Docstoc

Written Business Plans

Document Sample
Written Business Plans Powered By Docstoc
					Business Unit--> Corporate Administration - Purchasing
Date ------->    November 14, 2010

           Business Unit Recovery Planning Self-Evaluation
           Each business unit is measured on a scale of 0 to 9 in six specific evaluation categories. These categories are important
           to the overall capability the business unit to withstand a major business disruption and return to business with little or
           no permanent impact on current or future earnings potential. The average of the six categories provides an overall
           business recovery capability rating for the business unit.

           Instructions
           1. Review each category and determine your ranking in that category. Place the number in the colored box. If needed, you
              can adjust the numbers; i.e., 3.5 or 4.7, etc., to more accurately reflect your exact ranking in that category.
           2. The last section of this spread sheet will provide you with an overall rating and a graphic showing what sections will need
              work.
           3. Develop your action plans based on your weaknesses, as indicated by the rankings. Correct the weaknesses to improve
              your business unit recovery capability.
           4. After corrections have been made, re-evaluate your business unit recovery program and check the overall rating. Continue
              to develop and improve your recovery program based on the periodic evaluations using this spreadsheet.

           Specific Evaluation Categories
           A.   Recovery Planning Commitment [Weighting Factor = 1.0]
                This category measures the level of demonstrated commitment on the part of the area’s management and personnel.
                Are they aware of the need for protecting the operation with appropriate recovery planning, documentation, resources
                and is someone assigned to the recovery project/process?

      9.00 <------Ranking
           0 – No awareness of the need and no knowledge of the discipline.
           1 – Some understanding and knowledge recovery planning and requirements.
           2 – Taking and interest and learning about recovery planning.
           3 – Understands the need for planning, but has not yet committed resources to the process.
           4 – Has committed minimal resources to look into the issues.
           5 – Someone has been designated as the business recovery coordinator or planner for the area.
           6 – There is a commitment to create a plan, but actual work has not started.
           7 – Project team has been formed and resources allocated to begin a project.
           8 – Full-blown project has been initiated. Resources provided, training and education scheduled.
           9 – Continuous commitment and effort to maintain plans/personnel in a state of readiness.

           B.   Business Impact Assessment [Weighting Factor = 2.0]
                This category is concerned with the identification of critical processes and their financial, operational, public image, etc.
           impact, if they should be interrupted. The identification and details are important to developing recovery strategies and
           allocating appropriate resources for the functions protection and recovery.

4.00 <------Ranking
     0 – Little or no knowledge of the critical processes for the area. No idea of the impact of loss.
     1 – Need for a business impact assessment is recognized, but no idea how or where to start.
     2 – Educating self about the BIO process.
     3 – Learning to use the BIO tool provided for doing this step of the recovery planning process.
     4 – Applying the BIO approach to the processes of the department.
     5 – Analyzing the BIO data and ranking processes according to pre-determined objectives.
     6 – Verifying BIO findings with divisional management and making adjustments.
     7 – Sharing findings to ensure dependent areas understand critical their support requirements.
     8 – Negotiated adjustments until a final set of priorities are accepted by all parties.
     9 – Fully aware critical functions/processes and impact of loss. Data reviewed yearly.

     C.    Vulnerability Assessment [Weighting Factor = 1.6]
           This category reflects the continuous effort to identify disruptive risks and exposures and actively prevent their occurrence,
           minimize their frequency and severity, and plan for recovery from, should they occur.

5.00 <------Ranking
     0 – Given no thought to the possible risks or problems that could disrupt their operation
     1 – Some awareness, but no real concern, yet
     2 – Some discussion of exposures and risks, but no formal documentation or identification approach
     3 – Increased awareness of risks and dangers to their operations and attempting to document the issues
     4 – Risks and exposures being documented and heavily discussed, but no continuous process in place
     5 – Risks and strategies are being documented on a regular basis, no strategies in place
     6 – Risks documented and some strategies implemented to prevent problems
     7 – Risks documented, strategies implemented, but no continuous prevention program in place
     8 – Implementing vulnerability assessment program with a formal prevention process.
     9 – Maintains list of risks/exposures, implementing procedures to prevent, reduce and/or minimize.

     D.    Recovery Strategies [Weighting Factor = 1.8]
           Each business priority, critical process or identified risk must be analyzed and strategies developed to prevent, minimize
           or promptly recover. This category measures the extent of that planning and its effectiveness.

4.00 <------Ranking
     0 – No awareness of risks or the strategies to prevent or recover from them.
     1 – Some awareness, but no serious discussion of real solutions.
     2 – Recognize the need to identify and document recovery strategies for all risks and critical processes.
     3 – Beginning to develop strategies for known risks, but lacking formal process and documentation
           4–    Some documentation of strategies, but they have not clearly been matched with risks or benefits.
           5–    Actively documenting strategies, relating benefits and detailing risks avoided.
           6–    Most risks/exposures/priorities documented, but not part of written plans, nor implemented.
           7–    Risks/strategies identified and documented. Strategies in written plans, not implemented.
           8–    Risks/strategies identified, documented, incorporated in plans, but not yet executed.
           9–    Review of risks/priorities/exposures/strategies, documented, incorporated, implemented, working.

            E.    Plan Development [Weighting Factor = 1.5]
                 This category measures the amount and quality of the written plans and procedures for recovery and the personnel
                 selected to implement the plans.

      5.00 <------Ranking
           0 – No verbal or written plans, no team members to implement plans.
           1 – Some ideas for recovery documentation and personnel, nothing complete or documented.
           2 – Developed some outlines for written recovery plans and team responsibilities.
           3 – Plan documentation started. Some sections completed. Team members not involved yet.
           4 – Plan nearly completed and some team members are involved.
           5 – Plan completed, first draft. Additional reviews required.
           6 – Plan written and in review by team members.
           7 – Written plan updated and submitted to management for review and approval. Full team is on board.
           8 – Approved plan, team members selected. Need periodic updates and team reviews.
           9 – Plan in place, team members aware, plans regularly updated by team members.

           F.    Training, Testing & Maintenance [Weighting Factor = 2.0]
                 The level of continuous training, testing and maintenance of plans and recovery teams is crucial to make a good looking
                 plan into a good working plan. This category will measure the level of recovery capability a division really has.

      4.00 <------Ranking
           0 – No training, testing or maintenance program started.
           1 – Understands the need for testing and training, but no plans in place yet.
           2 – Commitment to include training, testing and maintenance procedures in the plan when completed.
           3 – Including test plans and training in the written business recovery documentation.
           4 – Asking for assistance to develop test scenarios and facilitate exercises.
           5 – First set of tests and training sessions scheduled and conducted by outside resources.
           6 – Taking initiative to test and educate team members. Still require outside assistance.
           7 – Developing test materials, facilitate exercises sessions with guidance from outside sources.
           8 – Consistently training and testing, moderate difficulty. Outside assistance needed occasionally.
           9 – Teams/plans regularly rehearsed, deficiencies noted and corrected, program is self-sustaining.

Business Unit--> Corporate Administration - Purchasing
Overall Rating for Business Recovery Capability
The overall rating provides a level of capability and confidence we can have in each of the business units to prevent,
respond and/or recover from a major business disruption with minor or moderate impact on providing products and
as usual. Since the overall rating is derived from an average of the six major categories the actual rating will fall
somewhere between the major categories listed below.

       4.82 <------Overall Ranking
            0 – No awareness of the need for recovery planning. No projects started. No chance recovery.
            1 – Some knowledge of recovery planning, but no active projects. Would not survive a major disruption.
            2 – Committed to do something, but people & resources sufficient to create viable plans for recovery.
            3 – Recovery planning started. Not likely the business unit could recover yet.
            4 – Making process, but sight chance they can recover successfully without much help and luck.
            5 – Recovery will be slow, expensive and painful, requiring help to succeed. Resources lacking. Major losses.
            6 – Should recover with heavy losses. Plans/people improving, need work.
            7 – Good chance of recovery given the right scenario and assistance. Good one shot plan.
            8 – Excellent program, need consistency/attention from management. Excellent chance of recovery with some losses.
            9 – Teams/procedures NASA quality. Can weather a disruption with minimal downtime or financial impact.
                9.00
       9.00                                                                                     A - Recovery Planning Commitment
                                                                                                B - Business Impact Assessment
       8.00                                                                                     C - Vulnerability Assessment
                                                                                                D - Recovery Strategies
       7.00
                                                                                                E - Plan Development
       6.00                           5.00                 5.00                                 F - Training, Testing & Maintenance
                                                                                    4.82
       5.00                  4.00              4.00                     4.00
       4.00
       3.00
       2.00
       1.00
       0.00
                       A       B           C    D         E         F          OVERALL

Date ------->          November 14, 2010
Business Unit--> Corporate Administration - Purchasing
Date ------->    November 14, 2010

           Systems Recovery Planning Self-Evaluation
           The client/server environment is extremely critical to most business unit operations. It is imperative that this resource
           is protected with prevention technologies, recovery plans and trained personnel to prevent and/or recover should a
           disaster strike. This evaluation tool is intended to guide the user in evaluating and correcting any deficiencies with
           their systems recovery program.

           Instructions
           1. Review each category and determine your ranking [0-5] in that category. Place the number in the colored box. If needed, you
              can adjust the numbers; i.e., 3.5 or 4.7, etc., to more accurately reflect your exact ranking in that category.
           2. The last section of this spread sheet will provide you with an overall rating and a graphic showing what areas your
              systems recovery plan needs work.
           3. This tool is intended to help you pinpoint the areas requiring development and encourage you to develop action plans
              and correct weaknesses to improve your recovery capabilities in the systems environment.
           4. After changes and testing have taken place, re-evaluate your recovery program and check the overall rating. Strive for
             continuous improvement of your systems recovery plans and personnel.

           Specific Evaluation Categories
           A.    Systems Recovery Planning Commitment [Weighting Factor = 1.0]
                 This category measures the level of demonstrated commitment on the part of the area’s management and personnel.
                 Are they aware of the need for protecting the operation with appropriate recovery planning, documentation, resources
                 and is someone assigned to the recovery project/process?

      9.00 <------Ranking
           0 – No awareness of the need and no knowledge of the discipline.
           1 – Some understanding and knowledge recovery planning and requirements.
           2 – Taking and interest and learning about recovery planning.
           3 – Understands the need for planning, but has not yet committed resources to the process.
           4 – Has committed minimal resources to look into the issues.
           5 – Someone has been designated as the business recovery coordinator or planner for the area.

           B.    Business Impact Assessment [Weighting Factor = 2.0]
                 This category is concerned with the identification of critical processes and their financial, operational, public image, etc.
                 impact, if they should be interrupted. The identification and details are important to developing recovery strategies and
           allocating appropriate resources to protect the client/server environment.

4.00 <------Ranking
     0 – Little or no knowledge of the critical processes for the area. No idea of the impact of loss.
     1 – Need for a business impact assessment is recognized, but no idea how or where to start.
     2 – Educating self about the BIO process.
     3 – Learning to use the BIO tool provided for doing this step of the recovery planning process.
     4 – Applying the BIO approach to the processes of the department.
     5 – Analyzing the BIO data and ranking processes according to pre-determined objectives.

     C.    Vulnerability Assessment [Weighting Factor = 1.6]
           This category reflects the continuous effort to identify disruptive risks and exposures and actively prevent their occurrence,
           minimize their frequency and severity, and plan for recovery from, should they occur.

5.00 <------Ranking
     0 – Given no thought to the possible risks or problems that could disrupt their operation
     1 – Some awareness, but no real concern, yet
     2 – Some discussion of exposures and risks, but no formal documentation or identification approach
     3 – Increased awareness of risks and dangers to their operations and attempting to document the issues
     4 – Risks and exposures being documented and heavily discussed, but no continuous process in place
     5 – Risks and strategies are being documented on a regular basis, no strategies in place

     D.    Recovery Strategies [Weighting Factor = 1.8]
           Each business priority, critical process or identified risk must be analyzed and strategies developed to prevent, minimize
           or promptly recover. This category measures the extent of that planning and its effectiveness.

4.00 <------Ranking
     0 – No awareness of risks or the strategies to prevent or recover from them.
     1 – Some awareness, but no serious discussion of real solutions.
     2 – Recognize the need to identify and document recovery strategies for all risks and critical processes.
     3 – Beginning to develop strategies for known risks, but lacking formal process and documentation
     4 – Some documentation of strategies, but they have not clearly been matched with risks or benefits.
     5 – Actively documenting strategies, relating benefits and detailing risks avoided.

     E.    Plan Development [Weighting Factor = 1.5]
           This category measures the amount and quality of the written plans and procedures for recovery and the personnel
           selected to implement the plans.
      5.00 <------Ranking
           0 – No verbal or written plans, no team members to implement plans.
           1 – Some ideas for recovery documentation and personnel, nothing complete or documented.
           2 – Developed some outlines for written recovery plans and team responsibilities.
           3 – Plan documentation started. Some sections completed. Team members not involved yet.
           4 – Plan nearly completed and some team members are involved.
           5 – Plan completed, first draft. Additional reviews required.

            F.    Training, Testing & Maintenance [Weighting Factor = 2.0]
                  The level of continuous training, testing and maintenance of plans and recovery teams is crucial to make a good looking
                  plan into a good working plan. This category will measure the level of recovery capability a division really has.
      4.00 <------Ranking
           0 – No training, testing or maintenance program started.
           1 – Understands the need for testing and training, but no plans in place yet.
           2 – Commitment to include training, testing and maintenance procedures in the plan when completed.
           3 – Including test plans and training in the written business recovery documentation.
           4 – Asking for assistance to develop test scenarios and facilitate exercises.
           5 – First set of tests and training sessions scheduled and conducted by outside resources.

Business Unit--> Corporate Administration - Purchasing

Overall Rating for Business Recovery Capability
The overall rating provides a level of capability and confidence we can have in each of the business units to prevent,
respond and/or recover from a major business disruption with minor or moderate impact on providing products and
as usual. Since the overall rating is derived from an average of the six major categories the actual rating will fall
somewhere between the major categories listed below.

      2.68 <------Overall Ranking
           0 – No awareness of the need for recovery planning. No projects started. No chance recovery.
           1 – Some knowledge of recovery planning, but no active projects. Would not survive a major disruption.
           2 – Committed to do something, but people & resources sufficient to create viable plans for recovery.
           3 – Recovery planning started. Not likely the business unit could recover yet.
           4 – Making process, but sight chance they can recover successfully without much help and luck.
           5 – Recovery will be slow, expensive and painful, requiring help to succeed. Resources lacking. Major losses.
Business Unit--> Corporate Administration - Purchasing
Date ------->    November 14, 2010

           Vital Records Recovery Planning Self-Evaluation
           Each business unit is measured on a scale of 0 to 5 in six specific evaluation categories. These categories are important
           to the overall capability the business unit to withstand a major business disruption and return to business with little or
           no permanent impact on current or future earnings potential. The average of the six categories provides an overall
           business recovery capability rating for the business unit.

           Instructions
           1. Review each category and determine your ranking in that category. Place the number in the colored box. If needed, you
              can adjust the numbers; i.e., 3.5 or 4.7, etc., to more accurately reflect your exact ranking in that category.
           2. The last section of this spread sheet will provide you with an overall rating and a graphic showing what sections will need
              work.
           3. Develop your action plans based on your weaknesses, as indicated by the rankings. Correct the weaknesses to improve
              your business unit recovery capability.
           4. After corrections have been made, re-evaluate your business unit recovery program and check the overall rating. Continue
              to develop and improve your recovery program based on the periodic evaluations using this spreadsheet.

           Specific Evaluation Categories
           A. Recovery Planning Commitment [Weighting Factor = 1.0]
               This category measures the level of demonstrated commitment on the part of the area’s management and personnel.
               Are they aware of the need for protecting the operation with appropriate recovery planning, documentation, resources
               and is someone assigned to the recovery project/process?

      9.00 <------Ranking
           0 – No awareness of the need and no knowledge of the discipline.
           1 – Some understanding and knowledge recovery planning and requirements.
           2 – Taking and interest and learning about recovery planning.
           3 – Understands the need for planning, but has not yet committed resources to the process.
           4 – Has committed minimal resources to look into the issues.
           5 – Someone has been designated as the business recovery coordinator or planner for the area.

           B.   Business Impact Assessment [Weighting Factor = 2.0]
                This category is concerned with the identification of critical processes and their financial, operational, public image, etc.
                impact, if they should be interrupted. The identification and details are important to developing recovery strategies and
                allocating appropriate resources for the functions protection and recovery.
4.00 <------Ranking
     0 – Little or no knowledge of the critical processes for the area. No idea of the impact of loss.
     1 – Need for a business impact assessment is recognized, but no idea how or where to start.
     2 – Educating self about the BIO process.
     3 – Learning to use the BIO tool provided for doing this step of the recovery planning process.
     4 – Applying the BIO approach to the processes of the department.
     5 – Analyzing the BIO data and ranking processes according to pre-determined objectives.

     C.     Vulnerability Assessment [Weighting Factor = 1.6]
            This category reflects the continuous effort to identify disruptive risks and exposures and actively prevent their occurrence,
            minimize their frequency and severity, and plan for recovery from, should they occur.
5.00 <------Ranking
     0 – Given no thought to the possible risks or problems that could disrupt their operation
     1 – Some awareness, but no real concern, yet
     2 – Some discussion of exposures and risks, but no formal documentation or identification approach
     3 – Increased awareness of risks and dangers to their operations and attempting to document the issues
     4 – Risks and exposures being documented and heavily discussed, but no continuous process in place
     5 – Risks and strategies are being documented on a regular basis, no strategies in place

     D.    Recovery Strategies [Weighting Factor = 1.8]
           Each business priority, critical process or identified risk must be analyzed and strategies developed to prevent, minimize
           or promptly recover. This category measures the extent of that planning and its effectiveness.

4.00 <------Ranking
     0 – No awareness of risks or the strategies to prevent or recover from them.
     1 – Some awareness, but no serious discussion of real solutions.
     2 – Recognize the need to identify and document recovery strategies for all risks and critical processes.
     3 – Beginning to develop strategies for known risks, but lacking formal process and documentation
     4 – Some documentation of strategies, but they have not clearly been matched with risks or benefits.
     5 – Actively documenting strategies, relating benefits and detailing risks avoided.

      E.    Plan Development [Weighting Factor = 1.5]
           This category measures the amount and quality of the written plans and procedures for recovery and the personnel
           selected to implement the plans.

5.00 <------Ranking
           0–    No verbal or written plans, no team members to implement plans.
           1–    Some ideas for recovery documentation and personnel, nothing complete or documented.
           2–    Developed some outlines for written recovery plans and team responsibilities.
           3–    Plan documentation started. Some sections completed. Team members not involved yet.
           4–    Plan nearly completed and some team members are involved.
           5–    Plan completed, first draft. Additional reviews required.

           F.    Training, Testing & Maintenance [Weighting Factor = 2.0]
                 The level of continuous training, testing and maintenance of plans and recovery teams is crucial to make a good looking
                 plan into a good working plan. This category will measure the level of recovery capability a division really has.

      4.00 <------Ranking
           0 – No training, testing or maintenance program started.
           1 – Understands the need for testing and training, but no plans in place yet.
           2 – Commitment to include training, testing and maintenance procedures in the plan when completed.
           3 – Including test plans and training in the written business recovery documentation.
           4 – Asking for assistance to develop test scenarios and facilitate exercises.
           5 – First set of tests and training sessions scheduled and conducted by outside resources.

Business Unit--> Corporate Administration - Purchasing

Overall Rating for Business Recovery Capability
The overall rating provides a level of capability and confidence we can have in each of the business units to prevent,
respond and/or recover from a major business disruption with minor or moderate impact on providing products and
as usual. Since the overall rating is derived from an average of the six major categories the actual rating will fall
somewhere between the major categories listed below.

      2.68 <------Overall Ranking
           0 – No awareness of the need for recovery planning. No projects started. No chance recovery.
           1 – Some knowledge of recovery planning, but no active projects. Would not survive a major disruption.
           2 – Committed to do something, but people & resources sufficient to create viable plans for recovery.
           3 – Recovery planning started. Not likely the business unit could recover yet.
           4 – Making process, but sight chance they can recover successfully without much help and luck.
           5 – Recovery will be slow, expensive and painful, requiring help to succeed. Resources lacking. Major losses.
Family Unit ---> The Harry Family
Date -------------> November 14, 2010

          Personal Disaster Preparation Self-Evaluation
          Each employee or family unit is measured on a scale of 0 to 5 in four specific evaluation categories. These categories
          are important to help you design a personal recovery program against man-made or natural disasters. The average of
          six categories provides an overall readiness index for you and your family.

          Instructions
          1. Review each category and determine your ranking in that category. Place the number in the colored box. If needed, you
             can adjust the numbers; i.e., 3.5 or 4.7, etc., to more accurately reflect your exact ranking in that category.
          2. The last section of this spread sheet will provide you with an overall rating and a graphic showing what areas need work.
          3. Develop your action plans based on your weaknesses, as indicated by the rankings. Correct the weaknesses and improve
             your recovery capability.
          4. After corrections have been made, re-evaluate your emergency program and check the overall rating. Continue
             to develop, test and improve your plans.

          Specific Evaluation Categories
          A.    Personal and/or Family Awareness [Weighting Factor = 1.0]
                This category measures the level of demonstrated commitment on your part and that of family members to actively protect
                themselves.

     4.40 <------Ranking
          0 – No awareness of the need and no knowledge of requirements
          1 – Aware of the need, read some, but taking no specific action yet.
          2 – Concerned! Gathering data and making plans. Have materials from Red Cross and FEMA.
          3 – Conducted a vulnerability assessment, family is organized and plans written
          4 – Supplies purchased, dated and stored securely. At least one family evacuation rehearsal.
          5 – Monthly reviews of plans and supplies. Rehearsals quarterly and supplies refreshed or replenished monthly.

          B.    Assessment and Plan Development [Weighting Factor = 2.0]
                This category is concerned with the identification of your local vulnerabilities, financial needs, medical concerns, risks etc.
                that can hurt you and your family. Written plans and exercises are also considered in this section.

     2.50 <------Ranking
          0 – No idea of the family needs, threats to safety or what vital records must be protected. No written plans.
     1–   Need for an assessment and plans is recognized, but no idea how or where to start. Reading available materials.
     2–   Assessment conducted, results documented. Using Red Cross and FEMA materials to assist with the process.
     3–   Plans written. Action plans developed to obtain supplies and/or correct weaknesses and vulnerabilities.
     4–   Plans rehearsed with all family members. Working on supplies procurement and weaknesses.
     5–   Assessments and Plans reviewed quarterly. Personal or family exercises planned and rehearsed quarterly.

     C.   Communications [Weighting Factor = 1.5]
          Contact with family members and work during a disaster is critical. This section reviews your communications readiness.

4.30 <------Ranking
     0 – No plans, no contacts.
     1 – Aware of need. Not sure what to do, but will find out.
     2 – Researching Alternatives: cell phones, phone cards, out of state contacts, meeting locations, etc.
     3 – Options selected. Will include them in the plans.
     4 – Alternatives tested. Emergency phone cards created and an out of state contact set up.
     5 – Numbers, locations, people reviewed and verified quarterly. People and systems work.

     D.   Supplies [Weighting Factor = 2.0]
          You and your family will be on their own for days, weeks or maybe even months. Stored supplies of the basics is crucial.

3.50 <------Ranking
     0 – See no need to store supplies of any kind.
     1 – See the need. Working with Red Cross and FEMA materials to create a list of supplies for me and my family.
     2 – Committed to purchasing and storing appropriate supplies at the house, in the car and at work.
     3 – Supplies purchased and distributed. Perishables dated. Vital records, money, etc. are included with supplies.
     4 – Training on the use of all supplies has been done with each family member.
     5 – Supplies and materials used during rehearsals to ensure competencies. Replenished as needed.

     E.   [Future Use]


0.00 <------Ranking

     F.   [Future Use]


0.00 <------Ranking
Family Unit      The Harry Family

Overall Rating for Personal Preparedness
The overall rating provides a level of capability and confidence we can have in each of the business units to prevent,
respond and/or recover from a major business disruption with minor or moderate impact on providing products and
as usual. Since the overall rating is derived from an average of the six major categories the actual rating will fall
somewhere between the major categories listed below.

      3.52 <------Overall Ranking
           0 – No awareness. Need is critical and immediate.
           1 – Need recognized. Collect data and set a date to start your program.
           2 – Committed to do program for self and family. Do your assessment, plan your supplies and begin writing a plan.
           3 – Coming together. Work harder. Set completion dates. Get everyone involved. Finish the plans and store the supplies.
           4 – Plans finished. Rehearse yourself and your family. Maintain a high state of readiness.
           5 – Excellent program. Keep it current and keep rehearsing. Don't get lazy or take your preparation for granted.


                                                                               A - Personal and/or Family Awareness
       4.50                                                                    B - Assessment and Plan Development
                                                                               C - Communications
       4.00                                                                    D - Supplies
       3.50                                                                    E - Future Use
                                                                               F - Future Use
       3.00                                                                    G - Overall Rating for Personal Preparedness
       2.50
       2.00
       1.50
       1.00
       0.50
       0.00
                  A      B       C      D       E      F       G
Business Unit--> Corporate Administration - Purchasing
Date ------->    November 14, 2010

           Emergency Response Self-Evaluation
           Each business unit is measured on a scale of 0 to 5 in six specific evaluation categories. These categories are important
           to the overall capability the business unit to withstand a major business disruption and return to business with little or
           no permanent impact on current or future earnings potential. The average of the six categories provides an overall
           business recovery capability rating for the business unit.

           Instructions
           1. Review each category and determine your ranking in that category. Place the number in the colored box. If needed, you
              can adjust the numbers; i.e., 3.5 or 4.7, etc., to more accurately reflect your exact ranking in that category.
           2. The last section of this spread sheet will provide you with an overall rating and a graphic showing what sections will need
              work.
           3. Develop your action plans based on your weaknesses, as indicated by the rankings. Correct the weaknesses to improve
              your business unit recovery capability.
           4. After corrections have been made, re-evaluate your business unit recovery program and check the overall rating. Continue
              to develop and improve your recovery program based on the periodic evaluations using this spreadsheet.

           Specific Evaluation Categories
           A.    Recovery Planning Commitment [Weighting Factor = 1.0]
                 This category measures the level of demonstrated commitment on the part of the area’s management and personnel.
                 Are they aware of the need for protecting the operation with appropriate recovery planning, documentation, resources
                 and is someone assigned to the recovery project/process?

      9.00 <------Ranking
           0 – No awareness of the need and no knowledge of the discipline.
           1 – Some understanding and knowledge recovery planning and requirements.
           2 – Taking and interest and learning about recovery planning.
           3 – Understands the need for planning, but has not yet committed resources to the process.
           4 – Has committed minimal resources to look into the issues.
           5 – Someone has been designated as the business recovery coordinator or planner for the area.

           B.    Business Impact Assessment [Weighting Factor = 2.0]
                 This category is concerned with the identification of critical processes and their financial, operational, public image, etc.
                 impact, if they should be interrupted. The identification and details are important to developing recovery strategies and
           allocating appropriate resources for the functions protection and recovery.

4.00 <------Ranking
     0 – Little or no knowledge of the critical processes for the area. No idea of the impact of loss.
     1 – Need for a business impact assessment is recognized, but no idea how or where to start.
     2 – Educating self about the BIO process.
     3 – Learning to use the BIO tool provided for doing this step of the recovery planning process.
     4 – Applying the BIO approach to the processes of the department.
     5 – Analyzing the BIO data and ranking processes according to pre-determined objectives.

     C.    Vulnerability Assessment [Weighting Factor = 1.6]
           This category reflects the continuous effort to identify disruptive risks and exposures and actively prevent their occurrence,
           minimize their frequency and severity, and plan for recovery from, should they occur.

5.00 <------Ranking
     0 – Given no thought to the possible risks or problems that could disrupt their operation
     1 – Some awareness, but no real concern, yet
     2 – Some discussion of exposures and risks, but no formal documentation or identification approach
     3 – Increased awareness of risks and dangers to their operations and attempting to document the issues
     4 – Risks and exposures being documented and heavily discussed, but no continuous process in place
     5 – Risks and strategies are being documented on a regular basis, no strategies in place

     D.    Recovery Strategies [Weighting Factor = 1.8]
           Each business priority, critical process or identified risk must be analyzed and strategies developed to prevent, minimize
           or promptly recover. This category measures the extent of that planning and its effectiveness.

4.00 <------Ranking
     0 – No awareness of risks or the strategies to prevent or recover from them.
     1 – Some awareness, but no serious discussion of real solutions.
     2 – Recognize the need to identify and document recovery strategies for all risks and critical processes.
     3 – Beginning to develop strategies for known risks, but lacking formal process and documentation
     4 – Some documentation of strategies, but they have not clearly been matched with risks or benefits.
     5 – Actively documenting strategies, relating benefits and detailing risks avoided.

     E.     Plan Development [Weighting Factor = 1.5]
           This category measures the amount and quality of the written plans and procedures for recovery and the personnel
           selected to implement the plans.
      5.00 <------Ranking
           0 – No verbal or written plans, no team members to implement plans.
           1 – Some ideas for recovery documentation and personnel, nothing complete or documented.
           2 – Developed some outlines for written recovery plans and team responsibilities.
           3 – Plan documentation started. Some sections completed. Team members not involved yet.
           4 – Plan nearly completed and some team members are involved.
           5 – Plan completed, first draft. Additional reviews required.

            F.    Training, Testing & Maintenance [Weighting Factor = 2.0]
                  The level of continuous training, testing and maintenance of plans and recovery teams is crucial to make a good looking
                  plan into a good working plan. This category will measure the level of recovery capability a division really has.

      4.00 <------Ranking
           0 – No training, testing or maintenance program started.
           1 – Understands the need for testing and training, but no plans in place yet.
           2 – Commitment to include training, testing and maintenance procedures in the plan when completed.
           3 – Including test plans and training in the written business recovery documentation.
           4 – Asking for assistance to develop test scenarios and facilitate exercises.
           5 – First set of tests and training sessions scheduled and conducted by outside resources.

Business Unit--> Corporate Administration - Purchasing

Overall Rating for Business Recovery Capability
The overall rating provides a level of capability and confidence we can have in each of the business units to prevent,
respond and/or recover from a major business disruption with minor or moderate impact on providing products and
as usual. Since the overall rating is derived from an average of the six major categories the actual rating will fall
somewhere between the major categories listed below.

      4.82 <------Overall Ranking
           0 – No awareness of the need for recovery planning. No projects started. No chance recovery.
           1 – Some knowledge of recovery planning, but no active projects. Would not survive a major disruption.
           2 – Committed to do something, but people & resources sufficient to create viable plans for recovery.
           3 – Recovery planning started. Not likely the business unit could recover yet.
           4 – Making process, but sight chance they can recover successfully without much help and luck.
           5 – Recovery will be slow, expensive and painful, requiring help to succeed. Resources lacking. Major losses.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Written Business Plans document sample