

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   Partnerships with community organizations will be increased at least by 20%.
   A minimum of three activities for teaching and documenting at least four Academic Standards will be developed and
    demonstrated through service learning projects.




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1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Anna Read * Tucson Unified School District, Pueblo Gardens Elementary School * 2210 E 33rd Street * Tucson AZ
85713 * Phone: 520.617.6300

Project Description
The Pueblo Gardens Mentor/Volunteer Center is currently in full operation. The center serves as the nucleus for providing
management, leadership, and instruction to meet the crucial needs for sustainability of many programs that have proven
successful for students, families, and community. By continuing to expand service learning opportunities, Pueblo Gardens
will continue to be a location for students, teens, and adult mentors/volunteers to plan and work together, as well as
acknowledge, validate, and honor those individuals who provide a service for our school and community. Funding and
guidance from the Learn and Serve grant will allow the project team to continue the Mentor/Volunteer Center, will provide
the opportunity to sustain the integrated service learning instruction to the classrooms and after-school programs and will
provided. In this way, students and staff will receive an enhanced service learning curriculum and adult training will be
increased through requested professional development.
Project Location
Pueblo Gardens is the primary location, although service learning projects may take student into the larger community. The
school setting is unique in that there are distinct areas where service learning can either take place or be supported. There is
also a desert habitat created with support from the Arizona-Sonoran Desert Museum; early childhood and older youth play
areas that include a fitness track and nature path; and a school/community garden that has received a national gardening
award the last 2 years.
Service Learning Team
The training team consists of a Project Coordinator, Mentor Specialist, and a minimum of two teens, two staff, 2 students,
one parent, and one business or community member.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
The project coordinator and the mentor specialist are both staff at Pueblo Gardens. Support for this project will also be
provided by Renee Carstens, the previous Learn and Serve Coordinator who is currently working with Pima County Youth
Opportunity. The project coordinator has experience in developing and organizing projects that require coordination with
classrooms and with outside organizations and volunteers. She has assisted with such events as the annual Fall Harvest
Festival, which involves 300 family members and 35 to 50 volunteers, and she has coordinated many fieldtrips and craft
projects for KIDCo and has been involved with the Tucson Parks and Recreation after-school program. These examples
provide evidence of the school’s unique capacity to coordinate projects that involved participants from within and outside
the school, blending academic learning with community service goals.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
Pueblo Gardens is a Fourth R partner and was selected as one of 15 schools out of the district’s 105 schools to participate in
a Harvard study of school-to-work activities. Pueblo has also been selected as a site for America Reads. University of
Arizona students are currently developing this into an after-school program for Pueblo students.
Leadership Opportunities
The learning environment serves as the basis for the leadership activities. Through the service learning projects, students
can participate and exercise leadership in a variety of ways, from serving on the Project Team to helping shape the
classroom activities, to organizing specific aspects of each project, to evaluation and celebration. The Project Coordinator
will establish ways for students to be engaged in each step of the process. Additionally, the older teens will serve as one-on-
one mentors with young student leaders identified at the beginning of each project.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
The understanding and expression of ownership, responsibility, and civic pride will be deepened and expanded through the
service learning projects. A powerful lesson that students experience is the importance of their own contributions, a
notability not based on materials wealth, but on intelligence, skill, compassion, and team work. The multigenerational
aspect of these projects is also powerful. Older students and teens mentor younger students, and these older youth are
valued and admired by the younger students. The adults appreciate these youth, children see their family members making a
difference, and parents feel they are involved positively in their child’s education. The strength of service learning is that
these abstract qualities—citizenship, responsibility, and pride—are made tangible and real.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 Build upon current community partnerships and increase partners by five through written newsletters, meetings, and
     mentor programs.
 Continue the Mentor/Volunteer Center through projects during the school day and in after-school programs.
 Plan, take action, reflect upon, and celebrate a minimum of three student-driven service learning projects.
 Students will demonstrate a sense of citizenship, civic pride, and responsibility as measured by attendance, journal
     entries, reflection activities, and performance evaluation.

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   Each staff member (approximately 35) will be given the opportunity to participate in additional service learning
    training.
   Professional development training to the project team and volunteers will continue through participation in the Learn
    and Serve workshops.




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1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Jacqueline Boyer * Sunnyside Unified School District, Sunnyside High School * 1725 E Bilby Road * Tucson AZ 85706 *
Phone: 520.545.5316 * Email: jacqueb@sunnysideud.k12.az.us

Project Description
Sunnyside Unified School District is developing a districtwide service learning program that joins high school-age students
in the education and pursuit of excellence through authentic learning in community classrooms. Service learning will
provide a platform for students to engage actively in the learning process. Service learning will provide opportunities for
educational achievement in both traditional and experiential settings by integrating service learning in the vocational and
academic curriculums. The grant will be used to develop, implement, and evaluate the district’s service learning program.
The initial design will begin with freshmen working as mentors in the elementary schools. Additional opportunities for
students to engage in active learning through community experiences will be added as the program develops. During the
first year of implementation, there will be some 60 students involved. Within 3 years, it is anticipated that the number of
participants will be 150-275 students.
Project Location
The Sunnyside service learning program will use a school- and community-based model. Administration of the program will
be at the Sunnyside High School facility in the Career Center. All files and student portfolios will be kept here in a secure
manner to ensure confidentiality. There is access to phones, fax, computers, and the Internet. Students at community sites
will be located close to the main facility at the high school to ensure ease of transportation issues. The strength of the site is
that the student and faculty is already familiar with its purpose. Both the Vocational Director and the Intern/Tech Prep
Coordinator’s offices are located in the facility. The Prevention Office is adjacent to the building.
Service Learning Team
The make up of the training team will consist of two administrators, an intern/tech prep coordinator, 2 teachers, and two
paraprofessionals. The administrators will collaborate with site principals to coordinate all activities and have the necessary
authority to respond to operational needs of they program. The vocational administrator, in conjunction with two teachers
and assistant principals in charge of curriculum, will be responsible for designing and incorporating service learning
curriculum and evaluation of the service learning efforts.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
Coordination with school and community projects and programs is evidenced by the already existing partnerships with Big
Brothers/Big Sisters, the Elvira Neighborhood Association, Sunnyside Neighborhood Association, Teachers of the Future,
and Blue Devil Partners in Reading. The goal is to take these existing partnerships that have already proven successful for
students, expand the opportunities for more students to become involved, and add additional academic content and focus to
increase student achievement on state and district mandated tests.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
Sunnyside’s service learning program is coordinated with the Vocational Department so that there can be a direct contact
with students and their interests in a career pathway. Teachers will incorporate the service learning curriculum for many of
their existing student-based enterprises and projects. The mission is to assure that all students served by the district learn the
skills, knowledge, behaviors, and attitudes they need to be productive in a changing, democratic, multicultural society.
Leadership Opportunities
Leadership opportunities will be an ongoing part of the program specifically designed to place the student in activities and
environments that will gradually nurture increased skills development. Students will have many opportunities to serve as
role models and tutors.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
The service learning activities will permit students to act independently and see themselves in the role of a responsible,
contributing member of their learning environment and community. From this, the student’s sense of civic pride is
developed. As students work within the neighborhood associations and agencies they will be involved in the creation of
materials and the sharing of service learning information with others. They will support, reflect, and verbally share with
others their civic pride as depicted by their hours of dedication and sense of responsibility.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 Students will be matched with elementary school students for one-on-one mentoring and tutoring.
 Assessment will involve reflections/journal writing, site evaluations, and a Personal Plan for Academic Progress.




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1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Archie Hamm * Wickenburg Unified School District, Wickenburg High School * 40 Yavapai Street * Wickenburg AZ
85390 * Phone: 928.684.6600

Project Description
Wickenburg High School is a partner with Habitat for Humanity. The purpose of this partnership is to aid the community by
providing volunteer opportunities, vocational training, and academic enhancement. The service learning program will serve
two families that need a home. There will be 20 students, 5 staff, and approximately 20 volunteers working on the service
project. Habitat for Humanity and Home Depot have collaborated with Wickenburg’s Success Program. Ten students from
the Success Program are partnered with 10 mentoring students. The first component of this project consists of volunteers
teaching the students vocational skills needed to build a house in the classroom. The second component is the actual
building of a home. This will involve staff, volunteers, and students. Wickenburg will provide a van for transportation.
Habitat for Humanity and Home Depot will allow students to borrow tools. The last component encompasses career
exploration, occupation searches, mock practices in applying for jobs, resume contact, thank-you letters, and tips for
succeeding on the job.
Project Location
The project will be based at Wickenburg High School. Students will work on the campus during the week, and on Saturdays
they will work in Aguila and Congress. The professional supervision, large and safe work area, Internet access, and the use
of trade tools are the strengths of the facility. A van or bus will transport the students to the job site. Staff, volunteers, and
students will work on Saturdays to avoid any class schedule conflicts.
Service Learning Team
The school training team will consist of the guidance counselor, two students, two representatives from the Habitat for
Humanity, the Success teacher, the Wood Working teacher, and the principal.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
The project will involve a collaboration of efforts. The Success teacher will help students with interviewing skills, resumes,
contact, and thank-you letters. The Wood Working teacher will also work on campus building cabinets, drafting, and
carpentry. Students, staff, and volunteers will dedicate their Saturdays to the actual building of a house.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
America’s Promise and Wickenburg’s service-learning project share the following common goals:
 Ongoing relationships with caring adults
 Safe places with structured activities during non-school hours
 Healthy start and future
 Marketable skills through effective education
 Opportunities to give back through community service
Leadership Opportunities
The service learning project will instill leadership skills by allowing students to lead a given task/project. Students are also
expected to co-teach a vocational skill to their classmates.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
The service learning project will foster the development of citizenship by giving students the opportunity to help individuals
in the community. During the process of building a home with Habitat for Humanity, students are responsible for borrowed
tools, job attendance, and assigned building tasks. Students will gain a sense of civic pride after witnessing how their hard
work helped build a home for an appreciative family.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 Strong relation between students, staff, and volunteers as measured by office referrals and observation of student-
     teacher relationships.
 Community involvement as measured by keeping and comparing written accounts of volunteer hours.
 Students will learn to take pride in the jobs they perform, and in the community as measured through observation and
     thank-you letters written to volunteers.
 Students will be given grades based on their ability to complete a given task.
 Students will be given the opportunity to learn marketable skills through effective instruction as measured by tracing
     students’ career paths and a written record.




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1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Beth Packard * Williams Unified School District, Northern Arizona Rural Challenge * 1300 S Milton Road, #206 *
Flagstaff AZ 86001 * Phone: 928.226.8053 * Email: bpackard@flagstaff.apscc.k12.az.us

Project Description
The Northern Arizona Rural Trust Cluster is comprised of the communities and schools of Williams, Seligman, and Grand
Canyon. Together with the community of Ashfork, the Rural Trust proposes to extend/expand existing volunteer, service
learning youth leadership activities by focusing on youth involvement and youth leadership. Efforts will give youth a greater
voice throughout all service learning projects. Students will brainstorm ideas, select project that create a solution to a
community concern, plan each project, write proposals, and celebrate their achievements and successes. This process will
provide youth with opportunities to incorporate reflection activities at each state of development. Teachers will be given
training and tools to adjust curriculum around themes identified by youth to ensure that Arizona’s Academic and Workplace
Standards are integrated into learning processes for each targeted activity.
Project Location
The service learning activities will take place in the communities and schools of Williams, Seligman, and Grand Canyon.
Each school has computer labs, digital cameras, and technology for these efforts. Many departments/grade levels and
community entities support service learning at all three sites. Williams’ vocational program labs provide optimum space for
activities in the evenings and during the week-end. Williams’ Kiwanis Club supports three after-school youth clubs for
elementary, middle school, and high school youth. Seligman’s greenhouse will be used by the Rural Trust to propagate
native seeds in the Williams and Seligman schools until they can be replanted in natural settings. Grand Canyon has access
to Grand Canyon National Park Service tools and equipment for re-vegetation.
Service Learning Team
The school team will consist of students, teachers, and administrators from all three schools and communities. These teams
have been evolving as the Trust adds interested individuals who wish training and information on service learning.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
Currently the Rural Trust is being funded by Annenberg Foundation Rural School and Community Trust and the Arizona
Department of Education Learn and Serve grants. These two grants provide the means for four communities to focus on
place-based education, service learning, and youth leadership activities. As the result of efforts during the past year and half,
local adult community members are successfully collaborating with schools and youth organizations. This is a major
accomplishment. Organizations schools have partnered in the past will continue these partnerships in the current year.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
The Learn and Serve grant aligns the Northern Arizona Rural Trust initiatives that promote place-based education with
environmental awareness, oral history, and vocational education service learning programs. Examples include the
partnerships between the Williams High School Construction class and the Habitat for Humanity to build a Ramada for
Elementary/Middle School students last year; the Seasons of Service Grant involving Williams’s schools and community
members in a community-wide service learning effort during Make A Difference Day; and a variety of integrated
environmental education activities that will be enhanced through service learning strategies.
Leadership Opportunities
Rural Trust uses the SCAN Skills and the Search Institute Assessment Model as a means of ensuring that youth develop
leadership skills. For example, through participation in service learning, youth learn creative thinking, problem solving, and
reasoning skills; they develop personal responsibility and self-management skills; they learn how to work as a team; and they
access resources. Focus on the Search Institute’s Developmental Assets includes providing youth with adult relationships,
caring neighborhoods, empowering opportunities, social competencies, and positive identify. Rural Trust intends for youth
to become active partners in the learning process, to become knowledgeable about local communities and their needs as well
as the needs of the world, and to become proactive in advocating solutions for identified problems.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
Through place-based service learning activities, youth learn about prairies, watersheds, Grand Canyon National Forest and
waterway issues. Through oral history projects, youth learn about their elders and the struggles they have overcome to
survive and thrive. Through addressing local drug and alcohol issues, youth learn to take responsibility for community
problems and solutions. As youth become leaders in their respective communities and have a voice in community activities,
they are more prepared to become stewards of the community in which they live. Rural Trust provides ample opportunities
for youth to share successes through conference presentations and community celebrations that result in media recognition.
These efforts provide a unique setting for youth to experience a sense of pride in their accomplishments.




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Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 Approximately 290 youth in three school districts will participate in service learning activities.
 Students will identify community-based service learning opportunities and teachers will provide reflection processes.
 A team of teachers, students, and others will promote service learning in the three communities.
 Program staff and team members will attend the designated Learn and Serve inservices.
 A 2-day training will be held in Williams for teachers from the three high schools.
 Teachers and students will submit mini-proposals in which they will describe the plan of celebration.
 Teachers will rewrite curriculum units to integrate service learning strategies into Academic and Workplace Standards.




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1.1 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of a Service Learning Program

Lorraine Eastes * Young Public School * PO Box 390 * Young AZ 85554 * Phone: 520.462.3244
* Email: yps@theriver.com

Project Description
The Young Public School consists of 81 students, PK-12. Although small in size, the district offers the state-required
courses. Students and staff strive to attain current and innovative educational experiences to enhance learning. One of the
main deficiencies students have is exposure to realistic opportunities to increase their knowledge and experiences. Students
in grades 7-12 will implement a school-based, community National Forest Service project to restore and maintain natural
wild grasses and trees.
Project Location
The initial greenhouse will be built on the school grounds with the help of students, staff, and community participants. The
project itself will be implemented in the community in designated places where natural wild plants should be planted.
Service Learning Team
The team will consist of one learn and serve coordinator, one National Forest Service member, one students, one teacher,
and one Community Council member.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
The school, community, and National Forest Service will in the Youth Offers United Natural growth project. Students will
coordinate the three participating groups to provide a united collaboration of growing and transplanting natural wild plants
in the Young community.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
The project ligns with the America Reads program that occurs on the Young School campus daily. In addition, the 7-12
students will introduce the project to the PK-6 students via class presentations, visitations to the greenhouse, and active
participation in the community transplanting project.
Leadership Opportunities
Leadership will be provided to the students as they design and implement not only the school participants, but also with the
community council and the National Forest Service. In addition, future continuation of this project will continue these
leadership skills.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
The Young project will foster the development of not only realistic and relevant curriculum and learning experiences for
students, but also for students working together with the community and the National Forest Service to enhance citizenship,
responsibility, and civic pride. When students can learn opportunities exist and can be obtained via cooperation and
collaboration with other existing possible people/agencies/community, the learning experience becomes one that will instill
civic pride and a lifetime experience to be remembered.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
1. Increase the natural plant life growth in the Young community.
2. Increase collaborative efforts between the school, community, and the National Forest Service.
3. Increase school, community, and NFS awareness of realistic, relevant learning experiences.
4. Increase student awareness of educational opportunities via collaboration.
5. Coordinate activities with the Arizona Standards.
6. Provide relevant educational experiences for 7-12 students.
7. Provide an introduction to relevant educational experiences for PK-6 students.
8. Develop leadership qualities via collaboration experiences and an attainment goal.
9. Increase the cross-curricular educational experiences for 7-12 students.
10. Provide a plan for continuation of the program.




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1.2 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of an Adult Volunteer Program

Bonnie Palmer * Coolidge Unified School District, Kenilworth Transition Center * 221 W Central Avenue * Coolidge
AZ 85228 * Phone: 520.723.4904 * Email: bpalmer@cusd.k12.1a.us

Project Description
This project focuses on the students in the Coolidge Unified School District who are transitioning back to the regular
classroom after participating in the district’s alternative-to-suspension program at the Kenilworth Transition Center. Instead
of being suspended and sent home, the student with a moderate-to-severe behavioral infraction is removed from regular
classroom and sent to KTC where he/she receives academic support, counseling, and discipline. Thus, the purpose of the
project is to give students the academic and social support they need to stay in school and out of trouble and transition
successfully back into their regular school life. At least 12 adults willing to serve as mentors will participate in the program,
in addition to the 8 adults recruited by the America’s Promise Fellow. Some 10 adult volunteers will be recruited to tutor
students in reading and math. At least 50 4th- through 12th- grade students will participate in the program. The majority of
the transitional students to be mentored/tutored will be from McCray Junior High School.
Project Location
The schools involved in this project are North School, Intermediate School, McCray Junior High School, and Coolidge High
School. Each site has meeting/conference rooms where mentors, tutors, and students can meet, as well as computer labs that
may be used by tutors and the students.
Project Staff
The service learning team will include the Executive Director of the Coolidge Family Resource Center, Community
Coordinator of Big Brothers/Big Sisters in Casa Grande, America’s Promise Fellow, Director of Curriculum and Instruction
at CUSD, and Academic Coaches at Coolidge High School, Intermediate School, and West School.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
The project will be coordinated with the school district’s alternative-to-suspension program explained previously.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
To help bring students to the performance levels required by the Arizona State Standards, CUSD has implemented the
Reading Success Network. The network supports classroom teachers’ efforts to provide powerful reading instruction
through a combination of components: peer-coaching, use of reading assessment tools, and data collection and analysis to
inform instruction and determine appropriate intervention strategies. In addition, the math tutoring will use tutor-training
materials from American Counts, the U.S. Department of Education initiative to improve students’ math skills and math
readiness for postsecondary education. These materials are free and are instantly available off the Internet. Lastly, an
America’s Promise Fellow will staff the project and the project supports the goals that Coolidge has as a Community of
Promise and CUSD has as a School of Promise.
Leadership Opportunities
Leadership is inherent in the roles of mentors and tutors in that they provide guidance, direction, and support through the
students. The training will help the adult volunteers develop the skills they need to be effective in their roles.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
The mentoring program will change the structure and institutional boundaries of the community and the vision of both the
mentors and the students mentored. Mentoring will expose students to the challenge of working with and getting along with
someone from a different background, age, and perhaps culture. Mentoring will forge a strong bond between the adult
volunteers, the school district, and the community organization involved in the project. In a time when many adults are
alienated from the community and community involvement, the project will commit adults to being involved in a community
issue, and therefore, foster a sense of active citizenship and real responsibility.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 12 adult volunteers will be screened and recruited to mentor students.
 12 adult volunteers recruited as mentors will complete a mentor training workshop.
 12 KTC students will be mentored by the 12 adult volunteers/
 Each student-mentor match will be monitored for progress and appropriateness.
 95 percent of all matches between mentors and students will be maintained for at least 6 months.
 90 percent of all students matched with mentors will indicate satisfaction with their mentors.
 85 percent of students being mentored will not commit behavioral infractions leading to suspension.
 10 additional adult volunteers will be recruited to tutor students.
 The adults recruited to tutor students will be trained in tutoring math and reading.
 The tutors will provide tutoring to 30 students.
 85 percent of the students tutored in math will each show a 2 percent growth on the District CRM test for math.
 85 percent of the students tutored in reading will each show a 2 percent growth on the District CRM test for reading.
 85 percent of the students tutored will show a .5 grade point increase n subjects tutored by marking period.
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   Students will be identified and utilized for mentor/tutor recruitment.
   Mentors and tutors will gain leadership experience.
   Mentors will reflect on and celebrate their mentoring experience.




                                                                             33
1.2 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of an Adult Volunteer Program

Paul Riley * Ira H. Hayes Memorial Applied Learning Center * PO Box 10899 * Bapchule AZ 85221
* Phone: 520.315.1875 * Email: pjvr@hotmail.com

Project Description
The Ira H. Hayes Memorial Applied Learning Center is the sole public charter high school in the Gila River Indian
Community. The high school serves an impoverished student population whose average academic proficiency is less that
9th-grade level. To address this serious academic deficiency, the staff is implementing a tutorage program entitled Eagle’s
Nest Volunteers. This program will provide a valuable tool and benefit to both students and teacher/mentors. The
program’s intent is to provide a one-to-one learning opportunity between a students and adult. The program is designed to
provide direct reading practice, tutorial assistance for both academic/elective classes, homework tutorial for both
academic/electives classes, and leadership development through interaction with community elders. As a pilot project, the
Eagle’s Nest Volunteers Program will recruit 14 volunteers to serve 14 students 2 hours per week. Once developed, it is
anticipated that the program will expand to serve additional students.
Project Location
Ira H. Hayes Memorial Applied Learning Center is located in the city of Bapchule on the Gila River Indian Community.
The Eagle’s Nest Volunteer Program will be instituted with the Ira H. Hayes Memorial Applied Learning Center.
Project Staff
The project’s overseer has successfully implemented a similar volunteer program at Sahuarita High School. He is a certified
special education teacher/administrator and is competent with one-to-one instructional models, is able to train volunteers,
and can provide supplemental materials across the curriculum.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
The program will be coordinated with several school initiatives: an Action Reading program, in which all students are
currently enrolled, and the school’s open classroom initiative, in which students learn creatively without being restricted to
the confines of a classroom.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
The program will be coordinated with Action Reading, a 6-weeks phonics reading program. The volunteer program will
build upon the Action Reading course to further students’ literacy. Another school initiative is the independent instructional
model, as well as computer-based instruction. Volunteers will be able to assist students with their independent projects.
Leadership Opportunities
The program will help students develop leadership skills by matching them with volunteer role models. Students will
interact with retirees having great experiential knowledge as well as Indian community elders. As the school supports an
open classroom model, students will develop leadership skills through self-monitoring their academic progress, while
volunteers will help guide their academic achievement in a one-on-one setting.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
The Eagle’s Nest Volunteer Program will foster the development of a sense of citizenship, responsibility, and civic pride.
The majority of the student body is Native American and can learn cultural aspects from community elder volunteers. The
volunteer program itself will help create and foster an atmosphere of inclusion and acceptance. Tutors will exemplify good
citizenship and reinforce the importance of civic pride and values to the students.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 Place students’ needs/interests as the first priority.
 Provide strong support for the ongoing educational programs at Ira H. Hayes Memorial Applied Learning Center.
 Support the overall mission and incorporate the Arizona Academic Standards.
 Help create and foster an atmosphere of inclusion and acceptance.
 Develop and adhere to high ethical standards.
 Maintain a long-term focus on growth and development while striving for immediate impact and benefit.




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1.2 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of an Adult Volunteer Program

Maggie Kraft * Madison Elementary School District, Madison Heights Elementary School * 5601 N 16th Street *
Phoenix AZ 85016 * Phone: 602.664.7810

Project Description
Madison Heights is a pre-K through 4th grade elementary school located in North Phoenix. The Madison Heights Mentoring
Minds Program was implemented during the 1999-2000 school year for the purpose of recruiting adult volunteers to help in
the classroom. Over the past two years tremendous progress has been made, however, it is necessary to strengthen the
volunteer corps by recruiting and training more parents, grandparents, neighbors, and especially community partners to work
in the classroom. The Mentoring Minds Program will continue to focus on bringing adult volunteers into the classroom to
support teachers. This program will strive to support all 431 students currently enrolled. The goal is to enrich students’
education by publishing their writing, by increasing adult volunteerism in the classrooms, by expanding the community
outreach program, by formalizing the district’s policies for accepting community volunteers, by providing mentor/tutor
training to adult volunteers, and by providing teachers with grant writing support.
Project Location
Madison Heights School is located in an urban community with a changing demographic population. Social economic
indicators of free and reduced lunch and mobility have almost doubled in the past decade. One significant outcomes of
changing demographics is the decline in the number of stay-at-home parents who are available to volunteer at the schools.
Therefore, a community outreach program is essential in trying to expand the participation of adults in the classroom.
Project Staff
The Mentoring Minds Coordinator/Trainer oversees the entire project. She is responsible for developing the program and
making sure that the primary goal of the program–to bring additional adult volunteers to the classroom–is met. Since
publishing is a cornerstone component of the program, the coordinator is responsible for addressing the needs of the
Publishing Center, specifically to provide training and technical assistance. Another responsibility is to coordinate the
OASIS Tutoring program for the whole district. This includes recruitment, training, and encouraging expansion to other
schools in the district. Finally the coordinator is responsible for passing on information to the teachers, placing students with
volunteers, making sure that the lines of communication are open between the teacher and tutor, as well as reflection and
assessment of the entire program.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
Support has been acquired and will continue with such agencies as the following: American Reads, OASIS, PookPals,
Squaw Peak Senior Center, Los Olivos Senior Center, Phoenix Jewish Coalition for Literacy, Retired and Senior Volunteer
Program, Phoenix Grants Forum, Maricopa County Volunteer Center, Mariserve, and Area Agency on Aging.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
The Mentoring Minds Program complements several programs. A key partner is with the America Reads Program. ASU
West has agreed to provide the school with two interns committed to work an average of 8.5 hours per week in the
classroom during the language arts class. In addition, the program incorporated some of the components specified in
America’s Promise. For example, the Intergenerational Tutoring Program component of Mentoring Minds touches the
resources of Mentor, Nurture, and Teach. The program will also support other school reform initiatives through
involvement with the Learning Network, which is the district’s Literacy Model. Currently, one teacher from Madison
Heights spends a full day dialoging with the other teachers to support them in the areas of reading and writing and
implementing literacy strategies into their classrooms. Finally, the Mentoring Minds Program will support teaching literacy
in accordance with the district’s standards and the Arizona State Standards.
Leadership Opportunities
This program provides tremendous leadership skills for children. As children progress into their adult life, there is no more
powerful skill that a school can give their students than strong communication skills. The Mentoring Minds Program
provides students additional chances to enhance their reading and writing, thus cultivating their communication skills.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
This program helps to foster the development of community. Volunteers are sought from the surrounding community
regardless of whether their children attend Madison Heights or not. The plan is to increase the number of adults involved in
children’s education. The commitment is to foster the development of citizenship, responsibility, and civic pride by placing
committed, responsible adults in the classroom to serve as positive role models and mentors to students.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 Encourage and increase the publishing capabilities of students’ writing by continued expansion of the existing
     Publishing Center.
 Increase community volunteers in the classrooms.
 Expand and develop the community outreach program.
 Streamline and formalize district’s policies and procedures for accepting community volunteers in the school.

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   Provide adult volunteers with mentor/tutor training as well as technical/computer and publishing training.
   Provide teachers with grant writing support for funds that directly support the classrooms.




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1.2 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of an Adult Volunteer Program

Jolene LeFlore * Omega Academy Charter School * 1951 W Camelback Road, #325 * Phoenix AZ 85015 *
Phone: 602.938.2092 * Email: jleflore@omegak12.com

Project Description
The Omega Academy Academic Counts Adult Volunteer Program is a school-based academic and community project that
seeks to increase the number of adults who volunteer in Omega Academy Charter Schools. The program focuses on
establishing 10 adult volunteers in 4 K through 3rd-grade multiple level classrooms to provide tutoring activities that will
enhance language arts skills. Academic Counts activities are aligned with the Arizona Language Standards and address the
four content areas of reading, writing, listening and speaking, and viewing and presenting. Volunteers interface with four
classroom instructors, one lead teacher, one curriculum coach, and two classroom assistants to provide more than 250 hours
of instructional tutoring for 120 students who are currently performing below the 50 percentile in language arts. The
academic portions of this program, including the Brigance reading curriculum and hands-on reading activities, will be
implemented during the day school hours. Community service project, volunteer training, parent workshops, and quarterly
field trips to the Good Samaritan Senior Care Center will take place during the after-school and Saturday morning hours.
Project Location
Omega students come from backgrounds that are economically and academically challenged. More than 85 percent enter the
school below grade level in language arts, math, and science. Because of the extreme literacy needs in this Southwest
Phoenix community, Omega has opened its doors to students and families during the after-school and Saturday morning
hours. Regular day school classrooms are open to accommodate learning centers and small-group instructional
opportunities. A computer lab is located in the center section of two large open classrooms. There are 20 computers that
join the two elementary classroom sections. Each elementary classroom can comfortably accommodate 60 students.
Learning centers provide an excellent opportunity for adult volunteers to use Brigance reading activities in small-group
learning sessions. Daily activities are centered on monthly themes. The lead teacher and the classroom instructors develop
monthly and daily lesson plans and provide student pre- and post-tests to measure academic success.
Project Staff
The project Curriculum Coach has more than 27 years of progressive teaching, curriculum design, and educational
leadership experience from public education, community college, and university settings. The project Lead Teacher has
more than 7 years of teaching and curriculum design experience. The four Classroom Teachers have 27 years of collective
experience as classroom student intervention and instructional implementation managers. The two Classroom Assistants
have 4 years of collective experience in instructional delivery practices.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
The Academic Counts Adult Volunteer Program will use existing classroom curriculum to design small-group tutoring
sessions that are designed to increase K through 3rd-grade reading skills. The community outreach activities link with after-
school field trips and school partnerships established through the United Way. Omega Academy School District has a pre-
established partnership with America Reads through the Omega Academy Arizona IMPACT Afterschool Program. The
Program will include program expansion, training, and community connection activities for additional volunteers.
Coordination with School Reform
Program activities are aligned with the Arizona Language Standards and address four language arts content areas.
Volunteers interface with three classroom instructors, one lead teacher, one curriculum coach, and two classroom assistants
to provide more then 520 hours of instructional tutoring for 120 students. The Brigance Reading curriculum will be used to
support volunteer tutoring and classroom activities. Each student will receive reading textbooks, workbooks, pre- and post-
testing materials, and hands-on reading materials. Instructional team members and students are expected to pursue 90
percent mastery of the language standards
Leadership Opportunities
The Academic Counts Adult Volunteer Program provides student leadership opportunities as follows:
 Offering K through 3rd-grade students the opportunity to engage in peer reading activities.
 Providing books, magazines, and newspapers in the classroom for hands-on learning activities.
 Adding to students’ enjoyment of reading by discussing the books they read.
 Engaging students in creative writing and book publishing activities.
 By learning from community leaders the importance of reading and how reading impacts daily life.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
The Academic Counts Adult Volunteer Program fosters the development of a sense of citizenship, responsibility, and civic
pride by emphasizing building and maintaining collaborative relationship, working to transform environments by expanding
and supporting opportunities rather than fixing students, identifying and maximizing existing assets, and by focusing on
building capacity.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes

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   Recruit 10 volunteers to serve as Academic Counts Adult Volunteers.
   Conduct Volunteer Training/Academic and Community Service
   Conduct Academic Counts Adult Volunteer Program Activities
   Conduct Community Service/Adult Volunteers & Students




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1.2 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of an Adult Volunteer Program

Denise Gray * Peoria Unified School District, Alta Loma Elementary School * 9750 N 87th Avenue * Peoria AZ 85345
Phone: 623.486.6068 * Email: dgray@peoriaud.k12.az.us

Project Description
Project Book Pals is a school-based adult volunteer program at Alta Loma School that is designed to assist and support 80
plus students in the third and fourth grades who struggle with reading. During the first year of implementation, 40 at-risk
third-grade students participated in the program. Some 1,000 Accelerated Reader quizzes were purchased along with 100s
of books. The renewal of this grant will allow for continuing participation of students and volunteers for the third grade and
will permit expansion of the program to fourth grade. The focus of the program continues to be to narrow the gap between
student potential and performance in reading for low-achieving students in the identified grade levels. More specifically the
goal is to have 10 volunteers from ASU West, Sun City, Peoria, and Glendale tutor up-to-8 students each for 20 minutes a
week for 8 months providing a total of 810 hours of tutoring for 80 students.
Project Location
Alta Loma was built in 1976 and receives its accreditation through the North Central Association. All classroom facilities
are compliant with federal, state, and local safety and building codes and provide classroom space for the tutoring program.
Teachers take special pride in providing classrooms where children feel welcome. Funding from the Learn and Serve grant
will be used to purchase and install software on computers in the media center. Classroom teachers are provided personal
computers making the Internet accessible for research and lesson planning, and email addresses for all teachers and
administrators make project collaboration easier.
Project Staff
The assistant principal will coordinate the selection of students, initiate purchase orders, act at liaison with the fire
Department, and monitor the implementation and evaluation of the program. The staff development specialist will facilitate
the volunteer training.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
The School Site Council consisting of administrators, noncertified employees, teachers, community members, parents, and
students will help with the school management process. The partnerships established with ASU West and the Peoria Fire
Department during the first year of the grant will continue and expand.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
Project Book Pals supports the America Reads initiative by targeting students in the early elementary years to assist them to
be able to read at grade level by the end of third grade. It also supports the America’s Promise initiative by providing a key
resource that is deemed necessary for the success of young people—a tutor. Finally, Project Book Pals supports the School-
to-Work Opportunities Act by providing positive role models that help children learn.
Leadership Opportunities
Students will gain knowledge of leadership skills by learning how to choose books that are appropriate to their reading level
and how to set goals and plan for achieving them. This will help them to become independent readers, to graduate from
Book Pals, and then continue as a peer tutor giving back and leading by example.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
Project Book Pals fosters the development of a sense of citizenship, responsibility, and civic pride by using volunteers as an
integral part of the program. These volunteers are seen as heroes to all, but especially to young people in need. These are
citizens who will share real life stories, providing a role model in citizenship for these children.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
   March—the assistant principal will order materials and supplies and coordinate the culminating activity for 2001-2002.
   May—40+ academically at-risk students in 3rd grade will receive 15 20-minute tutoring sessions from an adult
    volunteer.
   May—40+ academically at-risk students in 3rd grade will read an average of 20 books.
   May—100% of the 3rd grade students participating in the tutoring program for 2002 will increase their reading skills.
   May—at a culminating event 40 students will receive books and certificates for participating in the program.
   June—the assistant principal will order materials and supplies and coordinate the kickoff activity for the 2002-2003
    year.
   June—the media specialist will order 1000 Accelerated Reader quizzes and 200 books.
   June—two staff members will attend the Learn and Serve training conference.
   July—a staff member will attend a conference to learn the latest strategies to increase student achievement.
   September—the staff development specialist will train 10 adult volunteers the role, responsibilities, and skills of a tutor.
   September—80 3rd and 4th-grade students will be selected for participation in Project Book Pals.
   September—Peoria’s Fire Department will participate in Family Night, a kickoff event to promote the tutoring program.
   December—80 academically at-risk students participating in the tutoring program will read a minimum of 20 books.
                                                                                                                              39
   December—80 academically at-risk students will receive at least 15 20-minute tutoring sessions from an adult
    volunteer.




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1.2 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of an Adult Volunteer Program

Vivian Hunt * Peoria Unified School District, Apache Elementary School * 8633 W John Cabot Road * Peoria AZ
Phone: 623.486.6066

Project Description
Project THRILL Seekers Volunteer Program offers a 1-hour orientation with ongoing mentoring of the latest reading
strategies. Tutors volunteer an average of 1-hour a week to provide students with 2 or more 30-minute sessions weekly.
Each lesson consists of word study, guided writing, reading selections matched to instructional levels, and support classroom
selections. Monies supplied by the first Learn and Serve grant were used to purchase basic instructional materials, a training
manual and inservice for volunteers. Due to the overwhelming success of last year, THRILL Seekers is growing by leaps
and bounds. This year the focus will be on building the library of books and software so students will have the training
opportunities for volunteers by including a video that models good teaching practices and implementation of the THRILL
Seeker lesson plan. Some 85 students have been served by a total of 25 adult volunteers. This year, 50 volunteers have
been added through increased student involvement from upper grades. The goal is to serve 140 1 st- through 8th-grade
students by a maximum of 50 adult volunteers.
Project Location
Apache School was built in 1990 and receives accreditation through the North Central Association. All classroom facilities
are compliant with federal, state, and local safety and building codes and provide classroom space for the tutoring program.
Teachers take special pride in providing classrooms where children feel welcome. Funding from the Learn and Serve grant
will be used to purchase and install software on computers in the media center. Classroom teachers are provided personal
computers making the Internet accessible for research and lesson planning, and email addresses for all teachers and
administrators make project collaboration easier. A web page is also available for volunteers and students to access extra
practice in reading strategies. District media personnel will be used in the production of the new training video.
Project Staff
The administration and instructional staff has the experience, enthusiasm and commitment to make Project Thrill a success.
The LEAP Teacher will initiate purchase orders for materials and coordinate family reading events. She will attend the
Learn and Serve conferences, a professional reading conference, and plan and help produce a training video, train volunteer
staff, coordinate the selection of students, serve as liaison to the volunteers, and monitor implementation and evaluation of
the program.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
Community involvement is vital to Project THRILL’s success. The combined efforts of volunteers from the community give
students the extra support they need to be successful readers. Several family nights are planned that utilize community
resources. The Peoria Fire Department brings a fire truck and gives lots of encouragement to the children to continue
reading every chance they get. Last year, Baxter, the Diamondbacks’ mascot passed out awards at an ice cream social where
participants were recognized for their accomplishments.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
Project THRILL supports the America’s Promise initiative by providing resources that are deemed necessary for the success
of young people. The project also supports the School-to-Work Opportunities Act by providing positive role models that
help children learn bout contributing to the community through service.
Leadership Opportunities
Students will gain knowledge of leadership skills by learning how to choose books that are appropriate to their reading level,
ultimately enabling them to become independent readers. Leadership, responsibility, and civic pride are integral parts of the
service learning experience. The role model of community service will inspire students to give back to the system by
volunteering as peer-tutors some day.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
Project THRILL develops a sense of citizenship, responsibility, and civic pride by using volunteers as an integral part of the
program. These volunteers are seen as heroes to all, but especially to young people in need. They are citizens who share
real-life stories, providing a role model in citizenship for children. This program is a win-win for all participants.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 February—the LEAP Teacher will train up-top 50 adult volunteers about their role, responsibilities, and skills.
 February—the Fire Department will participate in a kickoff event to promote the program.
 June—staff members will register for and attend required Learn and Serve training conferences.
 December—a staff member/parent volunteer will attend a professional development conference to learn about research
     strategies to increase student achievement.
 December—up-to-140 academically at-risk students in grades 1-8 will receive a 30-minute tutoring session from a
     volunteer tutor one day a week during February, March, April, May, September, October, November, and December.
 December—100% of the student participants will read a minimum of 10 books.

                                                                                                                            41
   December—100% of the student participants will increase their reading skills by a minimum of three reading levels.
   December—at a culminating Family Read Night attended by staff, parents, and adult volunteers, students will receive
    books and certificates for participating in the tutoring program.
   December—the LEAP Teacher in collaboration with media specialists will produce a training video for volunteers.




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1.2 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of an Adult Volunteer Program

Sue McAuslan * Scottsdale Unified School District, Tavan Elementary School * 4610 E Osborn * Phoenix AZ 85018
* Phone: 480.484.3840 * Email: smcauslan@susd.org

Project Description
Tavan is a Title I school that is in school improvement. One goal of the schoolwide improvement plan is to promote parent
involvement to help increase student achievement. As such, a parent volunteer program is being planned. It is projected
that 60 parent volunteers and 23 teachers will work together with the goal of increasing parent involvement and student
achievement. The number of students involved is projected to be 410. Volunteers will be asked to volunteer for a minimum
of 1 hour every week. They will provide guided practice in skills deemed important by the teachers. The program will be
implemented on the Tavan campus. Teachers and a parent educator will supervise the volunteers. Student achievement and
the effectiveness of the volunteer program will be assessed in each of the areas by the school’s benchmark assessments.
Increased parent volunteer support will be documented in a participation log.
Project Location
The project location is Tavan Elementary School in Phoenix. Tavan is under extensive construction. Volunteers will have
access to classroom libraries and the Reading Center’s literacy library that is a collection of guided reading books and trade
books. Additionally, the public library is less than a mile from the school and is a resource for the volunteers. The school
will provide a computer and printer for documentation, record keeping, and preparation of student materials.
Project Staff
Leadership and program development will be provided through the parent educator. This person is chair of the Parent
Involvement Committee and will collaborate with staff and volunteers. This person is also a member of the school’s
Literacy Team that is comprised of four reading specialists, the librarian, the gifted teacher, an academic tutor, and two ESL
specialists. Collaboration with the Literacy Team will provide a forum to share ideas about the volunteer project.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
The volunteer program will coordinate with the schoolwide improvement plan. It is designed to improve academic skills
that are assessed each year as part of the schoolwide plan. Increased parent involvement and academic achievement are both
goals of the schoolwide improvement plan. Currently, OASIS volunteers are working on campus and they will be invited to
join the training provided to parent volunteers. In addition, Tavan has partnered with Arcadia High School to suport their
service learning project for 40 high school students who will provide tutoring skills. The Parent Teacher Association is also
supporting the program through announcements and volunteers.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
The volunteer program is highly correlated to the initiated schoolwide improvement plan in three areas: student
achievement, teaching and professional development, and parent involvement. This project addresses using parent
involvement to improve student achievement. The targeted skills of sight words, math facts, spelling, and retelling are areas
in which volunteers can provide guided practice and support to the academic program. The program will support the plan by
implementing a parent volunteer program that supports academic achievement. In addition, the spelling, sight word, and
retelling components align with the goals of America Reads to increase reading skills.
Leadership Opportunities
Elementary school students who are being tutored by the parent volunteers will have opportunities to demonstrate leadership
skills with their peers as they behave appropriately while working with the parent volunteers. They can be good role models
for each other and demonstrate an intention to participate with the volunteers. Students will be encouraged to help their
peers learn the skills being practiced. The volunteers will be given information on cooperative learning.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
Tavan Elementary is a neighborhood school. The school community made a commitment to raising student achievement
when they placed themselves in school improvement. This volunteer program provides parents with a vehicle with by to
support the academic achievement of their children and their school. This project is an opportunity for parents to
demonstrate their citizenship, responsibility, and civic pride through their commitment to the young citizens and their
academic success.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
The objective of the volunteer participation program is to increase parent involvement to support/increase academic
achievement. It is expected that 60 parent volunteers will attend five training sessions to learn how to implement activities
to increase student skills in sight words, math facts, spelling, and retelling comprehension. It is projected that volunteers
will work with 410 students in 23 classrooms. A minimum requirement of the program is that volunteers will work for at
lest 1 hour a week. Volunteer attendance and participation will be documented in a log. Outcomes of the program are the
following: (1) The attendance of each volunteer wit at 90 percent for 14 weeks. (2) Some 90 percent of the teachers and
volunteers will rate this project as highly successful and will be interested in participating in the program next year. (3)
Students will achieve their academic as identified by the school.

                                                                                                                            43
1.2 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of an Adult Volunteer Program

Sue Yockey * Tucson Unified School District, Keen Elementary School * 3538 E Ellington * Tucson AZ 85713
* Phone: 520.232-7600

Project Description
The Julia Keen Elementary School is a small to medium-sized school serving approximately 400 students in the central
section of the city of Tucson. To assist students to raise their academic standing, Keen plans to create an adult/child
volunteer tutor programs. This program will enable staff to make stronger connections between the students and their
community, provide volunteers with training in the area of instructional support and increase the time during the day that
students attend school to developing their skills as delineated in the Arizona Academic Standards. Adult volunteers will be
assigned to work with specific child volunteers so that they can create a strong working relationship, somewhat of a
mentoring relationship. They will then work together on two types of activities; creating tapes for the lending library and
tutoring students in reading and other areas during homework help time after school. It is anticipated that this program will
involve 20 student volunteers and serve approximately 60-80 students per week.
Project Location
The Julia Keen Elementary School is a neighborhood school meaning that none of the students come to the school by bus.
Keen’s neighborhood is bound by an industrial area and the railroad to the south, a commercial area to the east, a major
Tucson Parks and Recreation complex to the north, and more commercial/industrial areas to the west. The Keen
neighborhood can be a challenge for parents to raise their children. The mobility rate is around 36 percent. The student
population is less diverse than many schools in Tucson with 81 percent Hispanic students, 11 percent White/Anglo, and 1 to
3 percent African American, Native American, and Asian American. The poverty level is significant with 91 percent of the
students qualifying for free or reduced price lunch. Major categories of crime are strongly represented throughout the
neighborhood.
Project Staff
Two teachers will share the coordinating responsibilities, backed up by the work of a StAAR team curriculum specialist.
The primary level teacher has successfully implemented a similar volunteer program. The intermediate-level teacher has
been a teacher for 30 years in both urban and rural schools in elementary and secondary schools. The StAAR team
curriculum specialist has been a bilingual education classroom teacher, a project specialist, and is in her second year with the
School Improvement Department. She has designed and facilitated professional development inservices and courses for
TUSD, Northern Arizona University and has made many professional conference presentations.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
School/community connections to the Pima College Police Department and many local businesses have provided materials
and support for school activities and incentives for student behavior, attendance, and academic achievement.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives


Leadership Opportunities


Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes


Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 Creation of a consistent adult volunteer program with training for tutoring and other instructional support activities.
 Students will increase their participation in school as peer tutors and creators of a lending library of audiocassette tapes.
 Students will increase their achievement in reading as shown by placement SFA reading program and scores on local,
   state, and national standardized tests of reading.
 Creation of a lending library of audiocassette tapes with stories from the reading program, varied children’s literature,
   and content area materials.




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1.2 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of an Adult Volunteer Program

Marilyn Yassin and Kary;n Husman * Tucson Unified School District, Lyons Elementary School * 7555 E Dogwood
Street * Tucson AZ 85730 * Phone: 520.584.6600

Project Description
Through the Learn and Serve grant, Lyons Elementary School will expand and focus its current volunteer program-- The
Reading for Success Volunteer Program. The thrust of the program will be devoted to improving literacy in students who
are below grade level in reading in kindergarten through third grade and are thus at risk for future failure in school. The
program will have the following components: program management, student selection, volunteer placement, volunteer
recruitment, and volunteer training and support.
Project Location
The program will be located at Lyons Elementary School in Tucson. Lyons has an up-to-date facility with 19 regular
classrooms, one handicapped preschool classroom, 3 special education resource rooms, classrooms with computers, and a
central library with 20,000 volumes of children’s literature. The volunteers will have full access to the library’s collection
and the classrooms. They will work in the classrooms or in the volunteer center with the targeted children. The volunteer
center is a newly created area to meet the needs of the volunteers. There is a volunteer welcome area within one of the
resource classrooms to check in and to store and receive materials.
Project Staff
The volunteer facilitator is a special education teacher with 22 years of teaching experience in regular and special education.
She has attended volunteer workshops to learn training techniques to prepare volunteers to tutor the students. She has
excellent interpersonal skills and can work well with a wide variety of people. This person serves as a liaison between
Lyons and the community. She assists teacher in planning and connecting classroom learning with volunteers. She is a
resource to kindergarten through 3rd-grade teachers in developing volunteer programs for students. She coordinates the
volunteers and their placement in the classrooms and is a link among teachers, students, and volunteers.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
The Reading to Succeed Volunteer Program will coordinate with three programs. The Break-thru Program consists of two
and a half special education teachers who work with children who are academically needy. They provide small-group
instruction on a daily basis focusing on needed literacy skills. There is a Literacy Assistance Project tutor who works with
students who are behind in reading achievement. In addition, an America Reads tutor from Pima Community College works
with the Break-thru teachers by tutoring children in reading. The Reading to Success Volunteer Program will add more
assistance where it is most needed.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
The Reading to Success Volunteer Program will complement the America Reads Program in two specific ways: the
volunteers and the America Reads tutors will be trained together and the two programs will celebrate successes together.
The volunteer coordinator will work with both programs.
Leadership Opportunities
The volunteers will be invited to serve on the School Council as community representatives. The school council provides a
framework for site-based decision making. It is composed of teachers, parents, community members, and students.
Currently, three parent volunteers serve on the school council. In this way the volunteers will be able to give insight and
suggestions as to how to improve Lyons School community.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
This program is for people who are looking for an area of giving and commitment that encompasses loving, helping, and
working with children in a way that will make a lasting difference in the lives of children. This program provides an
opportunity for volunteers to assist at-risk children in achieving one of the most necessary skills of society--the ability to
read. For the gift of time, the volunteers will make a significant difference in the lives of the children they touch. This will
foster the development of a sense citizenship, responsibility, and civic pride.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 Increase reading skills of targeted children in grades 2 and 3
 Increase the number of children in grade 3 meeting the standard on reading
 Increase the reading scores on TUSD’s Core Curriculum Standards Assessment in grades 1 and 2
 Increase alphabet knowledge and phonemic awareness in kindergartners
 Increase number of volunteer hours




                                                                                                                              45
1.2 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of an Adult Volunteer Program

Gretchen Roward * Tucson Unified School District, Rogers Elementary School * 6000 E 15th Street * Tucson AZ 85711 *
Phone: 520.584.7100 * Email: groward@tusd.k12.az.us

Project Description
The Partners Assisting in Literacy and Leadership (PALS) program at Rogers Elementary School will establish a school-
based Service Learning Adult Volunteer Program designed to recruit, train, and support 25-35 community members and
parents to work as tutors and mentors to 40-80 students. The PALS program will emphasize literacy and leadership through
activities that incorporate the Arizona Academic Standards.
Project Location
The PALS program will be implemented at Rogers Elementary School located in central Tucson. It was built in 1957 and
facilities are of a traditional elementary school. There is ample space for adult volunteers to work with children individually
or in small groups. The PALS volunteers will have the benefit of a variety of resources to support their work with children.
Literacy-related resources include library books and a large collection of text sets. Classroom teachers are also able to
provide reading and writing materials and activities appropriate to students’ abilities and needs. Rogers is fortunate to host
one of four TUSD computer training labs. This lab is being upgrading to high-speed connectivity and will provide an
excellent venue for PALS and students to conduct on-line research or to engage in other computer-based activities.
Project Staff
The project coordinator is an experienced classroom and literacy teacher with a strong background in project management
and volunteer coordination. She has worked in a variety of educational and community settings. As the director of PALS,
she will be responsible for all aspects of the program’s successful implementation and evaluation. The PALS project
assistant will help in the areas of volunteer support and program communication. The community development specialist
will be responsible for developing activities and resources that facilitate the integration of Rogers School with the broader
community. He primary responsibilities for PALS will be to identify new community resources for volunteer recruitment, to
support in the recruitment and training of volunteers and teachers, to collaborate on program evaluation, and to participate
on the PALS Advisory Committee.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
Community collaboration and interface is a priority at Rogers School. The following partners have agreed to assist in
identifying and recruiting adult volunteers for the PALS program: Old Pueblo Rotary Club, Wilshire Heights Neighborhood
Association, Read and Seed, OASIS Intergenerational Tutoring Program, Canyon Ranch Faces of Change Initiative,
Volunteer Center of Tucson, and Lawyers for literacy.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
Rogers is home to several programs serving children with special needs. CCI (Cross-Categorical Intermediate) and CCP
(Cross-Categorical Primary are special education classrooms for students with a variety of cognitive, developmental, and
social needs. Children who qualify for the program have delays in the areas of cognition, communication, motor, adaptive,
and social skills. Also located at Rogers is CAPS (Child and parent Success), a preschool program for four- and five-year-
old children and their families. The primary goals of the program are to provide meaningful and playful learning
experiences as well as support the growth and development of families in their children’s education. This year, Rogers
instituted a Community School program that provides quality care for students before and after school.
Leadership Opportunities
Although the primary focus of the PALS program is to promote growth and excellence in the area of literacy, students’
academic progress and their relationship with an adult volunteer will translate into improved self-confidence. As these
students gain skill with reading and writing, they will begin to participate in classroom and school activities with more
enthusiasm and competence. PALS volunteers will promote leadership with their students through discussions related to
responsibility, respect, fairness, and other characteristics of leadership. They will encourage student to identify ways they
can play leadership roles in their families, classroom, and schools. Classroom teachers will promote leadership development
by providing opportunities and support as students take on leadership roles.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
The intergenerational aspect of the PALS program makes it a natural vehicle for promoting citizenship, responsibility, and
civic pride. Since the September 11th attacks, both adults and children have experienced an increased awareness of civic
responsibility and national pride. PALS volunteers will be ideally situated to share their experience with students and to
think with them about the many ways one can participate and contribute as a citizen. More importantly, the example of their
own volunteer work is a powerful demonstration to students of the importance of service to the community.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 Increase number of adult tutors/mentors at Rogers School
 Provide quality training for PALS volunteers
 Improve student achievement in literacy and leadership

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47
1.2 Development, Implementation, Operation and Expansion of an Adult Volunteer Program

Margo O’Neill * Villa Montessori Charter School * 4535 N 28th Street * Phoenix AZ 85257 * Phone: 602.381.9967

Project Description
Villa Montessori will enhance and expand its original program to train parent volunteers in the Montessori philosophy and
academic areas to assist the teachers in a uniform and systematic method to help students who scored below grade level and
special needs students to meet the Arizona Standards in reading. Thus far, the project has identified a group of dedicated
parent volunteers to assist teachers in bringing the children up to grade level in reading with special emphasis on the first
through third grade. This program has allowed Villa to address those additional services for both populations of students
who require one-on-one attention from trained volunteers. The renewal grant will provide more extensive training for
volunteers making them even more effective in the classroom.
Project Location
Villa is located on six sites around central Phoenix and south Scottsdale. The volunteers will work in the classrooms where
the students are located. They will share space within the classroom for the individualized lessons. Each site will have
boxes of materials and files for volunteers. Each classroom will be equipped with the writing apparatuses and reading
materials used for that grade level. Each classroom is equipped with four or five computers. Paper, pencils, notebooks, etc.
will all be purchased to enhance the smooth instructional process.
Project Staff
The Parent Volunteer Coordinator will supervise the program. A team will assist with the implementation, operation, and
expansion of the project. The team will consist of the Special Education Coordinator, the Education Director, a faculty
member, and a parent volunteer. The Parent Volunteer Coordinator will recruit parents, arrange the training schedule, match
the volunteers to the classrooms with children in need, track the hours, and correspond with the volunteers. The Director of
Education will conduct or arrange the education related training program. Likewise, the Special Education Coordinator will
conduct or arrange for outside consultants to provide training relevant to special needs children. The team will also develop
the evaluation instrument that will be administered by the Parent Volunteer Coordinator.
Coordination with School and Community Activities/Programs
Because this project will take place during and after school, it will interface closely with the activities occurring in the
classroom and the after-school program.
Coordination with School Reform Initiatives
Villa Montessori is a charter school that is part of the school reform movement allowing parents the opportunity of choice
for their children’s education. A Montessori education has primarily been the privilege of the affluent that could afford a
private education. A Montessori education has often been categorized as gifted education. The students usually acquire
high test scores and perform well academically. By becoming a charter school, Villa has opened the doors to children who
might not have had the privilege of a Montessori education.
Leadership Opportunities
The parent volunteers will have the opportunity for acquiring leadership skills by being part of a training program. Should
the group become large enough, there will be the possibility of developing supervisory skills over the other participants.
The program calls for recruiting, training, scheduling, teaching, and evaluating. However, the Learn & Serve program has
given many Villa parent volunteers the opportunity to gain a greater leadership role in the programs at the school.
Citizenship, Responsibility, and Civic Pride Outcomes
Villa enjoys a high number of volunteer hours from parents, which shows a genuine commitment to the education of their
children and goodwill to the school. The parent or student volunteers will develop a sense of citizenship by participating in
the Villa community that is devoted to the education of children. The parents will develop a sense of responsibility by
making a commitment to the training and working with the children, and they will develop a sense of civic pride by
participating in the Villa community whose mission is to develop a community where each child reaches his/her fullest
potential.
Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes
 Orientation meeting to introduce the program to the new parent volunteers.
 Monthly feedback/training meeting to offer continued support to the volunteers.
 Parent Volunteers will be sent to the Spalding Training that has a strong phonetic component and is compatible with
     Montessori philosophy on language.
 Parent Volunteers will be constantly recruited throughout the year.
 Materials in support of the reading program will be purchased.
 A plan for a service learning component will be researched and designed.
 Celebrations will be planned.



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