Docstoc

Insurance Louisiana Daily Claims Jobs

Document Sample
Insurance Louisiana Daily Claims Jobs Powered By Docstoc
					DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATION



     SAFETY MANUAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS

GOVERNOR'S STATEMENT OF POLICY ........................................................................ 4

COMMISSIONER OF ADMINISTRATION SAFETY POLICY STATEMENT ..................... 5

INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................ 6

PURPOSE OF THIS GUIDE ............................................................................................. 9

GENERAL SAFETY PLAN ............................................................................................... 10

                   COMPONENTS OF A GENERAL SAFETY PLAN .................................... 11

                   DOA SAFETY POLICY STATEMENT AND ASSIGNMENT OF
                       RESPONSIBILITIES ....................................................................... 12

                   INSPECTION PROCEDURES ................................................................... 18

                   PROCEDURES FOR ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION ................................. 21

                   PROCEDURE FOR JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS .......................................... 24

                   PROCEDURES FOR CONDUCTING SAFETY MEETINGS..................... 28

                   SAFETY RULES ......................................................................................... 30

                   SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS COMMON TO ALL SECTIONS ...................... 32

                             GENERAL SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS ............................................ 32

                             SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS FOR PERSONAL PROTECTION ........ 34

                             SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE OF
                                  EQUIPMENT AND TOOLS .................................................. 35

                             SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS FOR FLAMMABLE AND
                                  COMBUSTIBLE LIQUIDS .................................................... 37

                             ELECTRICAL SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS ....................................... 39

                             HOUSEKEEPING PRACTICES ...................................................... 41


6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                                     Page 2 of 65
COMPONENTS OF AN EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
        PLAN........................................................................................................... 42

PROCEDURES FOR SETTING UP A TRAINING PROGRAM ....................................... 47

         FIRST AID POLICY ............................................................................................... 50

         FIRST AID OUTLINE ............................................................................................. 51

         LIST OF REQUIRED RECORDS .......................................................................... 59

         LOSS PREVENTION AUDIT PROGRAM ............................................................. 61

         COMPONENTS OF THE LOSS PREVENTION AUDIT PROGRAM .................... 62

         LOSS PREVENTION AUDIT ................................................................................. 62

         REPORTING FORMS ............................................................................................ 65




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                                    Page 3 of 65
Governor’s Statement of policy




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                           Page 4 of 65
COMMISSIONER OF ADMINISTRATION SAFETY POLICY STATEMENT


         As Commissioner of Administration, one of my responsibilities is to provide a work environment and
working conditions that will be as accident free as possible for all employees and the general public who
utilize our facilities. To accomplish this, the Division of Administration shall comply with Federal and State
statutes, directives, and regulations by developing, implementing, and maintaining the best feasible
operations, procedures, technology, and policies to provide such conditions.

          The administration of safety is a function of management and its entire supervisory force. Each
supervisor will be held accountable for the actions of his/her employees. Supervisors are responsible for
ensuring that all safety rules, policies and procedures are followed as outlined in the Division of
Administration Safety Program. Additionally, supervisors are responsible for maintaining ongoing programs
at all levels to identify employee health and safety risks and to assure clear understanding of the State Loss
Prevention Programs that directly affect their sections and duties.

         Each individual is responsible for helping us reach our Loss Prevention goal of reducing personal
injury and loss of property due to accidents to the lowest possible degree. Each employee is responsible for
supporting all safety programs, following all safety rules and for immediately reporting potentially unsafe
conditions, work practices and taking effective temporary actions to minimize the risk to themselves and
others.

         Each Section within the Division of Administration shall designate a Safety Manager whose
responsibility will be to develop and implement a Safety Program within his/her section to comply with the
State's Loss Prevention Programs as developed by the Office of Risk Management in compliance with Title
39:1543 of the Revised Statues.

        This Division of Administration Safety Manual will serve as a guide for each section to develop their
own safety policies, procedures and rules. Any sections that develop their own sectional policies, procedures
and/or rules must submit copies of policies, procedures and/or rules to the Office of the Commissioner via
the DOA Safety Coordinator. The Appointing Authority will designate appropriate DOA personnel to review
proposed policies, procedures and/or rules for compliance with DOA policies and/or possible deviations from
existing DOA policy. Sections must receive written approval from the Appointing Authority before
implementation of policies, procedures and/or rules.

        It is my sincere request that you devote daily attention to making safety an integral part of our day-to-
day operations.




                                                    Mark C. Drennen
                                                    Commissioner of Administration



                                                    Date




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                               Page 5 of 65
INTRODUCTION


         The purpose of loss prevention is to reduce or eliminate the risks of doing business. The ultimate
goal is to create a safe work environment and an awareness of safety practices among employees in order to
prevent accidents that could cause injury or death to employees or the public and to prevent damage to
public property.

        Many potential losses can be prevented and/or the frequency reduced by taking the following
        steps:

        1.      Identify potential risks, exposures, and hazards.

        2.      Analyze those potential risks, exposures and hazards

        3.      Select an appropriate action to remove or reduce potential risks, exposures, and hazards.

        4.      Implement corrective actions.

        5.      Monitor corrective actions regularly

        In a business, public or private, organizations that strongly promote loss prevention benefit in
        many ways, including:

        1.      Increased productivity of employees by providing a safe work environment.

        2.      Reduction of accidents, which may affect insurance premiums, worker's compensation
                rates, lost employee services and overtime.

        3.      Minor repairs and adjustments that prevent major building and equipment repairs and
                replacements.

        The DOA Loss Prevention Program is designed to plan, organize, direct, and control its operations
and resources so as to minimize severity, frequency, and financial impact of job-related accidents.

        The Commissioner of Administration of the Division of Administration has appointed Diana
Williamson as the DOA ’s Safety Coordinator to be the representative of the Division and top management in
stressing safety and loss prevention within the Division.

         The DOA Safety Coordinator works with Division leadership and Section Safety Managers to
effectively implement a comprehensive loss prevention program that addresses the Division’s and each
section’s loss prevention needs.

        Personnel Policy #4 defines the responsibilities of the DOA staff including Assistant Commissioners,
Section Heads, Safety Coordinator, Section Safety Managers, supervisors and employees.




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                              Page 6 of 65
THE CONTENTS OF THIS LOSS PREVENTION MANUAL

         This manual was specifically designed for the Division of Administration. This manual is organized
according to five major kinds of insurance provided to the Division of Administration by the Office of Risk
Management: General Safety, Drivers' Safety, Equipment Management, Water Vessels and Bond/Crimes.
In addition, there is a section on the Division audit procedure and on resources available from the Office of
Risk Management. The following is a brief description of the contents of each section:

GENERAL SAFETY PLAN

        Rules adopted in the Louisiana Register require agencies to adopt a comprehensive safety and loss
prevention plan. The first section of this manual provides procedures for implementation of the safety plan as
required by the rules. Included under this umbrella are safety issues such as Hazard Control, Safety
Inspections, Accident Investigation, Job Safety Analysis, Emergency Preparedness, Site Security, Safety
Training, First Aid, and Record Keeping Procedures.

DRIVER'S SAFETY

         The State of Louisiana is committed to continuing an aggressive program of Driver Safety at all
levels of state government. Driver's Safety is intended to increase the safety awareness among drivers of
state vehicles, to reduce the State's exposure to liability and financial losses, and to assist state agencies in
achieving accountability for safe driving.

EQUIPMENT MANAGEMENT

         Equipment Management Loss Prevention is intended to reduce the number and frequency of failures
of boilers, electrical components, heating, and ventilating and air conditioning systems. Our goal is to extend
the operating life these major mechanical systems. This goal is accomplished by developing maintenance
schedules and records, and assisting sections in developing accountability for the maintenance of
equipment.

BOND CRIMES

         The Bonds/Crime Loss Control Program was developed to protect the State from financial and/or
property losses resulting from any act and/or omission by any state public officials, appointees, or employees
in the performance of their respective duties.

LOSS ANALYSIS AND DIVISION SAFETY AUDIT PROCEDURE

         The Unit of Risk Analysis and Loss prevention has established a system for monitoring accidents
and claims. These procedures ensure the uniform development and administration of loss prevention and
control efforts. Data on all claims is maintained as a means for comparing past and present accident rates
within the Division of Administration and each section or unit. It is a tool for comparing the accident rates in
Louisiana units with accident rates of similar organizations nationwide. A major goal of loss analysis is to
identify where losses are occurring and how the losses may be reduced or eliminated.

        Data concerning the type, frequency, and amount of claims from an agency is used by the Office of
Risk Management to determine the cost of insurance coverage for the Division. The cost of insurance is
determined by three factors:
        l.      The Division's exposure to risk,

6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                               Page 7 of 65
        2.        The frequency and severity of claims, and

        3.        The implementation of a comprehensive safety and loss prevention plan.

         The Audit Section of this manual includes the Self-Audit Sheets used in conducting the
Division's/section’s self-safety audit and the procedures that are followed.


TRAINING/RESOURCES

          The development of skills, knowledge, attitudes, and awareness is a fundamental component of the
Loss Prevention Program. The Office of Risk Management offers instruction and technical training programs
in a number of areas including drug testing, electrical safety, accident investigation, bloodborne pathogens,
asbestos awareness, confined entry, ergonomics, fire safety, hazardous materials, respiratory protection,
forklift safety, laboratory safety, and driver safety. The purpose of the training activities is to assist each
section in creating and maintaining a safe work environment and safe work practices. All employees must
understand what they can do to create and maintain safe work practices and a work setting that is free from
hazards.

       Videos are available to agencies through the Office of Risk Management. A list of ORM’s class
schedules and registration forms are provided on ORM 's WEB site.




FOR FURTHER INFORMATION


        For further information on services provided by the Office of Risk Management, call Jack Oliver, the
Loss Prevention Officer who is assigned to the Division of Administration. You may contact Mr.
Oliver at 342-8530.

The DOA Safety Coordinator is Diana Williamson who can be reached at (225) 219-4480. Her fax is
(225) 342-1057

Her address is:
                          Diana S. Williamson, Safety Coordinator
                          Division of Administration
                          Office of the Commissioner
                          1051 N. Third Street
                          Baton Rouge, LA. 70804




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                              Page 8 of 65
                                        PURPOSE OF THIS GUIDE


         This safety manual is designed to implement and maintain a comprehensive safety program, and to
help make safety an integral part of every section within the Division. This manual sets the parameters and
requirements established by management for the Division as well as the sections within its organizational
structure. All of the sections will comply with the policies and procedures set forth in this manual; but may
develop their own additional policies and/or procedures to address the section’s unique needs and/or
circumstances. Any sections that develop their own sectional policies, procedures and/or rules must submit
copies of policies, procedures and/or rules to the Office of the Commissioner via the DOA Safety
Coordinator.     The Appointing Authority will designate appropriate DOA personnel to review proposed
policies, procedures and/or rules for compliance with DOA policies and/or possible deviations from existing
DOA policy. Sections must receive written approval from the Appointing Authority before implementation of
policies, procedures and/or rules Copies of all sectional policies and/or procedures should be sent to the
DOA Safety Coordinator for inclusion in the DOA Safety files The DOA Safety Coordinator, the Loss
Prevention Officer and Section’s Safety Manager are available to assist with these endeavors.

         The following information includes detailed explanations of responsibilities for safety, advice about
safety instructions, emergency procedures and general safety knowledge.

          This manual will serve as a source book and guide for the comprehensive safety and health program
in all sections within the Division of Administration.

         The information that is presented in this guide is intended for use in an ongoing safety program, not
a short obligatory unit that is presented at the beginning of employment. The importance of integrating safety
into the total job function cannot be overemphasized. Employees should be constantly reminded that safety
must become an everyday consideration in their work in their various sections and work areas. In short,
safety should be a practical learning experience to be used in performing job duties.

         This manual was designed to help plan and implement the kind of safety program and training that
will result in every employee realizing that "the right way to perform any task is in the safe way!" Proper use
of the procedures presented here should result in a program through which every employee becomes safety-
conscious.

        It is recommended that employees become thoroughly familiar with the contents of this guide.




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                              Page 9 of 65
                                    Division of Administration

                               GENERAL SAFETY PLAN 1999-2000




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                           Page 10 of 65
        COMPONENTS OF A GENERAL SAFETY PLAN

         Each section must comply with La. R.S. Title 39, Section 1543-44 (See Office of Risk Management
Rule Title 37 Insurance Part 1 RM, Subpart 2, Chapter 32, Louisiana Register, Vol.15, No. 2, February 20,
1989.) These rules require that each state department and facility implement a sixteen-point operational
safety & loss prevention plan to protect employees from injury. This safety plan is organized around those
sixteen components, which are as follows:

        1.      A management safety policy statement
        2.      Responsibility for safety in an organization
        3.      Inspection Program
        4.      Job Safety Analysis
        5.      Investigation Program
        6.      Safety Meetings
        7.      Safety Rules
        8.      Employee Safety Training
        9.      Record Keeping
        10.     First Aid
        11.     Housekeeping Program
        12.     Hazard Control Program
        13.     Equipment Management Program
        14.     Driver's Safety Program
        15.     Water Vessel Operator Safety Program
        16.     Any other loss prevention program developed by the Office of Risk Management, Unit of
                Risk Analysis and Loss Prevention for the prevention and reduction in accident events that
                may cause injury, illness, or property damage.

        This safety plan as developed by the Division of Administration must be implemented by each
section and facility and for each geographically separate office of a section (regional offices, for example).
The Office of Risk Management identifies two classes of agencies, Class A and Class B.

        For the Safety Audit Year commencing April 1, 2001 through March 31, 2002, all sections
within the Division of Administration have been classified as Class B sections.




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                             Page 11 of 65
DOA SAFETY POLICY STATEMENT AND ASSIGNMENT OF RESPONSIBILITIES

PERSONNEL POLICY NO. 4

EFFECTIVE DATE:         September 1, 1989; Revised January 24, 1994

REVISED DATE:           May 26, 1999/May 7, 2001

SUBJECT:                Safety Program

AUTHORIZATION: ____________________________________________
                   Whitman J. Kling, Jr., Deputy Undersecretary

I.     POLICY:

       It is the policy of the Division of Administration that all employees are provided a work environment,
       which is as safe and accident free as possible. Employee safety is a legal and moral obligation, and
       is therefore, one of the top priorities of this Division. It is instructed that each employee devotes daily
       attention to making safety an integral part of his/her routine operations.

II.    PURPOSE:

       To authorize the implementation of a safety program for all employees which will:

               Promote a safe, productive work environment for all employees, and

               Prevent injuries, which are painful and potentially disabling.

               Be in compliance with Title 39 of the LA Revised Statutes, Sections 1527 through 1544,
               which mandates that "... all state agencies must implement a program to prevent and
               reduce employee job related accidents, injuries and loss of state property, thereby
               reducing the direct and indirect costs to the State of Louisiana."

III.   APPLICABILITY:

       This policy applies to all employees of the Division of Administration.

       This policy shall be applicable to all sections within the Division of Administration both general
       appropriation and ancillary appropriations.

IV.    RESPONSIBILITY:

       The Deputy/Assistant Commissioners are responsible for:

               Creating a safe work environment for all employees in their area of supervision.

               Holding each Section Head accountable as an aspect of job performance for the
               establishment and maintenance of an effective safety program in his/her section.

               Insuring compliance with the policy and procedures of the Safety Program by all Section
               Heads and employees under his/her immediate supervision.
6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                              Page 12 of 65
               Communicating and demonstrating support for the Safety Program and the Safety
               Managers in his/her sections.

               Authorizing necessary expenditures for the implementation of the Safety Program whenever
               possible.

               Supporting efforts to remedy unsafe work conditions existing in work environments under
               his/her area of supervision.

               Periodically participating in safety meetings of supervisors and Safety Managers in his/her
               area of supervision.


       Section Heads are responsible for:

               Establishing and maintaining a safe work environment for all employees in his/her section.

               Holding supervisors accountable as an aspect of job performance for the establishment and
               maintenance of an effective safety program in his/her unit.

               Appointing a Safety Manager for his/her section and providing that appointee the necessary
               authority to implement and manage a successful safety program.

               Holding the Safety Manager accountable as an aspect of job performance for the
               management of a successful safety program.

               Communicating and demonstrating support for the Safety Manager and the Safety Program
               in his/her section.

               Facilitating any training necessary to assure safe operation of equipment or performance of
               job duties by employees in his/her section.

               Insuring compliance with the policy and procedures of the DOA Safety Program by all
               employees.

               Authorizing necessary expenditures for the implementation of the Safety Program whenever
               possible.

               Supporting efforts to remedy unsafe work conditions in his/her work areas.

               Periodically participating in safety meetings of supervisors and Safety Managers in his/her
               section.

               Assuring that each employee, current and new, is made aware of this policy and its contents
               as well as any forthcoming revisions.



Supervisors are responsible for:

6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                           Page 13 of 65
               Creating and maintaining a safe work environment for employees in his/her area of
               supervision.

               Working with his/her employees to develop a Job Safety Analysis on tasks under his/her
               supervision.

               Making every reasonable effort to provide any equipment necessary to assure the safety of
               employees on the job.

               Assuring that all safety rules and procedures are distributed to and understood by his/her
               employees through training, meetings, discussions, etc.

               Ensuring that employees understand the Emergency Preparedness Plan.

               Ensuring that both he/she and his/her employees follow all safety rules, policies and
               procedures.

               Conducting or providing safety training for each new employee and for current employees,
               who must perform new tasks, operate new equipment, or where safety performance is not
               satisfactory.

               Counseling with employees regarding safety violations or unsafe work habits, documenting
               counseling, and recommending disciplinary action where appropriate.

               Immediately reporting any and all unsafe conditions and practices to the Safety Manager.

               Correcting any unsafe conditions in the work area if it is within his/her means to do so.

               Obtaining prompt first aid for injured individuals.

               Assuring that the proper investigation procedure is followed by investigating all accidents,
               which occur in his/her areas of responsibility during the shift upon which the accident
               occurred,

               Insuring that corrective action is recommended, immediately after assuring care of any
               individual injured.

                Reporting all accidents and near misses by completing, signing and submitting the
       Incident/Accident Investigation Form, DA 2000 Revised November 1999” or any
       successive format.

               Reporting all accidents which require medical attention by completing and signing the”
               Employer’s Report of Occupational Injury or Disease” sometimes referred to as “Employers'
               First Report of Injury.”

               Considering safety as a part of the performance criteria of each employee on a daily basis
               and during periodic official evaluations.

       The Safety Coordinator is responsible for:

               Coordination of the Safety Program for the Division of Administration with the authority of the
6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                             Page 14 of 65
              Appointing Authority

              Coordinating the Division of Administration Safety Program with various sections within the
              Division.

              Monitoring the Safety Program and coordinating safety activities, quarterly safety meetings,
              and safety inspections through the Section Safety Managers.

              Compiling and submitting all applicable Division-wide reports on a timely basis to the
              appropriate authority.

              Acting as liaison between the Division of Administration and the Office of Risk
              Management/State Loss Prevention Program.

              Facilitating training, whenever possible, on safety issues for Safety Managers, supervisors
              and/or employees of the Division.

              Serving as a member of the Division Safety Committee.


       The Safety Manager is responsible for:

              Serving as liaison between the Section Head and the Safety Coordinator in the
              establishment and maintenance of DOA Safety Policies and Safety Program.

              Coordinating the DOA Safety Program in his/her section.

              Assisting and monitoring the supervisors within his/her section in the performance of their
              safety responsibilities.

              Assuring that all supervisors are given copies of all safety procedures applicable to their
              area of supervision.

              Facilitating training, whenever possible, on safety issues for supervisors and/or employees
              of the section.

              Assuring that all appropriate procedures are followed for conducting investigations of
              incidents, accidents, and near misses as well as preparation of the applicable reports when
              requested.

              Compiling and routing to the appropriate authority all applicable reports reflecting safety
              performance, compliance, and accident trends.

              Serving on the Division Safety Committee.




       Employees are responsible for:


6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                           Page 15 of 65
               Recognizing that safety will be considered an aspect of job performance in periodic
               performance evaluations.

               Exercising safe work habits as an element of satisfactory work performance.

               Observing all safety rules and regulations.

               Accepting personal responsibility for his/her own safety and well-being.

               Reporting any potentially unsafe condition and/or work practice to the immediate supervisor,
               Section Safety Manager and/or DOA Safety Coordinator.

               Seeking training or instruction prior to operation of any office equipment or machinery
               he/she cannot operate or prior to performing any duty he/she is not trained to perform.

               Asking for assistance or further explanation in safety related matters when needed.

               Taking all available and effective action to minimize risk to self and others when hazards are
               recognized.

               Helping achieve goals of preventing personal injury and avoiding loss of State property due
               to accidents.

               Making suggestions to improve safety.

               Reporting to the supervisor and/or Safety Manager immediately if involved in an accident or
               injury.

               Completing the Employer's Report of Occupational Injury or Disease with the assistance of
               the Safety Manager when involved in an accident or injury, which requires medical attention.

               Completing the required Incident/Accident Report when involved in an incident, accident, or
               near miss.

               Reporting to the supervisor and Safety Manager after providing any necessary assistance if
               witness to an accident or injury.


V.     EXCLUSIONS:

       There will be no exceptions to this policy.




VI.    QUESTIONS:

       All questions concerning this policy should be directed to the Safety Coordinator, Diana Williamson,
       in the Commissioner’s Office at 219-4480

6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                              Page 16 of 65
VIII.VIOLATIONS:

       Employees found to have violated this policy may be subject to disciplinary action.




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                            Page 17 of 65
                                       INSPECTION PROCEDURES

PURPOSE

         The DOA Loss Prevention Program includes both scheduled and unscheduled inspections. Such
inspections not only help to assure that the various sections of the Division of Administration are the safest
they can possibly be, but are also instrumental toward making sure each section complies with safety
provisions.

          Constant changes caused by movement of materials, depletion of supplies, accumulation of waste,
and rearranging offices are a fact of life in the average section of Division of Administration. At the same
time, changes are made every workday resulting in employees involved in various kinds of activities, as well
as movement of the same employees from one project to the next. Thorough systematic inspections help to
keep everyone who works in the section alert by providing an incentive to keep both equipment and supplies
in their proper place, despite the inevitable constant traffic.

        Other more specific purposes for conducting safety inspections include:

        1.      To comply with state and federal health and safety laws, as applicable.

        2.      To conduct quarterly (or monthly) inspections (depending upon a section’s classification as a
                Class A or Class B section) of the facilities and activities to reduce or eliminate hazards and
                potential accidents.

        3.      To conduct target area inspections in areas reporting accident trends to evaluate potentially
                high-accident frequency activities or areas.

        4.      To follow-up and investigate an event that involves serious injury to a person.

        5.      To investigate a complaint of an unsafe or unhealthy situation that exists at the work site or
                as a part of a normal accident investigation program.

OBJECTIVES

        The following types of inspections should be conducted in each section of the Division of
Administration, as the needs of the particular section dictate:

        1.      Periodic inspections are to be made at quarterly intervals. (or monthly inspections depending
                upon a section’s classification as a Class A or Class B section) These will be coordinated by
                the DOA Safety Coordinator and will cover the entire work situation.

        2.      Intermittent inspections are made at irregular intervals as the need arises. They may be
                unannounced and concentrate on any specific area of the workplace. The need for such
                inspections is usually dictated by accident analysis, or an unusual number of accidents or
                injuries to determine reason or action needed.

        3.      Special inspections are required sometimes due to the installation of new equipment,
                introduction of new operation or process, remodeling or repair, or to investigate and analyze
                an accident, injury, fire or other hazards. Other special inspections may be conducted as
                part of special emphasis such as an open house or a specially designated week.

6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                             Page 18 of 65
       The primary objective of the Inspection Program is to determine whether or not everything is
       satisfactory. If problems are detected, emphasis should be placed on finding the causes, not placing
       blame. Basically, the Safety Manager should do three things:

       1.      DETECT:      Examine the work place and its activities for possible hazards and unsafe
               practices.

       2.      ANALYZE: Examine hazards and unsafe practices detected in Step 1 for potential accident
               producing capabilities.

       3.      CORRECT: Recommend measures to solve the problems, if appropriate. Safety Managers
               should be trained on the identification of hazards and unsafe practices and to realize that
               their responsibilities are to recognize possible hazards, not necessarily to provide solutions.

PROCEDURE

       1.      The Division is divided into sections, which are regarded as specific housekeeping units.
               Housekeeping responsibility for each section is assigned to the Section’s Safety Manager.

       2.      The Safety Manager will meet annually with first-line supervisors and employees to explain
               the purpose and objective of the inspection procedure. Each employee should be
               encouraged to assist in identifying eliminating, or effectively controlling potential safety and
               fire hazards.

       3.      Safety Managers are responsible for conducting regularly scheduled (monthly/quarterly)
               safety inspections and for identifying, reporting and taking steps to correct conditions or
               practices that are potential safety or fire hazards.

               Some examples of hazardous conditions are as follows:

               *       Slip or trip hazards such as cords or torn or broken floor covers

               *       Foreign materials that could cause loss of balance such as food grease, oil, liquids,
                       mud, algae, trash, etc.

               *       Holes or protrusions such as eroded, broken or sunken walking surfaces.

               *       Temporary accumulation of flammable or combustible materials

               *       Storage and use of chemical products and other hazardous materials.

       4.      The Safety Manager completes the Safety Inspection Checklist for the area and submits a
               copy to the Division of Administration Safety Coordinator. The completed Safety Inspection
               Checklist should be retained in the area it covers for at least two years and should be made
               available to the Section Head and the ORM's Unit of Risk Analysis and Loss Prevention
               upon request.


       5.      Maintenance Staff. Inspections could be conducted as a part of regular maintenance duty,
               provided proper in-service training is offered. An Inspection Checklist for Building Managers
               has been developed and approved by the Superintendent. These inspections should be
6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                            Page 19 of 65
              conducted on a regular basis

       6.     All employees are responsible for reporting any potentially hazardous conditions or practices
              they find. The employee records the unsafe condition on the Hazard Control Log (Form HC-
              1-00) which must be kept in each Section ’s Operations Area. The Safety Manager is
              responsible for checking the Hazard Control Log and is authorized to take immediate
              temporary control of the area to prevent exposure to the hazard until permanent corrective
              action is taken. If a Safety Manager cannot correct the hazard, he/she should report it to the
              next level of management.

       7.     If a hazard still exists for more than 30 days, the supervisor/Safety Manager must send
              copies of the Hazard Control Log to the DOA Safety Coordinator and to the Office of Risk
              Management's Unit of Risk Analysis and Loss Prevention.

       8.     The Hazard Control Log (Form HC-1-00) is retained in the originating work area for at least
              two years or until all hazards have been corrected.




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                           Page 20 of 65
        PROCEDURES FOR ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION


PURPOSE:

        The purpose of accident investigation is to learn all facts surrounding an accident through careful
        questioning and investigation of activities contributing to the event.


OBJECTIVE:

        l.      To document all facts and causes of the accident.

        2.      To determine the actions necessary to prevent recurrence.


PROCEDURE

        An accident is defined as "a series of unplanned events that caused or COULD HAVE CAUSED
personal injury or property damage." The Safety Manager responsible for the area in which the accident
occurred should investigate all accidents, including those occurring to non-employees. "Near misses" are
also considered accidents and should be investigated as thoroughly as an accident that results in injury or
property damage.

         When an employee is injured, the employer must complete the Employer's Report of Occupational
Injury or Disease form. Five-part forms are available from the Office of Worker's Compensation and the
Office of Risk Management. (Call 342-8530)

         When an employee has a "near miss", the employer must complete the Incident/Accident
Investigation Form. These forms are available from the DOA Safety Coordinator and/or the Office of Risk
Management's WEB site.)

        AFTER ACQUIRING NECESSARY MEDICAL AID FOR INJURED PERSONS, the Safety
        Manager should follow these steps in investigating the accident.

        1.      If possible, ask the person or persons involved to describe what happened. Do not fix
                blame or find fault; just get the facts.

        2.      Survey the accident scene for information.          Assemble any objects that might have
                contributed to the accident.

        3.      Determine if there were any witnesses to the accident and get their written accounts of the
                incident.

        4.      Take whatever steps are necessary to prevent recurrences until the condition can be
                permanently corrected.

        5.      Complete the Incident/Accident Investigation Form. If this was a near miss incident
                complete the same Incident/Accident Investigation Form.


6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                            Page 21 of 65
INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION FORM

              Accidents do not just happen; they are caused. The Incident/Accident Investigation Form
       (Form DA 2000 Rev 08/12/99) is a tool to assist in determining the causes and to develop
       procedures to prevent the recurrence of similar incidents. All spaces on the form should be
       completed. Notations such as “N/A” for “non-applicable” are not acceptable.

Box 1 Basic Information

       The first box contains questions # 1-18. Identifies patterns of injury.

               1.       Location code Leave Blank or call Safety Coordinator for the assigned number.
                        The location code is a code established by Office of Risk Management.
                        ORM will also provide this information upon receipt

               2.       Record the date that the accident occurred.

               3.       Record the date that the accident was reported.

               4.      Record the injured person’s job title. If the injured person is not a state
                       employee, a form, DA 2065 General Liability Loss notice should be filled out with
               a copy sent to ORM and one sent to the Safety Coordinator for DOA records.

               5.       Enter the name of the employee's immediate supervisor at the time of injury.

               6.       Enter employee’s name, Last name, and then first name.

               7.       Enter the employee’s social security number

               8.       Describe how the accident occurred in detail. Use additional sheets if necessary.
                        Be sure to get injured employee’s signature.

               9.       Enter the name of the person filing the report and get their signature.

               10.      Enter the agency/section and include the phone number

               11.      Enter the parish where accident occurred and the parish where employee is
                        domiciled.

               12. -16 Respond accordingly

               17.      Enter the exact location of the accident (doorway in Rm 320, north hallway, etc.)

               18.      List witnesses' names. If they are not state employees, obtain phone numbers
                        and addresses.

Box 2 Cause Codes

         The Cause Code is used to provide and describe the specific details of the accident. Check the
description code which best coincides with the employee’s description of the cause for the incident.
Box 3 Fields 23, 27 28,and 36
6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                              Page 22 of 65
Data collected from these fields is entered in computers and assists the DOA and the ORM to identify trends.

Field 23 City               Indicate the city where the incident/accident occurred by placing an “X” in the
                            space next to the appropriate code

Field 27 Day of Week        Indicate which day of the week the incident/accident occurred.

Field 28 Time of Day        Indicate what time of day the incident/accident occurred.

Field 36 Loss Prevention Review Indicate if you need assistance from a Loss Prevention Officer

Field 41 Nature of Injury           Check the description code which best describes the nature of the injury

Fields 43, 44, 45 Sex, Length of Service and Age of Employee           These fields are self-explanatory

Field 50 Part of Body       Indicate body part(s) that was/were injured

Root Cause Analysis Portion

         Once an accident occurs, the investigator must take immediate action to prevent a similar event.
Information requested in this box reviews what happened and asks what needs to be done and who is going
to do it. Suggest what long-range action is necessary to prevent the accident. Record your comments on
what could be done and tell others in order to prevent similar accidents at other locations.

       The Section where the incident/accident occurred retains the original form.
Copies should be sent to:

1.      The Injured Employee’s Section’s Safety Manager
2.      The DOA Safety Coordinator and
3.      ORM, Loss Prevention Unit
        P.O. Box 94095
        Baton Rouge, LA. 70804

Non-medical incident/accident reports are provided to the following:

1.      The Injured Employee’s Section’s Safety Manager
2.      The DOA Safety Coordinator and
3.      ORM, Loss Prevention Unit
        P.O. Box 94095
        Baton Rouge, LA. 70804




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                                Page 23 of 65
PROCEDURE FOR JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS


PURPOSE

         Job Safety analysis is one of the first steps in hazard prevention, incident/accident analysis and
safety training because a hazard must be recognized before it can be eliminated. Therefore a job safety
analysis should be performed on all tasks that have resulted in a trend, death or change in job procedures or
equipment.

        The Job Safety Analysis also provides a learning opportunity for the supervisor and employee.
Copies of the Job Safety Analysis should be distributed to all employees who perform that job. The
supervisor should explain the analysis to the employees and, if necessary, provide additional training.

         New employees or employees who are asked to perform new tasks must be trained to use the safe
and efficient procedures developed in the Job Safety Analysis. New employees should be taught the correct
methods to perform tasks before dangerous habits develop, to recognize the hazards associated with each
job step, and to use the necessary precautions to avoid injury or accidents.

          Jobs that are performed infrequently require additional effort to minimize accident potential. Pre-job
instruction addressing the points listed on the Job Safety Analysis will serve as a refresher to employees who
may have forgotten some of the hazards in performing the task and the proper procedures to be used to
avoid these hazards.

         Finally, the Job Safety Analysis is an accident investigation tool. When accidents occur involving a
job for which a Job Safety Analysis has been performed, the analysis should be reviewed to determine if
proper procedures were followed or if the procedures should be revised.


OBJECTIVES

        1.       To eliminate hazards and a potential exposure by evaluating jobs.

        2.       To develop a tool to assist in the teaching of safe work procedures.

        3.       To provide a framework for incident/accident analysis.

PROCEDURES

          Each time a trend is identified, a death occurs or a change in job procedures or equipment occurs,
the first-line supervisor is expected to perform at a Job Safety Analysis to determine the cause(s) of the
accident, to evaluate job and work methods, and to eliminate hazards.


        STEP 1: IDENTIFY THE JOB TO ANALYZED

        1.       PRODUCTION OF INJURIES. Every job that has produced a disabling injury or death
                 should be analyzed.

        2.       FREQUENCY OF ACCIDENTS. Jobs that repeatedly produce accidents (trends) are
                 candidates for a Job Safety Analysis. The greater the number of accidents associated with
6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                              Page 24 of 65
                the job, the greater its priority for a Job Safety Analysis. Subsequent injuries indicate that
                preventive action taken prior to their occurrence was not successful.

        3.      POTENTIAL SEVERITY. Jobs that do not have a history of accidents but do have the
                potential for severe injury or property damage may also have a Job Safety Analysis.

        4.      NEW JOBS. New operations created by changes in equipment or process obviously have
                no history of accidents, but their accident potential should be fully appreciated. A Job Safety
                Analysis should be made on every new job created. Analysis should not be delayed until an
                accident or near miss occurs.

        5.      DEATH. Any accident that caused the death of an employee must have a job safety
                analysis made as part of the accident/incident investigation

Step 2: PERFORM THE ANALYSIS

         The supervisor or Safety Manager responsible for the task should perform the Job Safety Analysis
using the Job Safety Analysis Worksheet (JSA-1-00). The supervisor or Safety Manager should conduct the
Job Safety Analysis with the help of employees who regularly perform the task. The job being analyzed
should be broken down into a sequence of steps that describe the process in detail. Avoid two common
errors: 1) making the breakdown too detailed so that an unnecessarily large number of steps results, or 2)
making the job breakdown so general that the basic steps are not distinguishable. As a rule, the Job Safety
Analysis should contain less than 12 steps. If more steps are needed, the job should be broken into separate
tasks.

        Job Safety Analysis involves the following steps:

        1.      Selecting a qualified person to perform the analysis.

        2.      Briefing the employee demonstrating the task on the purpose of the analysis.

        3.      Observing the performance of the job, and breaking it into basic steps.

        4.      Recording and describing each step in the breakdown.

        5.      Reviewing the breakdown and description with the person who performed the task.

         Select an experienced, capable, and cooperative person who is willing to share ideas. He should be
familiar with the purpose and method of a Job Safety Analysis. Sometimes it is difficult for someone who is
intimately familiar with a job to describe it in detail; therefore, reviewing a completed Job Safety Analysis
before conducting one will help illustrate the terminology and procedure to be followed.

        Review the breakdown and analysis with the person who performed the job to ensure agreement of
the sequence and description of the steps. Variations of routine procedures should be analyzed also.

        The wording for each step should begin with an action word such as "remove," "open," or "lift."




Step 3: IDENTIFY HAZARDS
6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                             Page 25 of 65
        Hazards associated with each step are identified. To ensure a thorough analysis, answer the
        following questions about each step of the operation:

        1.      Is there a danger of striking against, being struck by, or otherwise making injurious contact
                with an object?

        2.      Can the employee be caught in, by, or between the objects?


        3.      Is there a potential for a slip or trip? Can someone fall on the same level or to another?

        4.      Can an employee strain himself or herself by pushing, pulling, lifting, bending, or twisting?

        5.      Is the environment hazardous to one's health (toxic gas, vapor, mist, fumes, dust, heat, or
                radiation)?

        Using the Job Safety Analysis Worksheet (JSA-1-00) document hazards associated with each step.
Check with the employee who performed the job, and others experienced in performing the job, for additional
ideas. A reliable list will be developed through observation and discussion.


Step 4: DEVELOP SOLUTIONS

        The final step in Job Safety Analysis is to develop a safe, efficient job procedure to prevent
        accidents. The principal solutions for minimizing hazards that are identified in the analysis are
        as follows:

        1.      Find a new way to do the job. To find an entirely new way to perform a task, determine the
                goal of the operation and analyze the various ways of reaching this goal. Select the safest
                method. Consider work saving tools and equipment

        2.      Change the physical conditions that created the hazard. If a new way to perform the job
                cannot be developed, change the physical conditions (such as tools, materials, equipment,
                layout, location) to eliminate or control the hazard.

        3.      Change the work procedure to eliminate the hazard. Investigate changes in the job
                procedure that would enable employees to perform the task without being exposed to the
                hazard.

        4.      Reduce the frequency of its performance. Often a repair or service has to be repeated often
                because of another condition that needs correction. This is particularly true in maintenance
                and material handling. To reduce the frequency of a repetitive job, eliminate the
                condition/practice that results in excessive repairs or service. If the condition cannot be
                eliminated, attempt to minimize the effect of the condition. Reducing the number of times a
                job is performed contributes to safer operations because the frequency of exposure to the
                hazard is reduced. It is preferable to eliminate hazards and prevent exposure by changing
                physical conditions or revising the job procedure or both. In developing solutions, general
                precautions such as "be alert", "use caution," or "be careful" are useless. Solutions should
                state precisely what to do and how to do it. For example, "make certain the wrench does not
                slip or cause loss of balance" does not tell how to prevent the wrench from slipping. A good
6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                             Page 26 of 65
                recommendation explains both "what" and "how”. If a job or process is changed
                dramatically, it should be discussed with all personnel involved to determine the possible
                consequences of the changes. Such discussions check the accuracy of the Job Safety
                Analysis and involve personnel in the effort to reduce job hazards.


Step 5: CONDUCT A FOLLOWUP ANALYSIS

          Each supervisor should observe employees as they perform at least one job for which a Job Safety
Analysis has been developed. The purpose of these observations is to determine whether or not the
employees are doing the jobs in accordance with the safety procedures developed. The supervisor should
review the Job Safety Analysis before doing the follow up review to reinforce the proper procedures that are
to be followed.


RECORDKEEPING

        Job Safety Analysis Reporting Forms should be maintained in a notebook in the Section creating the
documents and should be readily accessible to all employees. An index naming the task, date the Job Safety
Analysis was completed, and date the analysis was revised should be maintained in the front of each section
manual.

Copies of Job Safety Analysis should be sent to the DOA Safety Coordinator.




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                            Page 27 of 65
PROCEDURES FOR CONDUCTING SAFETY MEETINGS


PURPOSE

        The purpose of the DOA Safety Meeting Program is to provide a method to systematically examine
work practices for potentially unsafe acts that could produce personal injury and solicit effective methods to
preclude recurrence.


OBJECTIVES

         The objective of the DOA Safety Meeting Program is to inform, and instruct DOA employees on
topics relating to the DOA Loss Prevention Program; to identify and discuss potential unsafe acts; and to
reduce and/or eliminate unsafe acts within the Division of Administration.


PROCEDURE

A.      PREPARE FOR MEETING

I.      The DOA Safety Coordinator will select the topic to be used as a safety meeting topic for the
        benefit of the Division overall. Section Safety Managers will conduct meetings on the assigned
        topic and return documentation (sign in sheets) by the due date set forth by the Safety
        Coordinator

II.     Additional Topics

        a.      Conduct quarterly/monthly inspections of various areas and work practices and note any
                unsafe activities or tendencies occurring within the section that need to be eliminated.

        b.      Another appropriate topic is a new job or procedure or changes in an operation.      A safety
                meeting can help identify and eliminate hazards before accidents occur.

        c.      Section Safety Managers should conduct additional meetings on any unsafe activities noted
                in their sections or include discussion of unsafe activities in addition to the DOA assigned
                topic.

III.    List the topic of the Safety meeting and the date of the meeting on the Safety Meeting Report.
        Indicate whether the employees attended an actual meeting by passing around a sign in sheet. If
        materials and information were circulated around the section, have employees sign a sheet which
        says, “I have read and received the attached materials”

B.      CONDUCT THE MEETING

Follow the format of the Safety Meeting Report.

I.      Allow employees to discuss if and/or why the situation occurs and what can be done to control or
        eliminate it.
II.     If appropriate, reach an agreement with employees on how to eliminate or control the situation.

6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                             Page 28 of 65
C.     COMPLETE THE SAFETY MEETING REPORT

I.     Complete the Safety Meeting Report by having employees sign the sign-in sheet indicating that they
       have either attended the safety meeting or they have received and read the materials provided on
       the safety meeting topic.


D.     RECORD MEETING

I.     Copies of the safety meeting report forms should be kept on file by each Safety Manager for his/her
       respective section.

II.    Originals of the safety meeting report forms should be sent to the DOA Safety Coordinator and upon
       request to the Section Head.




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                           Page 29 of 65
SAFETY RULES


       The following are the safety rules for the Division of Administration. Agencies within the Division
       may modify and add rules as needed:


       1.      Smoke only in approved areas. (See DOA Personnel Policy #18)

       2.      Horseplay and fighting will not be tolerated in the work place.

       3.      Possession of unauthorized firearms, alcoholic beverages, illegal drugs, or unauthorized
               medically prescribed drugs will not be tolerated in the work place

       4.      Before beginning work, notify your supervisor of any permanent or temporary impairment
               that may reduce your ability to perform in a safe manner.

       5.      Use personal protective equipment to protect yourself from potential hazards that cannot be
               eliminated.

       6.      Operate equipment only if you are trained and authorized.

       7.      Inspect the workstation for potential hazards and ensure that the equipment or vehicle is in
               safe operating condition before using it.

       8.      Immediately report any recognized potentially unsafe condition or act to your supervisor.

       9.      If there is any doubt about the safe work method to be used, consult the supervisor before
               beginning work.

       10.     Immediately report accidents, near misses, and property damage to a supervisor and
               Section Safety Manager regardless of the severity.

       11.     Supervisors should obtain special safety permits when required. Examples of conditions
               requiring special safety permits are working with hot objects and working in confined spaces.

       12.     Follow recommended work procedures outlined for the job including safe work methods
               described in the Job Safety Analysis.

       13.     Maintain an orderly environment and work procedure. Store all tools and equipment in a
               designated place. Put scrap and waste material in a designated refuse container.

       14.     Report any smoke, fire, or unusual odors to your supervisor and Section Safety Manager.

       15.     Use proper lifting techniques. For objects exceeding 50 pounds in weight, the immediate
               supervisor must determine specific methods for safe lifting.

       16.     Never attempt to catch a falling object.


       17.     If your work creates a potential slip or trip hazard, correct the hazard immediately or use
6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                            Page 30 of 65
                safety tape to tag the area before leaving it unattended.

        18.     Fasten restraint belts before starting any motor vehicle.

        19.     Obey all driver safety instructions.

        20.     Comply with all traffic signs, signals, markers, and persons designated to direct traffic.

        21.     Know departmental rules regarding first aid, evacuation routes, and fire department
                notification.

        22.     Adhere to departmental rules and procedures specific to departmental operations.

        23.     Assist and cooperate with all safety investigations and inspections and assist in
                implementing safety procedures as requested.

Employees who do not comply with Division safety rules may be subject to disciplinary action.




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                              Page 31 of 65
SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS COMMON TO ALL SECTIONS

        Almost all accidents that occur in work areas are attributable to one of the causes listed below:

        1.      Taking unnecessary chances
        2.      Getting in too big a hurry
        3.      Showing off
        4.      Lack of information
        5.      Preoccupation of the mind
        6.      Distraction of attention
        7.      Fear
        8.      Experimenting
        9.      Failure to follow instructions
        10.     Poor discipline
        11.     Defective machinery
        12.     Improperly guarded machinery
        13.     Faulty layout
        14.     Faulty installation
        15.     Excitement
        16.     Selfishness
        17.     Improper clothing
        18.     Poor health

         Note that approximately 20 percent of all accidents are caused by mechanical failure (unsafe
conditions), whereas approximately 80 percent of all accidents are caused by human failure (unsafe acts).

          The safety regulations that follow offer specific, tangible suggestions for avoiding these common
pitfalls and reducing the chance of an accident and/or injury.

        These safety instructions may used as examples in writing instruction sheets for each work situation,
or may be copied directly and used in a section’s instructional program.


GENERAL SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS


        1.      No horseplay or practical joking in any work area.

        2.      Never take chances.

        3.      Observe all posted safety notices and posters.

        4.      Know where fire extinguishers are located and how to use them.

        5.      Report immediately to your supervisor upon incurring any injury, even though slight.

        6.      Report to the supervisor any equipment that does not seem to work properly.

        7.      Keep tools and materials from projecting over the edge of desks/benches, whenever
                possible, so someone will not walk into them and get injured.

6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                              Page 32 of 65
       8.     Follow prescribed safety instructions in handling large, heavy, and long pieces of material.
              In general, never carry material over six feet in length or over 50 pounds in weight without
              assistance.

       9.     Walk; do not run, in all work areas.

       10.    Be considerate of the safety of others.

       11.    Adhere to safety rules pertinent to a specific work area.

       12.    Report unsafe conditions to the supervisor.

       13.    Never throw any object in the work area; an accident or an injury may result.

       14.    Make certain hands and tools are free from oil and grease.

       15.    Clean workstations and place tools in the proper areas at the end of each work period.

       16.    Study fire regulations pertinent to the work location so that you can assist in closing
              windows, making proper exits, etc.

       17.    If you feel ill, do not operate a machine. Report to your supervisor.




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                           Page 33 of 65
SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS FOR PERSONAL PROTECTION


       1.     Wear proper eye protection while participating in activities that may endanger your eyes.

       2.     Be sure clothes are safe and suitable for work. Remove or fasten any loose clothing. Roll
              loose sleeves above your elbows. Keep hair away from equipment in operation. Employees
              with long hair must confine their hair in hair fasteners, nets or caps when around tools and
              equipment.

       3.     Rings, bracelets, watches, and other jewelry must be removed when working in shops or on
              machinery.

       4.     Wear gloves when materials such as rough boards, metal subject to burrs or sharp edges,
              glass, or other such materials are handled.

       5.     Wear protective clothing and equipment for the use intended for its wear. Avoid wearing
              gloves or anything else that may be pulled into a machine.

       6.     Wear a respirator when harmful dust or fumes exist.

       7.     Use face shields during hazardous operations in cutting metal, wood, or similar materials.

       8.     Never use flammable liquids for cleaning purposes.

       9.     Wear rubberized protective equipment when working with electricity.

       10.    Wear ear protection when excessive noise is encountered.

       11.    Wear helmets and head shields when performing operations that produce intense radiant
              energy like arc welding and heavy gas cutting.

       12.    Wear canvas or heavy cotton work gloves for operations when the main hazards are blisters
              caused by friction. When heat is involved, like foundry work, a more protective type of glove
              or mitten should be worn.

       13.    Wear safety shoes with steel toes when lifting heavy objects or working around them.

       14.    Shop coats, aprons, or coveralls should be worn for general body protection against dirt and
              grease.

       15.    Remove ties when working around machine tools or rotating equipment.

       16.    Use soap and water frequently as a method of preventing skin disease.




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                           Page 34 of 65
SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE OF EQUIPMENT AND TOOLS


       1.     Use the right tool for the job.

       2.     Never leave a machine while it is running.

       3.     Observe rules governing operator's zones around tools and machines.

       4.     Use a brush or piece of wood to clear away dry chips from your machine or bench. (The
              machine must be turned off and have come to a complete stop.)

       5.     Secure permission from your supervisor for using machines and have special set-ups
              approved.

       6.     Do not use tools or equipment until instruction relative to safe handling has been given.

       7.     Persons not operating power tools, or not instructed to observe the operation thereof, should
              keep clear of operators.

       8.     Do not stop or start a machine for another person except in an emergency.

       9.     Machines must be operated by only one person at a time.

       10.    Do not use machines for trivial operations, or when hand tools would best accomplish the
              task.

       11.    Do not tamper with adjustments or play with machinery at any time. Serious accidents may
              result.

       12.    Do not lean on machines. You may press a switch or throw a control, which, upon starting,
              could endanger the safety of the operator, or damage the machine.

       13.    Stop all power machinery to oil, adjust, or clean.

       14.    Allow revolving machinery to stop on its own. Resist the desire to grab chucks, spindles, or
              other rotating parts with the hand.

       15.    Set up shields to stop flying chips, sparks or particles.

       16.    Replace grinding wheels showing cracks, those out of balance, or those worn too small to
              allow proper clearance (not more than 1/8") between the tool rest and stone.

       17.    Never mount a grinding wheel unless the speed of the motor and the speed of the wheel are
              known and the two are appropriate.

       18.    When starting a machine, allow it to reach its operating rpm before using it.

       19.    When finished with a tool, clean and return it to its proper location.

       20.    Ensure that vise handles hang free when not in use.
6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                                Page 35 of 65
       21.    Know and follow the specific requirements of the kind and type of machine you are
              operating.

       22.    Enclose all gears, moving belts, and other power transmission devices, or erect barricades
              to prevent contact.

       23.    Do not use defective tools, machines, or other equipment.

       24.    Do not remove guards and safety devices.

       25.    Observe specific safety zones designated by the instructor and become familiar with color
              codes.

       26.    Do not talk with other employees while operating machines.

       27.    Observe safety rules posted at or near potentially hazardous machines.

       28.    Do not operate any machine until you have received proper instruction and fully understand
              how to operate it.

       29.    Have your supervisor check special machine setups.

       30.    Check machines and make all adjustments before turning on the power.

       31.    Make sure other persons are clear before turning on the power.

       32.    Be sure the guards are in place and function properly.

       33.    Start and stop your own machine, and remain with it until it has come to a complete stop

       34.    Allow a safe distance between your hands and blades, cutters, or moving parts. Keep your
              fingers in such a position that there is no danger of their slipping into the cutter or moving
              parts.

       35.    Keep machines clear of tools, stock and other items.

       36     Keep the floor around the tools clear of liquids, scraps, tools, and other material.

       37.    Give the machine your undivided attention when using it. Never look away for any reason.

       38.    Notify your supervisor of any breakage or malfunction.

       39.    Allow all machines to come to a complete stop before removing work or making a new
              setup.

       40.    Make sure that all cutting tools are sharp and in good condition before using them.

       41.    Handle edged or pointed tools by the handles, with sharp points or edges pointed away from
              you and others.

       42.    Clamp small work on a bench, or secure it in a vise, when using a gouge or wood chisel or
6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                            Page 36 of 65
                   driving screws.

         43.       Control chisels, gouges, and carving tools with one hand while the other supplies the power.

         44.       When chipping or cutting with a cold chisel, arrange your work so that co-workers are
                   protected from flying chips.

         45.       Pass tools to other person with handles forward.

         46.       Carefully read instruction sheets before operating machines.

         47.       Avoid using wrenches that do not properly fit the nuts, bolts, or other objects, which they are
                   being used to turn.

         48.       Develop a respect for machine tools and understand their purpose.

         49.       Recognize the distinctive sound of a properly adjusted and smoothly running machine tool.


SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS FOR FLAMMABLE AND COMBUSTIBLE LIQUIDS

         Flammable and combustible liquids are categorized by their ease of ignition. Flammable liquids are
more easily ignited than combustible ones. Examples of flammable liquids are gasoline, acetone, and
lacquer thinner. Examples of combustibles are kerosene, fuel oil, mineral spirits, and brake fluid.

       Flammable and combustible liquids are essential in some sections of the Division of Administration.
They must be stored and used in a manner that will provide a high degree of safety. Before using any of
these materials, the label on the container must be read. Flammable and combustible liquids are potentially
dangerous because:

    1.         Many produce vapors that are heavier than air and can accumulate along the floor or other
               low points, lying in wait for a stray spark.

    2.         Many are readily oxidized, or release heat, so that rags or waste coated with them will catch
               fire spontaneously.

    3.         Vapors from some have harmful effects and can cause damage to nervous and/or waste
               elimination systems of the body.

    4.         All are poisonous if taken internally.

    5.         Most will remove protective oils from the skin, and repeated exposure can cause dermatitis
               (skin rash).

    6.      Nearly all will burn violently. Such fires are difficult to extinguish without proper extinguishing
         agents.


         7. When burning, most flammable liquids will produce dense black smoke that may drive you from
            the room before the fire can be put out.

6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                                  Page 37 of 65
Some of the more hazardous flammable liquids that you may encounter in your work activities           are
(listed in approximate order of hazard):

        Aerosol cans**                                               Alcohol
        Gasoline                                                     Shellac
        Catalyst M.E.K. peroxide*                                    Japan dryer*
        Carburetor cleaner                                           Kerosene
        Acetone                                              Paint
        Lacquer and lacquer thinner                                  Resin (polyester)
        Adhering liquid (for silk-screen process)                    Stain and varnish
        Paint thinner                                                Danish Oil

        *These materials could accelerate spontaneous combustion or could react violently when mixed with
        organic material.

        **The hazard could vary greatly depending upon the propellant used in the can.


STORE AND HANDLE FLAMMABLE AND COMBUSTIBLE LIQUIDS SAFELY, AS FOLLOWS:


        1.      Be sure the exhaust fan or vents are operating in the storeroom or area in which flammable
                liquids are stored.

        2.      Draw out only as much as you need for your particular operation.

        3.      Dump waste or excess materials only in covered metal containers as directed by the
                supervisor. Care should be taken to avoid mixing liquids, the mixture of which causes a
                chemical reaction.

        4.      Use a funnel when pouring into a small container.

        5.      Clean up spills and drips immediately, disposing of the rags and waste materials as
                instructed.

        6.      Read and follow instructions for handling and mixing catalysts with resins or finishes.

        7.      Never pour catalysts back into the bottle.

        8.      Always add the catalyst to the resin, not the resin to the catalyst.

        9.      Never apply resin, paint, or other finishing material near areas used for cutting, welding,
                grinding, or other hot work.

        10.     Be sure that the working area is well ventilated.

        11.     Store thinners and solvents only in original purchase containers or approved safety
                containers.

        12.     All flammable materials should be stored in closed containers when not in use.

6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                              Page 38 of 65
       13.    Have storage cabinets distinctly marked "FLAMMABLE--KEEP FIRE AWAY."

       14.    Use only approved cleaning solutions.

       15.    Avoid contact of carbon--removing or paint--stripping compounds with your skin.

       16.    Keep the top of oil drums and the surrounding area clean and free of combustible materials.

       17.    Properly dispose of unwanted flammable liquids and combustible materials daily.

       18.    Use a solvent only after determining its properties, what kind of work it has to do, and how to
              use it.


ELECTRICAL SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS


       1.     Know where electrical circuit breakers are located for an emergency shutoff.

       2.     Keep electrical boxes closed.

       3.     Ground all portable and stationary power tools.

       4.     Keep hoses and electrical cords from becoming tripping hazards.

       5.     Do not use electric drills or other electrical apparatus while standing on wet floors.

       6.     Cords are to be disconnected when portable tools are not in use.

       7.     Check for frayed electrical cords.

       8.     Disconnect electrical power equipment before oiling, cleaning, or making adjustments.

       9.     Do not use extension cords for permanent connections.

       10.    Ground all motors, fuse boxes, switch boxes, and other electrical equipment.

       11.    Assume that an electrical apparatus is "hot" and treat it as such.

       12.    Use a test lamp or a suitable meter for testing a circuit.

       13.    Never turn on a switch unless you know what it operates.

       14.    Turn off power when replacing a fuse.

       15.    Locate and correct the fault that caused the circuit breaker to open or the fuse to blow
              before turning on the power.

       16.    Be sure a circuit is protected against an overload by a fuse or circuit breaker or correct
              circuit-carrying capacity.

6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                            Page 39 of 65
       17.    Make changes in the wiring of a circuit only when the power is turned off.

       18.    Select and use wire of the correct current-carrying capacity.




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                           Page 40 of 65
HOUSEKEEPING PRACTICES


       1.     Keep your workstation clean and orderly.

       2.     Keep passageways clear to allow easy movement while working and to allow for a rapid exit
              in case of an emergency.

       3.     Keep the floor clear of scraps and litter.

       4.     Keep desk, bench, and cabinet drawers and locker doors closed to avoid hazards while
              walking.

       5.     Wipe up any liquids spilled on the floor immediately; then apply oil-absorbing compound to
              the area.

       6.     Avoid storing or placing objects overhead, except where adequate storage space is
              provided.

       7.     Provide a nonskid surface for floors.

       8.     Sweep daily, and clean thoroughly periodically, all work areas.

       9.     Put stock away promptly after using it.

       10.    Ventilate shops properly. Uncontrolled vapors, mists, gas, and fumes can cause serious
              disorders.

       11.    Keep shop areas neat and orderly in appearance at all times. Cluttered or dirty shops are
              good sites for accidents. Neat and orderly shops help eliminate unsafe working conditions.

       12.    Maintain proper light levels in work areas. Sight is essential for safety. Keep windows, light
              bulbs, reflectors, and walls, bright but without glare. Replace burned out bulbs at once.

       13.    Daily remove all sawdust, shavings metal cuttings, and other waste materials.

       14.    Place all scrap stock in the designated containers.

       15.    Keep the work area orderly and clean with all tools and materials in their proper place.

       16.    Do not throw anything on the floor. Put it in the trashcan.

       17.    Keep all clean-up equipment in its proper place when not in use.




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                            Page 41 of 65
COMPONENTS OF AN EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PLAN

PURPOSE

       The purpose of the Emergency Preparedness Program is to ensure that the Division and each
       section develops a plan for the safe evacuation of all persons in the affected area and the rapid
       control of hazards during the life threatening situations.

OBJECTIVES

       1)      To prevent and control emergency situations.

       2)      To warn employees of actual or impending disasters and prepare them for possible
               evacuation.

       3)      To establish safe evacuation routes.

PROCEDURE

A.     GENERAL PLANS

       Each Section Head will be responsible for implementing the emergency response plan and
       securing essential equipment for an orderly emergency response.

       Employees must be prepared to effectively cope with the unique problems that an emergency
       situation presents. Every facility has an emergency preparedness plan to protect its employees
       and property against, fire, bomb threats, sabotage, and civil disorder.

       An emergency preparedness program requires the prompt recognition of a serious situation;
       availability of a well publicized, flexible, tested plan; and clear delineation of responsibilities.

       The Emergency Control team will initiate emergency shutdown procedures.

       Emergency equipment should be audited monthly. The alarm system should be tested monthly.
       Tests and emergency drills should be conducted regularly during all shifts.


       1.      Emergency Control Committee: This Committee shall consists of the DOA Appointing
               Authority, DOA Safety Coordinator, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, Deputy
               Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, Director of the Office of Telecommunications,
               Direction of Office of Information Services.

               a.      Disaster Communication
               b.      Facility Shutdown
               c.      Employee Evacuation
               d.      Utility Control
               e.      First Aid and Rescue
               f.      Damage Control
               g.      Notification of Police, Fire Department and Hospital.


6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                           Page 42 of 65
          A list of the names and titles of personnel involved in the emergency preparedness plan should be
compiled in each agency and facility. Upper management is responsible for staffing and implementing the
emergency control committee. The members' work and home phone numbers, as well as the estimated
travel time from home to work, should be noted.

        2.      Emergency Crews: A disaster control team, activated by an emergency alarm, should be
                organized for each facility or office. The team should always be available and should remain
                in action until the emergency is resolved. If the disaster-control team cannot handle the
                situation alone, the team leader should contact outside help.

                An efficient communication network is crucial during emergencies. Responsibilities, names,
                telephone numbers, and address of key people and their alternates should be available.

                A chart of the disaster-control team should be constructed, and individual members of the
                crew would be assigned specific duties.

        3.      Emergency Alarms: A distinctive, reliable emergency signal that is capable of being heard in
                all areas of the facility should be installed and tested monthly. All employees should know
                how to activate the alarm and know what actions to take upon hearing it. Emergency drills
                should be conducted regularly during all shifts.

                The Safety Manager should pay special attention to how quickly his or her section is
                evacuated when a drill is conducted. The Safety Manager should also use this opportunity
                to note the special problems and area where the plan is inadequate, so that he/she can take
                steps to correct problems before an actual emergency occurs.

        4.      Emergency First Aide: Some personnel at each facility should be trained in first aid
                techniques. If an injured person requires additional medical attention, employees should
                know how to send for an ambulance and notify a hospital of the nature of the injury.

        5.      Emergency Power System: Automatic emergency power supply systems should be installed
                in areas where uninterrupted electrical service is essential for the preservation of life and
                property, such as in areas where precise procedures are performed (control room or
                operating room) or in areas where sensitive equipment is located (instruments or supplies
                requiring refrigeration).

                There should also be a manual control switch to activate the emergency power if the
                automatic system should fail.

                Alternative power sources and equipment should be maintained and regularly tested to
                ensure that the system is capable of supplying service within the time limits required by the
                specific operations.

                Emergency power systems are tested monthly to determine reliability.




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                            Page 43 of 65
B.     Procedures for Handling Specific Emergency Situations

       1.     Fire Prevention and Control: Almost all fires are preventable, and control measures can limit
              the losses if a fire does occur. Fire prevention and control principles include the following:

              a.      Prevent a fire from starting by using fireproof construction materials, designing
                      facilities to isolate hazardous areas, controlling operations, using preventive
                      maintenance, and eliminating unsafe practices.

              b.      Promptly discover the fire and extinguish it before it grows out of control. Most fires
                      start small and can initially be extinguished by a hand-held fire extinguisher.

              c.      Limit the spread of fire. Provide suitable fire barriers and keep the amount of
                      combustibles stored to a minimum.

              d.      Maintain exit facilities.

       2.     The following components are essential to a fire safety and prevention program:

              a.      Alarm System:

                      Prompt discovery of a fire is vital. Fire sensing and alarm systems should be
                      reliable and should be designed for rapid discovery of a fire. An effective alarm
                      system must:

                               1)        Be reliable and distinctive,

                               2)        Reach those trained to respond,

                               3)        Compel immediate attention,

                               4)        Indicate the fire location,

                               5)        Warn building occupants and area residents.

              b.      Extinguishing Facilities and Equipment:

                      Fire protection must be incorporated into the building design to achieve maximum
                      effectiveness. Special processes presenting unique fire protection problems should
                      be handled individually by fire protection engineers and the Office of Risk
                      Management.

              c.      Water Supply:

                      Water is the most effective extinguishing agent for most fires. A reliable water
                      supply is essential and should be sufficient to fulfill the demand of the automatic
                      protection system for at least four hours. Water for fire fighting should be stored
                      separately from processed and domestic water.



6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                             Page 44 of 65
              d.      Distribution Systems:

                      Pumping equipment may be required to produce the water pressure demanded by
                      the fire fighting operations.

              e.      Monthly Fire Extinguisher Equipment Inspection and Maintenance:

                      The Office of State Buildings and Grounds building personnel should inspect, test,
                      and maintain all fire protection equipment such as pumps, hydrants, hose lines,
                      automatic equipment, and portable extinguisher. Equipment testing also provides
                      training opportunities for employees.


       2.     Civil Disorder:

              a.      Emergency Authority – Safety Manager/Supervisors may be given additional
                      authority during civil disorders.

              b.      Emergency Responsibilities - During emergencies, responsibility for areas
                      vulnerable to attack or necessary for operations should be assigned to specific
                      persons on a case-by-case basis. Responsibility for decisions in these particular
                      areas should be assigned to employees with knowledge of the area and who will be
                      present at the emergency.

              c.      Community Relations – The Deputy Commissioner, Amy Lowery has been
                      designated to communicate with the news media and the public. The public should
                      be informed of potential hazards as soon as possible.

              d.      Security - Strict security of the facility should remain in effect until the emergency is
                      over. Gates and doors should be closed and perimeter fences maintained. Entry
                      into the facility should be strictly controlled.

       3.     Natural Disasters:        The following are procedures for handling natural disasters such
                               as hurricanes, floods, or tornadoes:

              a.      Only enter disaster areas if it is essential.

              b.      Do not bring lanterns, torches, or lighted cigarettes into buildings that have been
                      flooded or damaged because of the possibility of leaking gas lines or flammable
                      materials.

              c.      Do not touch fallen or damaged electric wires.

              d.      Immediately leave the area upon discovering a leaking gas line.

              e.      Isolate people from potential hazards.

              f.      Identify the disconnecting switch or master controls valves for utility services, and
                      make them accessible.

       4.     Tornadoes:
6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                            Page 45 of 65
              When a tornado warning is issued, take shelter immediately. The warning indicates that a
              tornado has been sighted in the area. Protect yourself from falling objects and flying debris.
               The best protection is an underground shelter or ditch or a steel-framed or reinforced
              concrete building. If no shelter is available, go to the basement or inner hallway of the
              lowest floor of the building.

       5.     Bomb Threats:

              Every threat should be taken seriously.

              If a bomb threat is received by mail, message, or telephone, record in writing the time, and
              type of threat, location of bomb, expected time of detonation, if it is a male or female voice
              and any other important information. If the threat is received by phone, keep the person on
              the phone as long as possible to determine any unusual voice characteristics such as
              raspiness, hoarseness, or stuttering. Ask why the bomb was placed there and whom the
              caller wishes to hurt.

              Report a bomb threat to a Safety Manager or the DOA Safety Coordinator, who will contact
              the proper authorities. The phone number of the local bomb squad should be placed near
              each telephone.




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                           Page 46 of 65
PROCEDURES FOR SETTING UP A TRAINING PROGRAM


Safety Training for Employees

       The purpose of employee safety training is to establish a systematic method of teaching
       employees to perform the required tasks in a safe and efficient manner. There are four primary
       objectives in employee safety training:

       1.      To teach employees hazard recognition and methods of corrective action.

       2.      To involve employees in accident prevention.

       3.      To motivate employees to accept their safety responsibilities

       4.      To provide employees with information on accident causes, occupational health hazards,
               and accident prevention methods.


Training Topics:

                       Safety Program Objectives

                                Rights and responsibilities of the employee
                                Authority and responsibilities of the supervisor
                                Safety policy/rules
                                Accident and near miss accident reporting procedures
                                Job Safety Analysis
                                Accident experience and trends

                       Hazard Recognition and Control

                                Types of hazards
                                Preventive measures
                                Inspection procedures
                                Recording and reporting
                                Immediate temporary controls

                       Emergency First Aid Procedures

                                Recognizing first aid emergencies
                                Gaining control
                                Emergency care

                       Emergency Response Procedures

                                Alarm systems
                                Evacuation routes
                                Fire extinguisher training

6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                            Page 47 of 65
                       Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

                                What to use
                                When to use
                                Storage area
                                How to check, inspect and maintain PPE

                       Material Handling

                                High-risk jobs
                                Proper lifting
                                Proper carrying

                       Slips, Trips, and Falls

                                Recognizing potential problems
                                Minimizing exposure

                       Unsafe Environmental Conditions

                                Outside (heat, cold, winds, rain, hurricanes, tornadoes)
                                Inside (noise, dust, vapor, fumes)
                                Other (fire, bomb threats)

                       Good Housekeeping Practices

                                Tools and equipment
                                Vehicles
                                Yard

                       Work from Elevations/Use of Ladders

                                Preventing a fall
                                Falling safely

                       Safe Vehicle Operation

                       Pre-operational inspection
                       Control of common hazards
                       Rules of the road

       3.     Develop a lesson plan for each training session which should include the following:

              Title:   Clearly identifies the topic.

              Objectives:       States what the trainee should know or be able to do at the end of the
                                training period. A well-written objective limits the subject matter, is specific,
                                and stimulates thinking on the subject.

              Estimated time of Instruction: States the length of the training session. Ample time
                                             should be allowed to thoroughly cover the subject.
6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                             Page 48 of 65
               Materials

               State the materials to be used in training including equipment, tools, charts, slides, films, etc.

               What the Instructor will do:

                       Gives the plan of action. Indicates the method of teaching
                       (lecture, demonstration, class discussion, etc.). Provides directions for instructor
                       (show chart, write key words on chalkboards, etc.)

               What the employee will do:

                       Indicates how employees will apply the material in the training session.

               Evaluation:

                       Establishes an assessment method (test, discussion, demonstration) for
                       determining whether the training objectives are achieved.

               Assignment:

                       Provides employees an opportunity to apply the material on the job.


Safety Training for Supervisors

       The immediate job of preventing accidents and controlling work hazards falls upon the Section
       Safety Manager because safety and production are part of the same supervisory function. Some
       objectives of safety training for supervisors are as follows:

       1.      To involve Section Safety Managers in the Division's accident prevention program.

       2.      To establish the Section Safety Manager as the key safety person in each unit.

       3.      To help Section Safety Managers understand their safety responsibilities.

       4.      To provide Section Safety Managers with information on causes of accidents and
               occupational health hazards and methods of prevention.

       5.      To help Section Safety Managers gain skill in accident prevention activities.




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                              Page 49 of 65
FIRST AID POLICY

PURPOSE

The purpose of this First Aid Policy is to have a first aid program, which provides a trained first       aid
person at each job. This policy covers all facilities and crews.

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this First Aid Policy is to provide emergency care, to prevent death or further injury, to relieve
pain, and to counteract shock for an injured or ill person until medical help can be obtained.


PROCEDURE

The Division’s First Aid Policy provides a systematic approach to the administration and recording of first aid.
A list with emergency telephone numbers should be posted throughout the building.

The following First Aid Outline shall be posted in all work areas.

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIRST AID

        1.       All employees must report any injury to his supervisor as soon as practical, at least before
                 the end of the shift during which the accident occurred.

        2.       A qualified person will treat minor injuries and, if medically possible, the employee will be
                 returned to work. The employee must sign a statement that the injury was the result of an
                 on-the-job accident. An Accident/Incident Report Form DA 2000 Rev 8/12/99 should be
                 included with the statement.

        3.       If a physician is needed, the employee will be given authorization for treatment by the Office
                 of Worker’s Compensation (342-8521), which will be given to the treating physician.

        4.       The employee will provide his supervisor with the treating physician's written diagnosis of the
                 injury and the length of time he/she is expected to be unable to work.

        5.       Injuries involving lost time and medical claims should be reported to the Office of Risk
                 Management.


FIRST AID TRAINING

        Only someone who has completed a certified first aid or emergency response course or someone
        who has advanced medical training may administer first aid. Refresher training is required according
        to certification requirements.

        The Division of Administration will maintain a file of trained first aid attendants.



FIRST AID LOG
6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                                Page 50 of 65
        The First Aid Log (FA-1-86) will be maintained by each facility that provides first aid care. The logs
        should be maintained for at least five years. (What is this and where do we get one?)


FIRST AID KIT AND INVENTORY FORMS

        A first aid supply kit will be issued to and maintained by a trained first aid attendant. A supply and
        reorder form should be included in each first aid box. Dates of inventory counting and reordering
        should be recorded.

EMPLOYEE GUIDELINES

        1.      Calmly and coherently report all injuries and near miss accidents immediately to a
                supervisor.

        2.      Do not treat an injury yourself. Get advice from a trained first aid attendant.

        3.      Unless a victim is exposed to further danger at the accident site, do not move him/her until
                the full extent of the injury is known first aid had been given, and emergency transport
                assistance has arrived.

        4.      Do not attempt to perform regular job functions if abilities have been impaired by an injury.

        5.      Report any sickness to your immediate supervisor.


FIRST AID OUTLINE


                                     CERTIFIED EMPLOYEES ONLY


        First aid is immediate care given to a person who has been injured or who has suddenly become ill.
 When properly administered, first aid can mean the difference between life and death, between a temporary
and a permanent disability or between rapid recovery and long hospitalization. This outline is designed to
make employees aware of first aid procedures. It is not a complete first aid guide. First aid attendants
should refer to Red Cross First Aid Guides and other sources of current information for administering
complicated procedures such as CPR.

        The following are some of the most common first aid procedures:

NOTE:           The First Aid Attendant(s) should be trained in CPR and by the Red Cross or equivalent.
                The American Red Cross CPR certificate is good for one-year (1) and the Standard First Aid
                Certificate is good for three (3) years.

        Before a person trained in first aid begins to a victim he/she should make a reasonable attempt to
get consent to an offer of help for the victim. You should also make a reasonable attempt to get consent
from the parent or guardian of a victim who is a minor or who is mentally or emotionally disturbed.


6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                              Page 51 of 65
       Always use the emergency action principles:

               1.       Survey the scene.

                        Remember: Is it safe? Stay clear of danger.

               2.       Do a primary survey of the victim.

                        Ask victim " Are you okay?"

                        Monitor: A-airway
                                         B - breathing
                                         C -circulation


               3.       Phone 911 the emergency medical services (EMS) system for help.

               4.       Do a secondary survey of the victim.


ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION

       Artificial Respiration is the process of causing air to flow into and out of a person's lungs when
       natural breathing ceases.


               1.       Causes of respiratory failure

                    A. Anatomic obstruction (tongue drops back and obstructs throat, asthma, swelling
                       caused by injury)

                    B. Mechanical obstruction (foreign object, fluid accumulation, vomit)
                    C. Air depleted of oxygen or containing toxic gas

                    D. Electrocution

                    E. Drowning

                    F. Shock

               2.       The normal breathing process

                        A. Inhalation (chest expands, air flows in)

                        B. Exhalation (chest returns to normal size, pressure increases and air flows out)

                        C. Approximate rate for an adult -- 12 to 15 times a minute or every 4 to 5
                           seconds.

               3.       Mouth to mouth breathing procedure

6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                            Page 52 of 65
                         A. The procedure must begin within four minutes after the blood supply is cut off.

                         B. The objective is to open the airway and restore breathing.

                         C. Procedure


                                  i.       Determine consciousness by asking, "Are you okay?"

                                  ii.      Tilt head back

                                  iii.     Look at victim's chest. Listen and feel for air being exhaled.

                                  iv.      Pinch nostrils shut.

                                  v.       Take a deep breath.

                                  vi.      Seal your mouth around victim's mouth.

                                  vii.     Blow two quick, full breaths into victim's
                                                            mouth.

                                  viii.    Check for pulse. If there is a pulse, give breath every five seconds.
                                           If there is no pulse, start CPR. (See First Aid Guide)


                         D.       Continue procedure until victim breathes on his own or until medical help
                                  arrives.

                         E.       How to remember: "A Quick Check"

                                  A - Airway, tip the head and check for breathing
                                  Quick -- Give four quick, full breaths
                                  Check -- Check for pulse and breathing

BLEEDING CONTROL

         Different methods are recommended to control bleeding depending upon the source of blood and
severity of the wound. IN ALL CASES, APROACH THE VICTIM AS IF HE/SHE WAS CONTAGIOUS AND
USE THE APPROPRIATE PERSONAL PROTECTION EQUIPMNT, IN PARTICULAR, LATEX GLOVES.


       1.        Identify source of bleeding

            A.   Bleeding from artery -- blood spurts and pulsates and is bright red.

            B.   Bleeding from vein -- blood flows in a steady stream and is dark red.

            C.   Bleeding from capillaries -- blood oozes. (Since blood loss will be small, there is little cause
                 for alarm.)

6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                               Page 53 of 65
        2.        Methods for controlling bleeding

             A. Direct pressure

                  1.         Don't waste time.

                  2.         Place sterile pad over wound and press firmly. If no pad is available, use your hand
                             directly.

                  3.         If blood soaks through pad, do not remove it. Add another one.

                  4.         Make sure the pressure applied does not interfere with normal circulation.

             B.   Elevation

                  Raise injury above the level of the victim's heart unless there is evidence of a fracture.

             C.   Pressure points (indirect pressure)

                  i.         When direct pressure on the wound and elevation is not enough to stop bleeding,
                             put additional pressure on the affected blood vessel.

                  ii.        Blood vessels are like soft rubber tubing; they may be squeezed shut. The vessel
                             passes close to the skin over a bony structure at a pressure point. Squeeze the
                             vessel against the bone.


                        a)   The brachial artery is located midway between the armpit and the elbow.      Use
                             the inside surfaces of the fingers to squeeze it against the bone.

                        b)   The femoral artery is located against the pelvic bone. Place the victim on his back
                             and press with the heel of your hand holding your arm straight.

SHOCK

        Shock is a depressed state of many vital body functions.

        1.        Causes of shock

                  A.         Severe injuries of all types.

                  B.         Lack of oxygen.

                  C.         Pain, rough handling, and delay in treatment.

        2.        Signs of shock

                  A.         Pale, cold, clammy skin

                  B.         Weakness and apathy

6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                                  Page 54 of 65
              C.         Rapid and faint pulse.

              D.         Increased rate of breathing

              E.         Dilated pupils


       3.     Treatment

              A.         Keep victims lying down to improve the blood circulation.

              B.         Cover the victim only enough to prevent him from losing body heat.

              C.         Raise victim's feet.


CHOKING

       Choking can be caused when any foreign particle becomes lodged in a victim's windpipe.
Swallowing unchewed food is a primary cause. Drinking alcoholic beverages can aggravate a choking
problem because the victim's sensations are diminished.

       1.     Signs of choking

              A.         Attempting inhalation

              B.         Face turning blue

              C.         No breathing

              D.         Unconsciousness

       2.     What to do when the victim is conscious?

              A.         Encourage coughing.

              B.         Use abdominal thrust.

                   i.    Place the side of your fist in the middle of the victim's abdomen between the waist
                                 and the rib cage.

                   ii.   Place your other hand on top of your fist and quickly press inward and upward.

                         iii.    Repeat as often as needed if the victim remains conscious.


       3.     What to do if the victim is unconscious?

              A.         Tip the head and check for breathing.

              B.         Try to give breaths if air will go into the lungs. Give TWO quick breaths and
6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                                Page 55 of 65
                       continue mouth-to-mouth breathing.

               C.      Check pulse and breathing.

               D.      If air will not go into lungs, re-tip head and try again.

               E.      If air will still not go into lungs, attempt the following:

                       i.       Roll victim toward you and do four back blows.

                       ii.      Kneel astride or alongside victim and do four abdominal thrusts.

                       iii.     Grasp the victim's tongue and lower jaw and use index finger to sweep his
                                mouth.

                       iv.      Try again to give breaths.

                       v.       If unsuccessful, repeat entire procedure.


HEAT ILLNESSES

       Heat stroke is a response to heat caused by extremely high body temperature and a disturbance of
       the sweating mechanism.

       1.      Signs of heat stroke

               A.      Body temperature is high.

               B.      Skin is dry (no sweating).

               C.      Victim has a rapid and strong pulse.

       2.      What to do

               A.      Cool the body quickly.

               B.      Do not give stimulants.


       Heat cramps are a response to heat involving muscular pains and spasm largely due to the loss
       of salt.


       Signs of heat cramps

       Cramps of the muscles in the legs and abdomen. What to do:

               A.      Gently message the pain.

               B.      Replace lost body fluids.
6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                              Page 56 of 65
       Heat exhaustion is a response to heat characterized by fatigue, weakness, and collapse.

       1.      Signs of heat exhaustion

               A.      Approximately normal body temperature

               B.      Pale and clammy skin

               C.      Profuse perspiration

               D.      Tiredness

               E.      Nausea

       2.      What to do

               A.      Replace lost body fluids.

               B.      Have the victim lie down.

               C.      Loosen the victim's clothing.

               D.      Apply cool wet cloths.



POISONING

       Poisonous substances may enter the body through the mouth, by absorption, by inhalation and
       by injection. For specific treatments, consult first aid guide or product label.

       Contact with poisonous plants can cause headaches, fever, itching, and rashes. The reaction
       may appear from within a few hours to 48 hours after contact.

       Treatment is as follows:

       1.      Remove contaminated clothing.

       2.      Wash all exposed areas.

       3.      Seek medical advice if reaction is severe.


INSECT BITES

       Apply cold compresses to minor bites.

       For severe reactions, the following treatment may be necessary:

6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                              Page 57 of 65
        1.      Administer artificial respiration if needed.

        2.      Keep the affected part of the body lower than the rest of the body.


CHEMICAL BURNS

You should keep flushing a chemical burn with water until EMS arrives and provides further care.

Remove any affected clothing and/or jewelry.

Check for shock:

        Monitor: A- Airway
                         B- Breathing
                         C- Circulation




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                               Page 58 of 65
LIST OF REQUIRED RECORDS

The following safety records should be kept by the Division for a least one-year. Copies of forms are
included with exhibits describing the specific procedures as noted.

Safety Inspection Report

Completed monthly/quarterly in each work unit following a general safety inspection. The completed form is
retained in the area it covers for at least two years. Copies should be made available to the DOA Safety
Coordinator, as well as, Section Heads and the Office of Risk Management's Unit of Risk Analysis and Loss
Prevention upon request.

Hazard Control Log:

Completed monthly to identify potential hazards in each work unit. The original form stays in the area it
covers for at least two years or until the hazard has been corrected. Copies are sent to the DOA Safety
Coordinator each quarter along with other quarterly reports. Potential hazards, which are not corrected in 30
days, should be reported to the Section Head and DOA Safety Coordinator. Copies must be made available
to the Office of Risk Management's Unit of Risk Analysis and Loss Prevention upon request.

Employer's Report of Occupational Injury, Illness or Disease:

Completed for each accident requiring medical treatment. The reports are filed by year of occurrence in a
Division central file. Agencies must implement a method for recording and filing reports of accidents that
result in time lost from work (missing a full workday after the day of injury). Employees must have written
authorization from treating physician to return to work following such an injury. See Sample Procedure for
Accident Investigation.


Incident/Accident Reporting Form:

Complete for each incident or near miss which occurs that does not require medical expense or lost time. A
copy should be given to the DOA Safety Coordinator and a copy sent to the Office of Risk Management, Unit
of Risk Analysis and Loss Prevention.
.

Job Safety Analysis:

Completed by supervisors in each work unit. Supervisors are expected to perform at least one Job Safety
Analysis each month. Job Safety Analysis forms are kept in a notebook in the originating area. The
documents should be readily accessible to employees and there should be an index naming the task and the
date the Job Safety Analysis was completed or revised. See Sample Procedures for Accident Investigation.

Safety Meeting Report:

Completed monthly in each unit following safety meeting and maintained in the operating area for two years.
Copies should be sent to the DOA Safety Coordinator and/or section head. Record should contain
signatures of employees who actually attended the safety meeting and/or signatures of employees who were
unable to attend the meeting. Those who were unable to attend a Safety Meeting should indicate by their
signature that “they have received and read the materials”.

6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                             Page 59 of 65
Training Documentation:

Completed following training sessions and maintained in the operating area for two years. See Procedures
for Setting Up Training Program.

First Aid Log:

Completed whenever first aid is administered. The log is maintained at the work site for at least five years.
See First Aid Requirements.




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                             Page 60 of 65
                              LOSS PREVENTION AUDIT PROGRAM




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                           Page 61 of 65
COMPONENTS OF THE LOSS PREVENTION AUDIT PROGRAM


Procedures for Audit

Procedures for Audit Scheduling

Audit Benefits

Appeal of Audit Findings

Safety Audit Forms



                                         LOSS PREVENTION AUDIT


PROCEDURES FOR AUDIT

         The Office of Risk Management, Unit of Risk Analysis and Loss Prevention will perform periodic
audits within each section of the Division of Administration. These audits will be used to determine if a
particular section and its subordinate units are in compliance with existing statutes and the state loss
prevention program. When a section and its subordinate units are determined to be in compliance by the
Unit of Risk Analysis and Loss Prevention, it will receive a five-percent (5%) credit of insurance premium to
include subordinates for the following fiscal year.

         A copy of the current audit report form is attached. These audit forms will be used for self-auditing
by the Division and its sections, on an annual basis. The purpose of these self-audits is to insure all of the
sections within the Division are in compliance with the State Loss Prevention Program and published rules.
Completed copies of these forms shall be on record with the DOA Safety Coordinator and each for inspection
by the Unit of Risk Analysis and Loss Prevention. Self-audits shall be completed no later than January 15, of
each year. Departments and/or its subordinates may request assistance in complying with the regulations by
writing to the Office of Risk Management, Unit of Risk Analysis and Loss Prevention, P.O. Box 94095, Baton
Rouge, Louisiana 70804-0995 or by calling (504) 342-8415/LINC 427-8415.

        An audit team will be established to include, but not limited to the Department and Subordinate
Representative, and representatives from the Office of Risk Management, Unit of Risk Analysis and Loss
Prevention. Other team members may be included such as the Fire Marshal, Health Officers, and etc.

PROCEDURE FOR AUDIT SCHEDULING:

         The Office of Risk Management, Unit of Risk Analysis and Loss Prevention will schedule random
audits by departments. The Department Head upon receiving notice of the coming audit, will establish the
audit team and provide a list of the team to the Office of Risk Management, Unit of Risk Analysis and Loss
Prevention within fifteen (15) working days from the date of the formal notice of audit. The audit will begin
upon and under the direction of the Unit of Risk Analysis and Loss Prevention will be assigned the
responsibility of conducting the audit. Upon concluding the audit, the audit team will discuss its findings with
the Department Head or his/her designee during an exit briefing.

        If the department or its subordinates do not attain a certification in the audit, it may correct the
6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                              Page 62 of 65
deficiencies and request a re-audit. Department management must request a re-audit in writing no later than
April 1 of each year.

         The findings during this check will be reported and discussed with the Department Head or his/her
designee at the time such check was conducted. This will allow the department and/or subordinate heads to
take corrective action prior to the loss of certification.

APPEAL OF AUDIT FINDINGS

         If department management disagrees with the assessment of the State Loss Prevention Officer, it
may file a written appeal with the Unit of Risk Analysis and Loss Prevention. Appeals must be received by
May 1 of each year. The State Loss Prevention Supervisor/Manager will audit the area in question and
attempt to resolve any differences.

         If the State Loss Prevention Supervisor/Manager determines that the department and/or its
subordinates are not in compliance, the department head will be notified in writing of this finding. The
department head may make a final appeal in writing to the Director of the Office of Risk Management. This
appeal must be submitted by June 1. A conference will be scheduled in the Baton Rouge Headquarters of
the Office of Risk Management with representatives from the department, its subordinates and the Unit of
Risk Analysis and Loss Prevention. The Director of the Office of Risk Management shall submit a final
written decision to the department head and the Unit of Risk Analysis and Loss Prevention by July 1.

SAFETY AUDIT FORMS

          The following Loss Prevention Audit forms will be used to certify agencies for discounts in   specific
lines of insurance coverage.

                 1.       General Safety Audit:

                                  Worker's Compensation
                                  Comprehensive General Liability
                                  Blanket Property
                                  Maritime
                                  Road Hazard Liability

                 2.       Driver Safety Program Audit:

                                  Automobile Liability
                                  Automobile Collision
                                  Automobile Comprehensive

                 3.       Boiler/Machinery and Loss Prevention Maintenance Program Audit:

                                  Boiler and machinery coverage




                 4.       Bonds & Crime Safety Audit:

                                  Bonds
6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                               Page 63 of 65
                              Crime


              5.      Water Vessel Safety Audit:

                              Wet Marine Liability
                              Marine Comprehensive/Collision

              6.      Aviation Safety Audit: (If applicable)

                              Aviation Liability
                              Aviation Comprehensive/Collision




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                           Page 64 of 65
                              REPORTING FORMS




6bc470c5-b8e8-4b11-8d1f-1b08cf5d72d1.doc
Revised April 2001

                                           Page 65 of 65

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Insurance Louisiana Daily Claims Jobs document sample