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					         Dr. Doug Harris


     District Director Position


             Portfolio


Berryville Public School District 27
                               From the desk of …      Doug Harris


To Whom It May Concern:

This portfolio represents my areas of assignment and supervision for the two years that I have served the
Berryville Public School as District Director. A job description is found on page 16. My qualifications for
the position are found in the pages of this portfolio under each area of my job title and supported in my
professional vita listed first in the appendices of this portfolio after page 18. I have also included my
certifications and my diplomas earned in the appendices. The three areas of my responsibility are federal
programs, information services, and external funding such as grants. I have enjoyed the past two years and
think that I have been a great asset to the Berryville District. The facts contained in the following pages
provide evidence that the Berryville District is much richer today in many ways due to my presence and
influence. It is my desire to continue to be a part of a progressive effort that is focused on student success.
After 17 years in the private sector, I chose to join the public education arena in 1995 full-time and to give
the leaders of tomorrow the benefit of my years of experience and my thirst for learning.
That thirst continues today.




Thank you.




Dr. J. Doug Harris




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Table of Contents
Federal Programs ............................................................................................................................................. 4

  No Child Left Behind Law ............................................................................................................................. 4
  Title I, Part A .................................................................................................................................................. 4
  Title II-A ......................................................................................................................................................... 5
  Title II-D ......................................................................................................................................................... 6
  Title IV-A ....................................................................................................................................................... 6
  Title V ............................................................................................................................................................. 6
  Title VI- High Poverty.................................................................................................................................... 7
  Perkins Program ............................................................................................................................................. 7
  Classroom Size Reduction .............................................................................................................................. 7
  Eisenhower ..................................................................................................................................................... 8
  Workforce/Vocational Education Coordinator............................................................................................... 8
  Workforce Special Equipment Funding Coordinator ..................................................................................... 8
  ACSIP ............................................................................................................................................................. 8
Information Services ...................................................................................................................................... 10

  Bobcat Sign on Highway 62 ......................................................................................................................... 10
  Technology Department ............................................................................................................................... 10
  Technology Plan ........................................................................................................................................... 10
  Computer Leasing ........................................................................................................................................ 11
  Email and Web Servers ................................................................................................................................ 11
  Web Page Updates ........................................................................................................................................ 11
         ACT 1747 information ..................................................................................................................... 11
         PPC Minutes ..................................................................................................................................... 12
         Calendar Updates.............................................................................................................................. 12
  District Professional Development ............................................................................................................... 12
  District-wide Inventory Control ................................................................................................................... 12
  Voice and Data Communication Systems .................................................................................................... 13
  Food Service Expansion ............................................................................................................................... 13
External Funding: Grants Written Since 1997- Over $500,000.00 ............................................................ 14

  E-rate Program.............................................................................................................................................. 14
  Community First Bank ................................................................................................................................. 14
  Math & Science Lab ..................................................................................................................................... 14
  Walton Foundation ....................................................................................................................................... 14
  T & I Microcomputer Systems Technology Lab .......................................................................................... 15
  Business Technology Lab............................................................................................................................. 15
  Technology Literacy Challenge Fund, Computers for Classrooms ............................................................. 15
  Cash Donations ............................................................................................................................................. 15
  Non-cash Donations ..................................................................................................................................... 15
  Volunteers..................................................................................................................................................... 15
POSITION TITLE / DESCRIPTION:                                 DISTRICT DIRECTOR ........................................................ 16

Appendices ...................................................................................................................................................... 18


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                                               Federal Programs

No Child Left Behind Law

On January 8, 2002, President Bush signed the No Child Left Behind Act into law. The NCLB will impact
elementary and secondary education more than any other law that has ever been enacted. For example, under
Section 1119 (a) (1), the law states that “each local educational agency receiving assistance under this part
shall ensure that all teachers hired after such day and teaching in a program supported with funds under this
part are highly qualified”. Since Berryville LEA receives funds under title programs, this statement means
that the district cannot hire any teacher to teach anywhere in the district after January 8, 2002, that is not
fully certified to teach that position. The law also states that every teacher employed by the district prior to
January 8, 2002, must be highly qualified no later than the end of the 2005-2006 school year. The law
defines a highly qualified teacher as one who holds a “minimum of a bachelor’s degree, has obtained full
state certification, and has demonstrated subject area competence in each of the academic subjects in which
the teacher teaches”. This competency is indicated by a test score in a state-recognized area test. It is vital to
the success of every child in every school district that the District both understands and adheres to this
diverse law. My position in Federal programs assures Berryville District that a well-informed local
administrator continually monitors both daily guidance from the federal side and daily compliance from the
district side. According to U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige, “the new law will give states more
flexibility on how they spend their education dollars. In return, it requires them to set standards for student
achievement, and hold students, teachers and other educators accountable for results”. These standards, after
being established by each state, are then given to each school district to achieve and to maintain. Under this
law, school districts are held accountable in a manner never before seen in U.S. education history. Areas
such as testing, reading, math, teacher professional development, curriculum assessment, and schools that
work are all integrated into this new law. It is the responsibility of each school district to provide safer
schools, greater learning environments, and more choice for students while meeting adequate yearly progress
in reaching the goal of all students learning at a proficient level. The actual law, PL 107-110, is 670 pages
long. The summary guidance for that law is 181 pages long. It is my job to study these documents and
current guidance on each section as it is published and to interpret and implement this law for the District. In
addition to the federal laws, the state has contact people in each area of federal funding that I interact with to
maximize benefit for our district.

Title I, Part A

The Berryville District has two employees acting as Title 1 supervisors over a program that will expend
almost $334,748.00 in federal funds during the 2002-2003 year. The Assistant Elementary Principal is the
educational component supervisor and I act as financial supervisor for Title 1. According to Title 1 guidance,
“Title I, Part A, is intended to help ensure that all children have the opportunity to obtain a high-quality
education and reach proficiency on challenging state academic standards and assessments”. This title is the
largest financial program supporting elementary and secondary education currently in place. Our district
qualifies each year according to its poverty index as established by the free and reduced lunch rate. Districts
with a minimum of 50% poverty indexes receive 73% of this money. According to Title 1 guidance,
”flexible funding that may be used to provide additional instructional staff, professional development,
extended-time programs, and other strategies for raising student achievement in high-poverty schools. The



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program focuses on promoting schoolwide reform in high-poverty schools and ensuring students' access to
scientifically based instructional strategies and challenging academic content. Title I provisions provide a
mechanism for holding states, school districts, and schools accountable for improving the academic
achievement of all students and turning around low-performing schools, while providing alternatives to
students in such schools to enable those students to receive a high-quality education”. It is the responsibility
of the district to apply for and maintain finances according to rules of federal accountability. In our district,
the Assistant Elementary Principal and I work constantly together in maintaining a program that conforms to
federal law in every manner. This effort includes the current self-study to take the program from target-
assisted status to school-wide. I act as contact person for the district and liaison with state and federal
program representatives. While Title 1, Part A, is a formula grant, it is not “free” money. My job is to
manage and to maintain compliance to insure that our district receives the maximum benefit. Included in the
requirements for our district to use this money are research-based educational practices, measurable
objectives, “highly-qualified” teachers, increased paraprofessional qualifications, meeting educational
adequate yearly progress, providing tutoring for children in need, and empowering parents through increased
notification and involvement. I manage record control and audit of all Title 1 inventory. The Berryville
method of using a central administrator and a principal as a team to manage this title program has been
applauded by state managers as an effective strategy to properly administer Title 1 and its integration into the
Arkansas Consolidated School Improvement Plan (ACSIP). I am in constant contact with state
representatives to assure local compliance and act as a resource to all the principals in the district. The
District Treasurer provides the data for the quarterly and annual reports which I generate and then she
submits to Little Rock.

Title II-A

The guidance states that Title II-A funds must be used to increase “student achievement by elevating teacher
and principal quality through recruitment, hiring, and retention strategies. The program uses scientifically
based professional development interventions and holds districts and schools accountable for improvements
in student academic performance”. This program allows for a wide array of interventions to be funded but
must conform to the components of increasing student performance. This program provided $88,400.00 for
the 2002-2003 school year and was used to pay the salaries of 3 teachers as well as support some
professional development for several teachers. Last year’s Eisenhower audit (see appendices) gives some
idea of how these funds are used to support our district’s attempt to provide professional development.
Under this title, the district is required to have all teachers “highly-qualified” by the 2005-2006 school year.
According to the guidance, “a "highly qualified teacher" is a teacher with full certification, a bachelor's
degree, and demonstrated competence in subject knowledge and teaching skills. See Section 9101(23) of the
ESEA for the complete definition of a highly qualified teacher”. It is this title that requires a school
improvement plan that drives Arkansas’ ACSIP. Each school is required to align curriculum with state
standards, coordinate professional development, develop measurable objectives to monitor progress, assure
that all instructional staff are “highly-qualified”, and incorporate all these components into a living document
at each school level that meets the requirements of ACSIP. The continuing involvement of each building
principal is key in compliance to both state and federal standards. An annual financial report will be required
under this program to assure that all funds were expended according to our ACSIP interventions and actions.




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Title II-D

This program is new this year and provides $8,404.00 to the district. A portion of the funds are used for
professional development activities that enhance the technology skills of instructional staff while the
remaining portion is used to supplement our technology program. The district qualified for this program due
to a 22% poverty rate. Title II-D’s primary role is to “improve student academic achievement through the use
of technology in elementary and secondary schools”. To accomplish this goal, districts must have technology
plans that incorporate technology into curricular areas that enhance student awareness and performance.
Schools can improve “student academic achievement through the use of technology in schools by supporting
high-quality professional development; increased access to technology and the Internet; the integration of
technology into curricula; and the use of technology for promoting parental involvement and managing data
for informed decision-making”. This program also issued a Request for Proposal (RFP) for Arkansas schools
under the title “Enhancing Education Through Technology” (EETT) on March 24, 2003. The guidelines for
application in Arkansas were high-poverty districts with poverty level at or above 24.1%. Berryville, at 22%
poverty level, does not qualify for this portion of the grant program.

Title IV-A

This title program is the old Safe and Drug-free program. The guidance states that “the Safe and Drug-Free
Schools and Communities Act supports programs to prevent violence in and around schools; prevent the
illegal use of alcohol, drugs, and tobacco by young people; and foster a safe and drug-free environment that
supports academic achievement”. My involvement in this program has been to support the coordinator prior
to this year. This program is one that must be incorporated into the ACSIP so I became more directly
involved beginning with the 2002-2003 year. This program generates $10,500.00 to the district during the
2002-2003 year in areas that must be included in ACSIP and approved first by the District’s federal program
ACSIP advisor, then by the Title IV-A people in Little Rock. Several forms have been submitted to the Title
IV-A people in addition to the latest ACSIP submission and final approval is pending. The District is in
“substantial compliance” with the federal guidelines and should receive final approval for the money prior to
June 30, 2003, for the 2002-2003 year. A teacher continues to coordinate the program while I provide local
verification for activities, process the paperwork, provide local support, and maintain records required under
the new standards.

Title V

This program is basically an expanded version of the old Title 6 program. The federal guidance states that
this money must be used to “assist local education reform efforts that are consistent with and support
statewide reform” while providing a “continuing source of innovation and educational improvement, and
supporting programs that improve school, student, and teacher performance”. Funds are allocated by formula
but are not issued until a district reaches “substantial compliance” which means that district has met all the
requirements under the NCLB law and the ACSIP process. Under this program, the district is required to
develop interventions and actions that use this money to support allowable improvement activities. These
actions must be research-based and used by any school receiving Title V money. This title program provided
$9,650.00 to the district during the 2002-2003 year.




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Title VI- High Poverty

This program provides money to districts that are identified based on poverty level and district location.
Berryville District qualified for this money due to a 22% poverty rate (had to be over 20%) and the fact that
the district was designated rural. Title VI is known as the flexibility and accountability program. The funds
allotted could be used in any federally-funded area. The district’s allotment was $34,820.00 and was used in
all schools to provide library materials, Second Step materials, LEP programs, BASE programs, and after-
school tutoring programs. Each area was included in the different schools’ ACSIP and then approved first by
the ACSIP program advisor and then by the Title VI person in Little Rock. On January 13, 2003, we
received initial approval on our Title VI ACSIP plan interventions and actions that used this money. An
annual financial report will be due under this program. This title was funded for one year only and it is
unclear if any additional funds will be available to any district under this title in subsequent years.

Perkins Program

Now in its second year under local supervision, this program provides $29,108.00 for the Vocational
Program of the district. Prior to the district acting alone on this program, this program was administered as
part of a consortium through the OUR Service Coop. The district’s inquiry revealed that much of the
allotment was not directly benefiting the Berryville District so the decision was made to bring this program
into the district and administer it locally. The funds are used to purchase technology equipment for the
vocational and workforce programs, provide professional development opportunities for vocational teachers,
support the Career Action Planning (CAP) program of the district, support to guidance and counseling,
purchase software to improve students’ test-taking skills and to allow students career exploration, and
support administrative functions (limited to 5% of the total funds). I first conduct 2 or 3 meetings with all the
vocational faculty and involved administration to determine areas of concern and need using both their input
and the results of site visits made to the school (made every 2 years, the last one conducted in January 2002).
Using these and other data sources, a plan is formulated for the projected funds. Next I write a proposal that
incorporates input from the faculty and administration that meets the criteria of both that year’s program and
site visit recommendations and critical elements. That proposal is submitted for approval. I then work with
the Arkansas Department of Workforce Education on any items that are rejected and adjustments that are
required to assure approval. After the proposal is accepted, approved, and the funds are received, I submit
expenditure requests for the Superintendent’s approval. With the support of other Central Office staff, I
monitor expenditures throughout the year and, finally, submit a yearly expenditure report for approval. No
funds are allotted until the yearly expenditure report is reconciled and approved by WFE. All equipment
purchased under this program must be inventoried and tagged separately to continue compliance with the
program’s regulations. This program was a separate submission from ACSIP this year but will be a required
component in the near future.

Classroom Size Reduction

The district has received funds totaling $115,934.00 during the past 3 years through this program and used
the funds for teachers’ salaries and for professional development. The process included making a proposal
under guidelines that examined and included current class sizes, number of teachers by grades, number of
teachers by buildings, and then a compliance statement that we do not exceed state standards for student-to-
teacher ratios. This process involved several days of work and processing. Annual financial reports (AFR)
were required as well as site visits from a program advisor for audit purposes. This program no longer exists



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in this form since these funds are now included under the Title II-A program as one of the 27 funded areas.
However, the AFR and site audit visits continue to be a requirement of compliance to receive funds under the
new program.

Eisenhower

This program was part of a consortium prior to my position creation. We administered this program locally
until it was closed out on receipt of final program review on March 12, 2003. The program provided
$10,296.00 for the district during the 2001-2002 year and was used for professional development, tuition
fees, materials and supplies, and administrative reimbursement. The application process was quite involved
and required several days to complete. The final program closeout evaluation report was 27 pages long and
itemized each expenditure made under this program including detailed descriptions of each inservice or
professional development item. This report included an extensive narrative detailing our indicators of
success under the Eisenhower Professional Development Program (see example included with this portfolio).
These funds were included under Title II-A under the new NCLB law beginning with the 2002-2003 year
and will be audited under this new program.

Workforce/Vocational Education Coordinator

Many school districts appoint, usually for one period each day, a vocational teacher the duty of coordinating
the vocational program and its compliance to state regulations. However, my position in the Berryville
District was the perfect choice for this task. Since the Perkins program is so intimately tied to the vocational
and workforce courses in this district, it was a positive move to bring this role under my supervision. I work
will all the administration and vocational teachers to keep current the curriculum frameworks, identify
students who are completers of programs of study, follow those students into post-secondary life, identify
and report placement status for program completers, and assist teachers in new on-line testing issues for all
vocational courses. I am a resource for all the vocational and workforce teachers in areas of curriculum,
technology, and programs both during meetings and throughout the year. These teachers also work closely
with the technology department since many have full computer labs as part of their teaching assignments.
The vocational and workforce programs must meet state-mandated standards, updated yearly, so another
aspect of my responsibility is one of an information source to these teachers.

Workforce Special Equipment Funding Coordinator

The district has received $5,202.68 in special equipment funds under my supervision of the program that
were used to upgrade equipment in the vocational areas. I received the allotment notices, generated the
necessary paperwork, ordered the equipment, inventoried the equipment, placed the equipment, generated
the reimbursement forms, and provided ADWE with a special inventory of all equipment purchased under
this allotment program. This money is now folded into the Perkins program.

ACSIP

The Arkansas Consolidated School Improvement Process (ACSIP) is the current requirement of the
Arkansas Department of Education to bring together all the areas of school improvement under one
submission. It is the result of many contributors including ACTAAP, Goals 2000, Smart Start, Smart Step,
Next Step, and the Blue Ribbon Commission work. Under the ACSIP plan, every district and every school



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within every district is required to submit a comprehensive document that represents that entity’s best effort
to incorporate interventions and actions to meet goals identified from assessment of that school’s or district’s
needs for academic improvement. The process is the responsibility of each building principal since that
person is held responsible for the academic success of every child in the building. First, key people are
identified to represent sectors within the building. Next, several meetings are held, some going all day and
into the evening, to identify and to address academic issues within the student body. After that, a plan is
developed to meet the academic needs of every child incorporating resources, funding (both internal and
external), people with primary responsibility for each action, research supporting each intervention, plans for
formative and summative evaluation, and the names of that school’s improvement planning committee.
Finally, plans for each building are generated and submitted. One difficult aspect of this process is the fact
that all federals funds must show in the plans since these plans are combined to form the basis for the
district’s federal programs plan. I work extensively with all building teams to both plan and implement
interventions and actions including those that use federal funds. The ACSIP is dynamic in nature so it is
constantly changing and being revised. In fact, we have made several revisions to our ACSIP plans so each
revision required a completely new ACSIP plan and an additional submission to ADE. It is apparent that
ADE plans to expand this approach and to use ACSIP and electronic submission to track all funding used
within the district and within each school. My responsibility has been to both coordinate and to generate
ACSIP plans in every building and to create the district building plan. I provide all the support for the ACSIP
software for each building. I also do all the submissions for every building and for the district. The ACSIP
will continue into the future and, probably, will be expanded. I refer to our ACISP plans every day in the
Central office on questions of coding funds and reference support from the various schools in our district.




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                                            Information Services

Bobcat Sign on Highway 62

In December, 2003, I was informed that the Bobcat Booster Club was donating a lighted sign on Highway 62
to the district. I coordinated the information and telephone connections to the sign and received training on
the maintenance and operation of the message part of the sign. I also received from a representative of the
booster club copies for our files of the application for state permit for outdoor advertising, the state permit
approval, a property owner permission statement, and a City of Berryville Sign Permit. I coordinated training
with VisionTech from Springfield, Missouri, for the message sign. On Friday, April 4, 2003, the
Superintendent informed me that we could begin using the sign for all school announcements. I will train a
person to do the updates and announcements that will require time on Friday afternoons, approximately one
hour, updating the athletic and school-related announcements for display the following week. All
announcements and updates will still receive my approval prior to uploading to the sign.

Technology Department

Under the reorganization plan 2 years ago, the technology department was further staffed to allow me to be
free from the day-to-day operation of the technology program. The technology department consists of one
technology coordinator, one full-time technician, one part-time technician with duties in the media area, and
two lab proctors who also work part-time as technicians in their respective buildings. Please refer to my job
description to find my responsibilities in this area. That plan has worked well. I receive daily updates from
the technology coordinator and am involved in a consulting role when needed. The seamless incorporation of
technology into the curriculum is accomplished most efficiently through our organizational structure and has
allowed our district to add such features as EdLine which allows the parents and the students to see their
classroom grades and assignments online and Gradequick which allows teachers to keep and to generate
grades and attendance electronically. Our greatest challenge in the technology area is that we need to add at
least one more staff member to be able to effectively administer this aspect for the parents and for the
students. The program, currently running in grades 4-12, has been extremely successful and widely
appreciated. The short-term goal is to make EdLine available K-12. Faculty and staff are also able to
electronically report both technology and maintenance issues to the respective departments for action. The
implementation of this feature has increased faculty morale when dealing with issues in their areas. I helped
design and acquire external support for equipment in the Distance Learning computer lab, helped design and
equip the Middle School computer lab, and consulted on the design of the Middle School Science and
Technology lab. I continue to oversee the entire wide area network and act as network supervisor.

Technology Plan

The state has required that districts have a current, biennially state-approved technology plan since 1997. I
developed the original district technology plan and subsequent plans using a variety of input sources
including students, parents, teachers, administrators, and experts in the field. The plan has changed over time
and remains in constant flux. The state issues requirements that I use to structure the plan. Next, a technology




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committee is formed and committee meetings and other data are gathered to assess and to project technology
need areas in the district. Subsequently, a plan is developed and written to meet the requirements of both the
state of Arkansas and the local district. Finally that plan is submitted for approval or revisions. A currently
approved technology plan is a requirement of participation in the E-rate funding program.

Computer Leasing

Berryville District was one of the first districts in Arkansas to lease computers. An examination of cost-of-
ownership (COS) and current fiscal realities were considered prior to making the decision to lease rather than
to buy computers. We currently have 250 computers under two leasing programs in all areas of the district.
These computers carry no maintenance cost other than our technician’s time. All parts are provided under the
lease agreement so the district has a fixed and stable cost for the 3 years of the lease. The district has no
disposal issues since the computers are returned to the lessor at the end of the lease and the district’s
allocation is then used to lease newer computers, usually a greater number of computers for the same money.
The district needs to continue to increase the allotments each year for computer leasing and, eventually, lease
every computer in the district to keep the COS to a minimum and to fix financial support. The program has
been highly successful and has enabled the district to provide computers in areas that would otherwise have
not been funded.

Email and Web Servers

The Berryville District has several servers providing services to an extensive network. In fact, Berryville
District’s network is probably one of the top 5 or 6 in the state in the area of services to classrooms and
overall technology services. There is not another district our size anywhere in the state that has the
technology that Berryville enjoys. The day-to-day operation of the servers is handled by the technicians and I
act as consultant when needed. I helped submit a proposal for Qualified Zone Academy Bonds (QZAB) that
will provide interest-free money to move services from several small servers to 2 main servers with
redundancy backups. This move will allow uninterrupted access to services during the day. The bonds will
also fund three mobile computer labs at the K-3 campus. Our libraries are all automated and have client
support that allows students to look up library holdings online. Currently student email accounts are issued
for grades 6-12 on one server while faculty and staff email is housed on a second server. The district also
provides dial-up capability for all faculty and staff through the Bobcat server that I administer since it is a
LINUX system.

Web Page Updates

      ACT 1747 information

Act 1747 of 2001 (also known as HB2503) was approved on April 18, 2001. The District, under this act, is
required to post the following on its website: minutes of all regular and special board meetings, budget for
the ensuing year, financial breakdown of each month’s expenditures, salary schedules for all employees, the
district’s yearly audit, and the annual statistical report. I am responsible for publishing all required
information to a site I created on the district’s website. The notes from every board meeting are first written
by the Superintendent or a designee of the board, proofed by the Superintendent’s secretary who then notifies
me that notes are ready for publishing. Next I move the notes from the server and implement a conversion
process that changes the notes into a universal format for publication on the Internet. Finally I post the notes



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to the website. Minutes are posted after they are approved by the board, usually at the next regular meeting
using the same procedure. The budget and salary schedules, after approval by the board, are manually
entered into an Internet-ready format and are then published to the website. The district’s annual statistical
report is posted after publishing by the state of Arkansas and the district’s yearly audit report is accessed
through a link to the Arkansas State Division of Legislative Audit's webpage placed on Berryville’s
Information page. Timely information is required for compliance with Act 1747.

      PPC Minutes

The Personnel Policies Committee meets several times during the year. The PPC chairperson emails me a
copy of the minutes from each meeting that I convert to .pdf format and post on a website I created that links
to the District Information page. This service provides an increased information flow to the faculty and staff
and improves public awareness of the processes involved in the educational area.

      Calendar Updates

The calendar for the school year is posted on the district webpage and requires updating when changes occur.
I do most of the changes from home for events such as snow days and do the rest from school with the
assistance of my secretary. The subsequent year’s calendar is also posted for viewing by those who will help
to determine the calendar of events for the following year.

District Professional Development

Since so much of our professional development financial support is made possible by federal funding, I work
closely with the principals and superintendent to plan, obtain, and schedule professional development
opportunities for the faculty and staff. A webpage is constantly updated for district viewing that contains all
the upcoming professional development opportunities. I also approve all federal program expenditures after
the principal has approved them and before they purchase order goes to the Superintendent in order to
maintain correct balance and funding flow from federal sources.

District-wide Inventory Control

When I first arrived at Berryville, I assisted in implementing an electronic inventory system. Two years ago,
all inventory and inventory control came under my supervision. I have implemented several procedural
changes to assist in the updating and maintaining of an accurate and current inventory. All purchases by
federal funds must be tagged with the programs name. Also all items that cost over $500.00 and some items
of electronic value that cost less than $500.00 are issued an inventory control number by my office. Since
much of the inventory that moves falls under the technology area, I created a site where technicians can log
in, enter inventory change information, and then post that information to my secretary for master inventory
updates. This system has worked very well. I also conduct a yearly self-reported audit using all faculty
members to assist in checking the inventory. Periodically, we do an in-house self-check to monitor the
accuracy of the master inventory. Once a year, auditors from the State Audit Division do a site visit and I
work with them to provide support for their audit. We have received high praise from the auditors about the
growing accuracy and integrity of our inventory system.




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Voice and Data Communication Systems

Berryville District has an extensive communication system including telephones, cell phones, pagers, bus
phones, and two-way radios. I act as the district contact with the various companies when acquiring and
maintaining these systems. This area is another integral part of the E-rate funding program so it has been a
good mix to bring these systems under my supervision.

Food Service Expansion

The food service program was a traditional lunchroom until I became involved about 1.5 years ago. I made
three trips to other, larger schools districts that were offering choice and individual food items in the food
service program. I took the Food Service Director and bookkeeper with me to view other food programs and
to visit with other food service directors about details surrounding and supporting this new approach. I then
assisted Berryville’s Food Service Director in planning a new program, contacting venders for display cases,
contracting with venders for food item stocking, and coordinating the new approach into the existing space.
We are also able to relocate existing technology for check-out stations at no cost to the food service program.
In 1999-2000, the total income for Berryville’s food service program was $388,420.42. In 2002, after
implementing the new expanded program for a full year, the Berryville Food Service Program received
$513,373.71, a gain of $124,953.29. Most of the gain in student participation has occurred in the high school
area where most students are now eating in the lunch room at lunch. Additionally, our reimbursable meals
count has increased from 896 average daily participation at the end of 2000 to almost 1000 reimbursable
meals per day during the 2003 year. This fact alone can account for about $37,000.00 of the increase. Most
of the remainder is probably high school students purchasing individual items. This new expanded program
has been accomplished through the teamwork and efforts of all food service staff. The evidence that the
students are enjoying this program and its great success can be seen both in the numbers and on the students’
smiling faces as they race towards the lunchroom.




                                                      13
                     External Funding: Grants Written Since 1997- Over $500,000.00

E-rate Program

The E-rate program, now entering its 6th year, has provided over $200,000.00 in benefit to the district. Each
year is a new funding cycle and has no bearing on funding from year to year. In other words, every year is a
new grant opportunity and every entity that applies is equal to every other applicant in funding opportunity.
Each year, I generate the grant proposal and necessary paperwork and forms to receive E-rate funding
discounts. The E-rate program advisors then examine all requests, approve and select recipients, and then
issues funding commitments to successful applicants. The funds are received now in the form of credits
applied to statements from Alltel telephone, Alltel mobile, Alltel paging, Cox Internet (formerly TCA
Internet), and Southwestern Bell. This credit application process was the easiest way to receive benefit from
the program without adding to the District Treasurer’s work load. I work directly with all service providers to
arrange for funding credits and to assure that Berryville District receives full benefit from the funds approved.
My expertise in this area is displayed in my publication, “Factors affecting E-rate funding in Arkansas Public
School Districts”, available at the University of Arkansas library (LB2826.A8 H37 2001).

Community First Bank

The Berryville Public School’s Middle School Reading Program was able to expand its teaching capabilities
by incorporating the latest methods and technology into the curriculum. The program needed three “smart
stations” consisting of large-screen TV’s, VCR’s, and a scan-converter that connects their demonstration
computer station to the large-screen TV. I wrote a grant proposal to the Berryville Community First Bank
and received $3600.00 from the Community First Bank to fund the purchase of three smart stations.

Math & Science Lab

I generated the grant proposal and necessary paperwork to receive $4,747.00 in matching funds under Act
453 of 1991 Improvement Program. The money was used to purchase equipment for the HS Science lab and
will be used by both the Science and the Math Departments. This project was developed through a shared
decision making model that included many areas of the District and the High School. First, a team was
assembled consisting of the Superintendent, High School Principal, teachers from the Science and Math
Departments, and the District Director of Information Services and Technology. The team studied the current
math and science efforts and explored ways that each area could enhance active learning. The exploration
process included student input and suggestions, observations, and investigations of current facilities and roles
of students, faculty, and administration. Finally, a grant proposal was prepared and submitted to a
competitive process. This grant award represents the first time Berryville District has received funding from
this program.


Walton Foundation

Over a four-year period, the district received a total of $13,400.00 from grant proposals I submitted to the
Walton Foundation. The District, along with the local Arvest Bank, submitted these proposals and used the
funds to purchase Smart-stations for several classrooms, one computer and printer for a MS math classroom,
teacher workroom computers at K-3 and HS, and to support the technology program.



                                                       14
T & I Microcomputer Systems Technology Lab

I wrote a grant proposal for funding a Trade and Industrial Microcomputer Systems Technology Lab to the
Arkansas Department of Workforce Education that generated $23,417.00 to begin the course in the High
School. I administered expenditures, inventoried equipment, and provided the paperwork such as
reimbursements requests to support and to finalize this grant award. The lab is currently in operation.

Business Technology Lab

I made a grant request for funding a business computer lab to the Vocational and Technical Education
Division on the Arkansas Department of Education that generated $32,455.00 to build the Computer
Applications Computer Lab. I administered expenditures, inventoried equipment, and provided the
paperwork such as reimbursements requests to support and to finalize this grant award. The lab is currently
in operation and will likely be upgraded with the next computer lease.

Technology Literacy Challenge Fund, Computers for Classrooms

I submitted a proposal under the Technology Literacy Challenge Program that generated $80,000.00 to place
computers in the classrooms. These funds were used to provide computers and network support to all
classrooms from K-6 during the 1999-2000 school year. Most of these computers have now become full-time
student-use computers since leased computers were place in these classrooms during the 2002-2003 year.

Cash Donations

I have solicited and coordinated several cash donations to the school district, most from donors who wished
to remain anonymous. I have also coordinated several small grants (see my vita for listing).

Non-cash Donations

Several businesses have donated many thousands of dollars in equipment and inventory to the district as a
result of my seeking assistance. In fact, one company donated over $30,000.00 in components and equipment
to the district. I wrote receipts to every donor acknowledging the donations and thanking each one for
supporting the district’s technology program.

Volunteers

I have solicited, trained, and used several volunteers in the building and maintaining of the Berryville
District’s infrastructure since its beginning in 1997. These volunteers include those provided by local
businesses who donate time to the district for various assisting roles that has saved the district many
thousands of dollars. I continue to develop these relationships over time. The efforts of these volunteers
made many things possible that would have otherwise been beyond the reach of district funds.




                                                      15
BERRYVILLE PUBLIC SCHOOLS

POSITION TITLE / DESCRIPTION:                 DISTRICT DIRECTOR
                                              OF GRANTS, FEDERAL PROGRAMS, AND
                                              INFORMATION SERVICES

                                              POSITION DESCRIPTION

Position Title:   District Director of Grants, Federal Programs, and Information Services
Department:       Central Office
Reports To:       Superintendent
Prepared By:      Dr. Donald Roberts          Date: May 18, 2001
Approved By:      Board while in Session      Date: June 18, 2001


SUMMARY:
Under supervision of the Superintendent, manages the school district’s external funding for Federal Programs, seeks external
funding through grants, and supervises the Information Services. Manages district technology program including networks,
computers, and audio/visual media, and works as part of the district team to incorporate technology into the curriculum and
instruction of grades K-12. The position includes responsibilities such as chairing committees, communicating between programs,
disciplines, schools, grade levels and with the school board and community.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

       Manages the Federal Programs in terms of funding, forms, reports, and audits.
       Works with Federal Program area managers to implement the district’s programs.
       Assists the Superintendent in interviewing candidates, hiring recommendations, and performance evaluations.
       Responds to staff and community regarding questions or problems in the above areas.
       Recommends policy and program decisions to the Superintendent.
       Assists in developing administrative rules and procedures to implement District policy.
       Oversees the preparation of annual budgets in Federal programs and Technology areas.
       Attends various organizational meetings outside district.
       Ensures compliance with appropriate State and Federal Constitutional and statutory rules and regulations

       Seeks external funding for the district through private, corporate, national, and international organizations.
       Writes and coordinates the implementation of local, state and Federal Grants.
       Oversees the implementation and expenditure of external funding.
       Provides administrative support for the above areas.
       Acts as District’s representative for reporting and auditing of the above programs.
       Maintains records for 5 years for all external funding generated by this position.

       Develops the computer and technology education program of the district.
       Works with curriculum committees to develop computer programs to meet instructional objectives.
       Represents the district computer education program to the public through computer workshops, public relations, and other
       presentations.
       Participates in development of District policies and procedures.
       Conducts and disseminates District research.
       Networks with outside experts and import worthwhile ideas and programs into the District.
       Coordinates follow-up to, and compliance with, state and national norms and mandates.

SUPERVISORY RESPONSIBILITIES:
Manages the Technology, Federal Programs, and Grant-writing staff. Is responsible for the overall direction, coordination, and
evaluation of these units. Carries out supervisory responsibilities in accordance with the organization's policies and applicable
laws. Responsibilities include assisting the Superintendent in interviewing, hiring, and training employees; planning, assigning,
and directing work; appraising performance; rewarding and disciplining employees; addressing complaints and resolving
problems.


                                                                  16
QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: To perform this job successfully, an individual must be able to perform each essential duty
satisfactorily. The requirements listed below are representative of the knowledge, skill, and/or ability required. Reasonable
accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions.

EDUCATION and/or EXPERIENCE:
Master's Degree in Educational Administration and Supervision or equivalent, Must have strong leadership and communication
skills.

CERTIFICATES, LICENSES, REGISTRATIONS:
Certification for Administrator through the state.

LANGUAGE SKILLS:
Ability to read, analyze, and interpret common scientific and technical journals, financial reports, and legal documents. Ability to
respond to common inquiries or complaints from customers, regulatory agencies, or members of the business community. Ability
to write speeches and articles for publication that conform to prescribed style and format. Ability to effectively present information
to top management, public groups, and/or boards of directors.

MATHEMATICAL SKILLS:
Ability to work with mathematical concepts such as probability and statistical inference, and fundamentals of plane and solid
geometry and trigonometry. Ability to apply concepts such as fractions, percentages, ratios, and proportions to practical situations.

REASONING ABILITY:
Ability to define problems, collect data, establish facts, and draw valid conclusions. Ability to interpret an extensive variety of
technical instructions in mathematical or diagram form and deal with several abstract and concrete variables.

OTHER SKILLS and ABILITIES:
Must be able to speak on demand to large groups of people. Must be able to transport between school buildings, districts and
cities. Ability to apply knowledge of current research and theory in specific field. Ability to establish and maintain effective
working relationships with students, staff and the school community. Ability to speak clearly and concisely both in oral and
written communication. Ability to perform duties with awareness of all district requirements and Board of Education policies.

PHYSICAL DEMANDS: The physical demands described here are representative of those that must be met by an employee to
successfully perform the essential functions of this job. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with
disabilities to perform the essential functions.

While performing the duties of this job, the employee is regularly required to walk and talk or hear. The employee frequently is
required to stand and sit. The employee is occasionally required to use hands to finger, handle, or feel objects, tools, or controls;
reach with hands and arms; and stoop, kneel, crouch, or crawl. Specific vision abilities required by this job include close vision,
distance vision, and depth perception.

WORK ENVIRONMENT: The work environment characteristics described here are representative of those an employee
encounters while performing the essential functions of this job. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals
with disabilities to perform the essential functions.

The noise level in this position varies. When visiting a building the noise level will be loud, in the office, quiet and at meetings
moderate.




                                                                  17
Appendices




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